A liberal arts college



First posted
Sunday May 23, 2009 06:50
Updated
Tuesday August 2, 2011 06:16

Pre reunion posts.

Reason for this page is to try to analyze educational causes for some of the problems in the US legal, media, bureaucratic systems from senior citizen liberal arts undergraduate degree holder perspective.

Liberal arts graduates attempt to avoid hard work and, therefore, gravitate to occupations such as journalism.

Do not fear the enemy, for your enemy can only take your life. It is far better that you fear the media, for they will steal your honor. That awful power, the public opinion of a nation, is created in America by a horde of ignorant, self-complacent simpletons who failed at ditching and shoemaking and fetched up in journalism on their way to the poorhouse.

Mark Twain

___

Monday August 1, 2011 07:34

Liberal arts 'educated' [Memorize, speculate, emote, then interpret] 'think' different we learned by experience at Whitman College.

And we are hopefully applying this experience.

Better Homes and Gardens energy efficient home. 760 Derby, Pullman, WA.

Home was empty in June of 2009. Pullman aka WSU is experiencing financial troubles.


War in September/October?

Having sampled a little "follow the money" logic, we now move on to considering how the PTB will spin the collapse of the US /Global economy into something which can be blamed on a "New Demon" which we've been watching develop as Iran is being set-up to take the fall.

One of the relatively "easy" tells (as in poke face giveaways) is that the US now has seven carriers at sea including the USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77) - 5th Fleet which means in the Persian gulf area.

We'll be watching today ships underway (presently 53%) and the locations of the Amphibious Warfare Ships (LHD's) for further hints. But, if you see two or three LHD's head toward the Gulf, it'll be time to check the potassium iodate supplies again.

The events of 9/11 and the subsequent war-frenzy whipped on Iraq (which didn't have anything to do with the events of 9/11 as is now commonly acknowledged) was a fine prototype: The PTB can bring the world to the brink of Depression 2 recognition and spin it away with a deft fall]-guy event.

Wouldn't want to be planning tourism in the Middle East this fall, thanks.

Urban Survival, Monday August 1, 2011



http://home.comcast.net/~bpayne37/whitman59/whitman59after.htm#robinson



Ryan Crocker
Whitman College, Walla Walla, Washington, B.A. in English literature , 1971

A gutsy commencement address
Former Iraq ambassador Ryan Crocker, a Whitman graduate, issues an unlikely Niebuhrian challenge to the class of 2009










Whitman Magazine July 2011 


May 5, 2011 05:44
Nothing in the world can take the place of persistence.

Talent will not; nothing is more common than unsuccessful men with talent.

Genius will not; unrewarded genius is almost a proverb.

Education will not; the world is full of educated derelects.

Peristence and determination alone are omnipotent.

Calvin Coolidge




Compound Effort Over Time

by Bill Bonner
May 4, 2011
The Daily Reckoning

[T]he point we are making is that success doesn't always come immediately. And it's not easy to sustain a career that doesn't provide quick, positive feedback. But in our experience, it pays to stay the course.

Starting out in life, young people are practically interchangeable parts. They leave school not knowing much of anything. If they can read and write clearly, they have an advantage over most college graduates. But school doesn't prepare them very well for real life. School problems are bounded, controlled, and simplified. Usually, they are idealized, with the confusing parts taken out. In history, for example, they are taught broad themes...and specific 'facts.' But the sequence of events in real life doesn't follow simple scripts. Instead, it is endlessly complex.

Historical characters are like stick figures, heroes or villains according to the storyline. In real life, they are like the people we know personally - they have their positive qualities and their negative ones; they perform well in some circumstances and poorly in others. They are neither good nor bad...but subject to influence.

That's why you cannot make a good history out of recent events; you know it too well!

In every discipline, the phenomenon is the same - in school, the complexities of real life are removed so that students can be tested on set groups of memorable, learnable, understandable bits of stripped-down, sanitized 'knowledge.'

That is why more education does not always lead to more success in the real world. In fact, it could go in the opposite direction. The better you get at handling the artificial world of academia, the worse you may do at solving the real world's infinitely nuanced challenges.

Problem solving in the academic world typically involves a part of the brain - but only a part of the brain. It is the 'rational' part...the part that remembers facts, reads, writes, and connects the dots. That is the skill measured by the SAT tests, for example. They are tests of 'scholastic aptitude.' And they are pretty good at measuring what they are supposed to measure. If you able to do the kind of tricks the tests require, you'll be able to handle the kind of work they give you in school.

But life sends very different tests your way. Life's tests involve many, many more variables - so many that your 'rational' mind is frequently overwhelmed. The human face, for example, is capable of hundreds...or thousands...of different expressions. Some people seem better able to read these messages than others.

In the world of textbooks, other people scarcely matter. You read. You write. You check the boxes. But once you get into a workplace, you are faced with an entirely new test. How well can you get along with others, motivate them, lead them?

In school, tests are anticipated. In real life, you never know when you will be tested. You never know what you will be tested on. And even when you are in the middle of an important test, you often don't know it.

In some careers you are able to apply the body of knowledge you picked up in school, but not many. In most careers, you have to learn on the job - a new body of knowledge, often additional, sometimes completely new and different. And unless your job is to throw the switch on a toll bridge, or to collect tolls on a toll road, your new knowledge is likely to involve a great many things that are uncertain...unknowable...and variable.

Even in 'routine' careers there is still plenty of room for career advancement and money-making. But it requires you to step beyond the routine. If you are a schoolteacher, for example, you might have to write a book on education...or start a school of your own. Or, if you are a carpenter, you could set up a carpentry business...or use your skills to build something rare and interesting enough that it could be sold at high margin...or mass produced.

Generally, the more formulaic the work, the less scope for making money at it. The more limited, that is to say, the more like school any job is, the less likely you are to turn it into a source of wealth, power, or outsize success.

But assuming you are doing something that is not routine, not formulaic, and not limited (an assembly-line worker, for example, may be able to earn a good living...but it is not a way to build a fortune), what is the secret to making a success of it? Ah, glad you asked. At least part of the secret is sticking to it. Here's why...

If your work is not simple and not formulaic, you need to use a fair amount of creative thinking, innovation and entrepreneurship to get ahead. Sometimes your work can be reduced to simple, school-like thinking. More often, it is more complex...involving subtle judgments about people...guesses about how others will react...mastering new technology and leadership skills needed to get others to follow your plan, and so forth. It may involve raising money...'selling' your ideas...taking a chance on a new career or a new business...convincing clients to leave their habitual sources...or convincing employees to work harder...or better.

You may have to develop a new product. Or, maybe you have an insight that tells you how to invest your firm's resources more productively.

Whatever it is, it is likely to require more than your 'school brain' to make it happen. It is likely to involve wisdom...intuition...and 'people skills.' It is likely to require more of you - your brain...your personality...your heart. And maybe soul too.

It is likely to require trusted contacts, seasoned hunches, educated guesses...

Where do these things come from?

Malcolm Gladwell's book, Outliers, makes the point that there is no secret to success. Successful people just put in more hours than other people. Our point today is similar. Success is usually the product of compound effort over time. It takes time to develop contacts. It takes time to develop trust - both of your own team and outside clients/customers/associates. It takes time and experience to develop the hunches and instincts that are useful in real life. It takes time too to understand other people and learn how to work with them. It also takes time to build a foundation of human and financial capital that allows you to take advantage of the insights and opportunities that experience bring you.

Time does not work in a linear, mathematical way. As with compound interest, time pays off geometrically. As contacts, experiences, wisdom, innovations and intuition are added one to another, your opportunities multiply. A $100,000 deal that you might have done when you were 25 grows into a $1 million deal 5 years later. And instead of doing two deals a year...you might do 10 a year.

This is also why it is so important to put in lots of time. Gladwell refers to the Beatles, major league athletes and people such as Bill Gates. In every case, he found that the leading figures in their industries put in thousands of hours - usually far more than their competitors. They may appear to be 'gifted.' Their achievements may seem effortless. But they are almost always the product of time.

Not only that, but the time spent at the end is much more powerful than the time at the beginning. You can see this by looking at charts of compound interest. Starting from a low base, the first series of compound interest produce little difference. But at the end, the results are spectacular.

Start with a penny. Double it every day. At the end of a week you are still only adding 32 cents per day. By the end of the third week, however, you're adding more than $10,000 per day. So you see, the last increments of time are much more important than the first.

It doesn't exactly work that way in real life, of course. Hang around too long and you get tired...and the lessons you've learned might not be applicable to the new realities. Suppose, for example, that you had learned to make the perfect buggy whip, at age 55, in 1910! Or imagine that you were the leading expert on silent movies...just before the 'talkies' started. Or maybe you were cornering the classified advertising market...just as Craigslist and eBay made their appearance.

But aside from that kind of a setback, time compounds your advantages. At age 20, you may know less than everyone in your business. But then, you work 10 hours a day, while others only work 8 hours. In 20 years, you may know more than just about anyone. Then, who gets the new contracts? Who finds the new opportunities? Who has pricing power?

Who makes money?

Compound interest works because each addition is then put in service to earn another increment of gain. Compound effort works the same way. Every insight, innovation and useful contact helps bring on another, bigger and better one.

Remember, success is competitive. While you are adding to your business capital, your competitors tend to wear out...move on...or retire. Sticking to it is not easy. People tend to get distracted. They often want easier, simpler, faster opportunities. They give up their accumulated capital...and take up something new. That leaves you in a commanding position.

Stick to it. ...


Wednesday December 8, 2010 12:16

Iran is winning and Israel is losing. That is the startling conclusion we reach if we consider how things have changed in the Middle East in the two years since most of the WikiLeaks State Department cables about Iran’s regional difficulties were written.
By prosefights, December 8 at 8:11 pm Link to this comment

Sounds like liberal arts BS.

Fact appears to have emerged [we read it on Inetert, then traced data to source]that the US imports 93% of the uranium it consumes!

‘According to the Times, China’s “civilian nuclear power industry” (and rest assured there’s a Chinese military nuclear power industry as well) has 11 operating reactors, with as many as 10 new reactors per year planned for the next 15 years. That’s 150 new reactors just in China.

So where will the world nuclear industry obtain the uranium fuel for all these new reactors? That’s a darn good question. Just in the US, annual uranium use for the nuclear power industry is about 55 million pounds. The US produces less than 4 million pounds of this fuel - about 7% - and imports the rest.

and

Uranium supply shortage is real, and “Peak Uranium” is harder to deny than “Peak Oil”.This year’s world uranium mine output could or might attain 55000 tons, but demand will be about 68000 tons. It is difficult to imagine what would happen to world oil, coal or gas prices if their world supply was 20% lower than their world demand.’

according to Byron King and Andrew McKillop.

Here is link to data source.

http://www.world-nuclear.org/info/inf23.html


Wednesday November 17, 2010 10:47

"The iinsurance doesn't cover this loss."

Show us the rule or law. 

Liberal arts 'education' has a serious downside. Mostly BS.


http://home.comcast.net/~bpayne37/whitman59/whitman59after.htm#crockeroverseer







 

 

Liberal arts educated Christopher Layne is typical of the liberal arts 'educated.'









Yes, I would expect liberal arts college Whitman to do something like this.

Below received Tuesday November 16, 2010


Dave is liberal arts educated at Whittier College.


Hello Dave,

Let's not discuss scientific or engineering merits, which neither of us have the credentials to do, but rather focus on how much money it cost to build and maintain the MSC/NASTRAN - Kirtland AFB, NM facility seen at http://www.thelivingmoon.com/45jack_files/03files/Kirtland_AFB_Laser_Power.html.

Millions of dollars I would speculate for what is seen plus the personnel.

Object of the New Mexico labs is to bring money into the state.

Project significance, success, or failure is of small importance. It's the money that counts.

90% of Sandia labs projects fail I was told when I worked for the labs.

Keep up the good work.
Two statistical analyses by Billy Brown, Ph.D. Mathematics and William Payne, Ph.D., along with a geochemical analysis by Registered Geologist Robert Gilkeson conclude that Moats' conclusions are not supported by the imaginary data that his Evaluation used, especially for Cadmium. In fact, the correct analysis of Cadmium data shows that a Cadmium release is contaminating the ground water below the MWL.

Sandia National Laboratories Mixed Waste Landfill cadmium and nickel statistical analysis

Sandia National Laboratories mixed waste landfill.

bill





Meanwhile, at Sandia there would be cuts in nuclear weapons, but Sandia Labs “would see offsetting increases in other areas, including renewable energy.”
Total Energy Department spending in New Mexico would drop from $4.27 billion this year to $4 billion in fiscal year 2010. The budget now goes before Congress. The fiscal year beings Oct. 1.


That's Dave McCoy of Citizen Action New Mexico.



Kirtland AFB New Mexico, in southeast Albuquerque Laser Power Transmitters or Solar Collectors?

Liberal arts media article.

Hello Ms Lombardi,

I read Idaho building its largest wind complex to date.

What is the Heat Rate for a 1.5-megawatt GE turbine?

Since 1 kWh = 3412.14163 BTU we speculate that more heat has to go IN compared to possible electricity-generated heat OUT if the second law of thermodynamics applies to wind generated electricity?

bill









But ongoing research and development of alternative energy could lead to a new era in human history in which two renewable sources -- solar and wind -- will become Earth's dominant contributors of energy, Kohn said.


Candace Lombardi, a freelance journalist based in the Boston area, focuses on the evolution of green and otherwise cutting-edge technologies, from robots to cars to scientific innovation. She is a member of the CNET Blog Network and is not a current employee of CNET. E-mail Candace.
Where do journalists come from?

They are manufactured in America's universities in a liberal arts curriculum.

Wednesday August 18, 2010 19:06

On the Government’s Growing Obsession With Hollywood-Style Command Centers





Larry Kudlow, Michael Oren, Israeli ambassador to US Wednesday August 18, 2010 interview about bombing Iran nuclear generation of electricity facilities by Saturday August 21, 2010.
In 1977, Oren completed his undergraduate degree from Columbia University. He continued his studies at Columbia, receiving a Masters in International Affairs in 1978 from the School of International and Public Affairs

Kudlow and Eagleburger were mp3 recorded discussing bombing Iran's nuclear electric generation facilities Monday August 16, 2010.

Former U.S. envoy to the United Nations, John Bolton, asserted that Israel has until Aug. 21 to attack Iran's nuclear facilities. He said from that point on Bushehr would become an operating nuclear reactor and effectively immune to any air strike.

Fidel Castro predicts WW III.

You will not hear the word 'electricity' in their discussion.
Bolton was a member of the Yale Political Union, and he ultimately earned a B.A. summa cum laude in 1970 and a J.D. in 1974.

Kudlow graduated from University of Rochester in Rochester, New York with a degree in history in 1969.

Lawrence Sidney Eagleburger (born August 1, 1930) is an American statesman and former career diplomat, who served briefly as the United States Secretary of State under President George H. W. Bush. Previously, he had served in lesser capacities under Presidents Richard Nixon, Jimmy Carter, Ronald Reagan, and George H. W. Bush. He is a graduate of the University of Wisconsin.

[liberal arts major?] - LAWRENCE S. EAGLEBURGER (1930- ) Served 1992-1993 Appointed by President ... his BS degree from the University of Wisconsin in 1952 with a major in history. [E]agleburger recieved a M.S. in political science from the University of Wisconsin in 1957.

In addition, the BNL loans were crucial to the Reagan and Bush administration's efforts to assist Saddam Hussein. While at the State Department, Eagleburger was fully aware of the link between BNL and the Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC) program for Iraq and the importance of the BNL scandal.

Whitman College did not make the list.

Thinking
Stage
 
Liberal arts approach
Alternate approach
1 Memorize Study
2   Speculate Analyze to understand
3 Emote Synthesize strategy
4 Interpret Do 

20 Colleges With High Tuition, Low ROI

No. 1: Willamette University Salem, OR Anthony B Robinson is a grad. Robinson's daughter is a 2009 graduate of Whitman College.


No. 10: Whittier College Whittier, Calif. Dave McCoy is a grad.

Best Bargain Colleges

What's Your College Degree Worth?


Whitman ranks 141.
University of Colorado at Boulder 151.
Purdue 105.
Washington State University 211.
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign 68.
University of Washington 127.
Oregon State 197.
University of New Mexico 468.
New Mexico State 503.
Kansas State 382.
Texas Tech 254.
Western Washington University 308.
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 20.
University of Wisconsin - Madison 145.|
Stanford 6.
Rice University 26.






http://home.comcast.net/~bpayne37/whitman59/whitman1960.htm


AMI’s Impact on Enterprise Applications.



They are gearing up totally for the destruction of Iran
Dan Plesch, director, Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy, University of London

Final destination Iran?
May 23, 2010 by Rob Edwards

Hundreds of powerful US "bunker-buster" bombs are being shipped from California to the British island of Diego Garcia in the Indian Ocean in preparation for a possible attack on Iran. The Sunday Herald can reveal that the US government signed a contract in January to transport 10 ammunition containers to the island. According to a cargo manifest from the US navy, this included 387 "Blu" bombs used for blasting hardened or underground structures. Experts say that they are being put in place for an assault on Iran's controversial nuclear facilities. There has long been speculation that the US military is preparing for such an attack, should diplomacy fail to persuade Iran not to make nuclear weapons.

Vacation planning. Providing it doesn't get messed up by WW III.

Sunday May 23, 2010 12:29

A retired family law specialist who lives in California, he filed his suit in a low boil a few months after $40,000 in Lehman Brothers corporate bonds he owned all but vanished when the investment bank collapsed.

That is exactly what Mr. Grassi is doing as he attempts to restart his lawsuit with an amended complaint. He admits that if someone came to him now with a case like his, he’d talk the client out of suing. The odds are too long; the costs are too high.

Then again, he is representing himself, so his expenses are far less than $1,000. And even if this exercise proves futile, he’s having a great time “poking back” at Wall Street, as he puts it.

“When you’re retired,” he says, “you’ve got time to do dumb things.”

And, he happily notes, any time he files a motion he sends copies to 17 different lawyers at the three rating agencies. Given that there have been more than 90 pleadings so far, and given that many of these lawyers bill at well over $500 an hour, he assumes that his case has already cost the company far more than he could ever hope to recover.

Mr. Abrams, the lawyer for S.& P., declined to get specific about the billings from his law firm:

“I’d rather not get into it. You’d fall off your chair.”







http://home.comcast.net/~bpayne37/whitman59/whitman59after.htm#wardwelljuergens



http://home.comcast.net/~bpayne37/whitman59/gfsr/gfsr.htm



The liberal arts educated judiciary does does not understand the distinction between the words 'request' and 'demand' or 'discretionary' and 'mandatory.'

So we must confront the insurance industry which has rules to be obeyed.

Whitman college class of 1960.


Whitman college taught me.
Liberal arts educated 'think' different. Most memorize, speculate, emote, then interpret.

Logic and reason does not work with them.

Ignoring facts is a liberal arts ploy.

Public scrutiny of them trying to ignore facts can get them to deal with facts. Grudgingly.

Dr Sobolewski's assessment.
However, I say that current liberal arts majors, in general, are not capable of logical thinking since they have been brainwashed by our education system which discourages inquiry, critical thinking, and the ability to synthesise solutions based on facts.

Where do journalists come from?

They are manufactured in America's universities in a liberal arts curriculum. Journalism schools teach students that they are "the voice of the people." Reporters are to stick up for the poor, the downtrodden, and the disadvantaged, in our sometimes-oppressive capitalist system. It is their job - so they are taught - to "comfort the afflicted and to afflict the comfortable."

It's a noble and necessary calling, but there is a problem here. Chances are quite good that you will be classified as "comfortable," regardless of whether you are or not much more on this in chapters 12 and 13, the Rules of Balance and Ambush). The point is that journalists are disconnected from he general population-and for more reasons than their politics or philosophical bent.
...

Manipulating the Media

The next time you watch a newscast, read a newspaper, flip through a magazine, or click through a news website, look for Invention. You'll be astonished at how much "news" is actually the product of media manipulation. Excluding spot news, most of what we receive from the Beast is at least partially manufactured.

Feeding the Media Beast: An Easy Recipe for Great Publicity
Mark Mathis

Wind and solar generation of electricity.

Overcoming Obstacles to Renewables Growth.

Following the takeover of the US embassy in Tehran in 1979, Jimmy Carter, the then US president, imposed sanctions on Iran, freezing around $12bn worth of Iranian assets abroad.

But coming as it did during a period of internal upheaval for Iran and shortly before the Iran-Iraq war, the sanctions were initially little more than an irritant for a country

Wednesday May 19, 2010 10:32

http://home.comcast.net/~bpayne37/whitman59/whitman59after.htm#wardwelljuergens

wardwers@whitman.edu

Hello Ms Wardwell,

As Whitman college director of communications, you emailed on August 21, 2009:
As you might expect, Whitman continues its belief in both the importance and value of a liberal arts education in a globally connected, multicultural world fraught with complex challenges.

I read Ms Juergens May 4, 2010 letter soliciting a donation to Whitman College.

Ms Juergens wrote
In three short weeks I will be graduating from this magical college that I have called my home for the past four years. Thanks to my highly-regarded Whitman education, both inside and outside of the classroom ...

Ms Juergens appears to have been brainwashed.

Goal of Ms Juergens letter is
On behalf of the entire Whitman College student body, I want to thank you so much for your strong and consistent support of the Whitman Annual Fund. ...

I invite you to make a gift to Whitman this year. As you can see, Whitman thrives because of your support. Whatever contribution you can donate truly does make a difference to the life of every student here.

supposes that continued support of Whitman College and liberal arts education is in the best interest of everyone.

Ambassador Ryan Crocker delivered the commencement address to the class of 2009. Crocker is a 1971 English major graduate of Whitman.

Crocker's address was characterizes as 'gutsy' by Anthony B Robinson.

Crocker was likely involved in inciting Saddam Hussein to attack Iran in 1980.

Efforts to solicit the help of Whitman College president George Bridges to try to convince Crocker to tell everyone what happened and then seek peaceful settlement failed. Bridges stopped reading email from me until Ms Wardwell apparently convinced him that was a bad idea.

1959 classmates Max Johnson and John Alsip were next approached for help. Neither acked for receipt of email or responded to plea. Johnson is apparently no longer accepting my emails.

These liberal arts educated ploys did not surprise me.

Continuing funding of Whitman college should be supported by Whitman administration, faculty and student behaviors.

I would feel better about donating money to Whitman and supporting liberal arts education if some of us liberal arts graduates could convince Ambassador Crocker to come clean about what he knows about how the Iraq/Iran war got started. And then see how to get these unfortunate matters peacefully settled.

I will attempt to contact those in the class of 1960.to let them know what happened at the 2009 commencement and 1959 reunion.

Whitman's performance at having Ryan Crocker deliver the 2009 commencement address and having Ms Juergens solicit money causes me to seriously question Whitman's continued role in 'educating' students.

So, Ms Wardwell, what do you propose to get Crocker to come clean?

We think this is serious business particularly at a time all countries, including Iran, are facing increased electricity costs and possible shortages.

Please ack this email and then respond by May 25, 2010.

Best regards,

bill

class of 1959 but matriculated in 1956

Distribution

juergemk@whitman.edu
anthonybrobinson@comcast.net
bridges@whitman.edu
mitchenl@whitman.edu
arpjs@whitman.edu
hansbuehler1@bluewin.ch


Hotel Bravo Nine Xray Julia from the Swiss radio international broadcast.
Purpose of this response is to alert you to possible problems with liberal arts education and a specific Whitman liberal arts education problem which should be solved, IMO.

hansbuehler1@bluewin.ch



Email to Buehler went through.




