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Bog Manufacturing of Chicago

[Decal From A Bog Jumbo Socket Set]
Decal from a Bog Jumbo Socket Set, ca. 1925-1929.

Bog Manufacturing was a tool maker in Chicago active during the 1920s and 1930s. This page will show some examples of the company's tools.


Table of Contents

Introduction

Company History

Bog Manufacturing of Chicago was a maker of automotive tools active in the 1920s and 1930s, and the known examples of its tools suggest a company with substantial development and manufacturing capabilities. However, until recently almost nothing was known about the company itself; no Bog catalogs had been found, and except for an industrial directory listing its address, nothing in the public record provided information about the company.

We recently made a connection to the founder of Bog Manufacturing, and the key breakthrough was the discovery of Bog tools listed in Western Auto Supply catalogs. The 1927 and 1929 Western Auto catalogs list a wide variety of Bog automotive tools, with the name "Bog Mfg." clearly visible in the illustrations. These catalog listings, together with other information, provided a link between Bog and the Western Auto Supply company.

It was previously known that a Ben Pepperdine had filed a patent for a Bog Ratchet, and that Western Auto Supply had been founded by a George Pepperdine. Given the supplier relationship between Bog and Western Auto, the matching surnames seemed unlikely to be a coincidence, and a search for Pepperdine family information confirmed that Ben and George were brothers. A web site for the Pepperdine family includes biographical information, and notes that Ben Pepperdine lived in Chicago and ran a company making hand tools for Western Auto Supply.

Based on the above information, we can be reasonably certain that Bog Manufacturing was founded by Ben Pepperdine, and probably did most of its business with Western Auto Supply. Although the founding date is not yet known, a continuing search of Western Auto catalogs has found a listing for a Bog tool as early as 1924. (A Bog piston ring compressor is shown in the 1924 "Ford Owner's Supply Book" from Western Auto.) This confirms that the company was active at least by 1924, and possibly earlier. The 1930 Donnelley's Industrial Directory listed the company's address as 2120 N. Menard Avenue in Chicago.

In addition to establishing the family connection between Bog and Western Auto, the Western Auto catalogs provide the most detailed information currently available for Bog products. Just the fact that Bog was a supplier to Western Auto is significant, as it means that the company must have had substantial volume manufacturing capabilities.

It's worth mentioning though that Bog was not the exclusive supplier of tools for Western Auto. Western Auto sourced tools from many other suppliers, including Billings, Crescent, Duro Metal Products, Hinsdale, Herbrand, Vlchek, and J.H. Williams. Examples of production for Western Auto can be found in other articles on this site.

Bog Catalogs

Well after the above section was written, we did finally manage to acquire a catalog issued by Bog Manufacturing. The publication is entitled "Catalog No. 7 of Guaranteed Tools" and provides a more complete view of the company's products. Although not dated, it appears to have been issued in the mid 1920s, as the numerous references to Ford automobiles all seem intended for the Model T. The catalog lists the company's address as 2116-2124 N. Menard Avenue in Chicago, which is consistent with the industrial directory listing mentioned earlier.

As was mentioned above, the earliest known Bog tool listing for Western Auto is a piston ring compressor the 1924 catalog. The Bog products shown in the No. 7 catalog are quite similar to those listed in the 1927 and 1929 Western Auto catalogs. The products include sockets and drive tools, a double-stud ratchet handle, a ratcheting connecting rod wrench, numerous models of fixed socket wrenches and speeder wrenches, and several socket sets including the Jumbo model shown below. It's likely that other Bog tools were carried as well, but the catalog illustrations and descriptions frequently do not indicate the manufacturer.

Two other catalog references for Bog products are known, a 1928 catalog from the McMaster-Carr Supply Company and the 1931 catalog from the Samuel Harris Company. Both companies were Chicago-based industrial distributors, and the item listed is each case is the Bog No. 898 socket set in a metal case.

Later Operations

The later history of Bog Manufacturing has been a long-standing mystery until just recently. Western Auto catalogs from the mid 1930s continue to show some Bog tools, indicating that the company continued operations at least into the mid to late 1930s. However, no further references to Bog Manufacturing appear in trade publications after the 1930s.

