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Specialty Pliers

In this section we'll look at pliers designed for more specialized applications than the standard grasping and cutting functions.

Battery pliers were a popular type of specialty pliers, designed for grasping and turning the nuts on battery terminal clamps. These nuts often became corroded due to contact with battery acid, making them difficult to turn with a wrench.


No. 1-7 Battery Pliers

[Utica No. 1-7 Battery Pliers]
Fig. 94. Utica No. 1-7 Battery Pliers, with Inset for Side View.

Fig. 94 shows an early pair of Utica No. 1-7 battery pliers, marked with the 3-Diamonds logo near the pivot.

The overall length is 7.4 inches, and the finish is plain steel.


522-7-1/2 Long-Jaw Battery Pliers

[Utica 522-7-1/2 Long-Jaw Battery Pliers]
Fig. 95. Utica 522-7-1/2 Long-Jaw Battery Pliers, with Inset for Side View, ca. 1930s to Early 1940s.

Fig. 95 shows a pair of Utica 522-7-1/2 long-jaw battery pliers, stamped "U.D.F.&T.Co." and "Alloy Steel" with the 3-Diamonds logo.

The overall length is 8.0 inches, and the finish is plain steel.


524-7 Battery Pliers

The next figures show two generations of the Utice 524-7 battery pliers.

[Utica 524-7 Battery Pliers]
Fig. 96. Utica 524-7 Battery Pliers, with Inset for Side View, ca. 1930s to Early 1940s.

Fig. 96 shows an earlier pair of Utica 524-7 battery pliers, stamped "U.D.F.&T.Co." and "Alloy Steel" with the 3-Diamonds logo.

The overall length is 7.8 inches, and the finish is plain steel.

[Utica 524-7 Battery Pliers]
Fig. 97. Utica 524-7 Battery Pliers, with Inset for Side View, ca. 1944-1960.

Fig. 97 shows a later pair of Utica 524-7 battery pliers, stamped with "Utica 524-7" and "Utica, N.Y. U.S.A." around the pivot.

The overall length is 7.9 inches, and the finish is plain steel.


528 Battery Pliers

[Utica 528 Battery Pliers]
Fig. 98. Utica 528 Battery Pliers, with Insets for Side View and Reverse Detail, ca. 1930s to Early 1940s.

Fig. 98 shows a pair of Utica 528 battery pliers, stamped "U.D.F.&T.Co." and "Alloy Steel" with the 3-Diamonds logo.

The overall length is 7.1 inches, and the finish is plain steel.


No. 15 Specialty Pliers

[Utica No. 15 Specialty Pliers]
Fig. 99. Utica No. 15 Specialty Pliers.

Fig. 99 shows a pair of Utica No. 15 specialty pliers, marked with the Utica 3-Diamonds logo and "Pat. Apld For" on the handle.

The overall length is 10.5 inches, and the finish is black oxide.

The patent corresponding to the pending status has not yet been found.

No catalog reference for these pliers has been found yet, so the intended application is uncertain, but the pliers may have been designed for tire chain repairs.


516 "Steeldraulic" Pliers

In the late 1920s and early 1930s several makes of automobiles (e.g. Hupmobile, Auburn) were equipped with Steeldraulic brakes, a brand of mechanical brakes with an odd adjusting mechanism. Special pliers were required for making adjustments to these brakes, and not surprisingly the pliers came to be known as Steeldraulic pliers.

[Utica 516 Steeldraulic Pliers]
Fig. 100. Utica 516 "Steeldraulic" Pliers, ca. 1930.

Fig. 100 shows a pair of Utica No. 516 Steeldraulic specialty pliers, marked "U.D.F.&T.Co." and "Utica N.Y." with the 3-Diamonds logo.

The overall length is 5.3 inches.

Steeldraulic pliers were produced by several other companies as well, and examples include the Blackhawk 2581 Pliers, Bonney 2581 Pliers, Duro-Chrome 2120 Pliers, Herbrand 272 Pliers, and Vacuum Grip No. 14 Pliers.


525 Brake Spring Pliers

[Utica 525 Brake Spring Pliers]
Fig. 101. Utica 525 Brake Spring Pliers, ca. 1944-1960.

Fig. 101 shows a pair of Utica 525 brake spring pliers, stamped "Utica Tools" with "Utica N.Y. U.S.A." near the pivot.

The overall length is 12.6 inches, and the finish is plain steel.


534 Lock-Ring Pliers

[Utica 534 Lockring Pliers]
Fig. 102. Utica 534 Lock-Ring Pliers, ca. 1956-1962.

Fig. 102 shows a pair of Utica 534 lock-ring specialty pliers, marked "USA" near the pivot.

The overall length is 7.5 inches, and the finish is plain steel with black oxide.

These pliers were acquired in the original box and appear to be unused. The label on the box listed the company as "Utica Drop Forge & Tool" with "Division of Kelsey-Hayes Company", and the location was given as "Utica 4, New York". These markings indicate a manufacturing date in the range 1956-1962, since Utica Tool moved to Orangeburg, South Carolina during 1962.


BX100 Armor-Cutting Pliers

[Utica BX100 Armor-Cutting Pliers]
Fig. 103. Utica BX100 Armor-Cutting Pliers, with Insets for Side View and Marking Detail, ca. 1944-1960.

Fig. 103 shows a pair of Utica BX100 armor-cutting specialty pliers, intended for working with BX (armored) electrical cable. One handle is stamped "Utica Tools" and "Utica, N.Y. U.S.A." above the pivot, with "S.P.A.C." on the lower handle. The reverse is stamped with a "Pat. 1934 USA No. 1970983" patent notice.

The overall length is 6.9 inches, and the finish is plain steel.

These pliers are covered by patent #1,970,983, issued to C.E. Smith in 1934. The cryptic notation "S.P.A.C." on the pliers is actually a reference to the inventor, as these were also known as "Smith's Pocket Armor Cutters".


Slip-Joint Pliers


[6000] Early 7 Inch Box-Joint Slip-Joint Universal Pliers

We'll begin this section with the rarely seen Utica box-joint slip-joint pliers, a design combining the higher strength of the older box joint with the convenience of an adjustable pivot.

[Utica 6000 Early 7 Inch Box-Joint Slip-Joint Universal Pliers]
Fig. 104. Utica [6000] Early 7 Inch Box-Joint Slip-Joint Universal Pliers, with Insets for Side View and Marking Detail, ca. 1913-1920.

Fig. 104 shows a pair of Utica 6000 box-joint slip-joint pliers with "universal" style jaws and side-cutters, marked with the 3-Diamonds logo and "Pat. Apd." forged into the handles. The model number is not marked on this example, but was identified by the illustration in the 1926 Utica catalog.