Liberal arts educated 'think' different. Logic and reason does not work with them.

Ignoring facts is a liberal arts ploy.

Public scrutiny of them trying to ignore facts can get them to deal with facts.

Where do journalists come from?

They are manufactured in America's universities in a liberal arts curriculum. Journalism schools teach students that they are "the voice of the people." Reporters are to stick up for the poor, the downtrodden, and the disadvantaged, in our sometimes-oppressive capitalist system. It is their job - so they are taught - to "comfort the afflicted and to afflict the comfortable."

It's a noble and necessary calling, but there is a problem here. Chances are quite good that you will be classified as "comfortable," regardless of whether you are or not much more on this in chapters 12 and 13, the Rules of Balance and Ambush). The point is that journalists are disconnected from he general population-and for more reasons than their politics or philosophical bent.
...

Manipulating the Media

The next time you watch a newscast, read a newspaper, flip through a magazine, or click through a news website, look for Invention. You'll be astonished at how much "news" is actually the product of media manipulation. Excluding spot news, most of what we receive from the Beast is at least partially manufactured.

Feeding the Media Beast: An Easy Recipe for Great Publicity
Mark Mathis







Blowback: Why They Try to Bomb Us
Posted on May 14, 2010
By David Sirota






Monday May 10, 2010

Max Johnson is 1959 Whitman College class president.



Received by snailmail.





May 4, 2010

Dear Class of 1959,

On behalf of the entire Whitman College student body, I want to thank you so much for your strong and consistent support of the Whitman Annual Fund. I am currently a Whitman senior history major and we students are very blessed by your generous donations. Without your support Whitman would not be the fantastic place it is today!

Throughout my past four years at Whitman, I have directly benefited from generous Whitman alumni support in a multitude of ways. Most prominently, I would not even be able to attend this fine institution without my merit scholarship dollars. Even my friends who are not on direct scholarship benefit from the generous donations of alumni as tuition only covers 60 percent of Whitman's actual expenses! The other 40 percent of tuition is supported by you - thank you.

Furthermore, alumni support has given me exposure to a variety of other priceless Whitman experiences that range from athletics to internships. For example, the summer after my junior year I was awarded a Whitman Internship Grant. This award provided me with a summer work stipend as compensation for my unpaid internship at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center (FHCRC) in Seattle. At that point in my life I had become very interested in non-profits, fundraising, and development. I had been given an opportunity to work (unpaid) as the Special Events Intern at the FHCRC, one of the most highly regarded research institutions in Seattle. If it were not for the Whitman grant, I would never have been able to financially afford a summer without an income. However, Whitman enabled me to work at FHCRC where I received direct fundraising project-management skills organizing a charity run/walk for over 2,000 participants that raised over $170,000 for immunotherapy research! This project gave me tangible real-world skills that one cannot learn in a classroom-all possible due to the dollars donated by our great alumni.

In three short weeks I will be graduating from this magical college that I have called my home for the past four years. Thanks to my highly-regarded Whitman education, both inside and outside of the classroom, two weeks after graduation I will begin a career in business at Microsoft! I am excited to join the strong network of Whitman alumni that support this oasis of education nestled in Walla Walla that we proudly call Whitman College.

I invite you to make a gift to Whitman this year. As you can see, Whitman thrives because of your support. Whatever contribution you can donate truly does make a difference to the life of every student here.

All the best,

Maryn Juergens '10
juergemk@whitman.edu

P.S. You may make your gift online at www.whitman.edu/give or by using the enclosed gift form and post-paid envelope. Please include a note about what's new with you - we'll pass the information along to the Alumni Office.

Semiconductor International demise.

Feeding the MEDIA BEAST An Easy Recipe for Great PUBLICITY by Mark Mathis is okay. Good stuff if you are trying to get the media on your case.

Here is a bit different. The media is our enemy and the friend of those who are trying to crush us.

The media is trying to blackout what has happened.

Before Internet the opposition would have surely won.

Mathis writes


The Trained Eye of Timing

Mark Twain once lamented, "I was seldom able to see an opportunity until it ceased to be one." Don't be fooled by false modesty. As one of America's greatest writers, Twain knew exactly how timing works, and in this pithy quote he attempts to instruct the rest of us.

What Twain wants us to realize is that excellent opportunities rarely plop in our laps and scream, "Here I am!" As a rule, they quickly stroll by in plain view. Most people are so busy they never even notice an opportunity's sudden arrival and departure. Others catch a glimpse of what could be but are caught flatfooted, mouths agape. Sorry, it's too late. Only those who are looking for publicity prospects are nimble enough to snatch this thing called Timing and use it to their benefit before the chance evaporates.

page 202

“If Iran is coming to say ‘We are willing to abide by the Non-Proliferation Treaty’, that would be very welcome news,” Mrs Clinton told NBC’s Meet the Press yesterday. “I have a feeling that is not what they are coming to do. I think they are coming to try to divert attention and confuse the issue. And there is no confusion. They have violated the terms of the NPT.”

Settle, liberal arts educated Ms Clinton.



http://english.aljazeera.net/news/americas/2010/05/20105352626950662.html

Troy Jollimore on Why Democracy Needs the Humanities
Posted on Apr 23, 2010
By Troy Jollimore











Exaggeration of Iranian Threat Could Have Dire Consequences
Posted on Apr 20, 2010 By William Pfaff



US official: Iran military strike 'off the table'
By ALEX KENNEDY (AP) – 55 minutes ago

Journalism’s Parasites

 

The Future of Journalism Is Written in Neon.



Friday April 2, 2010 13:30

http://home.comcast.net/~bpayne37/whitman59/whitman59after.htm#Davidson



http://www.santafegreenline.com/forum/topics/1972-paper-on-energy-economics


The Energy Dilemma
Melvin Davidson, Whitman College class of 1960
Western Washington State College
March 25, 1972







Palin: 'Second Holocaust' if Iran gains nuclear weapons






The "NEW" War That Could Rocket Oil Past $220 Before 2011. Search for 'iran'.

Sunday March 21, 2010 13:13


CELTIC SPRING music & stories of the season
Saturday, March 20, 2010 3:00 PM
Juan Tabo Lirbary
Albuquerque, NM 87111

Payne greets Ms Kennedy after performance.

http://home.comcast.net/~bpayne37/whitman59/whitman59after.htm#nooruzcnn


President Obama reiterated his offer of dialogue with Tehran in a message on Saturday to mark the beginning of the Iranian new year.

The online video, subtitled in Farsi, was timed to coincide with Nooroz, a festival celebrating the Persian new year. It pledged the administration's commitment to a more hopeful future for Iran.



Sunday Morning March 21, 2010 we discovered.



These matters may be related to below
So where will the world nuclear industry obtain the uranium fuel for all these new reactors? That's a darn good question. Just in the US, annual uranium use for the nuclear power industry is about 55 million pounds. The US produces less than 4 million pounds of this fuel - about 7% - and imports the rest.

But despite the large US demand for uranium imports, the world uranium mining industry lacks adequate capacity to meet demand. A large amount of the nuclear fuel imported into the US comes from decommissioned nuclear warheads from Russia. The warheads trace their origins back to the Soviet Union.

If you thought the US had a problem with imported oil, now you know that there's an issue with uranium fuel as well. Of course, I'm not the only one who knows this. It's a national security issue, and I can tell you that things are about to change in a very big way.

Shingles and the liberal arts-educated media. And Obamacare too.

Saturday March 6, 2010 18:06








Rove: Bush didn't 'lie us into war'



Crucially, Mr. Brzezinski instead thinks forces at work within Iran will undermine the regime over time, so long as the U.S. and the West don't take actions that actually interfere with that process.

Thus, it's important to craft sanctions in a way that "doesn't stimulate more anti-Westernism, or a fusion of Islamic extremism and nationalism." He'd keep talking to Iran too: "Most major issues internationally that have been resolved by negotiation have involved negotiations over a long period of time."

And he would avoid at all costs a military strike at Iran's nuclear facilities. Iran, he said, would make no distinction between an Israeli or an American strike. "The Iranians would strike out at us, in Afghanistan, in Iraq, in the Strait of Hormuz." If energy prices then soar, "we will suffer, the Chinese will suffer, the Russians will be the beneficiaries. The Europeans will have to go to the Russians for energy." In effect, he argues, America, more than Iran, would be isolated.

U.S. diplomat: Iran wants more enrichment
March 4, 2010 10:37 p.m. EST

Another unsolicted email.

Juan Tabo library will have a vernal equinox [Norooz] performance on Saturday March 20, 2010.


Sunday February 21, 2010 18:10

Hotel Bravo 9 Xray Julia?
HB9XJ Hans Bühler Immenweg 15, 8050 Zürich / Switzerland ph: 0041443124950 joining date:15.07.2007






Russia: No talks of punitive measures against Iran Sat, 20 Feb 2010 11:22:11 GMT



Contain Iran, don't attack it.





British military insider: World War III is being staged; starting with Israel and Iran February 18, 9:07 PM




http://home.comcast.net/~bpayne37/whitman59/whitman59after.htm#feb17


Thursday February 18, 2010 06:49



Yakima Rotary Club
Feb 18 2010 Ryan Crocker "Former Ambassador to Iraq"




http://home.comcast.net/~bpayne37/whitman59/whitman59after.htm#feb17






Monday February 8, 2010 06:36



U.S. government, on its way to bankruptcy, Part 3.



Iran to build 10 nuclear plants, beef up military.
Guess Who's Coming to Dinner sequel in Yakima, WA Wednesday, February 17, 2010 6:00 PM?

Tough to believe?

http://home.comcast.net/~bpayne37/whitman59/whitman59after.htm#harrellcrocke





Wednesday February 3, 2010 06:11




Unbelieveable? Unless you know how liberal art graduates 'think.'

maureen_adkison@ci.yakima.wa.us

Urban Survival posted on Monday February 1, 2010
the Iran War is being maneuvered back into position to be a social engineering scapegoat should the markets penetrate Dow 9,500 on the downside.

Nicely orchestrated too as we see (besides Iran taking the bait), the British press reporting "US raises stakes on Iran by sending in ships and missiles" and the "Pentagon is expanding missile defenses..."


See also: "China, Iran Prompt U.S. Air-Sea Battle Plan in Strategy Review"


http://home.comcast.net/~bpayne37/whitman59/whitman59after.htm#crockeryakima


 









http://www.whitman.edu/alumni/whittienews.htm

Happy Nowruz.

Monday January 25, 2010


Read the Green Line.

Green economics.

The liberal arts educated media is something to be feared.

Do not fear the enemy, for your enemy can only take your life. It is far better that you fear the media, for they will steal your HONOR. That awful power, the public opinion of a nation, is created in America by a horde of ignorant, self-complacent simpletons who failed at ditching and shoemaking and fetched up in journalism on their way to the poorhouse.

Mark Twain

Msm/corp/gov media had has awesome power. The media has had the power to determine who wins or loses.

Some of our projects would not have been possible before Internet. If we relied on Msm/corp/gov media, then we would have surely lost.

http://home.comcast.net/~bpayne37/grandcanyon/grandcanyon.htm

Visibility is absolutely essential in this type of project.

FACED with a fast-growing population, Idaho Power has been unable to avoid building new power plants altogether; a new natural gas plant is in the works. But executives are pressing ahead with efficiency measures. The utility is asking regulators to make permanent a pilot program started in 2007 that allows Idaho Power to raise rates to make up for selling less power.

Google 'steve martin pnm'

Wednesday January 20, 2010

Grand Canyon essential non-gas-wasting field trip Saturday January 16 - Monday 18, 2010.

We did not request.

All emails from Radio Javan were unsolicited.

Soosan Khanoom

Have you ever had so much fun?

Do you agree?

||



If Pesar doesn't understand English, then we speculate that the message will be translated into Farsi and forwarded to Pesar by some of our friends.

We are not working alone.

Hans Buehler got tossed into the Evin prison partially for what the above look to be serving. Alcohol.

If Iran lacks electricty, then they won't be posting on Internet.

And Iranians may freeze to death in the dark. Something to fight over? Settle.

From: bpayne37@comcast.net
To: "Bob Collins"
Cc: "John/Catherine Alsip" jkalsip@gmail.com, "Melvin Davidson" melnbarbara@comcast.net, "brian dohe" dohe@whitman.edu, "Fred Fair" fredfair@taosnet.com, "Cargill Hall" overflight@att.net, wardwers@whitman.edu, bridges@whitman.edu
Sent: Tuesday, January 19, 2010 6:42:20 PM GMT -07:00 US/Canada Mountain
Subject: brown v coakly

Hello bob,

We're getting back on to our money recovery and ryan crocker projects.

We went to Williams, AZ on saturday, rode the train to the grand canyon on sunday, then retuned to abq on Monday. Fun, except for the icy rim trails.

A lawyer liked my stat report discussed in a two hour meeting this afternoon.

This lawyer opined on how Arizona may react to NCUSIF doing business unlicensed in Arizona.

Obama health care plan may be decided by

http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&source=hp&q=brown+coakley+exit+polls&aq=1z&aql=&aqi=g-z2g8&oq=brow

regards
bill

From: bpayne37@comcast.net
To: "Bob Collins"
Cc: "John/Catherine Alsip" jkalsip@gmail.com, "Melvin Davidson" melnbarbara@comcast.net, "brian dohe" dohe@whitman.edu, "Fred Fair" fredfair@taosnet.com, "Cargill Hall" overflight@att.net, wardwers@whitman.edu, bridges@whitman.edu
Sent: Tuesday, January 19, 2010 6:42:20 PM GMT -07:00 US/Canada Mountain
Subject: brown v coakly

Hello bob,

We're getting back on to our money recovery and ryan crocker projects.

We went to Williams, AZ on saturday, rode the train to the grand canyon on sunday, then retuned to abq on Monday. Fun, except for the icy rim trails.

A lawyer liked my stat report discussed in a two hour meeting this afternoon.

This lawyer opined on how Arizona may react to NCUSIF doing business unlicensed in Arizona.

Obama health care plan may be decided by

http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&source=hp&q=brown+coakley+exit+polls&aq=1z&aql=&aqi=g-z2g8&oq=brow

regards
bill


Urban Survival posted on Monday January 11 ,2010

Saturday: General David Patraeus comes out and says "US has plan to deal with Iran's nuclear program"..
Sunday: Iran comes out and claims "Iran's military deterrent is unimaginable"
Monday: The US starts moving military assets into position to attack Iran.
Thursday or Friday (dark of moon this week, advantage Gen 3/Gen 4 nightvision): US & Israel attack Iran,

Google news is read first each morning to see if anything bad has happened to Iran. Urbana Survival looks to be wrong about attack.

We continue to suggest peaceful settlement before matters get far worse.

Poor aka BS education?
He subsequently earned a M.P.A. degree (1985) and a Ph.D. degree (1987) in International Relations from the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton University. He later served as Assistant Professor of International Relations at the U.S. Military Academy and also completed a fellowship at Georgetown University. He has a BS from the U.S. Military Academy—class of 1974—from which he graduated as a distinguished cadet (top 5% of his class).
And this guy is to help make a decision whether to bomb Iran's nuclear electricity generation facilities?

We're concered that Petraeus may not know 1kWh = 3413 BTU.

Friday January 1, 2010 15:50

We have an idea!

The Bush School of Government and Public Service
Texas A&M University
4220 TAMU
College Station, TX 77843-4220
Phone 979-862-3469 ·

http://bush.tamu.edu/about/contact/

jrektorik@bushschool.tamu.edu
admissions@bushschool.tamu.edu
extendeded@bushschool.tamu.edu
chermann@bushschool.tamu.edu

He will commence as the Dean of Texas A&M University's George Bush School of Government and Public Service in January 2010.



http://home.comcast.net/~bpayne37/whitman59/whitman59after.htm#harrellcrocker


Wednesday December 30, 2009 15:15

The Bush School of Government and Public Service
Texas A&M University
4220 TAMU
College Station, TX 77843-4220
Phone 979-862-3469 ·

http://bush.tamu.edu/about/contact/

jrektorik@bushschool.tamu.edu
admissions@bushschool.tamu.edu
extendeded@bushschool.tamu.edu
extendeded@bushschool.tamu.edu
chermann@bushschool.tamu.edu

He will commence as the Dean of Texas A&M University's George Bush School of Government and Public Service in January 2010.

:-)







Thursday December 17, 2009 07:49










http://home.comcast.net/~bpayne37/whitman59/whitman59after.htm#hoi2


Hoi Huyhn left a message on our cell phone. We returned it.



using bluetooh with Motorola Razr phone. That a Sony MP3 recorder in my right hand.

Here's the digitized coversation


Hoi and Payne talked lots about how technology is making our administrative and legal efforts possible.

Prior to Internet we would have lost for sure.

Uban Survival posted on Wednesday December 16, 2009

"Newspaper publishers experienced a single-year decline in total revenue of 8.3 percent — from $47.9 billion in 2007 to $43.9 billion in 2008.

Poorly educated liberal arts type had a lot of power since they controlled the media. Fortunately the liberal arts educated are not only losing this power but are being exposed as well.

Monday December 14, 2009 05:52

http://home.comcast.net/~bpayne37/whitman59/whitman59after.htm#ure

Tweet.






Five Americans in Pakistani custody moved to Lahore, police say.







A liberal arts educated ploy?






Hello George,

http://home.comcast.net/~bpayne37/moats/u/book/book.htm#lowry2

nojeh nsa lawsuit.

Another unsolicited email.



Radio Javan.



Friday December 4, 2009 10:52

http://home.comcast.net/~bpayne37/whitman59/whitman59after.htm#acmportal



http://portal.acm.org/author_page.cfm?id=81332520373



You can see my above thumbnail full size.

The Smart Grid Ready Framework, Part 2

First Solar also hopes to use federal loan guarantees to build a 30-megawatt generating facility in Cimarron, N.M., creating 200 construction jobs. [How many megawatt HOURS?]



The maximum possible insolation is therefore about 70 to 71 percent of the solar constant., or about 320 BTU per hour per square foot. No solar collector, regardless of shape or design can deliver more than this maximum possible value, without energy input from some other source.

SEDAC 200 btu per hour per square foot estimate.

On the clearest, sunniest day, around 340 Btu/hr or 100 watts of sunlight energy comes in each square foot of area.

Vaclav Smil 21st century energy: Some sobering thoughts appears to be a powerful article.

Only photovoltaic generation, a technique not yet ready for mass utilisation, can deliver more than 20 W/m2 of peak power.



We assume that Smil means per hour.

Keep in mind the second law of thermodynamics. For fossil fuel-generated electricity the best heat loss is slightly more than 50%. So what is the heat loss for solar? Let's try to find out.




Monday December 30, 2009 17:39

Whtman, through Ryan Crocker, established a significant link to Iran.


http://home.comcast.net/~bpayne37/whitman59/whitman59after.htm#tourism


Recent arrival of the Whitman college tourism business bulletin



carried on the back page



which serves to remind us of the class of 2009 commencement speaker ambassador Ryan Crocker who was graduated from Whitman in 1971 with a major in English literature.

Let's take a closer look at the class of 1959 members who like listened to Crocker's gutsy commencement address.



We see both John Alsip and Max Johnson but not Mary Silzel.









Mary entered the email addresses of many of the classmates!

November 29, 2009

Iran defies world with plan for ten new nuclear sites

bill payne wrote:

Iran, like the rest of the world, needs additional electricity which comes from BTUs.

Google 'scripting languages pollute' to read more about

HOW MUCH ENERGY IS IN?....


Energy Source Energy Content (Btu) Units
Sunlight 200 Btu per hour per square foot
Wind 75 Btu per hour per square foot of wind turbine swept area in 22 mile per hour wind.
Biomass 7,000 Btu per pound (value is for switchgrass)
Wood 8,000 to 10,000 Btu per pound
Coal (Anthracite) 14,000 to 15,000 Btu per pound
Coal (Bituminous) 10,500 to 14,000 Btu per pound
Oil (#2 Fuel) 137,000-141,800 Btu per gallon
Natural Gas 950 to 1,150 Btu per cubic foot
Gasoline 109,000 -125,000 Btu per gallon
Kerosene 130,000 to 140,000 Btu per gallon
Nuclear Fuel (Uranium) 35,000,000,000 Btu per pound Uranium-235

"[S]o far I have only described what is already obviously going on. Add to this the likelihood that Iran is closer to achieving membership in the atomic weapon club. They’ve been spinning their centrifuges all year and nobody has done anything about it. My guess is that neither the US nor Israel will attempt to take out their facilities in the year ahead. If Iran used a nuclear device against Israel, or anybody else, they would be asking to become, in turn, the world’s largest ashtray. ...

James Howard Kunstler

We're very disappointed that Whitman college president George Bridges and Whitman overseers Johnson and Alsip have not responded in a way to help get these unfortunate matters peacefully settled.

Ruth Wardwell, Whitman college director of communications, emailed on August 21, 2009
As you might expect, Whitman continues its belief in both the importance and value of a liberal arts education in a globally connected, multicultural world fraught with complex challenges.

We are concerned that liberal arts education may be part of the problem.

We would like to get responses from Bridges, Alsip, and Johnson not liberal arts-type non-response strategy.

Mary Silzel may be helping with her email list of addresses?
Friday November 20, 2009 10:49


http://home.comcast.net/~bpayne37/whitman59/whitman59after.htm#moneyspent








What is Whitman doing with this money?







More unsolicited email.




Thursday October 22, 2009 12:23

More unsolicited email.


Ariyai Nejad


Wednesday October 21, 2009 10:20

Below appears to be another liberate arts educated corp/gov MSM headline.
Crude Oil Drops After Bernanke Says Monetary Policy May Tighten

Show us the relationship. These guys are unthinking BS artists.

Democrats Working to Overturn Justices on Age Bias comment.



Education of the judiciary was likely, initially, liberal arts.

We think matters should get matters peacefully settled so that we can focus on business.

We haven't heard from Whitman college president George Bridges and liberal arts classmates Max Johnson and John Alsip.

But we would expect this from most of the liberal arts educated.
We're going to ignore this and it will go away ....
Let's pretend it doesn't exist ...
We can deflect this one ...
Let's try to shame them ...
We'll organize a demonstration ....
and the ultimate liberal arts ploy
Let's incite a despot to attack them ...
NCUA employee are likly largely liberal arts educated. But we have their number.

http://home.comcast.net/~bpayne37/whitman59/whitman59after.htm#mitchell

Email Tuesday October 6, 2009



Thursday October 1, 2009 19:31

Khabesho Bebini
Iran, world powers agree to further nuclear talks
By GEORGE JAHN (AP) – 1 hour ago

GENTHOD, Switzerland — Iran and six world powers put nuclear talks back on track Thursday at a landmark session that included the highest-level bilateral contact with the U.S. in years and a pledge to meet again this month. President Barack Obama then challenged Tehran to make good on its promises quickly.

Goal may be to try to deny Iran electricity for a petroleum reason as liberal art English major grad Mike Whitney speculated?

Whitney was wrong then.



Rather, the goal is to destroy major weapons-sites, destabilize the regime, and occupy a sliver of land on the Iraqi border that contains 90% of Iran’s oil wealth. ...

Khuzestan represents 90% of Iran’s oil production.

Under the proposal, Iran would stop expanding its fuel program in exchange for a halt to new U.N. sanctions.



Email links Hello Mr Champion, nojeh nsa lawsuit, regards.