Ben Pepperdine and his family later relocated to Southern California, probably sometime in the 1940s, and it's not known whether the operations of Bog Manufacturing continued after this. It's possible that the manufacturing operations were moved, or that Bog might have been acquired by another company.

There are at least some indications of a connection between Bog Manufacturing and the Plomb Tool Company during the 1940s and later. Bog is known to have assisted with Plomb's tool production during the war, as an example has been found of a Bog 202A ratchet marked as a Plomb WF-38. In addition, Ben Pepperdine assigned at least two patents to Plomb Tool, #2,518,173 filed in 1945 and #2,811,068 filed posthumously after Pepperdine's death in 1955.

The hints and speculation in the previous paragraphs have now been resolved by the recent (January 2010) discovery that by 1940 Bog Manufacturing had changed its name to the Cragin Tool Company. A 1940 directory of Illinois corporations (published by the secretary of state) lists the Cragin Tool Company at 2120 North Menard Avenue, the same address used by Bog for many years, and the owners are listed as Ben and Dora Pepperdine. Readers familiar with the history of Plomb Tool will immediately recognize the name "Cragin Tool" as a 1940 acquisition by Plomb, and the recognition of Cragin Tool as the successor to Bog provides conclusive evidence that by 1940 the former Bog Manufacturing had become part of the Plomb family of companies.


Patents

Several patents are known to have been issued to Ben Pepperdine and are summarized in the table below. There may be additional Pepperdine or Bog patents that have not yet been found.

The last patent in the table (#2,811,068) was filed posthumously by his wife Dora after Ben Pepperdine's death in 1955. This patent (and the previous one as well) were assigned to the Plomb Tool Company.

Table 1. Bog Manufacturing: Issued and Licensed Patents
Patent No.InventorFiledIssuedDescriptionExamples
1,888,885 B. Pepperdine05/21/193211/22/1932Method of Making Ratchet Handle Bog 202A Ratchet
2,170,461 B. Pepperdine06/23/193708/22/1939Combination Puller  
2,191,725 B. Pepperdine06/23/193702/27/1940Torque Measuring Wrench  
2,518,173 B. Pepperdine05/25/194508/08/1950Pliers with Adjustable Toggle  
2,811,068 B. Pepperdine02/21/195610/29/1957Parallel-Jaw Pliers  

Trademarks

Bog Manufacturing is not known to have filed any trademark registrations.


Early Tools


[T-306] 11/16 Ratcheting Box Wrench for Model T Reverse and Brake Bands

[Bog T-306 11/16 Ratcheting Box Wrench for Model T Reverse and Brake Bands]
Fig. 1. Bog [T-306] 11/16 Ratcheting Box Wrench for Model T Reverse and Brake Bands.

Fig. 1 shows a Bog [T-306] 11/16 ratcheting box wrench for Model T reverse and brake band adjustments, stamped "Guaranteed Products" and "Bog Mfg. Co. Chicago, U.S.A." on the handle. Although the tool is not marked with a model number, it is listed as a model T-306 wrench in the Bog No. 7 catalog.

The overall length is 6.6 inches.

This type of ratcheting box wrench was a popular and familiar tool for Model T owners. Similar models were made by a number of manufacturers, and an example by the Frank Mossberg Company can be seen as the Mossberg 645 Reverse and Brake Ratchet.


5/8 Speeder Socket Wrench

[Bog 5/8 Speeder Socket Wrench]
Fig. 2. Bog 5/8 Speeder Socket Wrench, with Insets for Construction and Marking Detail.

Fig. 2 shows a Bog 5/8 speeder socket wrench, stamped "Superior Bog Quality" on the shank.

The overall length is 19.3 inches, and the finish is nickel plating.


5/8 Offset Socket Wrench

[Bog 5/8 Offset Socket Wrench]
Fig. 3. Bog 5/8 Offset Socket Wrench, with Insets for Construction and Marking Detail, ca. 1920s.

Fig. 3 shows a Bog 5/8 offset socket wrench for Ford connecting-rod service, stamped "Bog Mfg. Co." and "Chicago" on the shank.

The overall length is 12.3 inches, and the finish is black paint.


11/16 Offset Socket Wrench for Ford Flywheel Capscrews

[Bog 11/16 Offset Socket Wrench]
Fig. 4. Bog 11/16 Offset Socket Wrench, with Insets for Construction and Marking Detail, ca. 1920s.