The overall length is 6.9 inches, and the finish is plain steel.

These pliers have a diamond checkered gripping pattern on the handles, a feature introduced around 1913.

The model 6000 pliers were available in three sizes with nominal lengths 7, 9, and 11 inches.


Early 6 Inch Slip-Joint Combination Pliers

The next two figures show examples of early Utica slip-joint pliers.

[Utica Early 6 Inch Slip-Joint Combination Pliers]
Fig. 105. Utica Early 6 Inch Slip-Joint Combination Pliers, with Insets for Side View and Marking Detail, ca. 1913-1920.

Fig. 105 shows an early pair of Utica slip-joint combination pliers, with markings "Pat. Apd. For" and the 3-Diamonds logo forged into the underside of the handles.

The overall length is 6.4 inches. The finish is plain steel but with a few traces of black paint, possibly the original finish.

These pliers have a diamond checkered gripping pattern on the handles, a feature introduced around 1913.

The patent corresponding to the patent notice has not yet been identified, but may refer to the design of the gripping pattern on the handles.

[Utica Early 6 Inch Slip-Joint Combination Pliers]
Fig. 106. Utica Early 6 Inch Slip-Joint Combination Pliers, with Inset for Side View, ca. 1920s.

Fig. 106 shows an early pair of Utica 6 inch slip-joint combination pliers, stamped with the 3-Diamonds logo on the handle.

The overall length is 6.6 inches, and the finish is plain steel.


5000 6 Inch Slip-Joint Combination Pliers

[Utica 5000 6 Inch Combination Pliers]
Fig. 107. Utica 5000 6 Inch Combination Pliers, with Insets for Logo and Handle Pattern, ca. 1920s.

Fig. 107 shows a pair of Utica 5000 6 inch slip-joint combination pliers with a recessed pivot pin, marked with the company name and 3-Diamonds logo.

The overall length is 6.5 inches, and the finish is black oxide.

The left inset shows the raised 3-Diamonds logo appearing on the underside of the handles, and the right inset shows the cross-hatched handle pattern.

The model 5000 pliers were specifically designed for automotive service applications, and the pivot pin is flush on both sides to improve access in tight places. These pliers were listed in a 1926 Utica catalog in 5, 6, and 8 inch nominal lengths.

Similar slip-joint pliers with a recessed pivot pin included the model 5001 with a bent nose, model 500 with a thin nose, model 502 with a thin bent nose, and model 503 with side-cutters.


7-6 6 Inch Slip-Joint Combination Pliers

[Utica 7-6 6 Inch Slip-Joint Combination Pliers]
Fig. 108. Utica 7-6 6 Inch Slip-Joint Combination Pliers, with Inset for Side View, ca. 1944-1960.

Fig. 108 shows a pair of Utica 7-6 6 inch slip-joint combination pliers, stamped "Utica Tools" and "Utica NY USA" near the pivot.

The overall length is 6.6 inches, and the finish is chrome plating.

The top inset shows the gripping pattern on the handles, composed of repeated groups of three diamonds.


14 6.5 Inch Slip-Joint Combination Pliers

[Utica 14 6.5 Inch Combination Pliers]
Fig. 109. Utica 14 6.5 Inch Combination Pliers, with Inset for Side View and Construction Detail, ca. Mid to Late 1940s.

Fig. 109 shows a pair of Utica 14 6.5 inch slip-joint combination pliers, stamped "Utica Tools" and "Utica, N.Y. U.S.A." near the pivot.

The overall length is 6.6 inches, and the finish is black oxide.

The lower inset shows the underside of one handle, with a raised circular area visible near the center. On these pliers the raised area is unmarked, but other examples have been observed with a "V" stamp.

Currently our only reference for this model is the Utica price sheet No. 57 from 1941, which notes that these pliers are "Specially Tempered". This model was available only in the 6.5 inch size, and only in "Utica Finish", presumably the black oxide seen here. The model 14 pliers had been discontinued by the early 1950s.


511-8 8 Inch Slip-Joint Combination Pliers

[Utica 511-8 8 Inch Combination Pliers]
Fig. 110. Utica 511-8 8 Inch Combination Pliers, with Inset for Handle Pattern, ca. 1944-1960.

Fig. 110 shows a pair of Utica 511-8 8 inch slip-joint combination pliers, stamped "Utica Tools" and "Utica, N.Y. U.S.A." near the pivot.

The overall length is 8.0 inches, and the finish is black oxide.


511-10 10 Inch Combination Pliers

[Utica 511-10 10 Inch Combination Pliers]
Fig. 111. Utica 511-10 10 Inch Combination Pliers, with Inset for Handle Pattern, ca. 1944-1960.

Fig. 111 shows a pair of Utica 511-10 10 inch slip-joint combination pliers, stamped "Utica Tools" and "Utica, N.Y. U.S.A." near the pivot.


512 8 Inch Bent-Nose Combination Pliers

[Utica 512 8 Inch Bent-Nose Combination Pliers]
Fig. 112. Utica 512 8 Inch Bent-Nose Combination Pliers, with Inset for Side View.

Fig. 112 shows a pair of Utica 512 8 inch bent-nose combination pliers, stamped with the model number and 3-Diamonds logo.

The overall length is 8.1 inches, and the finish is polished nickel.


513-5-1/2 5.5 Inch Combination Pliers with Side Cutters

[Utica 513-5-1/2 5.5 Inch Bent-Nose Combination Pliers]
Fig. 113. Utica 513-5-1/2 5.5 Inch Combination Pliers, with Insets for Side View and Reverse Detail, ca. 1944-1960.

Fig. 113 shows a pair of Utica 513-5-1/2 5.5 inch slip-joint combination pliers with side cutters, stamped "Utica Tools" and "Utica, N.Y." near the pivot.

The overall length is 5.7 inches, and the finish is plain steel.

The top inset shows a side view of the pliers, illustrating the checkered gripping pattern on the bow-shaped handles.


517-5 Miniature Ignition Pliers

The next figures show several generations of the Utica No. 517-5 miniature slip-joint pliers, intended primarily for ignition work.

[Utica 517-5 Miniature Ignition Pliers]
Fig. 114. Utica 517-5 Miniature Ignition Pliers, ca. 1930s to Early 1940s.

Fig. 114 shows an earlier pair of Utica 517-5 ignition pliers with bow handles, stamped "Alloy Steel" and "U.S.A." near the pivot.

The overall length is 4.4 inches, and the finish is plain steel.