"It is against our tenets, it is against our religion to produce, use, hold or have nuclear weapons or arsenal," Ali Akbar Salehi, the head of Iran's Atomic Energy Organization, told state-run Press TV. "How can we more clearly state our position? Since 1974 we have been saying this.

Scanning the Horizon of Books and Libraries by Amy Goodman - liberal arts graduate.
By prosefights, September 30 at 11:04 am #

All of this electronic stuff may end badly in the not-too-distant future for comment stated in “How Meaningful Is 230-MPG?” [gpogle title]

September 14, 2009
In response to: How Meaningful Is 230-MPG?
Markus Unread commented:

It’s like I tell my EV car friends - “Great! I like your 63% coal/natural gas car. It’s so green!”

We have the potential of another liberal arts disaster. Like bombing Iran's nuclear electric generation facilities and, as a result, the possibility of WW III - all possibly within the next three weeks!
WAR IS A RACKET

Bombs Away - Sooner or Later
Not here yet, but the report out of the well connected web site www.debka.com that the "US giant bunker-buster bomb project rushed since Iran's Qom site discovered" (that's their second uranium enrichment project) means we're right on track for events to kick over into high gear around October 25th. Remember, doesn't mean the bombs will fall on that day; think of it more like that's when the theatre doors open and people start going in for the big big show...
---
Read an analysis the other day that essentially said, ifs the US wasn't at least partially supportive of this, the Israelis would never be able to go it alone in such an attack. The rest destruction of Iran's lone AWAC's plane is...er...you don't think coincidental, do you?

Others, too, have identified the problem of liberals arts educated corp/gov MSM.
What you will find in the following headlines is a scatterbrain attempt of the media trying to make sense of an economic bubble. Instead of examining the deeper intricacies of the market and looking at the U.S. Treasury and Federal Reserve the media seemed to report what was one step in front of it. If that is the case, then who is really minding the store?

Israel liberal arts educated media weighs in
Iran would be "well advised" to take US President Barack Obama's offer to "engage into substantive negotiations without precondition," International Atomic Energy Agency chief Mohamed ElBaradei told CNN-IBN in an interview published Wednesday. He said he hoped that Thursday's meeting between the Islamic republic and the six world powers would "usher in a comprehensive, meaningful dialogue."

Other liberal arts educatedcorp/gov MSM.
Iran has come under intense pressure to fully disclose its nuclear activities ahead of Thursday's meeting in Geneva with the five permanent members of the U.N. Security Council and Germany. The recent revelation that Tehran has been secretly constructing a new facility to produce nuclear fuel drew international condemnation and raised suspicion that Iran is trying to make a nuclear weapon.

WW III within the next three weeks would screw-up our upcoming pheasant hunt in Kansas in early November. This, of course, is our interest.

Nojeh nsa lawsuit.

http://home.comcast.net/~bpayne37/whitman59/whitman59after.htm#javan2

Why does Payne continue to get these unsolicited emails?



Let's relax and think about peaceful settlement ploys while listening to cool music.


Saturday September 26, 2009 13:45

Hello Mr White,

Price of gas may go up even more if Iran is bombed?



Hello Mr Viscusi,



[nojeh nsa lawsuit] Settlement time yet?
http://home.comcast.net/~bpayne37/whitman59/whitman59after.htm#overseers

Let the record show that we have not received responses from Whitman college president George Bridges or gung-ho [they sent their kids to Whitman] classmates Alsip and Johnson. as of Tuesday September 22, 2009.


http://home.comcast.net/~bpayne37/whitman59/whitman59after.htm#clayback


Tuesday September 22, 2009 13:47 clay bird shooting in Valencia county, NM.

Whoops.



Time delay set too short!

That's the bad news.

Good news is that bill hit only missed 5 out of 25 [80%] tossing the clay bird, dropping the thrower, taking off the safety, shooting, then putting the safety back on AT AGE 72!

Saturday September 19, 2009 07:13

http://home.comcast.net/~bpayne37/whitman59/whitman59after.htm#stephens


Reuters Dan Williams appears to be liberal arts educated.

Next month's international good-faith talks offer no clear relief to Israel, which wants world powers to be prepared to penalize Iran's vulnerable energy imports but sees Russia and China blocking any such resolution at the U.N. Security Council.

"The longer the U.S. delays playing hardball with Iran, the sooner Israel is likely to strike," wrote Wall Street Journal columnist Bret Stephens.


Officials from the United States, Britain, France, Russia, China and Germany are to meet Iranian diplomats in Turkey on Oct.1, for the first time since a 2008 session in Geneva foundered over Iran's refusal to discuss its uranium enrichment program. [Let's hope how the Iraq/Iran war is on the agenda.]

Bret Stephens appears to be a liberal arts grad too. We emailed him a link to http://www.prosefights.org/nmlegal/ncualove/walters.htm#director2.



After above comment appeared below email appeared.




Let's relax and think about peaceful settlement while listening to cool music. And read some interesting comments - both in Farsi - English and English.

Ahhhh aslan eena hamash taghsireh Mohamadeh lol na na taghsireh

Habib bood lol Taghsireh har do shooneh hahhahahaa Baba

mardomeh aziz ye kam relax baashin...ye kam bi khial...Be gholeh Afshin Hameh donyaaro bi khiyaal, ghoseyeh fardaaro bi khiyaal, biaa vast gheresh bedeh. I'm not upset Mehdi. Getting attacked verbally by random people for having an opinion isn't upsetting, it's interesting and amusing. I just wish people would understand that if someone doesn't agree with you or share your point of view, it's not the end of the world. It actually makes the world more delightful and refreshing. Ok I'm done with this video and this whole mess lol on to the next

[ “I understand that "LOL" really means "How STUPID!!" in Farsi?]

Imam ghoft een rezhim-e ishghalgar-e qods bayad az safheh-ye ruzgar mahv shavad.

In his October 2005 speech, Mr. Ahmadinejad never used the word "map" or the term "wiped off". According to Farsi-language experts like Juan Cole and even right-wing services like MEMRI, what he actually said was "this regime that is occupying Jerusalem must vanish from the page of time."

'Wiped off the Map' – The Rumor of the Century.

Events are fast pushing Israel toward a pre-emptive military strike on Iran's nuclear facilities, probably by next spring.


Western countries, spearheaded by the US and Israel, accuse the Islamic Republic of pursuing a clandestine military nuclear program and have been pressuring Tehran to halt its enrichment activities.

Iran, however, denies the allegations and has called for the removal of weapons of mass destruction worldwide.

Ambassador Burns earned a B.A. in History from LaSalle University and M.Phil. and D.Phil. degrees in International Relations from Oxford University, where he studied as a Marshall Scholar.

US to Send Senior Diplomat to Talks with Iran
By David Gollust
State Department 14 September 2009

U.S. Undersecretary of State William Burns, 11 Jun 2009 The State Department announced on Monday that it will send its third-ranking diplomat, Under Secretary of State for Political Affairs William Burns, to an October 1 Big Power meeting with Iran over its nuclear program. U.S. officials say the five permanent U.N. Security Council member countries and Germany will present a "united front" against Iran's alleged nuclear weapons ambitions.

Ryan Crocker, Whitman College 2009 gutsy commencement address.

Monday September 14, 2009 09:53

Liberal arts education was focus of some of our conversations week of August 30 through September 5 while salmon fishing at Sekiu, WA.

Our Friday September 11, 2009 09:42
http://www.prosefights.org/nmlegal/ncualove/walters.htm#director2
was a result of the summary of our conversations.

Bird hunting buddy emailed.



Global warming and energy have been topics of converesation while salmon fishing in the past two years.

http://home.comcast.net/~bpayne37/whitman59/whitman59after.htm#sun


To: bpayne37@comcast.net
Sent: Sunday, September 13, 2009 1:39:26 PM GMT -07:00 US/Canada Mountain
Subject: RE: global warming and the sun

The author should have dug a lot deeper. Global warming a la Gore is nothing but a scam to raise our taxes through "carbon trading". Gore is a principal in several carbon trading companies and stands to become a billionaire if his scam succeeds thanks to an ignorant (liberal arts) press.

If you look at the facts, you can se that the earth has actually cooled (overall) since 1997. Also it is the sun that provides us all the energy directly or indirectly (eg coal, natural gas, oil). Several years ago an Australian climatologist presented a significant paper at an intenational conference on climate change. He plotted changes in atmospheric CO2 and measured average changes in global temperature for the years data are available (thousands of years). He found there is virtually ZERO correlation! Then he plotted the measurements of the sun's luminosity (which changes due to sun spots and solar flares) for the 100 or so years for which data are available against average global temperature and what did he find? 99% correlation!!

The conclusion is unmistakable. Climate change occurs all the time and will continue forever. Sometimes there are warm cycles and sometimes there are cool cycles. But CO2 is only a minor player. The major players are the luminosity of the sun and the amount of the sun's energy reaching different parts of the earth as the earth's orbit changes due to precession. Since there is nothing we can do about the sun and the earth's precession, saying that CO2 is the major cause of climate change is scientific fraud.

But as you said, liberal arts majors in the press "think differently" and have swallowd Gore's scam hook, line, and sinker. However, I say that current liberal arts majors, in general, are not capable of logical thinking since they have been brainwashed by our education system which discourages inquiry, critical thinking, and the ability to synthesise solutions based on facts. John.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
From: bpayne37@comcast.net
To:
Subject: global warming and the sun
Date: Sun, 13 Sep 2009 12:04:32 -0600

http://article.nationalreview.com/?q=ZmU0NDMzZTlkM2E5MDBhY2Q4N2ViYTFkNjVmNzU5NTc=

Wednesday September 9, 2009 17:59

A 9/11 Reality Check liberal arts comment.

Liberal arts education [mostly BS artists who don't think but emote and opine instead], we feel, contributes to our problems and the country's problems.
September 9, 2009 WASHINGTON — American intelligence agencies have concluded in recent months that Iran has enough nuclear fuel to make a rapid, if risky, sprint for sufficient enriched uranium for a nuclear weapon. But in a series of briefings to President Obama, they say they believe the country is still holding off on taking the last critical steps in designing a sophisticated bomb.

People educated similar to Ryan Crocker will likely be making the decision as to whether Iran is bombed or not. Be terrified.

We haven't heard from Max Johnson, John Alsip or George Bridges - even to acknowlege receipt of emails.

Liberal arts english grad Mike Whitney [fergiewhitney@msn.com]
Mike Whitney graduated from St. Michael's College in English Lit in 1975. Since then he has been running his own landscape company in Snohomish, Wa for the last 23 years.

writes
If there is an invasion it will probably be limited to securing the region of Khuzestan which is adjacent to Iraq’s southern flank and contains 90% of Iran’s oil wealth as well as much of its natural gas. This could be achieved with as little as 15-20,000 combat troops, plus a backup of Special Forces.

http://home.comcast.net/~bpayne37/whitman59/whitman59after.htm#eid


USPS New 42-Cent Stamp!!!



Celebrates Muslim holiday.

If there is only ONE thing you forward today.... let it be this!

REMEMBER the MUSLIM bombing of Pan Am Flight 103!

REMEMBER the MUSLIM bombing of the World Trade Center in 1993!

REMEMBER the MUSLIM bombing of the Marine Barracks in Lebanon !

REMEMBER the MUSLIM bombing of the military Barracks in Saudi Arabia !

REMEMBER the MUSLIM bombing of the American Embassies in Africa !

REMEMBER the MUSLIM bombing of the USS COLE!

REMEMBER the MUSLIM attack on 9/11/2001 !

REMEMBER all the AMERICAN lives that were lost in those vicious MUSLIM attacks!

Now President Obama has directed the United States Postal Service to REMEMBER and HONOR the EID MUSLIM holiday season with a new commemorative 42 Cent First Class Holiday Postage Stamp..

REMEMBER to adamantly & vocally BOYCOTT this stamp, when you are purchasing your stamps at the post office.

All you have to say is "No thank you, I do not want that Muslim Stamp on my letters!"

To use this stamp would be a slap in the face to all those AMERICANS who died at the hands of those whom this stamp honors.

REMEMBER ~ pass this along to every Patriotic AMERICAN that you know and lets get the word out !!!


Above writer overlooked

Looks like there are people after Crocker.
In 1998, as the Ambassador to Syria, his residence was plundered by an angry mob.

REMEMBER how the Iraq/Iran war got started.

Friday August 28, 2009 20:37

Study TITLE 17—COPYRIGHTS.

Know USPS regulations.

USPS attempts delivery of a Certified Mail letter three times over a 21 day period.

We feel relieve to know that Max and John are in charge so that we can focus on the main issue. Money.

http://www.prosefights.org/nmlegal/ncualove/walters.htm#director

Thursday February 18, 2019 05:59


Thursday August 27, 2009 09:45






http://home.comcast.net/~bpayne37/whitman59/whitman59after.htm#overseers

maxandmaggie@att.net
jkalsip@gmail.com

Hello Max and John,

Tuesday August 11, 2009 I requested help from George Bridges to try to help get some unfortunate matters involving Iran and $22,036.00 stolen from our Sandia Laboratory Federal Credit Union retirement-protected savings accounts peacefully settled.

Bridges did not
1 Please acknowledge receipt of this email.
2 Please let me a copy of the forward to Ambassador Crocker.
as requested in my email.

Several inquiries as to why my above requests were not answered resulted in:

----- Original Message -----
From: "Ruth Wardwell" wardwers@whitman.edu
To: bpayne37@comcast.net
Sent: Friday, August 21, 2009 1:31:32 PM GMT -07:00 US/Canada Mountain
Subject: FW: SR-71 Blackbird

Dear Mr. Payne,

I'm sorry that your e-mails to President Bridges were not accepted; we have resolved that situation. Unfortunately, the president is unable to respond to all inquiries individually. As you might expect, Whitman continues its belief in both the importance and value of a liberal arts education in a globally connected, multicultural world fraught with complex challenges.

I hope you enjoyed your fiftieth reunion on campus this past May and that you will continue to remain connected to your classmates and the college.

Sincerely,
Ruth Wardwell
Director of Communications
While Ms Wardell states that "we have resolved that situation," we have not.

Ryan Crocker's 2009 commencement address was labelled gutsy by Anthony B. Robinson.

Crocker wikipedia bio contains the two sentences
He completed the 20-month program at the Foreign Service Institutes Arabic School in Tunis in June 1978. Crocker was then assigned as chief of the economic-commercial section at the U.S. Interests Section in Baghdad, Iraq. Crocker served in Beirut, Lebanon as chief of the political section from 1981 to 1984; while there, he survived the 1983 United States Embassy bombing.
strongly suggests that Crocker was involved in starting the Iraq/Iran war in 1980.

Crocker's commencement address statement
As Dr. Bridges noted, I was an English major during my time at Whitman.
coupled with with Whitman/George Bridges scheduling Crocker to deliver the 2009 commencement address appears to suggest that Whitman English major education help qualify for the task of helping to incite Saddam Hussein to attack Iran.

Whitman College Class of 1959 50th Reunion May 21-24, 2009 booklet reveals







that both of you were involved in Whitman College oversight.

$22,036.00 was stolen from our Sandia Laboratory Federal Credit Union retirement-protected savings account as a partial result of filing a criminal complaint affidavit in CIV 97-266 MCA/LFG for genocide against another alleged conspirator in the action to start the Iraq/Iran war.

Theft occurred as a result of ignoring evidence:
http://www.prosefights.org/nmlegal/ncualove/facts.htm#facts
Bridge's and Whitman's attempts to ignore August 11, 2009 request for help appears to be a similar strategy.

Attempt to ignore how the Iraq/Iran war got started while attempting to move forward on Iran matters, like bombing Iran's nuclear electric generation facilities, maybe a bad idea.

Crocker's gutsy commencement address, failure of Bridges, Whitman College and Crocker to do the right thing by responding prompts us to dump this Tar baby in your hands.

Your task is to think-out and implement a strategy on how to put pressure on the right people to get Crocker to write a commentary on how and who was involved starting the the Iraq/Iran war with the goal of helping to get these unfortunate matters peacefully settled before they get worse.

1 Please acknowledge receipt of this email.
2 Please let send an email copy of your plans by September 8, 2009.

No response is a response.

best
bill

distribution

anthonybrobinson@comcast.net
bridges@whitman.edu
region5@ncua.gov
mayor@cabq.gov
jhamman@cabq.gov
rshultz@cabq.gov
bill.leonard@nara.gov
foialo@nsa.gov
julia.eichhorst@ic.fbi.gov
the.secretary@hq.doe.gov
alexander.morris@hq.doe.gov
jim.kovakas@usdoj.gov
tanya.kubinec@wpafb.af.mil
Amorales58@Comcast.Net


Wednesday August 26, 2008 09:40
NOTES


No responses?



http://home.comcast.net/~bpayne37/whitman59/whitman59after.htm#dougmclane

Whitman College may have committed suicide if Max and John don't pull it out.

We point to liberal arts education as a reason for loss of our stolen retirement-protected SLFCU $22,036.00.

Whitman College (Board of Trustees of Whitman College)
froesewr@whitman.edu

Whitman Board of Trustees elects three new members
parishlj@whitman.edu

KIMBALL COMPLAINT.
Cover sheet
Summary
Plaintiffs: Steve Kimball and Sandra Kimball
Defendants: Board of Trustees of Whitman College Welfare Benefit Plan, Great-West Life and Annuity Ins Co and Connecticut General Life Insurance Company
Case Number: 2:2009cv05052
Filed: June 30, 2009
Kimball lawyer tjk@tjkeanelaw.com

Even if the economy is beginning to pick up, the legal profession has been pummeled over the last year, with some firms closing and survivors often asking associates to take leaves of absence.

Let's not forget one reason why we are doing this. The money.

Wardwell's response appears to be liberal arts BS nonsense - the same type we got out of NCUA employee Kelly Lay.



Monday August 24, 2009 13:53


http://home.comcast.net/~bpayne37/whitman59/whitman59after.htm#dougmclane



We point to liberal arts education as a reason for loss of our stolen retirement-protected SLFCU $22,036.00.

So Thursday August 20, 2009 evening we search the web to find out how students currently get into liberal arts Whitman College.
“This is a cloudy idea. There’s not really a specific definition,” said Lidzbarski. “Test scores and involvement are looked at, of course. This extra element often includes a cultural fit. Are they passionate and active community members? Are these students going to try and make a difference or are we not going to even notice they are here?”

“Fit” does not have a specific definition. Students who are considered “fit” have made a difference in their high school, whether that means starting a club or making a current program better.

Payne got into Whitman College for two simple reasons:

1 Graduate of Shattuck School
2 South San Mateo, CA next door neighbor Ernie Elliot was a buddy of Doug McClane and reference.

If we recall correctly Ernie phoned Doug to give the reference.



Elliot, I recall [53 years ago], told me that McClane was looking at admission candidates from the standpoint whether or not they were going to succeed.

Class of 1959 achievement statistics shows that McClane did a pretty good job.

I matriculated at Whitman in 1960 and was graduated in 1959.

Taking 18 or more hours a semester and summer school attendance at the University of Colorado in the summers of 1957/59 made getting through Whitman possible in three years.

Here's an interesting take by a 1999 Whitman College writing major.
Is writing a liberal art? Yes and no. It depends how you spin it. In order to get the Board’s approval, you have to treat writing as a liberal art, which means not merely talking about it as a skill to be honed. There is no right way to do this: I chose to make a liberal art out of writing by looking at writing rhetorically. Through rhetoric classes and subsequent projects and theses, I studied writing, not as a skill, but as a discipline—one that was an object of study and not just an action. There are other ways to do this: looking at writing artistically, or philosophically, or as part of a literary history. It’s not a matter of what you do, just that you do it. If you don’t make a case for writing as a liberal art, you’ll have a hard time at it.

We look to Payne's knowledge of how the liberal arts educated think to try to get our money back.

Interpretation, as opposed to FACTS and LOGIC, is more to the liberal arts educated in nearly all cases.

http://www.prosefights.org/nmlegal/ncualove/facts.htm#facts2

http://www.prosefights.org/nmlegal/ncualove/facts.htm#facts

Whitman's selection of Ambassador Ryan Crocker [1971 English major] to deliver the 2009 commencement address on the 30th anniversary of the Iran Revolution grossed us out for the reason evidence suggests that Crocker was part of a illegal conspiracy to incite Saddam Hussein to attack Iran.

Eclipsing Crocker's 2009 commencement speech looks to be a difficult task.


That took a lot of guts. No Brains. But a lot of guts.

Ron Hopkins, WSU

Anthony B. Robinson who wrote A gutsy commencement address reason for attendance.
I was there as the proud dad of a graduating daughter.

Ryan Crocker may be the eptiome of the dark side of liberal arts education?

But not impossible.

We'll suggest to members of the class of 1960 that they pressure the current, or next, Whitman administration to extend an invitation to Sayyid Ali Khamenei


to deliver the 2010 commencement address.

2010 also marks the 30th anniversary of the Iraq invasion of Iran.

Perhaps some at Whitman might wish to apologize to the people of Iran at that time for its graduate Crocker's likely work?

Whitman college president George Bridges still has not responded to our request for help as of Friday August 21, 2009.

----- Forwarded Message -----
From: bpayne37@comcast.net
To: "Ruth Wardwell" wardwers@whitman.edu
Cc: "John/Catherine Alsip" jkalsip@gmail.com, "Bob Collins" bcuw@wbhsi.net, "Melvin Davidson" melnbarbara@comcast.net, "brian dohe" dohe@whitman.edu, "Fred Fair" fredfair@taosnet.com, "Cargill Hall" overflight@att.net, "bpayne37" bpayne37@comcast.net
Sent: Friday, August 21, 2009 2:49:01 PM GMT -07:00 US/Canada Mountain
Subject: Re: SR-71 Blackbird

Hello Ruth,

Thanks for email.

I hope

http://home.comcast.net/~bpayne37/whitman59/whitman59after.htm#dougmclane

explains all.


best bill

----- Original Message -----
From: "Ruth Wardwell" wardwers@whitman.edu
To: bpayne37@comcast.net
Sent: Friday, August 21, 2009 1:31:32 PM GMT -07:00 US/Canada Mountain
Subject: FW: SR-71 Blackbird

Dear Mr. Payne,

I'm sorry that your e-mails to President Bridges were not accepted; we have resolved that situation. Unfortunately, the president is unable to respond to all inquiries individually. As you might expect, Whitman continues its belief in both the importance and value of a liberal arts education in a globally connected, multicultural world fraught with complex challenges.

I hope you enjoyed your fiftieth reunion on campus this past May and that you will continue to remain connected to your classmates and the college.

Sincerely,
Ruth Wardwell
Director of Communications

From: bill payne [ mailto:bpayne37@comcast.net ]
Sent: Tuesday, August 18, 2009 5:24 PM
To: wardwers@whitman.edu; brownll@whitman.edu
Subject: FW: SR-71 Blackbird

Hello Ladies

George Bridges is not accepting email.

Any known reason why?

Best

bill, 1959

-----Original Message-----
From: bill payne [ mailto:bpayne37@comcast.net ]
Sent: Tuesday, August 18, 2009 6:12 PM
To: Bob Collins
Cc: Cargill Hall
Subject: RE: SR-71 Blackbird

Bob

Cargill reported that the sr-71 used too much expensive fuel and had little or no advantage over the U2.

Tuesday August 18, 2009 17:46

If it is not in the form of an affidavit, then it has no legal effect.

Bill: Thank you for taking time to share this opinion.
Lana

Ambassador Ryan Crocker, Whitman College 1971 English major, appears to be possibly involved in the same alleged crime [genocide] as Zbigniew Brzezinski .

Whitman has a twelve-person PR department .