Fig. 4 shows a Bog 11/16 offset socket wrench for Ford flywheel capscrews, stamped "Superior Bog Quality" on the shank.

The overall length is 12.2 inches. The finish is plain steel with extensive pitting due to rust, but with a few traces of the original nickel plating.

This wrench was designed to service the Ford Model T flywheel capscrews, which due to their awkward location required a special wrench with an offset shank. Several other companies produced similar wrenches, and examples can be seen as the Walden 3822 Socket Wrench and Blackhawk 4122 Socket Wrench. Earlier Ford service tools used an offset open-end wrench for this applications, such as the Herbrand 5Z-210 Flywheel Capscrew Wrench.


1/2x5/8x5/8 Triple Socket Wrench

[Bog 1/2x5/8x5/8 Triple Socket Wrench]
Fig. 5. Bog 1/2x5/8x5/8 Triple Socket Wrench, with Inset for Marking Detail.

Fig. 5 shows a wrench popular for Model T applications, a Bog (1/2x5/8)x5/8 triple socket wrench, stamped "Bog Mfg. Co. Chicago" on the shank.

The overall length is 9.2 inches, and the finish is nickel plating.


Connecting Rod Ratchet

[Bog 5/8 Connecting Rod Ratchet]
Fig. 6. Bog 5/8 Connecting Rod Ratchet, with Inset for Detail, ca. 1924.

[No. 686] 31/32x1-5/32 Spark Plug Socket Wrench

[Bog No. 686 31/32x1-5/32 Spark Plug Socket Wrench]
Fig. 7. Bog [No. 686] 31/32x1-5/32 Spark Plug Socket Wrench, with Inset for Broaching.

Fig. 7 shows a Bog [No. 686] 31/32x1-5/32 spark plug socket wrench, stamped "Bog Mfg. Co. Chicago" with the fractional sizes. Although not marked with a model number, this tool is listed as No. 686 in Bog catalog No. 7 of the mid 1920s.

The overall length is 3.5 inches.

The wrench is drilled with cross-bar holes at both ends, and was originally supplied with a bent steel handle. The catalog description notes "Machined from solid bar stock ... Beautifully knurled, mottled, and case hardened."


No. 690 13/16x29/32 Spark Plug Socket Wrench

[Bog 31/32x1-5/32 Spark Plug Socket Wrench]
Fig. 8. Bog 13/16x29/32 Spark Plug Socket Wrench, with Insets for Broaching and Marking Detail, 1935.

Fig. 8 shows another spark plug socket wrench, a Bog No. 690 with marked sizes 13/16x29/32. The wrench is stamped "Bog Mfg. Co. Chicago" and "8-35" (not shown) at one end, with the "No. 690" model number at the other end (see lower inset).

The overall length is 4.3 inches.

The "8-35" marking is a date code indicating production in 1935.


No. 3[A] 7/8-14 "Knock-Off" Wheel Puller

[Bog No. 3 7/8-14 Knock-Off Wheel Puller]
Fig. 8B. Bog No. 3 7/8-14 "Knock-Off" Wheel Puller, with Insets for End View and Marking Detail, ca. Late 1920s to 1930s.

Fig. 8B shows a Bog No. 3[A] "knock-off" wheel puller for 7/8-14 wheel studs, stamped with "Bog Mfg. Co." and "Chicago U.S.A." on the body.

The overall length is 2.8 inches, and the finish is black oxide.

This type of tool was designed to protect the wheel stud bolts so that hammer blows could be used to loosen a wheel from a tapered axle shaft.


4-Way Brace Socket Wrench

[Bog 4-Way Brace Socket Wrench]
Fig. 9. Bog 4-Way Brace Socket Wrench, with Insets for Top View and Marking Detail, ca. 1920s.

Fig. 9 shows a Bog 4-way brace socket wrench for servicing demountable rims or lug nuts, stamped "Bog Mfg. Co. Chicago" on the bend of the shank. The four sockets are permanently attached to the rotating carrier and have sizes 5/8, 11/16, 3/4, and 7/8.

The overall length is 15.9 inches, and the finish is nickel plating.

A similar 4-way socket wrench can be seen as the Blackhawk 5104 4-In-1 Rim Wrench.