The use of the "Alloy Steel" marking and the older marking style suggest a production date from the 1930s to early 1940s.

[Utica 517-5 Miniature Ignition Pliers]
Fig. 115. Utica 517-5 Miniature Ignition Pliers, with Inset for Marking Detail, ca. 1944 to Mid 1950s.

Fig. 115 shows the Utica 517-5 ignition pliers with bow handles, stamped "Utica Tools" and "Utica, N.Y. U.S.A." near the pivot (see inset).

The overall length is 4.4 inches, and the finish is plain steel.

[Utica 517-5 Miniature Ignition Pliers]
Fig. 116. Utica 517-5 Miniature Ignition Pliers, with Inset for Marking Detail, ca. Mid 1950s to 1960.

Fig. 116 shows a later pair of Utica No. 517-5 ignition pliers with recurved handles, marked "Utica Tools" and "Utica NY" near the pivot.

The overall length (fully extended) is 5.1 inches, and the finish is plain steel.

The Utica catalog No. 67 from around 1956 illustrates these pliers with recurved handles, a change that apparently took place in the mid 1950s.


No. 517-10 Waterpump Pliers

The next figures show two generations of the Utica model 517-10 waterpump pliers.

[Utica 517-10 Waterpump Pliers]
Fig. 117. Utica 517-10 Waterpump Pliers, with Inset for Handle Pattern, ca. 1930s to Early 1940s.

Fig. 117 shows an earlier pair of Utica No. 517-10 waterpump pliers, stamped "U.D.F. & T. Co." with "Alloy Steel" and "Made in U.S.A." on the handle.

The overall length is 10.1 inches, and the finish is plain steel.

The use of the "Alloy Steel" marking and the older marking style suggest a production date from the 1930s to early 1940s.

[Utica 517-10 Waterpump Pliers]
Fig. 118. Utica 517-10 Waterpump Pliers, with Inset for Handle Pattern, ca. 1944-1960.

Fig. 118 shows a similar but somewhat later pair of Utica 517-10 waterpump pliers, marked "Utica Tools" and "Utica, N.Y. U.S.A." on the handle.

The overall length is 10.2 inches, and the finish is plain steel.


523-7 7 Inch Angle-Nose Gripping Pliers

[Utica 523-7 7 Inch Angle-Nose Gripping Pliers]
Fig. 119. Utica 523-7 7 Inch Angle-Nose Gripping Pliers, with Insets for Reverse and Side View, ca. 1944-1960.

Fig. 119 shows a pair of Utica 523-7 7 inch angle-nose gripping pliers with a three-position slip-joint, stamped with "Utica Tools" and "Utica, N.Y. U.S.A." on the handle.

The overall length is 7.8 inches fully extended, and the finish is black oxide.


531-8 8 Inch Angle-Nose Gripping Pliers

[Utica 531-8 8 Inch Angle-Nose Gripping Pliers]
Fig. 120. Utica 531-8 8 Inch Angle-Nose Gripping Pliers, ca. 1944-1960.

Fig. 120 shows a pair of Utica 531-8 8 inch angle-nose gripping pliers with a three-position slip-joint, stamped with "Utica Tools" and "Utica, N.Y. U.S.A." on the handle.

The overall length is 8.3 inches, and the finish is black oxide.

These pliers are referred to as "Super-Grip Parrot Head Pliers" in the Utica catalogs. Our earliest reference for this model is the Utica Price Sheet No. 57 from 1941, which notes construction of alloy steel and gives the list price as $1.60 each.


550-8 "Pistol Grip" Slip-Joint Combination Pliers

[Utica 550-8 Pistol Grip Slip-Joint Pliers]
Fig. 121. Utica 550-8 "Pistol Grip" Slip-Joint Combination Pliers, with Inset for Reverse Detail, 1945.

Fig. 121 shows one of the less commonly seen models, a pair of Utica 550-8 slip-joint combination pliers featuring a distinctive "Pistol Grip" curved handle design with finger grips. The pliers are stamped "Utica N.Y. U.S.A." and "Pat. Applied For" on the front, with "Utica Tools" and the 3-Diamonds logo on the reverse.

The overall length is 7.6 inches, and the finish is plain steel.

The patent notice refers to design patent #D142,888, filed by A.H. Miller in January of 1945 and issued later that year. The "patent applied" status of this example implies a manufacturing date in 1945.


The Utica Tongue-and-Groove Pliers Patent

In 1951 W. Daugherty of Utica Tool filed a patent for a new method of making tongue-and-groove pliers. At this time the original Manning 1934 patent #1,950,362 for tongue-and-groove pliers had only recently expired, and Utica was interested in adding pliers of this type to its product line. The Utica patent was issued in 1952 as patent #2,622,464.

Daugherty's patent describes a method for directly forging the curved ribs of the tongue-and-groove design, so that no machining needs to be done to the forged surfaces. As the patent document explains, avoiding the need for machining preserves the grain structure established by the forging process, and this results in greater strength and less likelihood of cracking.

The Utica patent was an important second-generation improvement on the original tongue-and-groove design. The use of the forging method potentially lowered the cost of production for the pliers, at least for companies with the expertise to create precision forging dies. In addition, Utica Tool was apparently willing to license their patent to other companies. Shortly after the Utica patent was issued, the Diamond Calk Horseshoe Company began using their "Groove-Joint" trademark for tongue-and-groove pliers, and the corresponding pliers appear to have forged ribs as described in the Utica patent. (See for example the Diamalloy HL18 Groove-Joint Pliers shown in our article on Diamond.)


507-10 Tongue-and-Groove Pliers

[Utica 507 Tongue-and-Groove Pliers]
Fig. 122. Utica Model 507-10 Tongue-and-Groove Pliers, with Inset for Marking Detail, ca. 1951-1952.

Fig. 122 shows a pair of Utica 507-10 tongue-and-groove pliers, marked "Utica Tools" and "Utica N.Y. U.S.A." with a "Pat. Apl'd For" patent notice.

The overall length is 9.6 inches, and the finish is plain steel.

The patent notice indicates the pending status of patent #2,622,464, filed in 1951 by W. Daugherty and issued in 1952. This is a second-generation patent based on the tongue-and-groove ("Channellock") design, originally described in the Manning patent #1,950,362 of 1934. (Earlier versions of this article had incorrectly assumed that the patent notice implied a license for the Manning patent.)


Later Pliers


259-6 6 Inch Lineman's Pliers

[Utica 259-6 6 Inch Lineman's Pliers]
Fig. 123. Utica 259-6 6 Inch Lineman's Pliers, with Inset for Reverse Detail, ca. 1960+.