Our Vision

Whitman's Department of Communications is a team of professionals who are experts in both their specialty areas and customer service.

The team works in concert to develop communications ideas and strategies and execute action plans that help advance Whitman's mission.

Our Mission


To promote Whitman College as a liberal arts institution of national significance.
To communicate the goals and accomplishments of Whitman's people, programs and departments.
To support cultivation and stewardship efforts targeting each of the college's constituencies.

How will they attempt to spin Ryan Crocker?

And George Bridges for not yet responding to our request for help ?

Liberal arts education appears to be part of the corruption problem.

http://www.prosefights.org/nmlegal/ncualove/facts.htm#facts

bill

-----Original Message-----
From: Bob Collins [ mailto:bcuw@wbhsi.net ]
Sent: Monday, August 17, 2009 6:19 PM
To: 'bill payne'
Subject: RE: SR-71 Blackbird

Wow!!! What an impressive machine.

Bob


From: bill payne [ mailto:bpayne37@comcast.net ]
Sent: Monday, August 17, 2009 4:47 PM
To: Fred Fair; Cargill Hall
Subject: FW: SR-71 Blackbird

-----Original Message-----
From: terader@msn.com [ mailto:terader@msn.com ]
Sent: Saturday, August 15, 2009 2:32 PM
To: undisclosed-recipients:
Subject: Fw: SR-71 Blackbird

Subject: Fw: SR-71 Blackbird

This is really cool!!!

----- Forwarded Message ----
From: KEITH DUNN < dunn4k@bellsouth.net >
Sent: Wednesday, August 12, 2009 4:57:34 PM
Subject: SR-71 Blackbird

If you haven't seen this before, it's well worth a read > >

A little bit 'smulchy' in his recount but it does't detract from learning a bit more about this truly amazing aircraft. First flight 1962. Secret until first limited photos were releasd Nov 1965 - quite incredible. JW

SR-71 Blackbird

In April 1986, following an attack on American soldiers in a Berlin disco, President Reagan ordered the bombing of Muammar Qaddafi's terrorist camps in Libya . My duty was to fly over Libya and take photos recording the damage our F-111's had inflicted.. Qaddafi had established a 'line of death,' a territorial marking across the Gulf of Sidra , swearing to shoot down any intruder that crossed the boundary. On the morning of April 15, I rocketed past the line at 2,125 mph.

I was piloting the SR-71 spy plane, the world's fastest jet, accompanied by a Marine Major (Walt), the aircraft's reconnaissance systems officer (RSO). We had crossed into Libya and were approaching our final turn over the bleak desert landscape when Walt informed me that he was receiving missile launch signals. I quickly increased our speed, calculating the time it would take for the weapons-most likely SA-2 and

SA-4 surface-to-air missiles capable of Mach 5 - to reach our altitude. I estimated that we could beat the rocket-powered missiles to the turn and stayed our course, betting our lives on the plane's performance.

After several agonizingly long seconds, we made the turn and blasted toward the Mediterranean. 'You might want to pull it back,' Walt suggested. It was then that I noticed I still had the throttles full forward. The plane was flying a mile every 1.6 seconds, well above our Mach 3.2 limit. It was the fastest we would ever fly. I pulled the throttles to idle just south of Sicily , but we still overran the refueling tanker awaiting us overGibraltar .

Scores of significant aircraft have been produced in the 100 years of flight, following the achievements of the Wright brothers, which we celebrate in December. Aircraft such as the Boeing 707, the F-86 Sabre Jet, and the P-51 Mustang are among the important machines that have flown our skies. But the SR-71, also known as the Blackbird, stands alone as a significant contributor to Cold War victory and as the fastest plane ever-and only 93 Air Force pilots ever steered the 'sled,'

as we called our aircraft.

The SR-71 was the brainchild of Kelly Johnson, the famed Lockheed designer who created the P-38, the F-104 Starfighter, and the U-2. After the Soviets shot down Gary Powers' U-2 in 1960, Johnson began to develop an aircraft that would fly three miles higher and five times faster than the spy plane-and still be capable of photographing your license plate.

However, flying at 2,000 mph would create intense heat on the aircraft's skin. Lockheed engineers used a titanium alloy to construct more than 90 percent of the SR-71, creating special tools and manufacturing procedures to hand-build each of the 40 planes. Special heat-resistant fuel, oil, and hydraulic fluids that would function at 85,000 feet and higher also had to be developed.

In 1962, the first Blackbird successfully flew, and in 1966, the same year I graduated from high school, the Air Force began flying operational SR-71 missions. I came to the program in 1983 with a sterling record and a recommendation from my commander, completing the weeklong interview and meeting Walt, my partner for the next four years He would ride four feet behind me, working all the cameras, radios, and electronic jamming equipment. I joked that if we were ever captured, he was the spy and I was just the driver. He told me to keep the pointy end forward.

We trained for a year, flying out of Beale AFB in California , Kadena Airbase in Okinawa, and RAF Mildenhall in England. On a typical training mission, we would take off near Sacramento, refuel over Nevada, accelerate into Montana, obtain high Mach over Colorado, turn right over New Mexico, speed across the Los Angeles Basin, run up the West Coast, turn right at Seattle, then return to Beale. Total flight time: two hours and 40 minutes.

One day, high above Arizona , we were monitoring the radio traffic of all the mortal airplanes below us. First, a Cessna pilot asked the air traffic controllers to check his ground speed. 'Ninety knots,' ATC replied. A Bonanza soon made the same request. 'One-twenty on the ground,' was the reply. To our surprise, a navy F-18 came over the radio with a ground speed check. I knew exactly what he was doing. Of course, he had a ground speed indicator in his cockpit, but he wanted to let all the bug-smashers in the valley know what real speed was 'Dusty 52, we show you at 620 on the ground,' ATC responded.

The situation was too ripe. I heard the click of Walt's mike button in the rear seat. In his most innocent voice, Walt startled the controller by asking for a ground speed check from 81,000 feet, clearly above controlled airspace. In a cool, professional voice, the controller replied, 'Aspen 20, I show you at 1,982 knots on the ground.' We did not hear another transmission on that frequency all the way to the coast.

The Blackbird always showed us something new, each aircraft possessing its own unique personality. In time, we realized we were flying a national treasure. When we taxied out of our revetments for takeoff, people took notice. Traffic congregated near the airfield fences, because everyone wanted to see and hear the mighty SR-71 You could not be a part of this program and not come to love the airplane. Slowly, she revealed her secrets to us as we earned her trust.

One moonless night, while flying a routine training mission over the Pacific, I wondered what the sky would look like from 84,000 feet if the cockpit lighting were dark. While heading home on a straight course, I slowly turned down all of the lighting, reducing the glare and revealing the night sky.

Within seconds, I turned the lights back up, fearful that the jet would know and somehow punish me. But my desire to see the sky overruled my caution, I dimmed the lighting again. To my amazement, I saw a bright light outside my window. As my eyes adjusted to the view, I realized that the brilliance was the broad expanse of the Milky Way, now a gleaming stripe across the sky.

Where dark spaces in the sky had usually existed, there were now dense clusters of sparkling stars. Shooting stars flashed across the canvas every few seconds. It was like a fireworks display with no sound.

I knew I had to get my eyes back on the instruments, and reluctantly I brought my attention back inside. To my surprise, with the cockpit lighting still off, I could see every gauge, lit by starlight. In the plane's mirrors, I could see the eerie shine of my gold spacesuit incandescently illuminated in a celestial glow. I stole one last glance out the window. Despite our speed, we seemed still before the heavens, humbled in the radiance of a much greater power. For those few moments, I felt a part of something far more significant than anything we were doing in the plane. The sharp sound of Walt's voice on the radio brought me back to the tasks at hand as I prepared for our descent.

San Diego Aerospace Museum

The SR-71 was an expensive aircraft to operate. The most significant cost was tanker support, and in 1990, confronted with budget cutbacks, the Air Force retired the SR-71.

The SR-71 served six presidents, protecting America for a quarter of a century. Unbeknownst to most of the country, the plane flew over North Vietnam , Red China,North Korea , the Middle East,South Africa ,Cuba ,Nicaragua, Iran ,Libya , and the Falkland Islands . On a weekly basis, the SR-71 kept watch over every Soviet nuclear submarine and mobile missile site, and all of their troop movements. It was a key factor in winning the Cold War.

I am proud to say I flew about 500 hours in this aircraft. I knew her well. She gave way to no plane, proudly dragging her sonic boom through enemy backyards with great impunity. She defeated every missile, outran every MiG, and always brought us home. In the first 100 years of manned flight, no aircraft was more remarkable.

The Blackbird had outrun nearly 4,000 missiles, not once taking a scratch from enemy fire. On her final flight, the Blackbird , destined for the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum, sped from Los Angeles to Washington in 64 minutes, averaging 2,145 mph and setting four speed records.

Response deadline is Friday August 28, 2009.


NOTES

Don Hewitt was subject of 60 minutes Sunday August 23, 2009.

Here are notes saved in disk files.
Payne got a phone call from an upset and agitated Don Hewitt of 60 Minutes in August 2000.

Hewitt advised Payne to stop this.

Let's invite 60 Minutes to do a story the NSA spy sting on Iran.

The media wishes to control the situation. Sorry msm corp/gov media.

Whitman college moderation?




Crosscut A gutsy commencement address comment.
Topix A gutsy commencement address comment.

Note, TOWARD REVISING COMSUMPTION PATTERN.

Tuesday August 18, 2009 09:56

We must now confront liberal arts mentality at NCUA, hopefully effectively as a result of both Whitman and Bowdion Colleges.

Lana Brown along with 1971 Whitman College English major Ryan Crocker are helping too by clarifying results of liberal arts education.

Ambassador Ryan Crocker's biographers are credited too.

Bill: Thank you for taking time to share this opinion.
Lana
We backed up on DVD. Disk label reads Lana Brown.



If theses matters were not so serious, the below email response from Lana Brown would be hilarious.

Liberal arts colleges offer an opportunity to take a lot of BS courses. Many of my 1959 classmates availed themselves this opportunity.

Ambassador Ryan Crocker appears taken advantage of this opportunity too.

Looks like there are people after Crocker.
Crocker served in Beirut, Lebanon as chief of the political section from 1981 to 1984; while there, he survived the 1983 United States Embassy bombing.

In 1998, as the Ambassador to Syria, his residence was plundered by an angry mob.

Among the things he is enjoying is “freedom from needing a driver, a 40-person entourage and helicopter gunships hovering overhead” every time he steps out the door.

They were successful with Bakhtiar.
But on August 7, 1991, Bakhtiar was murdered along with his secretary, Soroush Katibeh, by three assassins in his home. The inquest found that he was stabbed by a knife matching a nearby blood stained bread knife. Bakhtiar's dead body was not found until at least 36 hours after his death, despite the fact that he had heavy police protection and that his killers had left ID (presumably faked) with a guard at his house. Two of the assassins escaped to Iran, but the third, Ali Vakili Rad, was apprehended in Switzerland, as well as an alleged accomplice, Zeyal Sarhadi, a great-nephew of former president of Iran Hasemi Rafsanjani, and both were extradited to France for trial. Vakili Rad was sentenced to life in prison in December 1994, although Sarhadi was acquitted.

We, of course, believe in legal remedy.

Shapour Baktiar is alleged to have instigated the attempted Nojeh coup in 1980.
It was staged by officers and servicemen from the infantry, air force, army and secret service under the leadership of the former imperial prime minister, Shapour Bakhtiar, who had been operating from Baghdad since Khomeini took power in Iran.

And next is Brzezinski in 1980.
According to Iran's president at the time, Abolhassan Banisadr, Brzezinski met directly with Saddam Hussein in Jordan two months before the Iraqi assault. Bani-Sadr wrote, "Brzezinski had assured Saddam Hussein that the United States would not oppose the separation of Khuzestan [in southwest Iran] from Iran."
And from Crocker's bio.

He completed the 20-month program at the Foreign Service Institutes Arabic School in Tunis in June 1978. Crocker was then assigned as chief of the economic-commercial section at the U.S. Interests Section in Baghdad, Iraq. Crocker served in Beirut, Lebanon as chief of the political section from 1981 to 1984; while there, he survived the 1983 United States Embassy bombing.

Anyone care to suggest that Crocker was not involved in helping to incite Saddam Hussein to invade Iran on 22 September 1980?
The United States of America were also involved in the plan, with Zbigniew Brzezinski, the national security advisor to the Carter Administration from 1977 to 1981, meeting regularly with all the parties involved.

Lets see if some Whitman grads and Brian Dohe can figure out how to help get out of these messes, now that Whitman College is directly involved as a results of its education.
Whatever engagements you choose, you will be taking this education with you. It will serve you well, if you use it well. And one thing that I hope all of you on my right will do before you get out of here today, is offer a final word of thanks to those on my left. Because if it hasn't already, it will occur to you with increasing clarity that the gift of what you have received here is more than your native brilliance, however great you may think that is, it is also the work of this great faculty.

Crocker, of course, is a 1971 Whitman College English major graduate.

Dohe and Payne had dinner at El Patio in Albuquerque.

Dohe described in detail a legal scrape his wife got into. And got out of okay.

So let's all hope Brian's mind, although Brian is not a Whitman grad, is working on how to get out these messes.

Crocker's performance [3 wars, possible genocide charge] does not appear to be a good selling point on why a student should select Whitman College. Or major in English.

So let's move to NCUA putting our knowledge of the liberal arts educated minds to good use and try to get all of these unfortunate matters peacefully settled.

http://home.comcast.net/~bpayne37/whitman59/whitman59after.htm#lana
No, Lana.

This is data, not opinion, provided in Crocker's wikipedia bio.
----- Forwarded Message -----
From: "Lana Brown" brownll@whitman.edu
To: "bill payne" bpayne37@comcast.net
Sent: Monday, August 17, 2009 10:07:13 AM GMT -07:00 US/Canada Mountain
Subject: Re: Whitman Magazine -- We need your input!

Bill: Thank you for taking time to share this opinion.
Lana


----- Original Message -----
From: "bill payne" bpayne37@comcast.net
To: "Lana Brown" brownll@whitman.edu
Cc: "mel davidson" melnbarbara@comcast.net, "John/Catherine Alsip" jkalsip@gmail.com, "Jason Arp" arpjs@whitman.edu>, "Fred Fair" fredfair@taosnet.com, "Cargill Hall" overflight@att.net, "Brian Dohe" dohe@whitman.edu, "Bob Collins" bcuw@wbhsi.net, "Amorales58@Comcast.Net" amorales58@comcast.net, bridges@whitman.edu
Sent: Saturday, August 15, 2009 3:55:25 PM GMT -08:00 US/Canada Pacific
Subject: RE: Whitman Magazine -- We need your input!

Lana

Whitman college class of 2009 commencement speaker, Ryan Crocker, may be involved in genocide against Iran.

Not good.

http://home.comcast.net/~bpayne37/whitman59/whitman59after.htm#axel2

bill




Monday August 1,7 2009 07:18

Crocker retired in 2009 from the United States Foreign Service after a 38-year career that included five ambassadorships: Iraq, Pakistan, Syria, Kuwait and Lebanon.

He has accolades of his own to give, crediting Whitman College for developing critical and creative thinkers, and says the college “did so much to shape my life and my career.”
Liberal arts approach?
Sun Aug 16, 2009 9:22am EDT The hardline nationalist also said the West must be held to account for stoking unrest in Iran after the June 12 presidential vote, as the third mass trial of demonstrators accused of trying to overthrow clerical rule began.

The election and its aftermath have plunged Iran into its biggest internal crisis since the 1979 Islamic revolution, exposing deepening divisions within its ruling elite and also further straining relations with the West.

Money recovery and liberal arts education in focus now that the final history link is complete.

Former neighbor Bill Stone is a graduate of Bowdoin College, then went on to graduate school in physics.

Several times we discussed our liberal art undergraduate experiences. We both conclude that most liberal arts graduates think differently.

So let's do our best to reason with NCUA over the facts.

Facts and logic take a back seat to interpretation and feelings, we observed at Whitman College.

After reading material at the Whitman website, I conclude that Whitman evolved even more towards liberal arts than it was 50 years ago.

See:

Wednesday, Aug 5, 2009

WALLA WALLA, Wash. – When colleges and universities reconvene this fall, a top agenda item will be mitigation of the present-day swine flu concern. But at Whitman College, the long-ago 1918 flu pandemic also will be a focus as students, faculty, staff and interested Walla Walla community members participate in the intellectual exercise of reading and discussing the emotional and physical phenomena of the “Spanish flu” pandemic.

Coincidentally, the college chose “The Last Town on Earth,” the critically acclaimed novel by author Thomas Mullen, as the first-year students’ required summer reading assignment —a decision made before news broke about the H1N1 flu. The book tells the fictional but historically correct story of a small town in rural Washington in 1918 that attempts to isolate itself to prevent the flu from infecting its citizens. The college will host two events based on the reading; both are open to the public.




Friday August 14, 2009 15:34

http://home.comcast.net/~bpayne37/whitman59/whitman59after.htm#axel2

axelopterix@gmail.com

Hello Axel,

I respond to your two July 25, 2009 emails.
By the way, thanks so much for posting the radio interview.
Technology finally arrived [Sony IC mp3 recorder, lots of disk space on Comast website] to do what Laszlo Baranyi wanted to do since 1998.
Any ideas about where to also find the television interview?
No.

That's a bit more thThis is a bit more

http://home.comcast.net/~bpayne37/whitman59/whitman59after.htm#deargeorge

than all us asked for but were given. an I asked for. For now I'm very specifically interested only in events up to 1995 regarding Hans Buehler and the web around Crypto AG.

When you get back, could you help me find some information on the technical details of what happened? What kind of machines was Crypto AG selling, which algorithms did they use, how were the subversions implemented, and how were they achieved?

Rick Francona apparently has first hand operational information.

Below email message was forwarded to me by J Orlin Grabbe [deceased]
-------- Original Message --------
Subject: US support to Iraq in 1980s
Date: Fri, 21 Jul 2000 23:29:03 -0700

From: "Ally to Adversary" <publicity@francona.com>
To: <kalliste@aci.net>

Read with interest your article on NSA, Crypto AG, and Iraq. I was part of the operation that supplied information to Iraq in 1988. While in the field with the Iraqi Army, I saw the Crypto AG machines in use. I cover some of these events in my book. Rick Francona-- Ally to Adversary - An Eyewitness Account of Iraq's Fall from Grace by Rick Francona

Naval Institute Press (ISBN 1557502811)
http://www.francona.com

I added the picture and links.

Sandia labs cryptographer G [Gus] J Simmons gave at least one talk I attended about his work on the covert channel [The notion of subliminal channel (also called covert channel) was introduced by Simmons while considering his "Prisoner's Problem.].

Sandia labs supervisor James Gosler proffered information in a meeting I attended on his division's work implementing covert channel technology.

Sandia labs supervisor John Portlock [deceased] division was involved in "white hat" work. Portlock proffered information to me in an informal conversation that his group could not discover how Gosler's group implemented any convert channel.

At the time of Gosler's talk, I was assigned to break electronic locks for the FBI.

Gosler, then a department manager, told me that he was going to transfer me from electronic lock breaking work into, I assumed, NSA-sponsored work [When Payne balked, his supervisor said Payne "did not choose his jobs. Rather, Sandia assigns duties to" him.]. That supervisor was Gosler.

Shortly after my refusal Gosler turned me into the FBI we discovered in 2006.



Back to the subject of your questions.

In 2005 I wrote Transmitting information in noise: A practical tutorial [technical details of what happened] which some methods. Statistical methods involve noise with a bias from which 0s and 1s can be discovered. I did not cover such techniques in my 2005 tutorial.

Ludwig De Braeckeleer in 2007 summarizes [What kind of machines was Crypto AG selling, which algorithms did they use, how were the subversions implemented, and how were they achieved?] in The NSA-Crypto AG Sting.

Swiss Radio International appears to have done a good job describing [how were they achieved].

I've tried to contact Hans Buehler but have been unable to.
Did you try phoning 1-312-49-50?

De Braeckeleer wrote
Yet Crypto AG settled the case out of court, in November 1996, before other former Crypto AG employees could provide evidence in court that was likely to have brought embarrassing details to light.

No one has heard from Buehler since the settlement. "He made his fortune financially," whispers an insider.

Last time I spoke with Buehler on the phone was in early April 1997 from a pay phone in Zurich.

My wife and I were in Zurich where I interviewed for a job at IBM Research - Zurich. Conversation topics were limited to work considerations.

OpEdNews correctly states
OpEdNews - This is Like Hitler's Suicide Order from the BunkerJan 31, 2007 ... In the spring of 1995 Hans Buehler reported to me on the phone, "Hey bill, THEY have nukes." click here Good news, of course, ... www.opednews.com/.../opedne_dave_lin_070131_this_is_like_hitler_.htm - Cached - Similar
I hope my responses help your project succeed.
Please enjoy your vacation,
Axel
We want to get these unfortunate matters peacefully so that we can thoroughly enjoy our next essential non-BTU-wasting food gathering [not vacation] work.
From: "John Sobolewski"
To: bpayne37@comcast.net
Sent: Thursday, August 13, 2009 8:29:39 PM GMT -07:00 US/Canada Mountain Subject:
RE: Ticketless Confirmation - PAYNE/WILLIAM - N2WGNV

I made tentative reservations for Sekiu for the nights of August 31- Sept 3 at Van Ripers. 3 nights at $65 and one night at $105 (we have to change rooms to an ocenn view room on the last night). Latest projections are that Ilwaco will close early because over 15,000 silver were caught there last week bringing it to 68.4% of quota as of Aug 9. So we may want to go out of Westport on a charter since they are only at 38% of quota as of August 9. Assuming they are open on Sept 1, we may do a Wesport charter on that date (in which case I will cancel the night of August 31 at Van Riper's) and then go to Sekiu where fishing for both silvers and pinks is good with about 2.5 fish/rod. John.

Whitman College/president George Bridges, to our astonishment and amusement, had Ambassador Ryan Crocker who was likely involved with Brzezinski to incite Saddam Hussein beginning the Iran-Iraq war on 22 September 1980, deliver the 2009 commencement address.

George Bridges has not yet acknowledged receipt of our request for aid to attempt peaceful settlement of these unfortunate matters.

So we're ready to file at NCUA next week to try to get our stolen $22,036 back.

Responsible people in authority in the US should have stepped forward to help get these unfortunate matters settled. So far no one has.

Let's hope your emails help.

Thanks
bill

distribution

bridges@whitman.edu
region5@ncua.gov
mayor@cabq.gov
jhamman@cabq.gov
rshultz@cabq.gov
bill.leonard@nara.gov
foialo@nsa.gov
julia.eichhorst@ic.fbi.gov
the.secretary@hq.doe.gov
alexander.morris@hq.doe.gov
jim.kovakas@usdoj.gov
tanya.kubinec@wpafb.af.mil
Amorales58@Comcast.Net



Saturday July 25, 2009 07:44

We may be able to help.
-----Original Message-----
From: bill payne [mailto:bpayne37@comcast.net]
Sent: Saturday, July 25, 2009 8:40 AM
o: Number Six
Cc: mel davidson; Amorales58@Comcast.Net; bridges@whitman.edu
Subject: RE: Hans Buehler

Axel

We've on vacation.

The matters with Iran and our stolen $22,036 are active matters.

Will Iran nuclear electric generation facilities be bombed?

Will we get our money back from NCUA?

Will DOE get Morales and my part of these matters financially settled?

Will our criminal complaint affidavit in 97 CV 266 against Brzezinski be properly processed?