Hex-Drive Sockets and Tools


Jumbo Socket Set

[Decal From A Bog Jumbo Socket Set, ca. 1925]
Fig. 10. Bog Jumbo 7/16-Hex Drive Socket Set Decal, ca. 1925-1929.

During the 1920s Bog produced hex-drive socket sets in compact cases, probably intended for automobile owners. One such set was the "Jumbo Socket Set", as shown in the decal at the left. This set was one of the Bog products offered in the 1927 and 1929 Western Auto Supply catalogs, and from the catalog listing we have a complete inventory of the tools included in the set.

The "Jumbo" set featured 7/16-hex drive tools consisting of a ratchet, speeder, T-handle, extension, universal, and a valve grinding attachment. The sockets included 11 hex sockets with sizes 7/16 to 15/16, three square sockets of size 7/16, 1/2, and 9/16, and one coupler socket. The set was contained in a seamless metal case with a shelf of cutout holes to organize the tools.

We were fortunate to acquire a reasonably complete example of this unusual set, and the figures below will show the socket set and tools.


Jumbo 7/16-Hex Drive Socket Set in Case

[Bog 7/16-Hex Drive Jumbo Socket Set]
Fig. 11. Bog 7/16-Hex Drive Jumbo Socket Set, ca. 1925-1929.

Based on the catalog description, our set appears to be missing the coupler socket (the upper left hole), two square sockets (7/16 and 9/16), and the double-male extension. The hex drive universal shown in the set was acquired separately, but is believed to be the correct tool, based on comparison with photographs of other Jumbo sets.


7/16-Hex Drive Ratchet from Jumbo Socket Set

[Bog 7/16 Hex Drive Ratchet]
Fig. 12. Bog 7/16-Hex Drive Ratchet, ca. 1925-1929.

Fig. 12 shows the 7/16-hex drive ratchet from the Jumbo socket set. Although not marked with a model number, this ratchet is identified as model No. 202 in the Bog catalog No. 7.


7/16-Hex Drive Speeder from Jumbo Socket Set

[Bog 7/16 Hex Drive Speeder]
Fig. 13. Bog 7/16-Hex Drive Speeder, with Inset for Detail, ca. 1925-1929.

7/16-Hex Drive Tee Handle from Jumbo Socket Set

[Bog 7/16 Hex Drive Tee Handle]
Fig. 14. Bog 7/16-Hex Drive Tee Handle, ca. 1925-1929.

Multi-Fit 7/16-Hex Drive Socket Set

Bog also produced smaller socket sets in addition to the Jumbo model shown above. The 1927 and 1929 Western Auto catalogs show a "Dandy" socket set of intermediate size, a "Multi-Fit" set in a very compact box, and a "Utility" set consisting of just sockets and an L-handle. Although not stated in the catalogs, all of these sets are presumed to use 7/16-hex drive. We recently acquired a Bog Multi-Fit socket set, and the next several figures show the set with its tools.

[Bog Multi-Fit Socket Set, ca. 1929]
Fig. 15. Bog Multi-Fit 7/16-Hex Drive Socket Set, ca. 1929.

Fig. 15 shows a Bog Multi-Fit socket set in its compact metal case, consisting of a ratchet and drive plug, an L-handle, an extension, and six sockets. The tools use the 7/16-hex drive size previously seen with the Bog Jumbo socket set.

The set as shown matches the illustration in the 1929 Western Auto catalog, and in particular the ratchet is clearly illustrated. The Multi-Fit set in the 1927 Western Auto catalog did not include a ratchet, indicating that this particular set is a later example. (Both Western Auto catalogs had some minor discrepancies between the illustrations and catalog descriptions.)

The Multi-Fit set is also illustrated in the Bog catalog No. 7 from the mid 1920s. The set at that time consisted of the L-handle, extension, and seven sockets ranging in size from 7/16 to 7/8.


7/16-Hex Drive Ratchet from Multi-Fit Socket Set

[Bog Multi-Fit 7/16-Hex Drive Ratchet, ca. 1929]
Fig. 16. Bog Multi-Fit 7/16-Hex Drive Ratchet, ca. 1929.

Fig. 16 shows the 7/16-hex drive ratchet from the Multi-Fit set, marked "Bog Mfg. Co. Chicago U.S.A." and "Guaranteed Products".

