SUMMARY OF EXPERIENCE OF DR.A.J.T.JOHNSINGH

 

 

 

            After obtaining a Master's degree in Zoology from Madras Christian College, Tamil Nadu, I have taught zoology in an undergraduate college in Tamil Nadu from 1968 to 1976. This was followed by a three-year study on Asiatic wild dogs or dholes in Bandipur Tiger Reserve, Karnataka, for my Ph.D. and an 18-month field research project on raccoons (Procyon lotor) and opossums (Didelphis virginianus) at Front Royal under the Smithsonian Institution post-doctoral fellowship programme. On return to India, from 1982 to 1985, I worked with Bombay Natural History Society elephant project. My major assignments were to train two biologists to take up field research on elephants and to begin a long-term study on the ecology of elephants in South India. Since March 1985, I have been working with Wildlife Institute of India as Head, Wildlife Biology faculty. My major tasks are to teach M.Sc. wildlife science students, train in-service forest officers in wildlife management and guide students on various research projects. The major research projects I have guided include field studies on the Asiatic lion (Panthera leo persica), Sloth bear (Melursus ursinus), Asiatic elephant (elephas maximus), Nilgiri langur (Presbytis johnii), grizzled giant squirrel (Ratufa macroura), goral (Nemorhaedus goral), Himalayan ibex (Capra ibex sibirica) and Nilgiri tahr (Hemitragus hylocrius).

 

            My experience with administrating people and funds ranges from being a lecturer in a First Grade college in Tamil Nadu, Research Scholar, Post-Doctoral Research Fellow with the Smithsonian Institution, Washington DC, Project Scientist with Bombay Natural History Society, to a Faculty at the Wildlife Institute of India.  The last position has given me opportunities to work as Course Director for the nine month Diploma Course in Wildlife Management which the Institute conducts every year, as Principal Investigator of several research projects, Head of Wildlife Biology Faculty, and as Chairman of the Internal Research Advisory Committee.  As Head of the Faculty, I have experience in conducting regular faculty meetings, examiners and Board of Studies meetings to conduct the Masters in Wildlife Science programme.

 

            My main interests centre around endangered species conservation, Biodiversity conservation through protected area management, Eco-tourism and training wildlife managers. Between April and December 1994, under United Nations Development Programme and Viet Nam Global Environment Facility Project, I have conducted training programmes for protected area forest guards and protected area managers in Viet Nam. I have prepared training manuals for them. I have also taught the Smithsonian Wildlife Conservation and Management Training Programmes. I have published 61 scientific papers, 16 reports for conservation action and 67 popular articles on wildlife conservation.  My bio-data give further details.

 

                                                           

 

 

                                                DR.A.J.T.JOHNSINGH.

                                                                                                21 July 2000


Name                                      JOHNSINGH A.J.T.

                                                (JOHNSINGH, ASIR JAWAHAR THOMAS)

 

Date of birth                           14th October 1945

 

Citizenship at birth                 Indian

 

Present citizenship                 Indian

 

Marital Status                        Married and have two sons, one aged 25 and the other 17

 

List of dependants                 Wife, Kousalya Johnsingh, 54;

                                                Son Mervin Johnsingh, 17

 

Present place and       Dehra Dun, India.

country of residence

 

 

Mailing address        

 

Wildlife Institute of India, Post Box 18, GPO Chandrabani, Dehra Dun - 248 001, India, Tel #  640111-640115 Ext.220 (O) and 640111-640115 Ext.314 (R); Fax # 0135-640117 WII IN; e-mail <ajtjohnsingh@wii.gov.in>

 

 

Academic qualifications                                

 

1.      B.Sc. Zoology 1965, Madras University, Madras, Tamil Nadu, First Class, University, Second rank.

 

2.      M.Sc. Zoology, 1968, Madras University, High Second Class.

 

3.      Ph.D., Madurai Kamaraj University 1982. Madurai. Thesis Title: Ecology and behaviour of dhole or Indian wild dog Cuon alpinus Pallas 1911 with special reference to predator-prey relations at Bandipur.