Will some responsible people try to achieve settlement with Iran?

We don't know the answers to these questions but we will take actions to possibly try to get these unfortunate matters peacefully settled.

As I think about detailed responses to your below statements I will respond by email.

We're off to Seattle then Spokane, finally to Albuquerque on essential non-BTU-wasting vacation.

Best reards,
bill


http://home.comcast.net/~bpayne37/whitman59/whitman59after.htm#alex


----- Forwarded Message -----
From: "Number Six" axelopterix@gmail.com
To: bpayne37@comcast.net
Sent: Friday, July 24, 2009 6:08:15 PM GMT -07:00 US/Canada Mountain
Subject: Hans Buehler

Hello Professor Payne,

I am a student at RPI who does computer security for sport, rather than profit or evil. I'm mostly interested in the means rather than the goals. That said, sometimes I look for good story lines for the wargame challenges I make. Approximately one month ago I became familiar with the story of Hans Buehler. I found your website among others.

I was wondering if you could offer any advice or insight into the project now as I begin or later on once I am about to release the project for people to explore.

Your website is very difficult to read by the way, have you considered getting it organized in some way?

The subject is computer espionage and international affairs between 1990-1995 focusing around Hans Beuhler's arrest. I will be taking many liberties but would like to strive for some realism that rings plenty of truths.

I would love to recreate as much of the technical details regarding Crypto AGs machines as possible.

From what I understand, you seem like the right person to ask. Everything should be fair game now that it's been 15-20 years.

So, what can you tell me?

Thanks, Axel




Thursday August 13, 2009 06:55

Deeper Thoughts Than Usual About Nuclear Energy question.

Nuclear power.

Media Meltdown in a Time of Crisis, Part 1 comment.

Retired Sandian Bob Wayland knows Jillson fairly well.

Bob's wife was a SLFCU board member.


----- Forwarded Message -----
From: bpayne37@comcast.net
To: "Robert & Susan Wayland" sbwayland@comcast.net
Cc: "art morales" amorales58@comcast.net, bridges@whitman.edu, boardmail@ncua.gov, oedmail@ncua.gov
Sent: Wednesday, August 12, 2009 7:43:15 AM GMT -07:00 US/Canada Mountain
Subject: our money, ncua and jillson

bob

Whitman college inviting ambassador Ryan Crocker to deliver the 2009 commencment address may have not have been too bright in view that Crocker likely helped start the Iraq/Iran war - along with Brzezinski, of course.

http://home.comcast.net/~bpayne37/whitman59/whitman59after.htm#deargeorge

We now try to get our money back through NCUA.

If we get our money back, then NCUA will likely go for Jillson to gets its money back through the New Mexico criminal system.

But this is not our problem. Our problem is getting our money back.

If NCUA does not pay, then we can file an insurance fraud claim with the state.

Let's all hope for peaceful settlement before matters get worse.

bill


APD police chief Schultz appears to be the only email that bounced.
This is an automatically generated Delivery Status Notification.

Delivery to the following recipients was aborted after 2 second(s): * rshultz@cabq.gov


We are making a transition into solar electricity storage with the hope that these unfortunate matters will be peacefully settled soon.




-----Original Message-----
From: bill payne [mailto:bpayne37@comcast.net]
Sent: Tuesday, August 11, 2009 10:47 AM
To: bridges@whitman.edu
Cc: Amorales58@Comcast.Net; tanya.kubinec@wpafb.af.mil; jim.kovakas@usdoj.gov; alexander.morris@hq.doe.gov; the.secretary@hq.doe.gov; Eichhorst, Julia E.; foialo@nsa.gov; bill.leonard@nara.gov; rshultz@cabq.gov; jhamman@cabq.gov; mayor@cabq.gov; region5@ncua.gov
Subject: Ambassador Ryan Crocker request for help



Tuesday August 11, 2009 10:20

http://home.comcast.net/~bpayne37/whitman59/whitman59after.htm#deargeorge

George Bridges, President
Whitman College
bridges@whitman.edu

Hello George,

After reading the transcription of Ryan Crocker's 2009 commencement address, studying Ambassador Crocker's Wikipedia bio, and finishing reading Tradition in a Turbulent Age: Whitman College 1925-1975 we've decided it may be worthwhile too seek your help and Crocker's advice on how to possibly get some unfortunate matters involving Iran peacefully settled.

We have tried for 17 years to seek legal, political and administrative remedies of these unfortunate matters without success.

Ambassador Crocker states in "Lessons From a Long War"
Wherever and however you engage, I commend to you the most important lesson I have taken out of this long war. It's simple: Be in it. Move to the sound of the guns. Show up for the fight.
and
It is a reminder that in life, you get what is just, often, only if you are ready to fight for it. And this ladies and gentlemen is a fight; it's an American fight, very much worth being in.
Sun Tzu observed
There is no instance of a nation benefitting from prolonged warfare.
During Ambassador Crocker's tenure as career diplomat starting with
After Persian language training, he was assigned to the American Consulate in Khorramshahr, Iran in 1972.
the middle east has been subject to a series of unfortunate events. The Iraq/Iran war. The first gulf war. The current Iraq war.

Threats are published by the MainStream Media that Iran's nuclear electric generation facilities may be bombed in October of 2009.

We feel that peaceful settlement with Iran is best.

Our personal involvement with the spy sting on Iran started with
Swiss Radio International Hans Buehler programs [Part 1, May 15, 1994 , 25 minutes long. Part 2 broadcast July 18, 1994, 12 minutes long - 33 megabytes mp3].

Hans Buehler letter.

Ambassador Crocker stated in his 2009 commencement address
Whatever engagements you choose, you will be taking this education with you. It will serve you well, if you use it well. And one thing that I hope all of you on my right will do before you get out of here today, is offer a final word of thanks to those on my left. Because if it hasn't already, it will occur to you with increasing clarity that the gift of what you have received here is more than your native brilliance, however great you may think that is, it is also the work of this great faculty.
We agree with Ambassador Crocker.

Ambassador Crocker concludes
[B]ut I did fight, and so shall you.
which is unfortunate because we believe it is far better to settle rather than fight.

Lawyers, MainStream Media, and bureaucrats frequently possess liberal arts degrees.

Penchant for members of these groups to ignore data and proceed doing whatever they want regardless of rules or laws in the belief that they can get away it knowing no one is looking caused us to seek visibility by suing the National Security Agency in 1997.

This is New Mexico CIV 97-266 MCA/LFG which was only filed after the Baltimore Sun and Electronic Engineering Times made the spy sting on Iran public.
Electronic Engineering Times, January 22, 1996, p. 84.



In 2007 we learned at Wikipedia
Nojeh Coup In July 1980, Zbigniew Brzezinski of the United States met Jordan's King Hussein in Amman to discuss detailed plans for Saddam Hussein to sponsor a coup in Iran against Khomeini. King Hussein was Saddam's closest confidant in the Arab world, and served as an intermediary during the planning. The Iraqi invasion of Iran would be launched under the pretext of a call for aid from Iranian loyalist officers plotting their own uprising on July 9, 1980 (codenamed Nojeh, after Shahrokhi/Nojeh air base in Hamedan). The Iranian officers were organized by Shapour Bakhtiar, who had fled to France when Khomeini seized power, but was operating from Baghdad and Sulimaniyah at the time of Brzezinski's meeting with Hussein. However, Khomeini learned of the Nojeh Coup plan from Soviet agents in France and Latin America. Shortly after Brzezinski's meeting with Hussein, the President of Iran, Abolhassan Bani-Sadr quietly rounded up 600 of the loyalist plotters within Iran, putting an effective end to the Nojeh Coup.[5] Saddam decided to invade without the Iranian officers' assistance, beginning the Iran-Iraq war on 22 September 1980. 1 2
In 2009 we read at Wikipedia
According to Iran's president at the time, Abolhassan Banisadr, Brzezinski met directly with Saddam Hussein in Jordan two months before the Iraqi assault. Bani-Sadr wrote, "Brzezinski had assured Saddam Hussein that the United States would not oppose the separation of Khuzestan [in southwest Iran] from Iran."

We don't know if either the 2007 or 2009 information is correct or not. But if Brzezinski did either we know, from our 17 year legal project, that it is against the law to incite genocide.

May 11, 2007 we filed to void judgment in New Mexico federal court at Santa Fe, NM in CIV 97-266 MCA/LFG.

Formal criminal complaint affidavit against Brzezinski was filed on June 6, 2007 was slipped into filings for his alleged role in inciting Saddam Hussein to attack Iran and properly docketed by the clerk of court.

Instead of properly processing criminal complaint affidavit by initiating a proper investigation of 2007 and 2009 allegations against Brzezinski, the court sanctioned us with $22,036.00 using a bogus not-file-stamped court order.

Using the fraudulent court order Sandia Laboratories Federal Credit Union Credit Union CEO Christopher Jillson stole $11,018.00 from each of Morales' and Payne's retirement-protected savings accounts using a bogus court order to attempt to justify theft.

While we will next move to get our NCUA- insured stolen money back, we felt that it is important to try to resolve all of these unfortunate matters at the same time.

During the past two years we have been studying electricity generation, first by attending PNM's electric Integrated Resource Planning meetings and study on the Internet.

Our conclusions are that electric shortfalls and increase costs loom in all countries. Further, we are increasingly skeptical that altenergies are solutions to produce electricity that's usable on any meaningful scale.

Bombing Iran's nuclear electricity facilities might cause electricity shortages in Iran and countries to which Iran exports electricity.

International reaction to an attack on Iran's electric nuclear generation facilities maybe unfavorable particularly if the federal court criminal complaint against Brzezinski is ignored and not properly investigated and disposed.

For all of the reasons above we ask that you forward this email to Ambassador Crocker

with the request that he send to us his suggestions by email for possible diplomatic settlement of these unfortunate matters.

President George W. Bush awarded Ambassador Crocker the Presidential Medal of Freedom on January 15, 2009. The citation Stated:
[T]he United States honors Ryan C. Crocker for his courage, his integrity, and his unwavering commitment to strengthening our nation and building a freer and more peaceful world.
Whitman college sociology professor Ely Chertok

told criminology class students in about 1958/9 that only, if I recall correctly, about 7% of crimes result in prosecution.

Let's hope the system begins to work properly and we receive our $22,036.00 from NCUA.

New Mexico attorney general Gary K King stated in the Albuquerque Journal Thursday July 30, 2009:
Perhaps, just as important, people should know that they can help us do our jobs by alerting us to corruption and other crimes. This is where I think we all can make a difference in that culture of corruption. When our society no longer tolerates it, when people act as a community against it, corruption may finally disappear from the headlines in our daily news.
1 Please acknowledge receipt of this email.
2 Please let me a copy of the forward to Ambassador Crocker.
3 We ask that Ambassador Crocker respond one way or another by August 28, 2009.
Nonresponse is a response.

Ambassador Crocker stated in his 2009 commencement address:
[B]ecause if it hasn't already, it will occur to you with increasing clarity that the gift of what you have received here is more than your native brilliance, however great you may think that is, it is also the work of this great faculty.
We believe that it would be a significant contribution to a "more peaceful world" if Whitman College could contribute what is asked above.

Evidence suggests
He completed the 20-month program at the Foreign Service Institutes Arabic School in Tunis in June 1978. Crocker was then assigned as chief of the economic-commercial section at the U.S. Interests Section in Baghdad, Iraq. Crocker served in Beirut, Lebanon as chief of the political section from 1981 to 1984; while there, he survived the 1983 United States Embassy bombing.
that Ambassador Crocker likely knew of or may have possibly been involved in starting the Iraq/Iran war.

Some in Iran made mistakes too
The Iranian hostage crisis was a diplomatic crisis between Iran and the United States where 53 Americans were held hostage for 444 days from November 4, 1979 to January 20, 1981, after a group of Islamist students and militants took over the American embassy in support of the Iranian Revolution.
by failing to consider possible consequences.

Bombing Iran's nuclear-powered electric generation facilities is something we should all work to try to avoid because more possible unfortunate consequences.

So, George, I look forward to hearing from you and Ambassador Crocker.

Objective criterion of whether this aspect of our project is a success or a failure is simple.

If you click on http://news.google.com/ to read that Iran's nuclear-powered electric generation facilities have been bombed, then, we believe, we have all lost.

best regards
bill

distribution

region5@ncua.gov
mayor@cabq.gov
jhamman@cabq.gov
rshultz@cabq.gov
bill.leonard@nara.gov
foialo@nsa.gov
julia.eichhorst@ic.fbi.gov
the.secretary@hq.doe.gov
alexander.morris@hq.doe.gov
jim.kovakas@usdoj.gov
tanya.kubinec@wpafb.af.mil
Amorales58@Comcast.Net


Monday August 10, 2009 18:44
NOTES

The "don't bomb Iran" media spin doctors may be at work?

Rick Steves IRAN was featured Friday August 7, 2009 on KNME at about 19:30 in Albuquerque.

"the middle east has been a real mess, if not disaster." is changed to "the middle east has been subject to a series of unfortunate events."

Truthdig Classic: The Terror America Wrought comment Thursday August 6, 2009.
Iraq: Wednesday, August 05 - 2009 at 11:15 Iran has reached agreement with the Iraqi Electricity Ministry to restart electricity supplies with the country. Under the new agreement, Iran will export 600 Megawatts through three lines, each for one part of Iraq, north, mid, and south. Iraq has a 50% power shortage level, the ministry said.

We are reading The Ten Most Beautiful Experiments by George Johnson who lives in Santa Fe.

We think we have a book in our legal project.

We don't trust English and Sociology majors knowledge or reasoning abilities.

But to see if they will THINK and, as a result, help is worth a try.
lap dog n. A small dog kept as a pet. Informal. One eager to do another's bidding, especially in order to maintain a position of privilege or favor:

Idiomatic use

The term lapdog is also used to describe a submissive person, such as a "yes" man, or an institution that can be very easily controlled (as in the lapdog press in contrast to the tougher, more confronting watchdog press).

There may be a reason Crocker lasted so long in his jobs? But Crocker is getting closer to retirement which can change attitudes!


Wednesday August 12, 2009 12:35

Harbor Freight August 24, 2009 deadline flyer ad.



Note blue circled requirements.

Biomass Wastes comment.

http://home.comcast.net/~bpayne37/whitman59/whitman59after.htm#jimbrown


Ecologist Hopes His Bleak Outlook for Humanity Is Wrong

UPFront
John Fleck
Albuquerque Journal Tuesday August 11, 2009

Jim Brown tugged at his thinning hair, speaking with a gravel-voiced intensity unusual for a scientific conference.

"I got into this stuff because I'm worried about the world we're leaving to my grandchildren," the University of New Mexico professor said. "The more I get into it, the more worried I get."

Bolstered by charts of the growth of global population and energy consumption, Brown argued there is a serious risk of very unpleasant things to come: climate change, the risk of disease pandemic and, ultimately, global economic collapse as we run out of the cheap energy on which modern society is built.

The occasion was a meeting in Albuquerque last week of the Ecological Society of America. Ecologists, the academic tribe of which the 66-year-old Brown is a leading member, are all about measuring things.

Energy comes from light falling on a plant. The plant grows, a small animal eats it then a large animal eats the small animal. All the while, the ecologist sits dispassionately off to the side, measuring the flow of that energy through the system, trying to understand how the whole thing works.

That is how Brown began his professional life in the 1970s, when he and his colleagues began counting things in the desert wilderness of southern Arizona not far from the New Mexico border.

The scientists looked at questions that, seen from the 21st century vantage point of Brown's fears about peak oil and societal catastrophe, seem almost Quaint. One of Brown's early research papers was about how hummingbirds and insects compete for nectar from two species of shrubs.

That was the way the science of ecology worked back then, Brown said during a talk at last week's meeting. Scientists would try to find an "absolutely pristine place" to study how nature worked when humans weren't mucking things up.

"Increasingly," Brown said "we've realized that we need study the world the way it is."

"The way it is" involves humanity as Earth's dominant critter, vaulted to prominence through its ability to move beyond the basic energy flow of those "pristine" ecosystem and massively alter the landscape to rev up our lives.

On one hand, Brown wrote in his 1995 book "Macroecology," humans are just one of the millions of species that inhabit Earth, "formed by the same processes that produced all other species, and our abundance and distribution are governed by the same natural laws that affec all living things.

And yet, he wrote, our ability to reshape our environment and impose our dominance on other living things is unprecedented.

When Brown wrote that, there were an estimated 5.5 billion humans on Earth. Today, there are an estimated 6.8 billion. But while our numbers are rising fast, our energy usage is rising even faster.

That is, at the core, what makes humans different from all the other species on Earth: our ability to leverage oil and coal and other sources of energy to gc beyond what pristine ecosystems offer. It has resulted in our rich standard of living. Today, the rising energy consumption in part is a refection of more people in the developing world leveraging the same energy sources to raise their own standards of living.

Now, Brown argues, those trends in growing population and increasing energy use. are hurtling headlong toward fundamental global limits. If we do not reduce our population growth and our per capita energy consumption, we'll burn through the last of our fossil fuels; triggering devastating climate change and, when the fuels run out, societal collapse.

Brown is well-aware he is taking on the mantle of a long line of thinkers who turned out to be wrong. In an interview, he brought up Thomas Malthus before I had a chance to ask.

Malthus, a British intellectual, wrote his "Essay on the Principle of Population" two centuries ago. He predicted that exponential population growth would always outpace the resources needed to feed, clothe and house us, leading to inevitable starvation and human misery.

Malthus and generations of thinkers who came after him, repeating versions of the same argument, were famously wrong, as new technologies, from coal to oil to modern fertilizers, repeatedly bailed us out. .Brown acknowledges that some new technology may once again prove the current generation of neo-Malthusians wrong. "Maybe we'll get one," he said, "but I don't see where it's coming from."

At this point in his pitch, Brown sounds like the quintessential ecologist who has spent much of his adult life watching what happens when ecosystems get out of sync.

"Nature," he said, "will take charge."

UpFront is a daily front-page opinion column. You can reach John Fleck at 823-3916 or jfleck@abojournal. com.


Monday August 3, 2009 12:47

Merle Meyer taught scienific experimental and industrial psychology at Whitman.

This is opposed to the BS areas psychology.

Payne finished reading Tradition in a Turbulent Age: Whitman College 1925-1975 in preparation for this week.

Edwards, in our opinion, accurately reflected Whitman college mentality.

Meyer was not mentioned in Edwards' book.

http://www.prosefights.org/nmlegal/theinvestigation/theinvestigation.htm#meyer




This article was originally published in the August - September 2005 issue of CLASnotes.

Merle Meyer, a professor and former chair of the psychology department, died on June 28 after suffering from a short illness. The 76-year-old had served the university for 33 years. Meyer received his PhD from the University of Washington in 1963 and served as chair of the psychology departments at both Whitman College and the University of Western Washington. In 1972, he became UF’s psychology chair, a role in which he served for 16 years. Meyer returned to full-time teaching in 1988, and until his death continued to teach a full course load. He was in the process of writing a General Psychology undergraduate textbook.

Tuesday August 4, 2009 07:52

The media is largely populated by liberal art graduates.

We collected msm corp/gov "journalism" on our 13 day 2009 vacation dealing with the Coeur d'Alene mining district. And off the web too.

The media forwards agendas.

If you aren't an agenda, then the media will not help you. Thus pro se fights.



http://home.comcast.net/~bpayne37/whitman59/whitman59after.htm#chapman





Below photo taken in Harrison, ID Saturday July 18, 2009.

MSM [spin doctors] at work.

New studies show the waste has spread downstream far beyond Kellogg, to an extent surprising even EPA officials. More than 500,000 pounds of lead flowed into Lake Coeur d' Alene last year, according to the U.S. Geological Survey, and some 72 million tons of toxic mining waste now rest on the lake' s bottom. Contamination in valley sediments goes down 50 feet in places. During a major flood in 1996, more than 1 million pounds of lead rushed into the lake in one day.

Ray Chapman's book purchased at the Shoshone County Mining and Smelting Museum. Inc. Tuesday July 14, 2009.


The lady who sold above book said the museum attendance has fallen as a result of the recession/depression. This is causing the museum financial probloems, she reported.











The media does not report the news, it shapes the the news.

John Gowan, Libertad


The second paragraph may expose business interests.





More lead goes into a smelter than comes out in pigs. That is a problem.

Likewise more BTUs go into producing electricity than electricity can produce BTUs [1 kWh = 2312.141.63 BTUs]. This fact, however, may escape most of the liberal arts educated.


Friday August 7, 2009 06:36

6:12 AM PDT, August 1, 2009 Iran confirmed today that it is holding three Americans who apparently strayed across the Iranian border while on a hiking trip in the northern Iraqi region of Kurdistan, according to Kurdish officials.

July 31 (Bloomberg) Iran Given Deadline

President Barack Obama said Iran must respond by late September to an invitation for unconditional talks with the West on ending what’s believed to be a nuclear weapons program. Secretary of Defense Robert Gates said this week in Israel that the offer is not open-ended, and his counterpart, Ehud Barak, warned that Israel is considering all measures if diplomatic efforts fail.


Ryan C Crocker has the credentials we have been searching for!
After Persian language training, he was assigned to the American Consulate in Khorramshahr, Iran in 1972.

Bringing Iraq ambassador Ryan Crocker to Whitman College 2009 to deliver the commencement address may be analogous to having Vidkun Quisling deliver a college commencement address in Norway.

Appointment to ambassador to Iraq is not an honor. It is punishment.
1. No one in government ever takes responsibility for anything.

2. Fundamental questions about the legitimacy of governmental measures are not allowed in mainstream political discourse.

3. People generally rise to – and maintain – high places in politics, academia, and the media by dutifully perpetuating the power elite’s system.

Our Iran visibility ploy continues to work almost too well.

Whitman College is helping too.

Whitman transcribed Crocker's commencement address.
There's an old saying that gives practical advice on what to do when you run out of ideas and others are catching on to your racket. "If you can't dazzle them with brilliance, baffle them with (BalderdaSh)."

Google search

"Lessons From a Long War," the 2009 Commencement Address by Ryan ...It started for me, not on 9/11 and in its aftermath, but in Beirut, more than a quarter of a century ago, when the Embassy and Marine barracks were bombed. ... www.whitman.edu/content/news/crockercommencement - Cached - Similar

In Iraq, we tend to forget the unprecedented challenge that Saddam Hussein posed to the integrity of the United Nations system itself. ...

And it is a long war. It started for me, not on 9/11 and in its aftermath, but in Beirut, more than a quarter of a century ago, when the Embassy and Marine barracks were bombed. ...

President Bridges made a comment to me last night about you as a graduating class: 'You know as you graduate, that you don't have all the answers, but you've learned here how to question.' ...

It is a reminder that in life, you get what is just, often, only if you are ready to fight for it. ...

Whatever engagements you choose, you will be taking this education with you. It will serve you well, if you use it well. And one thing that I hope all of you on my right will do before you get out of here today, is offer a final word of thanks to those on my left. Because if it hasn't already, it will occur to you with increasing clarity that the gift of what you have received here is more than your native brilliance, however great you may think that is, it is also the work of this great faculty.

Whitman College president George Bridges is a sociologist.

Ryan Crocker, 1971, stated at Commencement Address, May 24, 2009 , "As Dr. Bridges noted, I was an English major during my time at Whitman."

https://www.whitman.edu/content/commencement/speakers/crocker/video

Lessons from a Long War" 2009 Commencement address by former Ambassador to Iraq Ryan Crocker, a 1971 Whitman graduate.