Fig. 123 shows a pair of Utica 259-6 6 inch lineman's pliers, marked "USA" with "Lubring" and "Patented" on the reverse.

The overall length is 6.3 inches, and the finish is black oxide.

The "Lubring" marking and patent notice refer to patent #2,441,552, issued to W.A. Barnes in 1948.


1300-6 6 Inch Gas and Burner Pliers

[Utica 1300-6 6 Inch Gas and Burner Pliers]
Fig. 124. Utica 1300-6 6 Inch Gas and Burner Pliers, ca. 1960+.

Fig. 124 shows a later pair of Utica 1300-6 6 inch gas and burner plierspliers, stamped "Utica" and "USA" around the pivot.

The overall length is 6.5 inches, and the finish is plain steel.


896 6 Inch Short Needlenose Cutting Pliers

[Utica 896 6 Inch Short Needlenose Cutting Pliers]
Fig. 125. Utica 896 6 Inch Short Needlenose Cutting Pliers, with Inset for Side View, ca. 1960+.

Fig. 125 shows a pair of Utica 896 6 inch short needlenose pliers with a cutting tip, marked "Utica" and "USA" near the pivot.

The overall length is 6.1 inches. The finish is plain steel with plastic grips on the handles.


524 Battery Pliers

[Utica 524 Battery Pliers]
Fig. 126. Utica 524 Battery Pliers, with Inset for Reverse Detail, ca. 1960+.

Fig. 126 shows a later pair of Utica 524 battery pliers, stamped on the reverse with "Utica" and "USA" around the pivot.

The overall length is 7.9 inches, and the finish is plain steel.


511-6 6 Inch Combination Pliers

[Utica 511-6 6 Inch Combination Pliers]
Fig. 127. Utica 511-6 6 Inch Combination Pliers, with Inset for Side View, ca. 1960+.

Fig. 127 shows a pair of Utica 511-6 6 inch slip-joint combination pliers, stamped "Utica Tools" and "USA" near the pivot.

The overall length is 6.6 inches, and the finish is plain steel.


Later 8-6 Slip-Joint Combination Pliers

[Utica 8-6 Slip-Joint Pliers]
Fig. 128. Utica 8-6 Slip-Joint Combination Pliers, with Inset for Handle Pattern, ca. 1967+.

Fig. 128 shows a pair of Utica 8-6 slip-joint combination pliers, marked "USA" near the pivot.

The overall length is 6.5 inches, and the finish is chrome plating.

The model 8-6 pliers were lower cost tools intended for general service and maintenance applications. This particular example is of relatively recent origin; a forged-in triangle symbol can be seen on one handle, probably indicating production after Utica was part of Triangle Tool.


529 Soft-Grip Pliers

[Utica 529 Soft-Grip Pliers]
Fig. 129. Utica 529 Soft-Grip Pliers, with Inset for Reverse Detail, ca. 1960+.

Fig. 129 shows a pair of Utica 529 soft-grip pliers, stamped "USA" on the reverse.

The overall length is 9.3 inches, and the finish is chrome plating.


Adjustable Wrenches

Makers of pliers were often makers of adjustable wrenches as well, as the examples of Crescent Tool or J.P. Danielson illustrate. However, Utica did not produce adjustable wrenches in its early years, and as late as 1926 did not offer adjustable wrenches in its catalog.

Utica introduced its No. 90 carbon steel adjustable wrenches sometime after 1926, and during the 1930s began offering the No. 91 alloy steel wrenches. Originally the carbon steel wrenches were made with substantially thicker heads and larger handles, so that the thinner and lighter construction of the alloy models was one of their main selling points.

Utica's early carbon-steel adjustable wrenches were generally similar to the popular Crescent-style models, but when the alloy steel wrenches were introduced, Utica made a design change worth noting here. For the alloy steel wrench design, the fixed jaw joins the milled track of the sliding jaw in a 90 degree angle, with only a small rounded corner to relieve stress. This contrasts with the earlier carbon-steel wrench design (and the Crescent standard), in which the fixed jaw has an extended shoulder at a 60 degree angle, giving the wrench opening a hexagonal gullet.

The obvious consequence of this design change is that the Utica alloy-steel wrenches could grip square objects more closely, with possibly some slight loss of strength due to the smaller reinforcing area. Apparently Utica decided that the greater strength of the alloy steel made the change to the square-jaw design preferable. The change to the square-jaw design is documented in the 1939 Utica catalog (page 19), which shows the No. 91 alloy-steel wrenches with square openings, while the illustration of the No. 90 carbon-steel wrench has a hexagonal opening.

In practice of course both designs work fine on a variety of shapes, but the better grip for square nuts is mentioned in some catalogs as a feature. A quick review of other brands of adjustable wrenches shows that J.P. Danielson also used the square-jaw design, but that many other makers, including Crescent, Diamond, and Williams, produced hex-jaw style wrenches.

The advantages of alloy steel for adjustable wrenches were significant, and as early as 1941 Utica was listing both the No. 90 and No. 91 models with alloy steel construction; the main difference at this point appears to be the finish, with chrome plating for No. 91 and plain steel for the No. 90 wrenches. The Utica price list No. 57 of 1941 shows both models with square jaw openings, and the shanks of both show a web-like raised panel.

Somewhat confusingly, the 1952 Utica catalog 63-D went back to listing the No. 90 wrenches as "Carbon Steel" models with a black finish and polished heads. However, the description states that the design pattern was identical to No. 91, and a table of specifications lists the same thickness and weight for both models in each of the various sizes. In addition, the spare parts for the two wrenches were identical. This strongly suggests that the No. 90 and No. 91 wrenches were actually the same, except for the finish. Both models are shown with stamped markings on the shank, instead of the earlier forged-in markings.

Utica Catalog 67 makes it clear once again that both No. 90 and No. 91 were of alloy steel, with the former finished in black and the latter in chrome plating.

The interested reader may want to compare the Utica wrenches with examples from other makers, such as the Danielson "Bet-R-Grip" Wrench, Crescent Adjustable Wrench, Diamond Adjustable Wrench, and Williams Adjustable Wrench.


Adjustable Wrench Sizes

The 1939 Utica catalog offered carbon steel (model No. 90) wrenches in nominal 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12 inch sizes, and the alloy steel (model No. 91) wrenches were available in 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 15, 18, and 24 inch sizes.

By 1951 the model 90 and 91 adjustable wrenches had identical specifications (except for finish), and both were available in 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 15, and 18 inch sizes. (The 24 inch size had been discontinued.)