The overall length is 6.6 inches, and the finish is nickel plating.

The ratchet is a simple non-reversible design constructed of laminated sheet steel.


7/16-Hex Drive L-Handle and Extensions from Multi-Fit Socket Set

[Bog Multi-Fit 7/16-Hex Drive L-Handle and Extensions, ca. 1929]
Fig. 17. Bog Multi-Fit 7/16-Hex Drive L-Handle and Extensions, ca. 1929.

Fig. 17 shows the L-handle, extension, and ratchet drive plug from the Multi-Fit set. The handle and extension are marked "Bog Mfg. Co. Chicago U.S.A." and "Guaranteed Products", and the small drive plug is unmarked. The overall lengths are 5.4, 3.8, and 1.0 inches respectively.


7/16-Hex Drive Sockets from Multi-Fit Socket Set

[Bog Multi-Fit 7/16-Hex Drive Sockets, ca. 1929]
Fig. 18. Bog Multi-Fit 7/16-Hex Drive Sockets, with Inset for Broaching, ca. 1929.

Fig. 18 at the left shows the 7/16-hex drive sockets from the Multi-Fit set, each marked "Bog Mfg. Co." and "Chicago, U.S.A." at the broached end. The sizes from the left are 7/16, 1/2, 9/16, 5/8, 11/16, and 3/4.


Square-Drive Sockets and Tools

By the mid 1920s Bog was already offering sockets and tools with 1/2 square drive, even though its hex-drive tools were very popular at that time.


1/2-Drive 6-Point Sockets

[Bog 1/2-Drive 6-Point Sockets]
Fig. 19. Bog 1/2-Drive 6-Point Sockets, with Insets for Broaching and Marking Details.

Fig. 19 shows a group of four 1/2-drive Bog sockets, each marked with "Bog Mfg. Co." and "Chicago, U.S.A.", plus the fractional size. The sizes are, from the left, 1/2, 3/4, 25/32, and 13/16.

The three leftmost sockets are finished with nickel plating, with varying amounts of wear, and the righthand socket has a plain finish. (These sockets were collected separately and would not necessarily have matching finishes.)

The lower inset shows the fractional size markings flanked by five-pointed stars, a distinctive marking used by Bog. The number of stars marked varies from socket to socket, but usually both sides of the size have the same number of stars. The examples here have three stars except for the 1/2 socket, which has two.

Indestro Manufacturing also marked its sockets with stars, but usually used only a single star on each side of the size.


No. 936 Heavy Ratchet Handle

[Early Bog No. 936 Ratchet]
Fig. 20. Early Bog No. 936 1/2-Drive Ratchet.

Fig. 20 shows a 1/2-drive Bog No. 936 ratchet handle, marked "Bog Mfg. Co." and "Chicago, U.S.A." with "Guaranteed Products" at the top. Although not marked with a model number, this ratchet was listed as the No. 936 "Heavy Ratchet Handle" in Bog catalog No. 7.

The ratchet is constructed of laminated sheet steel held together by rivets.


1/2-Drive Speeder

[Bog 1/2-Drive Speeder]
Fig. 21. Bog 1/2-Drive Speeder, with Insets for Drive End and Markings, ca. 1925.

Fig. 21 shows a Bog 1/2-square drive speeder similar to the 7/16-hex drive example above, marked "Bog Mfg. Co. Chicago" as shown on the inset.

The overall length is 12.3 inches, and the finish is nickel plating.


No. 955 "Junior" 1/2-Drive Socket Set

We recently acquired a Bog No. 955 "Junior" 1/2-drive socket set and are currently preparing it for display.

Fig. 22. Bog No. 955 "Junior" 1/2-Drive Socket Set To Be Added.

Dandy 1/2-Drive Socket Set

[Bog Dandy 1/2-Drive Socket Set]
Fig. 23. Bog Dandy 1/2-Drive Socket Set, ca. 1929-1932.

Fig. 23 shows a Bog 1/2-square drive socket set in a metal case, consisting of double-hex and double-square sockets, a No. 202 ratchet, and a short extension. Although no decals remained on the case to provide identification, this is likely a "Dandy" model socket set, updated to use 1/2 square drive instead of the earlier 7/16 hex drive.