Crocker received the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the highest civilian honor a U.S. president can bestow, in January from then-President George W. Bush, who referred to him as "one of the finest Foreign Services officers in American history."

The majority of Crocker’s 38-year career was spent in the Middle East. "His understanding of the region is unmatched," said President Bush.


http://www.prosefights.org/nmlegal/theinvestigation/theinvestigation.htm#ryancrocker


Tuesday July 28, 2009 07:30 AM CDT

Some good news for a change...although just how good we don't know. It started with a strange and very short phone call from an unidentified source in Europe who said he was with an agency that is in a place to know what's going on with the advance planning for the possible attack on Iran by Israel. The caller informed us that because the ALTA/Shape of Things to Come reports run 'above chance' in their outcomes, and since some .mil types read them as soon as release, the folks in attack contingency planning have gone into much deeper target backgrounding than usual on secondary and tertiary targets. That was it. A very short phone call and the caller hung up - no other details. A foreign country code and a 'no such number' beyond that.

Whether the call is 'legit', or not, we certainly hope it is and that advance planning does turn up the 'risk' in a tertiary target which was outlined for the apparent October 25th (+/- a few days) attack date.

Wednesday July 29, 2009 07:55 AM CDT

A reader did ask an interesting question about the Monday phone call we got vis-à-vis the Iran attack in October. He asked - in so many words - "Is it possible that in sounding the alarm about the dangers of the tertiary target risks that the project might cause the events foreseen?"

That's one of those nightmares that keeps us awake nights. We know from past experience that when something about the future is widely reported (as we have done in the past) it often changes slightly in modelspace...so since the data 'pipe' is going to stay open, we may get some early indications maybe next week or the week after. I'll keep you posted, of course.



Wednesday July 29, 2009 07:11

Whitman College liberal arts education was fun and educational. We learned how they think.


http://home.comcast.net/~bpayne37/whitman59/whitman59after.htm#obamaphysics

----- Forwarded Message -----
From: "Melvin Davidson" melnbarbara@comcast.net
To: "bill payne" bpayne37@comcast.net
Sent: Thursday, July 23, 2009 11:02:41 AM GMT -07:00 US/Canada Mountain
Subject: The Physics of Obama


Some interesting ideas from the administration...



Subject: Automotive Industry Challenge...Dr. David Cole From a senior
level Chrysler person

Monday morning I attended a breakfast meeting where the speaker/guest
was Dr. David E. Cole, Chairman, Center for Automotive Research, (CAR
and Professor at the University of Michigan ). You have all likely
heard CAR quoted, or referred to in the auto industry news lately.

Dr. Cole, who is an engineer by training, told many stories of the
difficulty of working with the folks that the Obama administration has
sent to save the auto industry. There have been many meetings where a
30+ year experience automotive expert has to listen to a newcomer to the
industry, someone with zero manufacturing experience, zero auto industry
experience, zero business experience, zero finance experience, and zero
engineering experience, tell them how to run their business.

Dr. Cole's favorite story is as follows:

There was a team of Obama people speaking to Dr. Cole (Graduate
Engineer, automotive experience 40+ years, Chairman of CAR). They were
explaining to Dr. Cole that the auto companies needed to make a car that
was electric and utilized liquid natural gas (LNG) with enough combined
fuel to go 500 miles so we wouldn't "need" so many gas stations, (a
whole other topic). They were quoting the BTU's of LNG and battery life
that they had looked up on some website.

Dr. Cole explained that to do this you would need a trunk FULL of
batteries and a LNG tank at big as the car to make it happen and that
there were problems related to the basic laws of physics that prevented
them from...

The Obama person interrupted and said (and I am quoting here): "These
laws of physics? Who's rules are those? We need to change that. (Some
of the others diligently wrote down the law name so they could look it
up). We have both the congress and the administration. We can repeal
that law, amend it, or use an executive order to get rid of that
problem. That's why we are here, to fix these sort of issues".

This country is in big trouble...

Clearly these folks didn't take any of my classes. It will be interesting to see what kind of cars English majors and sociologists will come up with. / Mel

U.S. Energy Security and Natural Gas Vehicles: A Reality Check comment.

Whitman College president George Bridges is a sociologist.

Ryan Crocker is a 1971 Whitman College English major he reported in the now missing video.

https://www.whitman.edu/content/commencement/speakers/crocker/video

Lessons from a Long War" 2009 Commencement address by former Ambassador to Iraq Ryan Crocker, a 1971 Whitman graduate.

Crocker received the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the highest civilian honor a U.S. president can bestow, in January from then-President George W. Bush, who referred to him as "one of the finest Foreign Services officers in American history."

The majority of Crocker’s 38-year career was spent in the Middle East. "His understanding of the region is unmatched," said President Bush.




Thursday July 23, 2009 11:32

Shattuck School and Whitman College classmate R Cargill Hall brings up subject of Iran and Zbigniew Brzezinski.

Okay. Let's pursue these subjects.

We attribute much of the problems were having to liberal arts education.

But there are fellow liberal arts students who are helping.
----- Forwarded Message -----
From: "Melvin Davidson" melnbarbara@comcast.net
To: "bill payne" bpayne37@comcast.net
Sent: Thursday, July 23, 2009 11:02:41 AM GMT -07:00 US/Canada Mountain
Subject: The Physics of Obama


Some interesting ideas from the administration...



Subject: Automotive Industry Challenge...Dr. David Cole From a senior
level Chrysler person

Monday morning I attended a breakfast meeting where the speaker/guest
was Dr. David E. Cole, Chairman, Center for Automotive Research, (CAR
and Professor at the University of Michigan ). You have all likely
heard CAR quoted, or referred to in the auto industry news lately.

Dr. Cole, who is an engineer by training, told many stories of the
difficulty of working with the folks that the Obama administration has
sent to save the auto industry. There have been many meetings where a
30+ year experience automotive expert has to listen to a newcomer to the
industry, someone with zero manufacturing experience, zero auto industry
experience, zero business experience, zero finance experience, and zero
engineering experience, tell them how to run their business.

Dr. Cole's favorite story is as follows:

There was a team of Obama people speaking to Dr. Cole (Graduate
Engineer, automotive experience 40+ years, Chairman of CAR). They were
explaining to Dr. Cole that the auto companies needed to make a car that
was electric and utilized liquid natural gas (LNG) with enough combined
fuel to go 500 miles so we wouldn't "need" so many gas stations, (a
whole other topic). They were quoting the BTU's of LNG and battery life
that they had looked up on some website.

Dr. Cole explained that to do this you would need a trunk FULL of
batteries and a LNG tank at big as the car to make it happen and that
there were problems related to the basic laws of physics that prevented
them from...

The Obama person interrupted and said (and I am quoting here): "These
laws of physics? Who's rules are those? We need to change that. (Some
of the others diligently wrote down the law name so they could look it
up). We have both the congress and the administration. We can repeal
that law, amend it, or use an executive order to get rid of that
problem. That's why we are here, to fix these sort of issues".

This country is in big trouble...

Clearly these folks didn't take any of my classes. It will be interesting to see what kind of cars English majors and sociologists will come up with. / Mel



http://home.comcast.net/~bpayne37/whitman59/whitman59after.htm#taheri


----- Forwarded Message -----
From: "Cargill Hall" overflight@att.net
To: Undisclosed-Recipient:;
Sent: Wednesday, July 22, 2009 3:52:03 AM GMT -07:00 US/Canada Mountain
Subject: Amir Taheri's views on Iran

Thanks Fryar.
Cargill

Two items here. Amir Taheri, an Iranian exile, is in my opinion one of the best analysts of the Middle East.

F.
---------------------------------------
National Review Online Blog, 6/24/09
http://corner.nationalreview.com/post/?q=NjU0NmNhYjNiMDM3NTA0MGFjNTQ4NjExZDNiYjU5NzY=
Iran, Exposed

[Kathryn Jean Lopez]

As people die from the government crackdown, I asked Amir Taheri if any real progress is actually being made in Iran, for Iranians. He’s optimistic:

Yes. The regime has already lost control of the streets. It is now holding them not through “popular masses” but with armored cars and forces of repression.

On Wednesday, the regime was forced to cancel its rent-a-mob demonstration against Britain’s alleged “interventions in Iranian affairs.” Its fear was that the opposition might use the stage-managed event as a cover for its own genuine protest demonstration.

Meanwhile, the taboo of criticizing Khamenei has been broken.

Hundreds of poems and songs mocking him, some using his sobriquet “Ali Gedda” (Ali the Beggar), are now in circulation throughout Iran. He has been exposed as the “godfather” of the Khomeinist establishment rather than the arbiter of national interests as he claimed.

People like Zbigniew Brzezinski can no longer go around claiming that the Khomeinist regime is a “vibrant democracy.” Sen. John Kerry cannot pretend, as he did in a recent New York Times oped, that Iran was facing not a popular uprising but a “neco-con plot.” Even if Ahmadinejad manages to impose himself for four more years, President Obama will not have a remotely credible interlocutor to negotiate with.

The revolution that led to the shah’s fall took a year before it bore fruit.

History is not written in advance, and the current revolt in Iran may well fizzle out.

However, one thing is now certain: The oxymoron “Islamic Republic” has been exposed as a sham.

The regime in Iran has become an Islamic emirate, or imamate if you prefer, like the one that existed in Yemen until 1961 and in Afghanistan under the Taliban until 2002.

In Iran we have reached a moment of clarity. And, believe me, that is priceless.

In my humble way I have fought for three decades to help bring about that clarity, to show my people, and the world at large, the true nature of the regime created by Khomeini, and I am happy.

To be sure, I hope to be even happier a year from now.

-----------------------------------------
National Review Online, 6/17/09 http://article.nationalreview.com/?q=NDMwM2Q0ODM3NTBhYjA0OWYyYzUzODQ0YzI1NmFiNzY=

Light on the Night
Inside Iran.

An NRO Q&A;

In recent days, the world has been riveted by images from Iran. Fallout from a “disputed” — that is, fraudulent — presidential election has spurred massive street protests, which the Iranian regime is attempting to suppress by force. How will the violence end? Could Iran be on the cusp of a democratic revolution? For answers to these questions and others, National Review’s Kathryn Lopez turned to Iranian-born journalist Amir Taheri, author of the new book, The Persian Night: Iran Under the Khomeinist Revolution.

KATHRYN JEAN LOPEZ: Why did anyone pretend that Iran had a shot at a democratic election last week? The American media and President Obama seemed to.

AMIR TAHERI: Yes, many journalists and certainly President Obama have been desperate for some good news from Tehran. A segment of the Western Left has always regarded the Islamic Republic with sympathy because of its supposed “anti-imperialist” stance. As for Obama, he is trying to reverse Bush’s Middle East policy, which sought to distance the U.S. from its traditional support for despotic regimes in the name of realism. By pushing for democratization, Bush changed the political landscape in our region. Afghanistan and Iraq got a chance to build a different future. Lebanon has just held a genuinely free election, without Syrian troops on its soil. Kuwait has enfranchised women, and has even allowed four women to be elected to the parliament for the first time. Egypt has accepted multi-candidate presidential elections, and even Saudi Arabia has held elections for some of the seats on municipal councils.

Opponents of the Bush Doctrine, including Obama, first claimed that Arabs, and Muslims in general, are not ready for democracy. Once this was proved not to be the case in so many countries, the same people claimed that democracy would only bring the Islamists to power. However, that, too, was proved wrong. In Pakistan’s latest general election, the Islamist share of the vote shrunk from 11 percent to 3 percent. In Iraq, the Islamist parties were defeated across the board in municipal elections. In Kuwait, the Islamist bloc in the parliament was cut by half. In Lebanon, Hezbollah won 11 of the 128 seats in the parliament, and the coalition under its leadership failed to win a majority.

The statement, “Democracy cannot be imposed by force,” is often made by Obama as if it were the cleverest of philosophical observations. However, we know that democracy can be imposed by force, as happened in West Germany, Japan, and Italy, among other places, after the Second World War. In any case, what happened in Afghanistan and Iraq was not the imposition of democracy by force, but the use of force to remove impediments to democracy. Imagine using force to topple the despots in Burma or Zimbabwe. Would that not remove impediments to democracy?

In the case of Iran, the phrase was used to reduce the debate to a choice between preemptive war, regarded as the original sin, and preemptive surrender. Because we don’t want war with Iran, let us surrender to the mullahs! Opponents of the Bush Doctrine had hoped for “a shot at a democratic election” to prove that there was no need for regime change in Tehran. Something that looked like a free election would have made it easier for Obama to sell his appeasement policy. We now know that the theory of “evolution within the Islamic regime,” so dear to Joe Biden, is pure nonsense. Totalitarian regimes cannot reform themselves.

LOPEZ: Your new book is titled The Persian Night. When did the “Persian Night” begin and when will it end — and how?

TAHERI: The night that has fallen on my country started in February 1979, when armed groups attacked army barracks and police stations in Tehran and seized control of major government buildings. The Shah’s army and government evaporated, leaving a vacuum that was filled quickly by the Khomeinists, who at that time led a coalition of leftist, nationalist, and Islamist groups and parties. The “night” continued with the imposition of theocracy, the massacre of tens of thousands of political prisoners from all points on the ideological spectrum, the forcing into exile of some 5 million Iranians, an eight-year war with Iraq that claimed a million lives, genocidal operations and ethnic cleansing in areas inhabited by Iranian Kurds and Turkmens, and so on.

During this long night, more than 10 million Iranians have spent some time in the regime’s prisons on a wide range of charges, from violation of the Islamic dress code to practicing religions other than Khomeinist Islam. This has been a night of censorship and terror, of attempts at destroying Iran’s multi-millennial culture and civilization. This long night will end when the regime is overthrown. The Khomeinist system cannot be reformed, just as the Soviet Union and Nazi Germany could not. The only realistic option in Iran is regime change. This is what Iranians want. Listen to the shouts of “Marg bar diktator!” (“Death to the dictator”) in streets, and from rooftops, throughout Iran.

LOPEZ: In what sense is Iran a “haven of jihad”?

TAHERI: Every single terrorist organization in the world has an office in Tehran. The Islamic Republic organizes an international terrorist feast every year, from February 1 to 11. The regime spends vast sums of money in support of what it calls “exporting the revolution.” Right now, the Islamic Republic is sponsoring terror operations in Afghanistan, Iraq, Lebanon, Bahrain, Yemen, and Egypt, among other countries.

LOPEZ: In the current environment — Ahmadinejad there, Obama here — can anything be done about that?

TAHERI: The people of Iran have never wanted the United States to take any risks on their behalf. Apologists for the Khomeinist regime claim that its opponents want a military invasion of Iran. Nothing is further from the truth. Obama, meanwhile, pretends that the choice is between preemptive war and preemptive surrender. Since preemptive war is associated with the “simplistic” George W. Bush, the sophisticated Obama is trying to market his preemptive surrender as “intelligent and vigorous diplomacy.”

All that Iranians want the U.S. to do is to be true to its own principles, not to kowtow to the Khomeinist regime, and not to help it restore its shattered legitimacy. We want Obama to condemn the shooting of demonstrators in Iranian streets and the rigging of the election, and to make it clear that he would not shake Ahmadinejad’s bloodstained hand. We want Obama not to organize a strategic retreat from the Middle East, which would create a vacuum that the Khomeinists would fill. We want him not to leave the region’s new and fragile democracies alone and defenseless against the Islamofascists.

We also want him not to flatter the Islamists by pretending that the Renaissance and the Enlightenment were bred in an Islamic theological college. Don’t claim that Islam invented the pen and the printing press along with poetry and architecture — as if the Hellenic, Byzantine, Persian, Indian, and Chinese civilizations could be scripted out of history. Today, the U.S. has a choice: It can side with the Iranian people and invest in a future democratic Iran, or it can beg for a dialogue with the Islamofacists gathered around Ali Khamenei.

LOPEZ: One of the chapter titles in your book is “Crazy Eddie and Martyr Hussein.” Who are they, and why is it important to know about them?

TAHERI: The “Crazy Eddies” of the moment are to be found in Washington. Hardly a day passes without the Obama administration offering more appeasement goodies to the Khomeinists. Obama expresses “concern” about “reports of violence” from Iran. Only “concern”? Only “reports”? Hasn’t he watched the television news? Has he no access to YouTube? The “Martyr Husseins” of the moment are around Ahmadinejad. These individuals are prepared to see Iran destroyed in the hope of accelerating the return of the “Hidden Imam” by provoking global conflagration.

LOPEZ: You call Iran “schizophrenic.” What do you mean by that?

TAHERI: There are two Irans. One is Iran as a vehicle for the Khomeinist revolution; the other is Iran as a nation-state. The interests of the two do not always coincide, and often they clash. For example, Iran as a revolution must act as an enemy of the United States in order to establish “anti-imperialist” credentials and woo those in Arab and Muslim countries who hate the U.S. because of its refusal to allow the destruction of Israel. Iran as a nation-state, however, has no quarrels with the United States. In fact, the U.S. is the most popular foreign nation among Iranians. In my book, I have given numerous instances of this split personality. Iran is experiencing a Jekyll-and-Hyde form of schizophrenia.

LOPEZ: Executions have been on the rise in Iran. Is that all about maintaining fear and control?

TAHERI: Executions have always been a major instrument of terror in the hands of Islamofascists. According to Amnesty International, the Islamic Republic executed more than 25,000 people in the first three years of the Khomeini regime. Every time the regime felt threatened, it went for mass executions. In 1989 — when, incidentally, Mr. Mir-Hossein Mousavi, the defeated candidate in last Friday’s presidential “election,” was prime minister — the regime executed 8,000 people in three days. Iranian human-rights organizations have collected data about more than 100,000 executions since 1979. People are executed on all sorts of charges: anti-regime activity, gay and lesbian lifestyles, being Christian or Bahai, espionage for Israel or the United States, membership in banned political groups.

LOPEZ: Are you afraid there are going to be more mass executions in the coming months?

TAHERI: In his “victory” speech last Saturday, Ahmadinejad implicitly threatened more executions. This kind of regime is always based on mass murder. My hope is that the current popular movement will gain enough strength to make it impossible for the regime to organize the kind of mass murders we saw in 1981, 1983, and 1989. Right now, Iran is holding 10,000 prisoners of conscience, more than any other country in the world. Mohseni Ezhehi, a mullah who acts as minister of security and intelligence, warned on Sunday that some of the prisoners already sentenced to death might be executed quickly as a warning to “troublemakers” in the streets. In the past few days, hundreds of people have been arrested throughout the country. Scores of intellectuals, trade unionists, women’s-rights activists, and leaders of nongovernmental organizations have simply disappeared. We have already appealed to the European Union and the United Nations to be vigilant and warn the regime against mass executions.

LOPEZ: A while back you wrote that Iran was in its “deepest crisis” since 1979. Does that term now apply to the current situation?

TAHERI: Well, the ruling establishment is split three ways: There are the bitter-enders led by Ahmadinejad; the “accommodationists” led by former president Hashemi Rafsanjani; and those, like former interior minister Abdullah Nuri, who want an end to the Khomeinist system. The popular movement is also divided, with different centers of leadership in competition against one another.

At the same time, the nation is heading for an economic meltdown — with an average of 1,000 people losing their jobs each day and inflation over 20 percent.

The military is also split; even the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC), the regime’s Praetorian Guard, does not appear to be immune to splits. The defense minister, an IRGC general, has endorsed Ahmadinejad in glowing terms. However, the current IRGC commander, another general, has remained silent. On Monday, IRGC units refused to enter Tehran to quell the demonstrations. And in at least two cities, Shiraz and Mashhad, IRGC units stood by and watched anti-regime demonstrations without reacting.

We do not have a history of civil wars in Iran. But the Khamenei-Ahmadinejad tandem appears to be deliberately pushing the country toward such a situation.

LOPEZ: Do the Iranian people have any hope of a democratic revolution?

TAHERI: Most certainly. The democratic discourse is already dominant in Iran. For the first time in decades, the Iranian intelligentsia is united in its support of democratization. The intelligentsia have been split between left and right from the 1920s onwards. But now that Communism is dead and other leftist ideologies have lost their appeal, all the rivulets are flowing back into a mainstream of democratic pluralism. Needless to say, Islamism has also become a bankrupt ideology, while traditional nationalism appears outmoded. The only lively option for most Iranians is democracy. Our nation has seen free elections in Afghanistan and Iraq, and it wonders why it should not have the chance to choose its own leaders. All the more so because Iran was the first Muslim-majority country to establish a parliament (in 1906) and hold free elections. Iran also has a rich history of political activity across the ideological spectrum. The Khomeinists have tried to impose uniformity on my people, just as other totalitarians — from Stalin and Hitler to Mao Zedong and Kim Il Sung — tried in their respective lands. But they have failed. Iran is ready for pluralism, and it could develop the leadership to build a democratic system of government.

LOPEZ: What happens if Iran attacks Israel, or vice versa?

TAHERI: Iran as a nation has no reason to attack Israel. In fact, when we consider Iran as a nation-state, we see Israel as its natural ally. The reason is that Israel, like Iran, is opposed to an exclusively Arab Middle East. Both want a pluralist Middle East in which there is room for diversity; a Middle East where one finds Iranians, Turks, Kurds, Christians, and Jews, as well as Arabs. In all Arab countries — including Syria, which lives on a subsidy from Tehran — the name of the Persian Gulf is changed “the Arabian Gulf.” In Israel, however, it remains the Persian Gulf, as it has always been.

Most Arab countries — again including the mercenary regime in Syria — support the fiction that the Iranian province of Khuzestan, where 80 percent of Iran’s oil is located, is part of the “Arab homeland.” They call it “Arabistan” (Land of the Arabs) and support a number of secessionist groups operating in or close to the province. (Incidentally, I myself am from Khuzestan — I was born in its capital, Ahvaz.) Several Arab countries also claim sovereignty over three Iranian islands strategically located close to the Strait of Hormuz. Israel, however, makes no territorial claims against Iran. Iranians are proud that Cyrus the Great, the founder of the first Iranian empire, liberated the Jews from bondage in Babylon some 2,500 years ago and helped them return to their ancestral land and rebuild their temple. During the Iran-Iraq war (1980–88), Israel helped smuggle key arms to Iran, helping us defeat Saddam Hussein. There is absolutely no objective reason why Iran, as a nation-state, should be an enemy of Israel, let alone want to go to war with it.

As the vehicle for the Islamic Revolution, however, Iran must be and is an enemy of Israel. The Khomeinists hope to assume the leadership of Muslims in the Middle East, thus creating what Ahmadinejad calls “the hard core of an Islamic superpower.” However, most Arabs are Sunni Muslims, and would find it hard to accept the predominantly Shiite Iran as the leader of an “Islamic superpower.” It is in the hope of seducing the Arabs that Ahmadinejad speaks of “wiping Israel off the map.” As a vehicle for the Islamic Revolution, Iran has been at war with Israel for 30 years, a proxy war that it has waged through agents and allies such as the Lebanese branch of Hezbollah, the Islamic Jihad, and, more recently, the Palestinian Hamas. Iran as a vehicle for revolution is committed to the destruction of the Jewish state. Iran as a nation-state, however, would see its interest in the preservation of Israel.

As for Israel’s attacking Iran, I think Israeli leaders will think carefully about what I have already said. Do they want to risk losing Iran as a strategic ally in order to score a tactical point against Iran as a vehicle for revolution? If Israel attacks Iran’s nuclear installations, this might slow the program for a few years. But if the Khomeinist regime remains in power, the program could be revived. Briefly, I don’t think the Khomeinists will retaliate by directly attacking Israel itself. They would not want to risk an escalation that could ultimately force the U.S. to enter the fray in support of Israel. Instead, the Khomeinist regime will respond through its proxies among Lebanese and Palestinian radicals.