Early Carbon Steel Adjustable Wrenches


Early 6 Inch Carbon-Steel Adjustable Wrench

We'll begin this section with an example believed to represent the earliest of the Utica adjustable wrenches.

[Utica Early 6 Inch Adjustable Wrench]
Fig. 130. Utica Early 6 Inch Adjustable Wrench, with Insets for Side View and Reverse Detail, ca. 1930s.

Fig. 130 shows an early Utica 6 inch adjustable wrench of carbon steel construction, marked with "Utica Drop Forge & Tool Co." forged into the shank, with the 3-Diamonds logo and "Utica, N.Y. U.S.A." forged into the reverse.

The overall length is 6.1 inches and the maximum opening is 0.7 inches. The head thickness was measured at 0.47 inches.

The finish is plain steel with polished faces.

The top inset shows a side view of the wrench, and the relatively thicker head of this carbon steel model can be clearly seen.


Early [No. 90] 8 Inch Carbon-Steel Adjustable Wrench

By the late 1930s Utica had modified the design of their adjustable wrenches to include a raised panel on the shank, apparently intended to facilitate the custom markings required for contract production. In this design the generic markings were forged into the shank, and the company-specific information was then stamped on the raised panel area.

[Utica Early No. 90 8 Inch Adjustable Wrench]
Fig. 131. Utica Early [No. 90] 8 Inch Adjustable Wrench, with Insets for Side View and Reverse Detail, ca. Late 1930s.

Fig. 131 shows an early Utica [No. 90] 8 inch adjustable wrench with a raised oval panel, and exhibiting a mix of stamped and forged-in markings. The front is marked with "8 In." and "Drop Forged Steel" forged into the shank, with another size marking and "Made in U.S.A." forged into the reverse. The raised panel is stamped with the 3-Diamonds logo on the front, with "U.D.F.&T.Co." and "Utica, N.Y." on the reverse.

The overall length is 8.0 inches, and the maximum opening is 1.0 inches. The head thickness was measured at 0.62 inches. The top inset shows a side view of the wrench, and the relatively thicker head of this carbon steel model can be clearly seen.

The finish is plain steel with polished faces.

This example is not marked with a model number, but was identified as a No. 90 carbon steel wrench based on the catalog description. Note that this wrench has a hexagonal gullet, as expected for this earlier carbon-steel model.

The mix of stamped and forged markings suggests that this wrench style was designed for contract production, with the final brand being added after the manufacturing was complete.


Early [No. 90] 10 Inch Carbon-Steel Adjustable Wrench

[Utica Early No. 90 10 Inch Adjustable Wrench]
Fig. 132. Utica Early [No. 90] 10 Inch Adjustable Wrench, with Insets for Side View and Reverse Detail, ca. Late 1930s.

Fig. 132 shows an early Utica [No. 90] 10 inch adjustable wrench with a raised oval panel. The mix of stamped and forged markings includes "10 In." and "Drop Forged Steel" forged into the front, with another size marking and "Made in U.S.A." forged into the reverse. The raised panel is stamped with the 3-Diamonds logo on the front, with "U.D.F.&T.Co." and "Utica, N.Y." on the reverse.

The overall length is 10.2 inches, and the maximum opening is 1.1 inches. The head thickness was measured at 0.80 inches, and the relatively thicker head of this carbon steel model can be clearly seen in the top inset.

The finish is plain steel with polished faces.


Early Alloy Steel Adjustable Wrenches


Early [No. 91] 4 Inch Adjustable Wrench

[Utica Early No. 91 4 Inch Adjustable Wrench]
Fig. 133. Utica Early [No. 91] 4 Inch Adjustable Wrench, with Insets for Side View and Reverse Detail, ca. Late 1930s.

Fig. 133 shows an early Utica No. 91 4 inch adjustable wrench with a raised oval panel, stamped with the 3-Diamonds logo on both sides. The forged-in markings on the shank show "4 In." and "Alloy Steel" on the front, with another "4 In." and "Made in U.S.A." on the reverse.

The overall length is 4.4 inches, and the maximum opening is 0.6 inches. The head thickness was measured at 0.34 inches. The top inset shows a side view of the wrench, illustrating the thin profile of this alloy steel model.

The finish is chrome plating with polished faces.

This wrench has a plain hanging hole, indicating a relatively early production date.


Early [No. 91] 6 Inch Adjustable Wrenches

The next figures show several generations of early Utica [No. 91] wrenches in the 6 inch size.

[Utica Early No. 91 6 Inch Adjustable Wrench]
Fig. 134. Utica Early [No. 91] 6 Inch Adjustable Wrench, with Insets for Side View and Reverse Detail, ca. Late 1930s.

Fig. 134 shows an earlier Utica [No. 91] 6 inch adjustable wrench with raised oval panels, stamped with "U.D.F. & T.Co." and "Utica, N.Y." on both front and reverse panels. The shank is marked with "6 In." and "Drop Forged Alloy Steel" forged into the front, with another "6 In." and "Made in U.S.A." forged into the reverse.

The overall length is 6.4 inches, and the maximum opening is 0.7 inches. The head thickness was measured at 0.37 inches.

The finish is plain steel.

The top inset shows a side view of the wrench, illustrating the thin profile of this alloy steel model.

This wrench has a plain hanging hole, indicating a relatively early production date.

[Utica Early No. 91 6 Inch Adjustable Wrench]
Fig. 135A. Utica Early [No. 91] 6 Inch Adjustable Wrench, with Insets for Side View and Reverse Detail, ca. 1939-1940.

Fig. 135A shows a somewhat later (but still early) Utica [No. 91] 6 inch adjustable wrench with raised oval panels, stamped with the 3-Diamonds logo on the front panel, with "U.D.F. & T.Co." and "Utica, N.Y." on the reverse panel. The shank is marked with "6 In." and "Drop Forged Alloy Steel" forged into the front, with another "6 In." and "Made in U.S.A." forged into the reverse.

The overall length is 6.4 inches, and the maximum opening is 0.7 inches. The head thickness was measured at 0.38 inches.

The finish is chrome plating with polished faces.

The top inset shows a side view of the wrench, illustrating the thin profile of this alloy steel model.

Note that the design of this wrench includes a reinforcing ring around the hanging hole, a feature found on all of Utica's later wrench production. The illustration in the 1939 Utica catalog shows this model with a plain hanging hole, providing a 1939 or later production date for this example. Since by 1941 Utica wrenches were being made with a web-like panel, the manufacturing date for this example can be narrowed to 1939-1940.


[Utica Early No. 91 6 Inch Adjustable Wrench]
Fig. 135B. Utica Early [No. 91] 6 Inch Adjustable Wrench, with Insets for Side View and Reverse Detail, ca. 1941.

