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Welcome to the Berry Benson Chapter #2584 of North Augusta, South Carolina. Please read the poem below it explains why we are Daughters of the Confederacy.  Also, please visit the  SC Web page

Why I Am A Daughter of the Confederacy

I am a daughter of the Confederacy because I was born a daughter of the Confederacy. A part of my heritage was that I came into this world with the blood of a soldier in my veins…a soldier who may have had nothing more to leave me and those who come after me except a heritage---a heritage so rich in honor and glory that far surpasses any material wealth that could be mine. But it is mine to cherish, to nurture and make grace, and to pass along to those yet to come. I am, therefore, a daughter of the Confederacy because it is my birthright. 

I am a Daughter of the Confederacy because I have an obligation to perform. Like the Man in the Bible, I was given a talent and it is my duty to do something about it. That is why I've joined a group of ladies whose birthright is the same as mine...an organization which has for its purpose the continuance and furtherance of the true history of the South and the ideals of southern womanhood as embodied in its constitution. 

 I am a member of the Daughters of the Confederacy because I feel it would please my ancestor to know that I appreciate what he did and delight his soldier love to know that I do not consider the cause which he held so dear to be lost or forgotten. Rather, I am extremely proud of the fact that he was part of it and was numbered among some of the greatest and bravest men that any such cause ever produced. 

I am a Daughter of the Confederacy because I can no more help being a daughter of the Confederacy than I can help being an American, and I feel that I was greatly favored by inheriting a birthright for both. 

-By Mrs. John S. Moon, Kirkwood Otey Chapter #10 
Lynchburg, Virginia, December, 1948