LOPEZ: What should people never forget about Iran?

TAHERI: As long as Iran is controlled by Islamofascists, it will remain a threat to America. Therefore, America’s interests and indeed its security require the emergence of a democratic regime in Iran. Successive U.S. administrations, from Jimmy Carter to Barack Obama, have tried to appease the Khomeinist regime and failed. Remember the Soviet Union? It was always an existential threat as long as it was a totalitarian state, even during the so-called détente period. Today, Russia may be a rival, a competitor — even a nuisance — but it is not an existential threat to the United State. Strategically, the only realistic policy vis-à-vis the USSR was regime change. It is the same with Iran today. No one is asking the U.S. to invade Iran or even to help the opposition. But the minimum the U.S. can do is not swim against the tide of history in Iran. The tide of history is toward change. With every day that passes, Khamenei and Ahmadinejad — the men Obama hopes to woo — look increasingly like figures from another time and another place.



Tuesday August 4, 2009

Administrative, legal, political, and soap box [pro se fights] remedies must all be pursued.

In these matters don't be afraid to try it again if it did not work the first time.

Gangster government.

Let's hope DOE is working hard to get these unfortunate matters settled.

Chris Morris 202-586-3159


http://home.comcast.net/~bpayne37/whitman59/whitman59after.htm#latimes

----- Forwarded Message -----
From: bpayne37@comcast.net
To: "ned parker" ned.parker@latimes.com, "Liz Sly" Liz.Sly@latimes.com
Cc: "art morales" amorales58@comcast.net
Sent: Thursday, July 9, 2009 6:56:27 AM GMT -07:00 US/Canada Mountain
Subject: improve relations with Tehran

U.S. military frees five Iranian diplomats held since 2007
By Liz Sly and Ned Parker, Los Angeles Times Staff Writers 5:29 AM PDT, July 9, 2009

http://www.prosefights.org/nmlegal/theinvestigation/theinvestigation.htm#reedemail

We filed a genocide criminal complaint affidavit against Brzezinski in New Mexico 97CV 266.

Thursday June 11, 2009 18:40

How thoughtful on my 72nd birthday.


This cost us $22,036 which we are in the process of trying to get back.


The Good, the Bad and the Ugly (Italian: Il Buono, il Brutto, il Cattivo) is a 1966 Italian epic spaghetti western film directed by Sergio Leone, starring Clint Eastwood, Lee Van Cleef, and Eli Wallach in the title roles.

Wednesday July 8, 2009 07:02


But they are also 30 percent more efficient than older bulbs. Philips says that a 70-watt Halogena Energy Saver gives off the same amount of light as a traditional 100-watt bulb and lasts about three times as long, eventually paying for itself.

The line, for now sold exclusively at Home Depot and on Amazon.com, is not as efficient as compact fluorescent light bulbs, which can use 75 percent less energy than old-style bulbs. But the Energy Saver line is finding favor with consumers who dislike the light from fluorescent bulbs or are bothered by such factors as their slow start-up time and mercury content.


PNM is pushing CFLs at WAL*MART



so that more new construction can continue, of course.

PNM forecaster Steve Martin alerted us about new construction as the principal factor in increased electric load. See FOIL 1.



http://home.comcast.net/~bpayne37/whitman59/whitman59after.htm#cfls






Sunday July 5, 2009 06:19

Prosefights posted the below June 26 email at Truthdig.

Patty Payne reported by phone July 4, 2009 from Bradenton, FL that her three sisters are going to demonstrate at a Tea Party in Florida.



Tea Party Plans To Show Off Size Today

from PAGE C1

organizers hope can draw more than 10,000 people.

The Albuquerque event is being held just east of the Balloon Fiesta Park entrance at 4509 Alameda Blvd. NE on Telstar Construction Company property. It's scheduled to run froir 4 to 6 p.m.

Linda Merrell, another organizer, said that, once people understand what the Tea Party is really about, they are usually more likely to join than to criticize.

It's all about spending whai the country can afford and keeping government from intruding on our daily lives, Merrell said.

Government needs to shrink before deficits or taxation become too much for the country to handle, she said. "What (elected officials) need to understand is that the American people know there is only so much we can afford."

And while each Tea Party is different, the AlbuquerquE version is fiercely nonpartisan, Carson said. Both politi. cal parties have approached the group trying to coopt its members - and message, she said.

"They've tried to do that, but that's just not going to work," Carson said. "These people here in this movement, they're not sheep to be herded by a political party."

Merrell said the evidence of the group's appeal can be seen through its quick rise into the public eye. She said it was organized by about 50 friends and acquaintances who sent out e-mails and set up a Web site. Just a few short weeks later, on April 15, roughly 7,000 people showed up to demonstrate on Albuquerque's Montgomery Blvd., she said. (Journal reporters covering the event were able to estimate a crowd about half that size).

Most of the people who have pledged their support aren't crackpots, Carson said. They're normal people with concerns that have been ignored by both parties for a long time. And most have never been part of a political movement before, Merrell said.

"I've never protested or carried a sign or done anything like this," Merrell said.

Albuquerque Journal Saturday July 4, 2009



http://home.comcast.net/~bpayne37/whitman59/whitman59after.htm#paine


Tuesday June 30, 2009 10:14

The word ignore is used lots in the below video.



We have to get NCUA to pay attention and respond inquiries in writing.

Liberal arts educated must be kept off their verbal turf.


http://home.comcast.net/~bpayne37/whitman59/whitman59after.htm#paine


----- Forwarded Message -----
From:
To: undisclosed-recipients:;
Sent: Friday, June 26, 2009 4:19:01 PM GMT -07:00 US/Canada Mountain
Subject: [Fwd: Fw: (no subject)]

----- Folks - truer words never spoken - now what?

Dear Friends, won't you please listen to this carefully?

This guy's video on youtube has been so popular that Obama called him personally. He said that he was very disturbed with the video and invited him to the White House. Obama also said he wanted the White House to handle the Press and not to talk about the video or the White House visit. That's interesting.

Watch it now. This may be the best six minutes invested in your future

You may have to turn your Sound Control up some.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jeYscnFpEyA




Saturday July 4, 2009 06:49

Opportunity to learn a lot of liberal arts BS was available at Whitman.

Many, if not most, of the students availed themselves this opportunity.

We believe we heard George Bridges at lunch on June 26, 2009 reporting on how he abused a female Whitman College student with his opinions.

Nonetheless, we have a job for Bridges and

https://www.whitman.edu/content/commencement/speakers/crocker/video

Lessons from a Long War" 2009 Commencement address by former Ambassador to Iraq Ryan Crocker, a 1971 Whitman graduate.

Crocker received the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the highest civilian honor a U.S. president can bestow, in January from then-President George W. Bush, who referred to him as "one of the finest Foreign Services officers in American history."

The majority of Crocker’s 38-year career was spent in the Middle East. "His understanding of the region is unmatched," said President Bush.

to try to help get these unfortunate matters peacefully settled before they get worse.

Shattuck school clasmate Bill Howden andformer mayor of Rio Rancho, NM and bill will have lunch at the Flying Star on Rio Grande Bvld on July 7, 2009 to discuss some of these matters..


http://home.comcast.net/~bpayne37/whitman59/whitman59after.htm#george


Sunday May 24, 2009.



Received Saturday July 3, 2009.



Saturday May 23, 2009.



Cargill Hall is important to this project because he personally knows Thomas C Reed.
Friday July 3, 2009 07:52

Paper distribution of EE Times may be phased out it appears.

EE Times got our legal project off the ground.

Electronic Engineering Times, January 22, 1996, p. 84.


New Mexico electric energy and corruption are moving our legal project ahead.

New Mexico may be embarked on its next sting?

http://www.prosefights.org/nmlegal/eclipse/eclipse.htm#blog

Wind, Backup Power and Emissions Sobel comment.

And liberal arts education too!



http://home.comcast.net/~bpayne37/whitman59/whitman59after.htm#cfl




03 July 2009 How compact fluorescent lamps work--and how to dim them

KNME passed out free frizbees and



at the Magdelena Ridge Observatory on Saturday June 27, 2009.
INTERNATIONAL YEAR OF ASTRONOMY 2009

Speaker: Dr. Dave Westpfahl, Professor and chair of the Physics department at New Mexico Tech Date: June 27, 2009 Time: 9:00 am - 1:00 pm Meeting Location: MRO - South Baldy Ridge in the Magdalena Mountains, 30 miles west of the NM Tech campus

Let's see how the above works to replace a 75 watt incandescent bulb in the light seen below.



Incandescent 75 watt bulb replace by above cfl on Friday July 3, 2009.



Bright white light drawing only 15 watts.

http://www.planetanalog.com/features/showArticle.jhtml;jsessionid=VBAJ4WYVA5LESQSNDLPCKH0CJUNN2JVN?articleID=215800707#community


Thursday July 2, 2009 07:34

The old GIGABYTE 7VM400M-RZ running Windows 98SE on a AMD XP 1.6 did not work plugged into a APC 1200 watt UPS. It had to be plugged directly into the wall.

An somewhat expensive lesson since the predecessor ups was given to a neighbor when conclusion was the problem was in the UPS.

The new GIGABYTE GA-MA78GM-USB2H running Windows XP home on an AMD PHENOM works well with the APC 1200 watt UPS


http://home.comcast.net/~bpayne37/whitman59/whitman59after.htm#apc2

Wre're now able to monitor PNM electric performance in our neighborhood.



Negative aspect of the new computer is its power consumption.



measured Thursday morning July 2, 2009.

Electric power is becoming more expensive. Shortages may develop in the future.
Thu Oct 02 01:00:00 CDT 2008 A new study released this week highlights what experts have been saying for years: the U.S. faces significant risk of power brownouts and blackouts as early as next summer that may cost tens of billions of dollars and threaten lives.

The study, "Lights Out In 2009?" warns that the U.S. "faces potentially crippling electricity brownouts and blackouts beginning in the summer of 2009, which may cost tens of billions of dollars and threaten lives." ...



Wednesday July 1, 2007 17:56

We have known of John Markoff for many years. And even communicated with Markoff.

Markoff is a colleague of
The Baltimore Sun, About December 4, 1995, pp. 9-11.

No Such Agency Part Four

Rigging the Game

Spy Sting: Few at the Swiss factory knew the mysterious visitors were pulling off a stunning intelligence coup -- perhaps the most audacious in the National Security Agency's long war on foreign codes.

By Scott Shane and Tom Bowman, Sun Staff

Zug, Switzerland. For four decades, the Swiss flag that flies in front of Crypto AG has lured customers from around the world to this company in the lake dis- [words missing] most sensitive diplomatic and military communications value Switzerland's reputation for business secrecy and political neutrality. Some 120 nations have bought their encryption machines here.

But behind that flag, America's National Security Agency hid what may be the intelligence sting of the century. For years, NSA secretly rigged Crypto AG machines so that U.S. eavesdroppers could easily break their codes, according to former company employees whose story is supported by company documents.

The value to NSA of such an intelligence windfall is hard to exaggerate. For NSA effortlessly to read coded messages between top officials of many countries is the equivalent of recruiting reliable spies in key government posts around the world, receiving minute-by-minute reports from them and never risking that they will be unmasked.

NSA appears to have pulled off an international sleight of hand as brazen and brilliant as the original Trojan horse by winning the covert cooperation of the Swiss firm. Wary of encryption companies in NATO countries, the suspicious governments of such prime U.S. targets as Iran, Iraq, Libya and Yugoslavia bought equipment from Crypto AG (or Crypto Inc.). They never imagined that when they coded their messages with the Swiss machines, they may have been sending an easily unscrambled copy directly to NSA headquarters at Fort Meade.



We did not know until Jason Arp sent



that Markoff is a Whitman grad.

We have some problems with liberal arts education we must address.


http://home.comcast.net/~bpayne37/whitman59/whitman59after.htm#markoff




Sunday June 28, 2009 18:56

We did not learn software at Whitman.

Some software at Purdue, not through courses, but by self-study of computer manuals and doing.

At WSU I taught IBM assembler largely as a result of my experience with IBM 1401 and IBM 7090 at Purdue.

At Sandia Labs I took as many industrial courses as possible 8051 school twice, 9096, INTEL 80386 hardware and systems all taught by INTEL.

Don White TEMPEST harware design course.

DOS course taught by Don White. FORTH course taught by ? ... Both held at Sandia Labs.

There are different forms of education. Liberal arts, University somewhat practical, Industrial practical, ....

Shmoo plots are not likely taught at Whitman.

College professors teach what they know and don't teach what they do not know.

College professors almost exclusively learned what they know at a Unversity.

This goes on generation after generation.

Below article is of interest because of my Boeing 767 work experience.

My Thoughts on Bernanke, Boeing and Citibank comment.

And about 50 years of computer work experience.

We wonder if Airbus A330 using real-time operating systems [RTOS].

8051 family FORTH RTOS was job assignment at Sandia Labs.


http://home.comcast.net/~bpayne37/whitman59/whitman59after.htm#A330


Northwest Jet Suffers Similar Malfunctions to Air France Flight

[D]uring the brief but dramatic event, the Northwest Airbus A330's crew was left without reliable speed measurements for three minutes. In addition, the computer safeguards designed to keep the aircraft from flying dangerously too fast or too slow were also impaired. Like the Air France A330 jetliner, the Northwest plane entered a storm and quickly started showing erroneous and unreliable airspeed readings. ...

Recent crashes and incidents underscore that "pilots don't just need to understand automation," they also must recognize "how it fails and how to deal with that," says Bill Voss, head of the Flight Safety Foundation. "Some of these situations don't have checklists and plans," he says, yet aviators must "have a way to cope."...

Coping with computer problems is part of routine pilot training. But "pilots only occasionally have the chance to practice" flying a plane with major computer systems down, says John Goglia, a former NTSB member. Part of the reason is because airlines want to reduce training costs by limiting the amount of time pilots practice in simulators.

Write to Andy Pasztor at andy.pasztor@wsj.com and Daniel Michaels at daniel.michaels@wsj.com


Sunday June 28, 2009 12:18

We bought a Logitech USB desktop microphone. Here's our first try.

We bought new webcam for reason that old would not install under xp. But we used a Sun sound card microphone.

Poor, aka BS, education is at the root of many of today's problems, we believe.

The Geeks Shall Not Inherit the Earth commentS.

Know your own BS.

John E Harrigan
Washington State University psychology professor ca 1966


http://home.comcast.net/~bpayne37/whitman59/whitman59after.htm#geeks

We have been facing lawlessness in CIV 97-266 MCA/LFG, of course.

Criminal lawlessness in writing. Our $22,036.00 stolen retirement-protected Sandia Laboratory Federal Credit Union savings funds.

"Once lawlessness becomes a norm, things will be complicated and the interests of people will be undermined," Khamenei said after a meeting with lawmakers, according to state television.

"Everyone should respect the law," he said. "Even in the case of the recent incidents, I have been, still am and will continue to be insisting on the implementation of the law. . . . Certainly, neither the system nor the people will yield to pressure under any circumstances."



Friday June 26, 2009 05:18

Electric energy conservation is important to us as it is to Whitman college and prof Carson.

So we looked, in real world terms, at how the AMD Phenom 9950 X4 Quad-Core Processor is consuming power.

We are running at 2.5 GHz.

http://home.comcast.net/~bpayne37/whitman59/whitman59after.htm#phenom


We worked for ten years writing windows device drivers and APIs.



We are grossed out.



by how Windows handles a quad-core processor.

Note the ™ not ® Whitman college.

There is a very important distinction between the ™ and ® and COPYRIGHT and ©.

You pay your money to the feds and wait. And if you use ® or © before the gov issues a certificate, then there is a serious penalty.



179 watts!

The AMD Phenom 9950 X4 Quad-Core Processor is protected by a very large fan.

So for green sake we must consider powering down when it is not in use.

Friday June 19, 2009 17:28

Cargill Hall and Payne are both 1959 graduates of Whitman College.

Hall is a 1955 and Payne a 1956 graduate of Shattuck School.

Bill Howden, former mayor of Rio Rancho, NM was a year behind bill at Shattuck.

Bill Howden, Patty and I met at a Arts and Crafts festival where bill was playing a banjo many years ago.

Howden is a very good banjo player.

Hello, bill
director@abqfolkfest.org

http://www.prosefights.org/shattuck/shattuck.htm



http://home.comcast.net/~bpayne37/whitman59/whitman59after.htm#howden

Friday June 19, 2009 11:34

Book writing is an avocation for us. And we write for the money.

We are suprised that the really geek book Embedded Controller Forth for the 8051 Family looks to have made, so far, $15,537.24.

We might make more money with a good pro se legal project book?

A New Productivity Revolution comment.
A New Productivity Revolution second comment.

http://home.comcast.net/~bpayne37/whitman59/whitman59after.htm#forthbook



Thursday June 18, 2009 19:05

Whitman College/Iran link.
Algebra knowledge acquired from professor Aboulghassem [sp?] Zirakzadeh at the University of Colorado in the summer of 1958 was used for Sandia labs job assignment tutorial.



Frederic Wehrey of RAND was sent an email with link to Reed email.

But we did not send a link to cool music.

Whitman college math professor William Hutchings instruction was, in large part, responsible for
Orderly enumeration of nonsingular binary matrices applied to text encryption

Whitman college math professor Douglas Underwood educated me about



Knowlege imparted by Hutchings, Underwood, Zirakzadeh at the undergraduate level propelled me into graduate school math and statistics at Purdue.

And computing too!

I've competed against as a graduate student from undergraduate students from Harvard, MIT, Cornell, the big ten ... at Purdue.

Here's the surprise TO ME.

Logic taught in math and engineering schools at the above was inferior, I discovered, to my logic course in the philosophy department at Whitman College!



Let's try to use logic with NCUA. Right Spock?

We continue to emphasize that we are using our knowledge of way liberal arts students think in our NCUA fraud loss complaint letter/appeal.

Liberal arts students tend to be more "touchy feely" and interested in interpretation as opposed to facts. In this case all of the facts are in writing.

So you have to make them visible.

The Islamic Republic Is Not in Danger comment.

We now have three unopened Whitman letters.

http://home.comcast.net/~bpayne37/whitman59/whitman59after.htm#alsip4

Received Thursday June 18, 2009 but not opened.







Friday June 12, 2009 17:50

Cool music.


http://home.comcast.net/~bpayne37/whitman59/whitman59after.htm#bonner


We went to dinner with a group of Americans last night – at one of London’s oldest gentleman’s clubs. Women are not allowed at the bar or in many other parts of the club, but they may come for dinner in the main dining room. Included was a young woman:

"I have a lot of friends who are just getting out of college. None of them has gotten a good job. Instead, they're all moving back in with mom and dad. And some of them are in their mid-'20s... It's very depressing."

It's a phenomenon known as household compression. Households expand and contract with the credit cycle. The '80s, '90s and early '00s were a time of household expansion. Families broke up. Men and women separated, setting up house in different places. The average house size went up...but the average number of people per household size went down!

Now, those trends are reversing. Children are moving in with parents...spouses are moving back in with each other...old folks are staying put. Multi-generational families are becoming more common.

We don't have any statistical proof of this. But it makes sense. And it's not a bad thing. We've had a multi-generational household for many years. Grandmother, parents and children all in one house. Everyone seemed to benefit from it.


Maybe we're getting close to send a pointed email to Whitman college president Bridges and RAND first author Wherey suggesting what they can do help peaceful settlement?



Thursday June 11, 2009 18:40

How thoughtful on my 72nd birthday.

----- Forwarded Message -----
From: "Iran Defense Forum" support@irandefence.net
To: bpayne37@comcast.net
Sent: Wednesday, June 10, 2009 10:01:34 PM GMT -08:00 Tijuana / Baja California
Subject: Happy Birthday from Iran Defense Forum

Hello billp37,

We at Iran Defense Forum would like to wish you a happy birthday today!


Thomas C Reed [pink pants] has freaked-out. Further.

Maybe for good reasons.



The U.S. has denied that it gave Iraq a "green light" for its September 22, 1980 invasion of Iran. Five months before Iraq's invasion, on April 14, 1980, Zbigniew Brzezinski, signaled the U.S.'s willingness to work with Iraq: "We see no fundamental incompatibility of interests between the United States and Iraq... we do not feel that American-Iraqi relations need to be frozen in antagonisms." According to Iran's president at the time, Abolhassan Banisadr, Brzezinski met directly with Saddam Hussein in Jordan two months before the Iraqi assault. Bani-Sadr wrote, "Brzezinski had assured Saddam Hussein that the United States would not oppose the separation of Khuzestan [in southwest Iran] from Iran."[6]


We're on a first name basis with George.

http://www.whitman.edu/content/president/biography

After earning his undergraduate degree in 1972 from the University of Washington, Dr. Bridges pursued his graduate studies at the University of Pennsylvania. There he earned his MA in criminology (1973) and Ph.D. in sociology (1979). His areas of expertise include social control, criminal justice, juvenile justice, crime and its measurement, and research methods and statistics.

Dr Payne directed his final Ph.D. disserations in computer science at WSU in 1971.

Dr Payne was on sabbatical leave at the computer science department at the University of Illinois - Urbana Champaign in 1972-3.

How shall we start Bridges help email salutation? "George, my boy" Or ... .

Think things out in advance while listening to cool music, Farsi and studying some Persian algebra.

Algebra knowledge acquired from professor Aboulghassem [sp?] Zirakzadeh at the University of Colorado in the summer of 1958 was used for Sandia labs job assignment tutorial.


Terms and Conditions
information obtained for this booklet is considered confidential. information included in this booklet may not be reproduced, distributed or sold, either electronically or otherwise, and may not be released to any external entity, except with prior approval from Whitman College.


Booklet was distributed May 23, 2009 in


Terms and conditions must be agreed to.

We smell a lawyer.

We learned at concealed handgun class [which included lots of law] on February 25, 26 2006 to anticipate and be prepared for situations.

We've previously won two credit card fraud actions.

First was against Yahoo!/Geocities who stated that prosefights was a very popular website. Then demanded money which we did not intially agree too.

Second was Cibola Internet Services which claimed we violated its terms and conditions. We denied this and won.

Not only was Cibola's bill rejected by US Bank but we later learned that the merchant is billed a credit card company for the cost of the investigation.

30-11-1. Libel.

Libel consists of making, writing, publishing, selling or circulating without good motives and justifiable ends, any false and malicious statement affecting the reputation, business or occupation of another, or which exposes another to hatred, contempt, ridicule, degradation or disgrace.

Whoever commits libel is guilty of a misdemeanor.

The word "malicious," as used in this article, signifies an act done with evil or mischievous design and it is not necessary to prove any special facts showing ill-feeling on the part of the person who is concerned in making, printing, publishing or circulating a libelous statement against the person injured thereby.

A. A person is the maker of a libel who originally contrived and either executed it himself by writing, printing, engraving or painting, or dictated, caused or procured it to be done by others.

B. A person is the publisher of a libel who either of his own will or by the persuasion or dictation, or at the solicitation or employment for hire of another, executes the same in any of the modes pointed out as constituting a libel; but if anyone by force or threats is compelled to execute such libel he is guilty of no crime.

C. A person is guilty of circulating a libel who, knowing its contents, either sells, distributes or gives, or who, with malicious design, reads or exhibits it to others.