The set was originally supplied with eight double-hex sockets, of which seven remain in the set. The sizes are, from left to right, 15/16, 7/8, 3/4, 11/16, 5/8 (missing), 9/16, 1/2, and 7/16. Three double-square sockets were also included, with sizes 7/16, 9/16, and 5/8 (from left to right in the photograph).

The construction and marking of the sockets is very similar to the Bog Hex Sockets shown above, but with double-hex (or double-square) broachings.

The sockets and tools are organized in the case by a metal bracket with a hole punched for each socket.


No. 202 1/2-Drive Reversible Ratchet

[Bog No. 202 1/2-Drive Reversible Ratchet]
Fig. 24. Bog No. 202 1/2-Drive Reversible Ratchet, with Inset for Side View, ca. 1929-1932.

Fig. 24 shows the 1/2-drive Bog No. 202 ratchet from the above socket set, stamped "Bog Mfg. Co. Chicago" on the shank.

The overall length is 9.0 inches, and the finish is nickel plating.

This ratchet has the same basic design as the earlier No. 202 ratchet shown in the "Jumbo" socket set, but has been updated to be reversible by rotating the shift knob. In addition, the drive stud is now 1/2 square instead of the 7/16 hex found in earlier versions. This model No. 202 ratchet with the reversing lever and 1/2 square drive is listed in the 1929 Bog catalog.


1/2-Drive 4 Inch Extension

[Bog 1/2-Drive 4 Inch Extension]
Fig. 25. Bog 1/2-Drive 4 Inch Extension, ca. 1928-1932.

Fig. 25 shows the 1/2-drive extension from the Dandy socket set, stamped "Bog Mfg. Co." and "Chicago, U.S.A." on the drive end.

The overall length is 4.6 inches, and the finish is nickel plating.


No. 643 1/2-Drive Double-Stud Gearless Ratchet

[Bog No. 643 1/2-Drive Double-Stud Gearless Ratchet]
Fig. 26. Bog No. 643 1/2-Drive Double-Stud Gearless Ratchet, with Inset for Marking Detail, ca. 1929.

Fig. 26 shows a 1/2-drive Bog gearless ratchet with a double-stud head, stamped "Bog Mfg. Co. Chicago" on the shank.

The overall length is 10.0 inches.

This ratchet is listed as a No. 643 "Clutch Grip Ratchet Handle" in the 1929 Bog catalog, with a price of $3.25 (dealer net). The 1929 Western Auto catalog also shows a double-stud ratchet handle very similar to this example.


Later Tools


1721 Open-End Wrench

This next figure shows an example of a Bog open-end wrench.

[Bog 1721 Open-End Wrench]
Fig. 27. Bog 1721 Open-End Wrench.

Fig. 27 shows a Bog 1721 5/16x3/8 open-end wrench, stamped with "Bog Mfg. Co." and "U.S.A." on one face.

The overall length is 4.7 inches, and the finish appears to be nickel plate, now worn away in some areas.

Wrenches of this type were not shown in Bog catalog No. 7, so we've tentatively identified this as later production.


3/8 Socket Wrench

The next several figures show examples of Bog fixed socket wrenches with 12-point broachings.

[Bog 3/8 Socket Wrench]
Fig. 28. Bog 3/8 Socket Wrench, with Inset for Broaching Detail, ca. 1928-1933.

Fig. 28 at the left shows a Bog 3/8 fixed socket wrench, marked "Bog Mfg. Co. Chicago" with "3-8" for the size.

The overall length is 5.5 inches, and the finish is nickel plating.

The 12-point broaching suggests that this is a somewhat later tool, probably from the late 1920s to early 1930s.


7/16 Socket Wrench

[Bog 3/8 Socket Wrench]
Fig. 29. Bog 7/16 Socket Wrench, with Inset for Broaching Detail, ca. 1928-1933.

Fig. 29 shows a Bog 7/16 fixed socket wrench, marked "Bog Mfg. Co. Chicago" with "7-16" for the size.

The overall length is 5.8 inches, and the finish is nickel plating, with loss due to rust.


1/2 Socket Wrench

[Bog 1/2 Socket Wrench]
Fig. 30. Bog 1/2 Socket Wrench, with Inset for Broaching Detail, ca. 1928-1933.