Fig. 135B shows a later Utica [No. 91] 6 inch adjustable wrench with web-like raised panels, stamped with the 3-Diamonds logo on the front panel, with "U.D.F. & T.Co." and "Utica, N.Y." on the reverse panel. The shank is marked with "6 In." and "Drop Forged Alloy Steel" forged into the front, with another "6 In." and "Made in U.S.A." forged into the reverse.

The overall length is 6.4 inches, and the maximum opening is 0.8 inches. The head thickness was measured at 0.36 inches.

The finish is pitted due to rust, with traces of the original chrome plating.

The top inset shows a side view of the wrench, illustrating the thin profile of this alloy steel model.


Early [No. 91] 10 Inch Adjustable Wrenches

The next figures show two generations of early Utica [No. 91] wrenches in the 10 inch size.

[Utica Early 91-10 Adjustable Wrench]
Fig. 136. Utica Early [91-10] Adjustable Wrench, with Insets for Side View and Reverse Detail, ca. Late 1930s.

Fig. 136 shows an earlier Utica [No. 91] 10 inch adjustable wrench with raised oval panels, stamped with the 3-Diamonds logo on the front panel, with "U.D.F. & T.Co." and "Utica, N.Y." on the reverse panel. The shank is marked with "10 In." and "Drop Forged Alloy Steel" forged into the front, with another "10 In." and "Made in U.S.A." forged into the reverse.

The overall length is 10.1 inches, and the maximum opening is 1.2 inches. The maximum head thickness was measured at 0.60 inches.

The finish is chrome plating.

The top inset shows a side view of the wrench, illustrating the relatively thinner head made possible by the alloy steel construction.

[Utica Early 91-10 Adjustable Wrench]
Fig. 137. Utica Early [91-10] Adjustable Wrench, with Insets for Side View and Reverse Detail, ca. 1941.

Fig. 137 shows a slightly later Utica [No. 91] 10 inch adjustable wrench with a web-like raised panel. As with the previous example, the wrench has a mix of stamped and forged-in markings. The panel is stamped with the 3-Diamonds logo on the front, with "U.D.F.&T.Co." and "Utica, N.Y." stamped on the reverse panel. The front of the shank has "Drop Forged Alloy Steel" forged near the end, with "Made in U.S.A." forged into the reverse.

The overall length is 10.1 inches, and the maximum opening is 1.1 inches. The maximum head thickness was measured at 0.60 inches. The top inset shows a side view of the wrench, illustrating the relatively thinner head made possible by the alloy steel construction.

The original finish has been lost due to rust, except for a few remaining patches of chrome. The model number is not marked on this wrench, but was identified by the illustration in the Utica price list No. 57 of 1941. The illustration there shows the distinctive web-like panel on the shank, with "Drop Forged Alloy Steel" forged at the end for the No. 91 wrench. (Note that by 1941, both the No. 90 and No. 91 models had similar designs in alloy steel, and differed only in the finish and markings.)

The mix of stamped and forged markings suggests that this wrench model was designed for contract production, with the final brand being added after the manufacturing was complete. The distinctive web-like raised panel on the handle of this wrench has been observed on wrenches marked for Bonney, Herbrand, and Plomb, confirming that all of these companies used Utica as a contract manufacturer at some point. Not unexpectedly, the catalogs of these companies mention the improved handling for square nuts.

A wrench of this style made for Bonney can be seen as Bonney BW8 Adjustable Wrench, and an example made for Plomb is shown as the Early Plomb 708 Adjustable Wrench.


Early [No. 90] 10 Inch Adjustable Wrench

[Utica Early 90-10 Adjustable Wrench]
Fig. 138. Utica Early [90-10] Adjustable Wrench, with Insets for Side View and Reverse Detail, ca. Early to Mid 1940s.

Fig. 138 shows a somewhat later Utica [No. 90] 10 inch adjustable wrench with a web-like raised panel. As with the previous example, the wrench has a mix of stamped and forged-in markings. The front is marked with the 3-Diamonds logo stamped on the panel, with "10 In." and "Alloy Steel" forged into the shank. The reverse side has "Utica" stamped on the panel, with another "10 In." and "Made in U.S.A." forged into the shank.

The wrench has an overall length of 10.1 inches with a maximum opening of 1.1 inches. The maximum head thickness was measured at 0.62 inches. The top inset shows a side view of the wrench, illustrating the relatively thinner head made possible by the alloy steel construction.

This wrench has a plain finish with no trace of prior plating, indicating that this would be a model No. 90 wrench.


Early [No. 90] 12 Inch Adjustable Wrench

[Utica Early 90-12 Adjustable Wrench]
Fig. 139. Utica Early [90-12] Adjustable Wrench, with Insets for Side View and Reverse Detail, ca. Early to Mid 1940s.

Fig. 139 shows a Utica [No. 90] 12 inch adjustable wrench with a web-like raised panel. As with the previous examples, the wrench has a mix of stamped and forged-in markings. The front is marked with the 3-Diamonds logo stamped on the panel, with "12 In." and "Made in U.S.A." forged into the shank. The reverse side has "Utica" stamped on the panel, with another "12 In." and "Alloy-Steel" forged into the shank.

The wrench has an overall length of 12.1 inches with a maximum opening of 1.3 inches. The maximum head thickness was measured at 0.72 inches.

This wrench has a plain finish with no trace of prior plating, indicating that this would be a model No. 90 wrench.


Later Alloy Steel Adjustable Wrenches

Sometime in the mid 1940s Utica dropped the raised panel design, but continued using forged-in markings on the shank, at least for Utica's own production. Wrenches intended as contract production are believed to have been forged without markings so that customer-specific stamped markings could be added easily.

At this time the No. 90 and No. 91 wrenches were both made of alloy steel and were probably identical except for the finish.


[90-8] 8 Inch Adjustable Wrench

[Utica [90-8] 8 Inch Adjustable Wrench]
Fig. 140. Utica [90-8] 8 Inch Adjustable Wrench, with Inset for Reverse Detail, ca. Late 1940s.

Fig. 140 shows a somewhat later example of a Utica No. 90-8 8 inch adjustable wrench. The shank design no longer includes the raised panels, but does bear forged-in markings "8 In" and "Drop Forged Alloy Steel" on the front, with "Utica Tools" and "Utica NY USA" forged into the reverse. The finish is plain steel.

The overall length is 8.0 inches, and the maximum opening is 1.0 inches. The maximum head thickness was measured at 0.48 inches, substantially thinner than the head on the corresponding carbon-steel model shown in a previous figure.