 

4.      Post-doctoral research, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC. Radio-tracked activity, movement patterns of raccoons (Procyon lotor) and opossums (Didelphis virginianas) at the Smithsonian Conservation and Research Centre, Front Royal, Virginia, USA under the guidance of Dr. John Seidensticker.

 

Knowledge of languages        Tamil, excellent

                                                English, excellent

                                                Hindi, slight

                        


Job experience                      

 

1.         MARCH 1985 TO PRESENT; SENIOR FACULTY COORDINATOR (RESEARCH & EDUCATION) HEAD, FACULTY OF WILDLIFE BIOLOGY, WILDLIFE INSTITUTE OF INDIA, DEHRA DUN.

                         

This job has given me opportunities to work as Course Director for the 9-month Diploma Course in Wildlife Management regularly run by the Wildlife Institute of India, as Investigator of several research projects on endangered species, Head of Wildlife Biology Faculty, and as Chairman of the Internal Research Advisory Committee.  As Head of Wildlife Biology Faculty, I have experience in conducting regular Faculty meetings, and examiners and Board of Studies meetings of the Saurashtra University. The Institute is affiliated with the University to conduct the Masters in Wildlife Science programme.

                                                           

My major contribution to conservation in India and the countries around during this period is my help in the training of about 300 wildlife managers. Many of them now man premier protected areas in the country and the adjacent nations.                                    

 

During this period I also had opportunities to visit field sites abroad as part of officially sponsored study tours or after attending conferences. All the visits have significantly enhanced my concepts of wildlife management and conservation scenario around the globe. The field areas I have visited are the following.

 

Visited Tiger Tops, Chitawan National Park, Nepal six times as study leader of Ecotourist groups from the Smithsonian Institution, Washington. DC., USA.

 

During June-July 1987, sponsored by Food and Agriculture Organisation, to study wildlife management practices, I visited Aberdare, Samburu, Nakuru, Masai Mara, Amboseli and Tsavo National Parks in Kenya; Arusha National Park in Tanzania; Matetsi safari area, Sengwa Wildlife Research Area, Victoria Falls and Gonarezhou National Parks in Zimbabwe.

 

In August 1989 visited Abruzzo National Park in Italy.

                                               

In August 1990, to observe serow and its habitat, visited Nikko National Park in Japan.

 

In February 1992, to observe Ecotourism in practice, visited Hato Pinero in Venezuela.

 

In May 1992 visited Way Kambas National Park in Sumatra.

 

From June to August 1992, to observe large mammals and take part in studies on them, visited La Pierreuse Nature Reserve for Alpine ibex in Switzerland; Saguaro National Monument and Grand Canyon National Park in Arizona; Taylor Ranch in Idaho; Kotzebue, Denali National Park, Kenai Peninsula and Nome in Alaska and Jasper National Park in Canada.

 

In September-October 1993 visited two Ecotourism resorts in Costa Rica and northern parts of Norway where reindeer are domesticated and managed for meat, skin and antlers.

 

During April-mid July, and mid October-mid December 1994 when I conducted the training programmes in Viet Nam I had the opportunity to visit Vu Quang Nature Reserve, and Cuc Phuong, Cat Ba and Nam Cat Tien National Parks.

 

In December 1994 while returning from Viet Nam visited Khao Yai National Park, Thailand.

                    

In September-October 1995 stayed in Wuyishan Biosphere Reserve, China while teaching the Smithsonian Wildlife Conservation and Management Training Programme.

 

In March 1996 after attending the Asian Elephant Specialist Group meeting in Thailand, with Dr. Raman Sukumar, visited Arakan Yoma in Myanmar to supervise the elephant survey programme funded by Mac Arthur Foundation. Gathered preliminary information on the status of tiger in Myanmar.                                                

 

In August 1996 spent 15 days in Cobourg peninsula and Wildman Reserve in Northern Territory, Australia studying banteng and baramundi fish. This was followed by a 15-day visit to Himalayan tahr habitats and Lake Taupo, to study trout conservation, in New Zealand.

 

In March 1997 visited Chitawan National Park, Nepal for 5 days, as a resource person, to conduct workshop to evolve methods for assessing tiger distribution and abundance in the wild.

 

In May 1997 after attending the 2nd World Conference on Mountain Ungulates, visited Gran Paradiso National Park in Italy.