Fig. 30 at the left shows a Bog 1/2 fixed socket wrench, marked "Bog Mfg. Co. Chicago" with "1-2" for the size.

The overall length is 6.2 inches, and the finish is plain steel, with traces of the original nickel plating.


9/16 Socket Wrench

[Bog 9/16 Socket Wrench]
Fig. 31. Bog 9/16 Socket Wrench, with Inset for Broaching Detail, ca. 1928-1933.

Fig. 31 at the left shows a Bog 9/16 fixed socket wrench, marked "Bog Mfg. Co. Chicago" with "9-16" for the size.

The overall length is 6.8 inches, and the finish is nickel plating.


5/8 Socket Wrench

[Bog 5/8 Socket Wrench]
Fig. 32. Bog 5/8 Socket Wrench, with Insets for Side View and Marking Detail, ca. 1928-1933.

Fig. 32 shows a Bog 5/8 fixed socket wrench with a slightly angled handle, stamped "Bog Mfg. Co. Chicago" on the socket.

The overall length is 7.3 inches, and the finish is nickel plating.

This wrench is similar to the previous several figures, but the angled handle suggests that it may have been intended as a connecting rod wrench.


[No. 496] 13/16x13/16 Box and Socket Wrench for Chevrolet Service

[Bog No. 496 13/16x13/16 Box and Socket Wrench]
Fig. 33. Bog [No. 496] 13/16x13/16 Box and Socket Wrench, with Insets for Side View and Marking Detail, ca. 1930s.

Fig. 33 shows a Bog [No. 496] 13/16x13/16 box and socket wrench, pairing a 13/16 hex socket with a 13/16 double-hex box opening. The wrench is stamped "Bog Mfg. Co. Chicago" on the shank.

The overall length is 11.2 inches, and the finish is plain steel.

The Bog catalog No. 132 of 1932 listed this wrench for Chevrolet service, noting that it fits the main bearing bolts and the king bolt and spring bolt nuts.


No. 882 Socket Wrench

[Bog No. 882 9/16x3/4 Socket Wrench]
Fig. 34. Bog No. 882 9/16x3/4 Socket Wrench, with Inset for Detail, 1935.

No. 635 1/2-Drive Breaker Bar

[Bog No. 635 1/2-Drive Breaker Bar]
Fig. 35. Bog No. 635 1/2-Drive Breaker Bar, with Inset for Date, 1934.

The overall length is 9.3 inches, and the finish is chrome plating.


No. 637 1/2-Drive Sliding Tee Handle

[Bog No. 637 1/2-Drive Sliding Tee Handle]
Fig. 36. Bog No. 637 1/2-Drive Sliding Tee Handle, with Insets for Construction and Marking Detail, 1930s.

Fig. 36 shows a 1/2-drive Bog No. 637[B] sliding Tee handle, stamped with "Bog" and the model number on the sliding head. (The "B" suffix refers to the sliding head itself, which could be purchased separately in later catalogs.)

The overall length is 9.6 inches, and the finish is chrome plating.

This sliding Tee has some distinctive features worth noting here. The handle bar has a relatively large 11/16 diameter, compared with the 9/16 or 5/8 bar typically used for a tool of this drive size.

Another uncommon feature is the threaded hole in the head for a locking thumbscrew, unfortunately missing when the tool was acquired.

The unusual features of this tool were also noted in a nearly identical sliding Tee handle marked for Billings, allowing us to identify Bog as one of the contract manufacturers for Billings & Spencer. The Billings version of the tool can be seen as the Billings 5853 Sliding Tee.

The model 637 sliding Tee was listed in the 1932 Bog catalog No. 132 as a "Combination Offset and Tee Handle" with a $1.00 list price. The 1937 Bog catalog No. 37 offered the 637 sliding Tee with a $1.65 price, and also listed the sliding head separately as a model 637B tool with a $1.00 price.


202A 1/2-Drive Ratchet

[Bog 202A 1/2-Drive Ratchet]
Fig. 37. Bog 202A 1/2-Drive Ratchet, with Inset for Reverse, 1935.

Fig. 37 shows a 1/2-drive Bog 202A ratchet, stamped "Bog Mfg Co" on one side, with "Pat. 1888885" and "Others Pend." on the reverse.