D. The written, printed or published statement to come within the definition of libel must falsely convey the idea either:

(1) that the person to whom it refers has been guilty of some penal offenses;

(2) that he has been guilty of some act or omission which, though not a penal offense, is disgraceful to him as a member of society, and the natural consequence of which is to bring him into contempt among honorable persons;

(3) that he has some moral vice or physical defect or disease which renders him unfit for intercourse with respectable society, and as such should cause him to be generally avoided;

(4) that he is notoriously of bad or infamous character; or

(5) that any person in office or a candidate therefor is dishonest and therefore unworthy of such office, or that while in office he has been guilty of some malfeasance rendering him unworthy of the place.

E. It shall be sufficient to constitute the crime of libel if the natural consequence of the publication of the same is to injure the person defamed although no actual injury to his reputation need be proven.

F. No statement made in the course of a legislative or judicial proceeding, whether true or false, although made with intent to injure and for malicious purposes, comes within the definition of libel.

Reason for all of this is NCUA fraud loss claim preparation.

And possibility of getting the unfortunate Iran matter peacefully settled too, of course.
https://www.whitman.edu/content/commencement/speakers/crocker/video

Lessons from a Long War" 2009 Commencement address by former Ambassador to Iraq Ryan Crocker, a 1971 Whitman graduate.

Crocker received the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the highest civilian honor a U.S. president can bestow, in January from then-President George W. Bush, who referred to him as "one of the finest Foreign Services officers in American history."


According to Mr Salehi, Iran has about 500,000 surviving Basijis. The war with Iraq, between 1980 and 1988, was triggered by Saddam's invasion of his neighbour and became one of the deadliest in modern times, killing some 230,000 Iranian soldiers and claiming perhaps a million lives in total.

Some of the Basijis were only 13 when they volunteered and they fought Iraq without proper military training, often simply charging the enemy in "human wave" attacks.

Reed and others have admitted more students to bolster revenue with larger classes. Many are cutting costs by freezing or reducing salaries, suspending hiring and postponing building maintenance and construction. And the cost of attendance is rising; in Reed’s case, by 3.8 percent, to nearly $50,000 a year for its 1,300 students.

We feel good about donotating our money to

Edward Harkness

at Shattuck/St Mary's.

Both try to get their students into college or other higher educational instutions.

We have serious concern about liberal arts education.

We may have to do some more legal research since we noticed after Nancy Mitchell's email warning on the inside cover

Who is "John Bogley"?
----- Forwarded Message -----
From: bpayne37@comcast.net
To: mitchenl@whitman.edu
Cc: "John/Catherine Alsip", "bpayne37", "Bob Collins", "Melvin Davidson", "brian dohe", "Fred Fair", "Cargill Hall", bridges@whitman.edu, tanakahk@whitman.edu
Sent: Tuesday, June 9, 2009 5:16:09 PM GMT -08:00 Tijuana / Baja California
Subject: who is "John Bogley" bogleyjw@whitman.edu?

regards

http://home.comcast.net/~bpayne37/whitman59/whitman59after.htm#copyright



----- Forwarded Message -----
From: "Nancy L Mitchell" mitchenl@whitman.edu
To: "bill payne" bpayne37@comcast.net
Cc: "John Bogley" bogleyjw@whitman.edu
Sent: Friday, June 5, 2009 9:07:02 AM GMT -08:00 Tijuana / Baja California
Subject: Website

Hi Bill,

I see that you've posted several of your classmates' bios on your website. I would ask that you contact each of them asking if they mind if you do that. The reunion booklet (inside cover) does have a statement that the materials aren't to be reproduced electronically without permission.

It would be a courtesy to your classmates to ask them -- probably they don't care but you never know... but just in case it is a concern for them, I would appreciate it if you asked them.

Thank you!

Nancy


--
Associate Director of Alumni
Whitman College
219 Marcus Street
Walla Walla WA 99362
509-527-5952
509-527-5046 fax
800-835-9448 ext. 1
mitchenl@whitman.edu



We, of course, donated an additional $1,000 to Whitman.

Shattuck/St Mary's didn't pull this nonsense. But, of course, both got $1,000 more ... and perhaps even more in the future.

I have thought at times that my high school education was better than my undergraduate college education.

Let's investigate.

We learned in the below trademark and copyright exercise that the proper procedure for trade mark ™ and copyright is write COPYRIGHT [date], then send the application to the government.

Once it is approved, you get a certificate of copyright back and can use the ® or © symbol.

However, if you use the ® or © symbol before the trademark or copyright is issued by the government, then the material can never be officially trademarked or copyrighted.

We have a new legal challenge from Whitman college Nancy Mitchell.


http://home.comcast.net/~bpayne37/whitman59/whitman59after.htm#copyright














Monday June 8, 2009 14:37

Future Perspectives for Renewable Energy in India comment
----- Forwarded Message -----
From: bpayne37@comcast.net
To: maxandmaggie@att.net, "John/Catherine Alsip" jkalsip@gmail.com
Cc: "bpayne37" bpayne37@comcast.net, "Bob Collins" "John/Catherine Alsip" "Melvin Davidson" "brian dohe" , "Fred Fair" Cargill Hall" , bridges@whitman.edu
Sent: Thursday, June 4, 2009 9:28:53 AM GMT -08:00 Tijuana / Baja California
Subject: Future BTUs available at whitman

Max [whitman oversee 1971, board of trustees 1984, trustee emeritus]
John [whitman overseer 1977-1992]

http://www.energypulse.net/centers/article/article_display.cfm?a_id=2052&response_msg=Your%20comment%20has%20been%20added!&error_msg=

Heads up.

bill


High End Home Market Still Has Further to Fall comment.

As Goes GM, So Goes the Country comment.

Solar Energy Continues to Shine comment.

Bernanke 'Puzzled' by Collapse of Bond Bubble comment.

Now that we've had a refresher course in liberal arts thinking,

----- Forwarded Message -----
From: bpayne37@comcast.net To: "Nancy Mitchell" mitchenl@whitman.edu
Sent: Wednesday, June 3, 2009 4:32:38 PM GMT -08:00 Tijuana / Baja California
Subject: Re: Class of 1959 reunion photos and more

Nancy

We appreciate all of the work you, Jason and others did.

Let's hope that our 50th visibility helps get some very unfortunate matters peacefully settled.

http://home.comcast.net/~bpayne37/whitman59/whitman59after.htm#monday

Perhaps Whitman might consider philosophy department course LOGIC as a requirement for all students?

best
bill and patty

let's proceed logically with NCUA fraud loss claim objection to initial determination or possible appeal.
Impossible: no valid argument can have true premises and a false conclusion.

When an argument has true premises and a false conclusion, it must be invalid. In fact, this is how we define invalidity. ...

Empirical scientists and private detectives tell us whether statements are true. Logicians tell us whether reasoning is valid.

Add NCUA fraud loss claimants with all evidence of fraud in writing to support true statements. Right Spock?

Aristotelian logic is a skill most liberal arts students lack, a septuagenarian friend with the Ph.D. in mathematics from the University of Wisconsin told me on Wednesday June 3, 2009 on the phone.

Here's my about 1957 Whitman College logic book inside cover.



Friend also mentioned Mortality Tables.

23% of the Whitman College class of 1959 are dead as of Saturday May 23, 2009 Whitman insensitively pointed out at our last dinner at the Walla Walla country club.


Mission accomplished Cargill.
Hall and I talked for the first time in 50 years

http://home.comcast.net/~bpayne37/whitman59/whitman59after.htm#monday



Between Spokane and Seattle.



Final destination Albuquerque Monday May 25, 2009.

About three hours flying time in 737s.

Q I'm doing a research project and am trying to find the fuel consumption of a Boeing 737 in gallons/hour or liters/hour in the various phases of flight. I swear you'd think this was top secret or something, I can't find this stuff anywhere. Any help would be greatly appreciated.


A Oh, Aero42, you will have to be much more specific for having any numerical values on this subject.
First the 737 has been built in nine different major configurations named 737-100 up to 737-900 (the 900 not in service yet).
Some of the nine types have been made for various maximum weights. Obviously those with a lighter max weight don't need to be as strong here and there, and are consequently built lighter, and visa versa.
Most of the types have come with slightly different engine subtypes, some optimised for economy, some for hot&high performance.
The actual load (payload + fuel load) means a lot to fuel consumption.
The altitude, at which you fly, also means a lot. Most often the flight crew don't decide that, ATC controlers do.
Often, because of other traffic, you have to change altitude several times during a flight, it costs fuel.
Different airlines equip their planes with different interior of different weight.
Some airports restrict climbout to minimise noise. Often it means more fuel consumption because flaps must be extended for a longer time.
Are you allowed a straight in landing, or does ATC put you on hold and tell you to descend one flight level at a time, and do it as fast as possible making room for the one above you.
At what speed do you fly? In calm weather there is an optimum speed. There are other optimum speeds for any amount of headwind or tailwind.
Have you had enough? Or should I also mention air temperature and humidity? Small factors, but noticeable.
Of course the fuel consumption at level flight also goes down all way during the flight simply because the plane get lighter as more and more fuel has been burned.
You can have thousands of answers to your question.
How much fuel will be needed for a flight, that is something the flight crew calculates according to all these variables before every flight even if they have flown the same sector a hundred times before. And after the landing they sometimes are surprised about how wrong they calculated.
But whatever calculations you may do, then you should come out with the result that the 737-600 is probably the most economic airliner considering fuel burn per hour, while the similar sized 737-200 is a real fuel guzzler.
Did it help? At least it didn't answer your question.
But anyway, let me give you an answer: 1000 - 2000 US gallons/hour depending on circumstances.
Best regards, Preben Norholm


Jet fuel = 135000 BTU/gallon.

More essential non-BTU-wasting travel planned.


----- Forwarded Message -----
From: "Rose Poston" rposton@knme.org
To: bpayne37@comcast.net
Sent: Monday, June 1, 2009 7:30:28 AM GMT -08:00 Tijuana / Baja California
Subject: RE: year of astonomy 2009

Hello,

I have received your RSVP for two attendees. We look forward to seeing you at the event.

Thank you,

Rose M. Poston
Community Outreach Coordinator
KNME
1200 University Blvd. NE
Albuquerque, NM 87102
(505) 277-2396 Phone
(505) 277-5967 Fax

We wonder if the class of 2009 will have a 50th reunion because they may have run out of BTUs long before 2059.

The class of 1959 did more than its share to help deplete available BTUs.
In 1959 we used a small fraction of the BTUs we use today.

Fewer campus buildings.

Less square feet per building.

Little or no air conditioning.

Few electronic devices.

Cars were discouraged.

We walked.

Class of 1909 probably used less BTUs than our class of 1959.

And we suspect that the class of 2009 will use fewer BTUs than the class of 1959.

Further we suspect that the class of 2059 will use fewer BTUs than the class of 2009 - if it exists.


The problems of today will not be solved by the same thinking that produced the problems in the first place.

Albert Einstein



Saturday June 6, 2009 17:13



http://home.comcast.net/~bpayne37/whitman59/whitman59after.htm#fishtripmileage


Fishing buddy and I met at Home Depot in Bernalillo at 06:00.

Breakfast in Cuba,NM.

Arrived at Abiquiu lake at about 8:40.

Overcast and the the low 70s. Most of the time it.

We fished until 13:00 at which time the wind became too strong and the boat motor tank was getting low.

We returned to Home Deport at at about 16:00.

Honda 2006 CR-V realtime 4WD manual transmission averaged 25.51 mpg.

We towed boat and ran the air on return to Albuquerque.



114,500 BTUs per gallon for conventional summer gasoline. A reason we get better mpg in the summer.

55 miles was on the trip odometer when I left home.

So round trip fishing expedition was 267.4 miles.

We suspect, for many possible reasons, this type of essential non-BTU-wasting travel may not continue too much longer.



Catch and release? BTU wasting.

We clean and eat them. The smaller ones only.

Larger fish contain LOTs of methyl mecury thanks to coal-fired electic generation plants.

We're taking banjo lessons in preparation for less BTUs in the future.





Wednesday June 3, 2009 07:25

I could have marched with the class of 2009 on Sunday but did not.

Mission accomplished.
Hall and I talked for the first time in 50 years

Patty pointed out that we horribly programmed at the 50th.

http://home.comcast.net/~bpayne37/whitman59/whitman59after.htm#sunday




Crossing the Snake river at Central Ferry, WA.



We returned to Coeur d'Alene, ID to walk and look at the scenery.



We checked in to the Ramada at the Spokane airport then went to dinner at Clinkerdagger.



That's the Spokane river falls.

We turned in the rental car and walked to the Ramada.

We consumed about 30 gallon of gasoline at about 114,000 BTUs per gallon. 114,000 * 30 = 3,420,000 BTUs for essential non-gas-wasting WA, ID, and OR 50th reunion car travel.

Then, of course, there were the BTUs consumed for refrigerated air conditioning at the motels and electric lights.


Tuesday June 2, 2009 14:41



http://home.comcast.net/~bpayne37/whitman59/whitman59after.htm#thursday
 

We first registered on Thursday May 23, 2009 at about 15:30.

I first spoke to Sandy Waters Collins.



in black blouse.

Top of Bob Collins' head is seen slightly over Sandy's.




Next we picked up our registration envelope. This contains book which cover is pictured at the top of this page.

Name tags.



Included was the card







Whitman college president's home Thursday May 23, 2008 about 17:45.




Temperature about 80F.

Nancy Mitchell opens door.



Whitman College president George Bridges greets us moments later.

Drinks and buffet dinner served in backyard.



George Bridges gives speech at end of dinner.

Listen to all plus Albert [Bucky - rodeo rider, he reported] Jentzsch.



R Cargill Hall but I did not have an opportunity to talk to him. But, of course, I was ready as you can hear.



Autobiography.




Hall and Payne have known each other for 55 years.

Being totally different people we have probably exchanged about 5 sentences during that time.

But now we are emailing frequently.

Friday evening we discussed Thomas C Reed for a few minutes.

Assessment by R Cargill Hall of the intellect of Thomas C Reed was recorded. I even commented on Reed's pink corduroy pants.

Unless Reed responds [thomas c reed nojeh. Look at number 4] with constructive suggestions on how to get these matters peacefully settled, we may not share Hall's view of Reed's intellect.

Reed and Stillman were involved the nuclear side [physics package] of thermonuclear weapon design and implementation.

We, on the other hand, were involved in the software and hardware technology which can be used to implement fire sets for thermonuclear weapons fuzing.

NSA Forth expert Donald Simard stated that the former USSR uses Forth technology and a variation of the 8051 microcontroller to fuze its weapon systems.

Hall's verbal assessment [Whitman college liberal arts technology] of Reed's intellect is already on a server.


Tuesday June 2, 2009 19:35

Talking to Cargill Hall was one of the most important missions of our 50th for me.

Hall knows Thomas C Reed.

We were trying to get Reed's help to get these unfortunate matters peacefully settled.

Reed has not responded.

Listen to our conversation below.

http://home.comcast.net/~bpayne37/whitman59/whitman59after.htm#friday
 

G Thomas Edwards Whitman history lecture Friday May 22, 2009 in Conservatory.















After professor Edwards' lecture we went on a campus tour.



This, naturally, attracted my attention.


If we knew what we were doing, then they wouldn't call it research.

A. Einstein



Then we had lunch.



Whitman college president George Bridges at Friday lunch refreshed our memory on why most liberal arts graduate think in a different mode. Their education. Interpretation is more important than facts.

After lunch Patty and I drove to Pendelton to visit the Pendelton Woolen Mills store.

We talked to Dale and Herb Harrell in the parking lot of the Cougar Crest winery at about 6 PM.

Herb and I talked about alternate energy.

Wind turbines were installed on the hills to the south of the winery.

told us that

is her grandfather.

Cargill Hall is standing

is to the left of Patty facing us. It appears like he and




are talking.

Hall and I talked for the first time in 50 years several minutes after this photo was shot.

$22,036.00 was stolen from our Sandia Laboratory Federal Credit Union retirement-protected savings accounts. We are in the process of trying to get it back through fraud loss claim with NCUA.






Wednesday June 3, 2009 16:54

Saturday evening banquet at the Walla Walla country club was the last dinner, probably literally, of the class of 1959.


http://home.comcast.net/~bpayne37/whitman59/whitman59after.htm#saturday



Saturday morning trip from Walla Walla to Wallula to view wind turbines.



Chairman, President and CEO Questar Corporation Keith O. Rattie said on April 2, 2009
Why did my generation fail to develop wind and solar? Because our energy choices are ruthlessly ruled, not by political judgments, but by the immutable laws of thermodynamics. In engineer-speak, turning diffused sources of energy such as photons in sunlight or the kinetic energy in wind requires massive investment to concentrate that energy into a form that's usable on any meaningful scale.
Perhaps solar technologies have changed since Mr Rattie's generation of engineers studied choices?

Or perhaps assertions made in the post

fast neutron
Santa Fe, NM
January 12, 2009

From actual experience, wind farms produce 1.2 watts per square meter. Solar Thermal and Photovoltaic methods capture 5 to 6 watts per square meter. There is no economy of size in either technology. Dividing the watts you need by those values gives the land area in square meters needed to produce the juice. The numbers are astronomical

http://www.topix.net/forum/source/santa-fe-new-mexican/T0QVJ5UD3R25C8HRL

are correct?

We stopped at Waiilatpu on way back to take walk.

We saw the obelisk erected in the memory of Marcus and Narcissa Whitman.

Next was class photo.



Then









Nancy Mitchell at back to the right.

Sun was blazing down. Temperature about 82.

We were concerned that heat and sun might "get" some of the senior citizens.

Max and Nancy distributed to all of the attendees



wrapped in








We think that Whitman is trying to scare us

Mortality Tables

- out of our money.





Listen to Nancy speak.

----- Forwarded Message -----

From: "Margaret Johnson" maxandmaggie@att.net

To: "bill payne" bpayne37@comcast.net
Sent: Wednesday, May 27, 2009 3:19:47 PM GMT -08:00 Tijuana / Baja California
Subject: FW: stats

Max

Please email me the graduate vocational stats you presented on the class of 1959 on Saturday May 23, 2009.

thanks.
bill

                                                                       CLASS OF 1959

Career                                                           Number                                      % of Total

BUSINESS:                                                   45                                               31.7


Owners                                                           14                                                 9.9
Managers/Executives                                    22                                               15.5
Consultants                                                       4                                                 2.8
Misc.                                                                  5                                                 3.5

EDUCATION:                                                 39                                               27.5

College Professors                                             7                                                  5.0

MEDICINE:                                                     15                                                10.6

Doctors                                                              11                                                  7.7
Dentists                                                                1                                                    .7

LAW:                                                                  10                                                  7.0

Lawyers                                                                7                                                   4.9

GOVERNMENT:                                                 9                                                   6.3

MILITARY:                                                           3                                                   2.1

ENGINEERS:                                                        9                                                    6.3

ARTISTS:                                                               6                                                    4.2

VOLUNTEERS:                                                      5                                                    3.5

PILOTS:                                                                   1                                                      .7

Good information on 142 of the 156 graduates of the Class of 1959.

Advanced degrees: Masters, Law, Medicine        71
PhDs:                                                                        12

Total: 83 58%






Tuesday June 2, 2009 07:10

Clean Energy Tracking Portfolio Outperforms Benchmark comment.

New Home Sales Flat, Delinquencies Surge comment.

Housing comment.

The Second Crash – On the Way and Unstoppable.


When bill spoke with Helen Tanaka on Tuesday May 26, 2009, he asked her a question in Japanese.

Nihon go wa wakarimasu ka.

Helen responded in Japanese.

Hai. Wakarimasu.

http://home.comcast.net/~bpayne37/whitman59/whitman59after.htm#liberalarts
 
According to a statement from a group of ad hoc institutional bondholders, 54 percent of GM bondholders met a 5 p.m. Saturday deadline to exchange their unsecured bonds for a 10 percent stake in a newly restructured company and warrants to purchase a greater share of the new GM at a later date.

GM, part of American life for more than 100 years and once the country's largest employer, is expected to file for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection at 8 a.m. EDT Monday
, according to people familiar with the company's plans. They declined to be identified because the plans haven't been officially announced.

Simply put, a bond is an instrument offered for sale when the seller (a business, or a municipality, or perhaps a national treasury) needs to raise cash money. The bond is effectively a promise by the seller to pay the buyer back his original purchase price, plus interest, at a certain date in the future (the maturity date).

One of the saddest stories emerging from the GM bankruptcy drama is the plight of “Main Street” bondholders. Most of the investors holding $27 billion in GM debt are big banks and institutional firms, but apparently Mom and Pop-type investors hold about $7 billion in GM bonds.

DETROIT — The final obstacle to an orderly bankruptcy by General Motors could be removed Saturday as the automaker finds out how many of its bondholders will agree to exchange their claims for as much as 25 percent of the equity in a restructured G.M.

Mitispy gains importance.
----- Forwarded Message -----
From: bpayne37@comcast.net
To: tanakahk@whitman.edu
Sent: Tuesday, May 26, 2009 12:58:49 PM GMT -08:00 Tijuana / Baja California
Subject: mitispy and liberal arts education

http://www.prosefights.org/japanspy/mitispy.htm

Helen

Thanks for the call.

We will return the envelope with our additional $1,000 contribution of the class of 1959.

I'm not too happy at the moment with liberal arts educated people for the reason of our stolen $22,036.00.

Here some history.

http://www.prosefights.org/nmlegal/shorthistory/shorthistory.htm

Here a link explaining why the money was stolen.

http://www.prosefights.org/nmlegal/theinvestigation/theinvestigation.htm#reedemail

We gave $2,000 to Shattuck School on my 50th in 2006.

Attending Shattuck was probably helpful for Whitman admission.

When I went to Purdue for graduate school, Psychology department chairman told me that I was admitted DESPITE attending Whitman.

The hh, h, p, and f grading system confused Purdue.

Fortunately Whitman graduate Bill Osborn was attending and doing well in the Purdue industrial psychology graduate program AND my Whitman course grades were better than his. Also I took tougher courses [math].

Let's hope these unfortunate matters get peacefully settled so that we have better feelings about giving more to Whitman and supporting liberal arts education.

We enjoyed sitting next to you at the Saturday lunch.

http://myacwwdiary.wordpress.com/2008/05/14/hajimemashite-nice-to-meet-you/

We had a great time.

Thanks to all.

bill

http://home.comcast.net/~bpayne37/entelec/entelec.htm#background

PS I bought and got signed TRADITION IN A TURBULENT AGE Whitman College 1925-1975 by G Thomas Edwards.

I read to page 103 on the plane back to abq. An economic horror story.

I also bought Where the Great River Bends A natural and human history of the Columbia at Wallula edited by Robert J Carson.

Professor Carson's liberal arts approach to solar electricity generation fascinates us.

http://home.comcast.net/~bpayne37/whitman59/whitman59.htm#carson




Friday June 5, 2009 05:16

Future Perspectives for Renewable Energy in India possible comment.

We have an idea.


https://www.whitman.edu/content/commencement/speakers/crocker/video

Lessons from a Long War" 2009 Commencement address by former Ambassador to Iraq Ryan Crocker, a 1971 Whitman graduate.

Crocker received the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the highest civilian honor a U.S. president can bestow, in January from then-President George W. Bush, who referred to him as "one of the finest Foreign Services officers in American history."

The majority of Crocker’s 38-year career was spent in the Middle East. "His understanding of the region is unmatched," said President Bush.

We're on a first name basis with Whitman College president George Bridges.



Whitman College president George Bridges greets us moments later.


http://home.comcast.net/~bpayne37/whitman59/whitman59after.htm#classphoto
 


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