The model number is not marked on this wrench, but was identified as No. 90-8 based on the size and plain finish. Models No. 90 and No. 91 both designated alloy steel adjustable wrenches, which were available in nominal lengths from 4 to 18 inches.


[90-10] 10 Inch Adjustable Wrench

[Utica [90-10] 10 Inch Adjustable Wrench]
Fig. 141. Utica [90-10] 10 Inch Adjustable Wrench, with Insets for Side View and Reverse Detail, ca. late 1940s.

Fig. 141 shows a later example of the Utica 90-10 10 inch adjustable wrench. marked with "10 In" and "Drop Forged Alloy Steel" forged into the front, with "Utica Tools" and "Utica NY USA" forged into the reverse. The wrench is not marked with a model number, but was identified as a No. 90-10 based on the size and plain finish.

The overall length is 10.0 inches, and the maximum opening is 1.1 inches. The maximum head thickness was measured at 0.57 inches.

The finish is plain steel.


[90-12] 12 Inch Adjustable Wrench

[Utica [90-12] 12 Inch Adjustable Wrench]
Fig. 142. Utica [90-12] 12 Inch Adjustable Wrench, with Insets for Side View and Reverse Detail, ca. late 1940s.

Fig. 142 shows a Utica [90-12] 12 inch adjustable wrench of alloy steel, with markings "Utica Tools" and "Utica NY USA" forged into the shank, and with "12 In" and "Drop Forged Alloy Steel" on the reverse. The finish is plain steel.

The overall length is 12.2 inches, and the maximum opening is 1.3 inches. The maximum head thickness was measured at 0.69 inches. The top inset shows a side view of the wrench, illustrating the relatively thinner head made possible by the alloy steel construction.

The model number is not marked on this wrench, but was identified as No. 90-12 based on the size and plain finish.

This is a ruggedly made wrench that has stood up well under very hard service -- the adjusting screw has been practically worn smooth from extensive use. But the jaws still operate smoothly and close tightly, a good indication of a well made tool.


92-8 8 Inch Locking Adjustable Wrench

In later years Utica engineers worked on developing locking mechanisms for adjustable wrenches, and at least two patents were issued for their efforts. This next figure shows one of the resulting products.

[Utica 92-8 8 Inch Locking Adjustable Wrench]
Fig. 143. Utica 92-8 8 Inch Locking Adjustable Wrench, ca. 1953-1956.

Fig. 143 shows a Utica 92-8 8 inch locking adjustable wrench, stamped "Utica Tools U.S.A." and "Pat. Apl'd. For" on the shank, with "Alloy-UTICA-Steel" stamped on the reverse (not shown).

The overall length is 8.1 inches, and the maximum opening is 1.0 inches. The maximum head thickness was measured at 0.50 inches.

The finish is chrome plating, but with significant losses due to rust.

The patent applied notice refers to patent #2,750,829, filed by W.A. Barnes et al in 1953 and issued in 1956.


Other Tools


Chisels, Punches, and Striking Tools

3/4 Star Drill

[Utica 3/4 Star Drill]
Fig. 144. Utica 3/4 Star Drill, with Inset for Marking Detail.

Fig. 144 shows a Utica 3/4 star drill marked "USA" on the shank.

Contract Production

Utica provided contract production for a number of other tool companies. In this section we'll look at examples of Utica tools marked for other companies.

Plomb Tool Company

Utica produced adjustable wrenches for Plomb Tool in the late 1930s and early 1940s. See our article on Plomb Adjustable Wrenches for more information.


Early 706 6 Inch Adjustable Wrench

[Plomb Early 706 6 Inch Adjustable Wrench]
Fig. 145. Plomb Early 706 6 Inch Adjustable Wrench, with Insets for Side View and Reverse Detail, ca. 1939-1940.

Fig. 145 shows an example of Utica's earliest production for Plomb, a Plomb 706 6 inch adjustable wrench with a raised oval panel. The shank has a mix of stamped and forged-in markings, with the PLVMB logo stamped on the panel, plus "6 In." and "Drop Forged Alloy Steel" forged into the shank. The reverse markings show the model number stamped on the panel (but partially disfigured), with "6 In." and "Made in U.S.A." forged into the shank.

The overall length is 6.4 inches, and the maximum jaw opening is 0.8 inches. The head thickness was measured at 0.38 inches.

The finish is chrome plating.

The 1939 Utica catalog has illustrations of adjustable wrenches with a floating panel closely resembling the present example.


Early 708 8 Inch Adjustable Wrench with Web-Like Panel

[Plomb Early 708 8 Inch Adjustable Wrench]
Fig. 146. Plomb Early 708 8 Inch Adjustable Wrench, with Insets for Side View and Reverse Detail, ca. 1941.

Fig. 146 shows another example of Utica production for Plomb, a Plomb 708 8 inch adjustable wrench with a raised web-like panel. The shank is stamped with the PLVMB logo on the panel, with "8 In." and "Alloy Steel" in forged raised letters, and the reverse is stamped with the model number on the panel with "8 In." and "Made in U.S.A." forged into the shank.

The overall length is 8.0 inches, and the maximum jaw opening is 1.1 inches. The head thickness was measured at 0.47 inches.

The finish is plain steel.

The use of the web-like panel is documented in the Utica No. 57 illustrated price list from 1941.

Montgomery Ward

Montgomery Ward sold tools under the Master Quality, Lakeside, and Eclipse brands, with "Master Quality" representing the highest quality (and price) selections, and Eclipse representing the economy grade tools. There was some variation in the markings for these brands, with "Master Quality" sometimes marked as "Wards Master Quality" or simply "Wards Master".

Utica is known to have produced pliers for the Master Quality and Lakeside brands, as the figures below show.


Ward's "Master" 7 Inch Angle-Nose Gripping Pliers

[Ward's Master 7 Inch Angle-Nose Gripping Pliers]
Fig. 147A. Ward's "Master" 7 Inch Angle-Nose Gripping Pliers, with Insets for Reverse and Side View, ca. 1930s to Early 1940s.

Fig. 147A shows a pair of Ward's "Master" 7 inch slip-joint angle-nose pliers, stamped with "Wards Master" and "Alloy Steel" near the pivot.

The overall length is 7.7 inches fully extended, and the finish is plain steel.

These pliers are nearly identical (except for markings) to the Utica 523-7 Angle-Nose Pliers shown in an earlier figure.