The overall length is 9.7 inches, and the finish is chrome plating.

The patent notice refers to patent #1,888,885, issued to B. Pepperdine in 1932.


No. 252 1/2-Drive Compact Socket Set

[Bog No. 252 1/2-Drive Socket Set]
Fig. 38. Bog No. 252 1/2-Drive Socket Set, with Inset for Date Codes, 1938.

Fig. 38 shows an unusual Bog No. 252 1/2-drive socket set, listed in the 1937 catalog as a "Flex-Handle Barrel Wrench Set".

The catalog description lists six sockets with sizes 7/16, 1/2, 9/16, 5/8, 11/16, and 3/4. Our example retains four of its sockets, each stamped with "Bog Mfg. Co." and a date code.


328 Piston Ring Groove Cleaner

[Bog 328 Piston Ring Groove Cleaner]
Fig. 39. Bog 328 Piston Ring Groove Cleaner.

Fig. 39 shows an example of the specialty tools produced by Bog, a No. 328 piston ring groove cleaner.

The overall length is 10.2 inches, and the finish is nickel plating.


References and Resources

Photographs and observations of particular tools are based on items in the Alloy Artifacts collection.

Information on the Pepperdine family was obtained from a web site at pepperdinefamily.org.

Information on the history and development of the Western Auto Supply company is available in The Last Western Flyer, published 2004 by Jim Marchman.


Catalog Coverage

We have recently acquired several Bog catalogs from the late 1920s, all published as small booklets. The No. 7 catalog was undated but was likely published in late 1926 as a 1927 catalog edition. (See next paragraph for the rationale for the publishing date.) This 30-page mini-format publication shows the product line consisting of fixed socket wrenches, sockets and drive tools, and numerous specialty tools.

Bog catalog No. 8 is very similar to No. 7 but includes a few new products, and in addition provides a valuable clue to the publication date. Items on two of the pages are stamped "Delivery Mar. 1st, 1928", apparently indicating that certain products (socket sets) were not quite ready at the printing date. Based on the stamped date, this catalog was likely published in late 1927 as the 1928 edition.

The catalog is 36 pages long (including front and back covers) and lists fixed socket wrenches, sockets and drive tools, and specialty tools. New items include sockets made of alloy steel (called "Crome-Vanadium") and socket sets in the 3/4-drive size.

Catalog No. 29 is likely from 1929 and is generally similar to the previous editions, but lists socket sets of both chrome nickel and chrome vanadium steel, and includes 3/4-drive socket sets.

These Bog catalogs are summarized in the table below.

CatalogDateFormatNotes
No. 7 1927 Booklet Undated but likely published in late 1926 as the 1927 catalog edition.
No. 8 1928 Booklet Likely published in late 1927 as the 1928 edition.
No. 29 1929 Booklet Includes sockets of chrome-nickel and chrome-vanadium steel.
No. 30 1930 Booklet  
No. 132 1932 Full-size Includes offset box wrenches of chrome-vanadium steel.
No. 37 1937 Half-size  

Prior to finding the Bog company catalogs, our primary sources of information for were the 1927 and 1929 Western Auto Supply catalogs, which list several pages of Bog tools. The products offered there included socket sets and fixed socket wrenches.

Bog tools were carried by at least two industrial distributors, and their catalogs provide additional product information.

  • The 1928 catalog No. 28 from the McMaster-Carr Supply Company, a Chicago-based industrial distributor, lists one socket set made by Bog, the No. 898 set. The catalog describes it as a "High Grade Wrench Set", and the contents include 19 hex sockets, 8 square sockets, and drive tools for a total of 35 pieces. The tools were finished with nickel plating and supplied with a black steel case, all for a price of $7.50 net.

  • The 1931 Samuel Harris Company industrial supply catalog No. 57 lists a single Bog item, a No. 898 Socket Set, which appears to be the same set as described above.


Patents and Trademarks

Patent and trademark information was obtained from the U.S. Patents and Trademarks Office (USPTO) web site at uspto.gov. Patent documents were obtained from sites offering free downloads, notably freepatentsonline.com.


Feedback

If any readers have additional information about Bog Manufacturing, please let us know via the "Contact Us" link on the home page. Your comments and suggestions are welcome as well.


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