Family Beginnings in England

1600s Timeline
ReignEvents
1558-1603
Elizabeth I
 
1603-1625
James I
1624
George Fox Born
1625-1649
Charles I
1634
William Hopkins Born
1648
George Fox's
Ministry Begins
1649-1660
Commonwealth
1655
George Fox in Northamptonshire
1660-1685
Charles II
1661-1665
Clarendon Code Enacted
1665
The Plague
1666
The Great Fire
Abt 1669
William Hopkins Marries
1683-84
Frost Fair on the Thames
1685-1688
James II
1687, 1688
Declarations of Indulgence
1689-1694
William & Mary
1691
George Fox Dies
1694-1702
William III
Howland Great Wet Dock Constructed in Rotherhithe 
1702-1714
Anne
1705
William Hopkins Dies
1730
Benjamin Hopkins Dies
1714-1727
George I
1705
William Hopkins Dies
1727-1760
George II
1730
Benjamin Hopkins Dies

The earliest Hopkins I know of in my line is William Hopkins (1634-1705), a gardener and a member of the Society of Friends (Quakers) in St. George's Parish, Southwark, Surrey. He was a member of the Southwark Friends Meeting and the Vintner's Company of London. He married Katherine ---- (1646-1704) by 1669.

Old Southwark Houses

According to two secondary sources, both William and Katherine were born in Northamptonshire, but I've been unable to find any citations or source records to verify this. I'm continuing to look, and hope to find proof some day. A number of other families who emigrated to Haddonfield, New Jersey had roots in Northamptonshire, including the French, Gill, and Haddon families.

William and Katherine had eleven children, of whom only four lived into maturity. William was born in 1670, and was said to be living in Buckinghamshire in his father's 1705 will. He was a shop keeper in Wooburn, Bucks, and died there about 1747. Abraham (1676-1700) died young and apparently without marrying. Sarah (1678-1742) married Thomas Fellows in 1701 and had nine children.

Benjamin (1685-1730), the youngest of William and Katherine's sons to survive, married Sarah Haddon (1687-1758) in the Horseleydown Meeting on 29th day, 6th month, 1706. The Quaker records describe both Benjamin and his father as members of the Vintners Guild and as gardeners. Benjamin and Sarah had twelve children, eight of whom died in infancy or childhood. Mary married Edward Butcher, a tallow chandler, in 1729 at Horselydown Meeting. Sarah lived for a time in West Jersey with her Aunt and Uncle. She later married a man named Simpson, and was mentioned in family wills, but I've found no other information about her. Elizabeth married a Quaker named Joseph Etherington. Haddon (1715-1757) married three times: to the widow Judith Swainson in 1742, to Ann Arnold in 1746, and to Mary Hoare in 1752. He and Mary had a daughter Ann and a son, Benjamin. The youngest son of Benjamin and Sarah, Ebenezer (1718-1757), became the first of my Hopkins line to settle in America.

Consumption

Most of the deaths of the Hopkins family in Southwark were caused by consumption, or what we today call tuberculosis. In his book The Remedy, author Thomas Goetz says the it was the leading cause of death in Europe and England at that time. The cause of the disease was not known then, and there was no cure or useful treatment. Prevention through better sanitation wasn't practiced to any great extent. He says that people thought of it as inevitable. People might have the disease for years, slowly deteriorating, before finally dying. Others might have the germ inside them for years, and then have it become active. Others might have the germ and it would never become active.

I've prepared a report showing the people in the family in Southwark who died of consumption. These are the ones I have records for that give the cause of death. I've also prepared a list and graph showing the causes of death reported in all the burial records I transcribed from the Southwark MM records..

The Haddon Family

John Haddon (1653-1724) was a blacksmith and anchor maker in Rotherhithe, which was near the docks and shipyards along the Thames River. In a 1909 letter to his cousin Rebecca Nicholson Taylor, Samuel Nicholson Rhoads says that the Haddons lived first on Jacobs Street, Bermondsey, in "Jacobs Island" before moving downriver to Rotherhithe, where John's anchor smithy was located at the corner of West Street and Rotherhithe Street.

Silhouette of John Haddon.
See Others and notes.

He was born in Northamptonshire, the son of Matthew Haddon and his wife Phillipia (Marriott) of Hardingstone. He was born on December 13, 1653 and baptised at the Parish church. He married Elizabeth Clarke (1650-1723) 3rd day, 6th month, 1676 in the Horseleydown Meeting in Southwark. Their daughter Sarah married Benjamin Hopkins and their elder daughter Elizabeth (1680-1762) went to America and married John Estaugh (1676-1742) in 1702.

A new book about the Haddons, Elizabeth Haddon Estaugh, 1680-1762, has been published. The authors are Jeffery M. Dorwart and Elizabeth A. Lyons. This book contains a wonderful amount of information about her and her family, and her role in establishing the family in America and founding the town of Haddonfield. It's available from the Haddonfield Historical Society.

Other Families

Other families in my ancestry who came from England include the Lords and the Woods. The Lord family came from Lancashire, as did the Wood family. They were also members of the Friends and migrated to West Jersey in America to become part of William Penn's experiment there. The move to America offered them religious freedom and economic opportunities not available to them in England.

In previous versions of this page, I mentioned the Boone family of Devon. I have since learned that my Boone ancestors were not related to these Boones, as I had thought. DNA tests have proved that my Boones were from an entirely different line, the origins of which have not yet been discovered.



Next: Emigration to West Jersey

See also these pages related to the Hopkins and Haddon families, and those families they intermarried with:

Southwark Monthly Meeting Documents London & Middlesex Quarterly Meeting Documents Southwark Data
William Hopkins' Will William Hopkins 1650 Administration Document Benjamin Hopkins' Will
John Haddon's Will Article about the Haddons

This file was last updated on 6/8/2014.

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