[Wards] Lakeside 10 Inch Button's Pattern Pliers

[Wards Lakeside 10 Inch Button's Pattern Pliers]
Fig. 147. [Wards] Lakeside 10 Inch Button's Pattern Pliers, with Insets for Side View and Construction Detail, ca. Late 1940s+.

Fig. 147 shows a pair of Lakeside 10 inch Button's Pattern pliers, stamped with the Lakeside script logo across the pivot.

The overall length is 10.6 inches, and the finish is plain steel.

The middle inset shows a close-up of the jaws, illustrating the two angled cutting slots between the jaws, a characteristic of Utica's Button's pliers.

Utica referred to this model as the No. 1002 Button's Pliers for Wire and Steel Mills. These pliers are similar to the well-known Utica No. 1000 Button's pliers, but have rounded edges on the head to allow access in tight places. This model was available during the late 1930s and 1940s, but appears to have been discontinued by the 1950s.


References and Resources

Photographs and observations of particular tools are based on items in the Alloy Artifacts collection.

A 1906 report from the New York appellate court on the Russell Hardware v. Utica Drop Forge case provided background information on Utica's early contract with Russell Hardware.


Catalog Coverage

Product information was obtained from a number of Utica catalogs, as summarized in the table below.

PublicationTitleDateFormatNotes
N/A Utica Nippers and Pliers 1915 Half size New products for 1915 include No. 130 and Nos. 706-708.
Pliers illustrated with checkered handles.
? Utica Nippers and Pliers 1926 Half size Catalog undated, but came with Price List No. 35 of October 1, 1926
No. 50 Utica Tools 1939 Full size Illustration shows No. 90 adjustable wrench with hexagonal gullet
N/A Utica Automotive Tools 1939 Booklet No. 91 adjustable wrench shown with raised panel, in sizes from 4 to 24 inches.
No. 57
(Price List)
Utica Tools 1941 Full size Price list with illustrations. Both No. 90 and No. 91 adjustable wrenches of alloy steel,
illustrated with web-like panel.
No. 63-D Utica Tools 1951? Full size Adjustable wrenches with stamped markings.
No. 66 Utica Tools 1952 Full size "Rib-Joint" tongue-and-groove pliers available.
No. 67 Utica Tools 1956? Full size Division of Kelsey-Hayes
No. 695 Utica Tools 1975? Full size Division of Triangle Tools in Orangeburg, SC.

Industrial Distributors

Utica tools were available through many industrial and automotive distributors, and the catalogs from these companies offer additional product information.

  • Chandler & Farquhar 1910. The 1910 catalog No. 115 from the Chandler & Farquhar Company, an industrial distributor, lists only one model of Utica pliers, the No. 3 Compound Nippers. The illustration shows the markings "U.D.F.&T. Co." with the 3-Diamonds logo.

  • J.M. Waterston 1916. The 1916 catalog No. 22 from J.M. Waterston, a tool distributor based in Detroit, lists two models of Utica pliers on page 191. The Utica No. 1000 Giant Button's Pliers are offered in four sizes from 4.5 to 10 inches nominal, with prices ranging from $0.40 to $0.65. The illustration shows pliers with handles with the diamond checkered gripping pattern, and the markings have "U.D.F. & T. Co." and the 3-Diamonds logo stamped around the pivot.

    Also listed are the No. 5002 combination pliers in the 6 inch size for $0.25 each. These pliers also have the diamond checkered gripping pattern on the handles, and the Utica 3-Diamonds logo is shown forged into the underside of the handles.

    Later pages list three additional Utica models, the No. 654 Long Chain Nose Side Cutting Pliers, the No. 1950 Heavy Side Cutting (Lineman's) Pliers, and the No. 325 Round Nose Combination Pliers. The illustrations show the No. 654 and No. 1950 with the diamond checkered gripping pattern on the handles.

  • Chandler & Farquhar 1919. The 1919 catalog from Chandler & Farquhar lists two pages of Utica pliers, with the models including the No. 50 Side Cutting Pliers, No. 1000 Giant Button's Pliers, and No. 3 Compound Nippers.

  • Cragin & Company 1921. The 1921 catalog No. 2 from Cragin & Company of Seattle lists two pages of Utica pliers. The models include Nos. 11, 20, 21, 42, 55, 60, 612, 655, 700, 1000, 1050, and 1950.

  • Marwedel 1922. The 1922 catalog No. 11 from the C.W. Marwedel Company, an industrial supplier, includes three pages of Utica pliers. The models shown include the No. 3 Compound Nippers, Nos. 60 and 360 End Nippers, No. 130 Gas and Burner Pliers, No. 1000 Giant Button's Pliers, and No. 4000 Slip Joint Box Joint Pliers.

  • Samuel Harris 1931. The 1931 catalog No. 57 from the Samuel Harris Company, an industrial supplier, lists several models of Utica pliers. The models listed are the No. 1 Battery Pliers, No. 16 Battery Terminal Lifters, No. 42 Diagonal Cutters, and No. 1000 Giant Button's Pliers.


Advertisements

Utica advertised its products in trade journals and popular magazines beginning in the early 1900s. The following links show examples of some of these ads.

  • A full-page ad at the back of the Popular Mechanics Shop Notes for 1906 shows several models of Utica Pliers & Nippers, including the No. 1650 Box-joint side cutters, No. 50 Side Cutters, No. 700 Combination Side Cutters, No. 1000 Giant Button's Pliers, and No. 60 End Nippers. The text shows the use of the early linked-chain form of the Utica 3-Diamonds logo.

  • An ad on the back page of the October 1906 edition of Popular Mechanics offers the Utica No. 1000 Giant Button's Pliers, in sizes of 4 1/2, 6, 8, and 10 inches. The illustration shows the underside of the handles with "Pat. Apd. For", and the text shows the linked-chain form of the Utica 3-Diamonds logo.

  • The June, 1907 edition of the Hardware Dealers' Magazine shows an ad for Utica nippers and pliers on page 1066, with an illustration of the No. 1000 Giant Button's Pliers:

    The text shows the linked-chain form of the Utica 3-Diamonds logo, and the company address is listed as 75 1/2 Genesee Street in Utica.

  • A full-page ad on page 1228 of the June 1910 edition of the Hardware Dealer's Magazine shows the Utica No. 1300 Gas and Burner Pliers. The text shows the linked-chain form of the Utica 3-Diamonds logo.


Patent and Trademark Information

Patent information was obtained from the U.S. Patents and Trademarks Office (USPTO) web site at uspto.gov. Patent documents were obtained from sites offering free downloads, notably freepatentsonline.com.


Feedback

If any readers have additional information about Utica, please let us know via the "Contact Us" link on the home page. Your comments and suggestions are welcome as well.


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