 

In August 1999 after attending the Conference on “Ecology and management of ungulates: integrating across spatial scales” in Nelson, British Columbia, observed the spawning of land-locked sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka), and visited the spawning site of Gerrard trout, the habitats of grizzly bear (Ursus arctos) and mountain caribou (Rangifer trarandus caribou).

 

Consultancy                           

 

Have worked as a consultant to United Nations Development Programme and Viet Nam Global Environment Facility Project CONSERVATION TRAINING AND BIODIVERSITY ACTION PLAN (VIE/91/G31) in the CONSERVATION FIELD TRAINING PROGRAMME. The consultancy involved developing curriculum and training protected area forest guards (mid April to mid July 1994) and managers (first week of October to mid December 1994). 

 

Short courses                        

 

Since 1986 have assisted various national and international agencies to run the following short courses.

 

Ø      Conducted a three-day training for 113 Village Forest Committees of the Kalakad-Mundanthurai Tiger Reserve, highlighting the values of conservation.

 

Ø      Conducted five-day field training for 20 wildlife staff of southern districts of Tamil Nadu, Southern India, in methods to evaluate the status of tiger and prey abundance, May 1999.

 

Ø      Conducted field training in methods to evaluate and monitor the status of tiger and prey abundance for 94 wildlife staff from the state of Uttar Pradesh and 30 staff from Kerala, December 1998-January 1999.

 

Ø      International workshop to evolve methods to assess the distribution and abundance of prey species and tiger. Chitawan National Park, Nepal 16-21 March 1997.

 

Ø      Wildlife Management Training Programme for 20 officers from Sri Lanka, January-February 1996.

 

Ø      Smithsonian Wildlife Conservation and Management Course, China, September-October 1995.

 

Ø      Three-week field training programme for 12 higher level wildlife officers from Viet Nam, March-April, 1995.

 

Ø      Wildlife Institute of India and British Council Course on Biodiversity Monitoring, February 1994.

 

Ø      Mobile seminar for Protected area managers from South and Central Asia, Kanha Tiger Reserve in March 1993.

 

Ø      Capsule Course in wildlife management for in-service forest officers in Kaziranga National Park, Assam in February 1989.

 

Ø      Capsule Course in wildlife management for in-service forest officers in Kanha Tiger Reserve, Madhya Pradesh in January 1989.

 

Ø      Capsule Course in wildlife management for in-service forest officers in Bandipur Tiger Reserve, Karnataka in Sept. 1988.

 

Ø      High altitude large mammal census workshop for Protected area managers in Dachigam National Park, Kashmir in October 1988.

 

Ø      Large mammal census workshop for in-service forest officers and university teachers in Sariska Tiger Reserve, Rajasthan in November 1986 and 1987.

 

My job with the Wildlife Institute of India has given me a splendid opportunity to guide students on various research topics. The dissertation projects I have guided in Masters in Wildlife Science programme include community ecology of birds, shifting cultivation and bird communities, wintering strategy of great tit (Parus major), ecology of peafowl (Pavo cristatus), habitat use by goral (Nemorhaedus goral), sexual segregation in Nilgiri tahr (Hemitragus hylocrius), and feeding ecology and habitat use by Himalayan black bear (Selenarctos thibetanus).

 

So far nine students have registered with me for their Ph.D degrees. Topics include

 

1.      ecology of Asiatic lions (Panthera leo persica),

 

2.      behavioural ecology of Asiatic elephant (Elephas maximus),

 

3.      habitat ecology of ungulates in Gir protected area,

 

4.      habitat ecology of ungulates in Kedarnath musk deer sanctuary,

 

5.      ecology of Nilgiri langur (Presbytis johni) on Mundanthurai Plateau, South India,

 

6.      feeding ecology of ibex (Capra ibex sibirica) in Pin valley National Park in Himachal Pradesh,

 

7.      habitat use by sympatric small carnivores in Sariska Tiger Reserve, Rajasthan, India,

 

8.      the effect of forestry practices on bird species diversity in Satpura hill ranges, Central India,

 

9.      behaviour ecology of sloth bear in Panna National Park, Central India..

 

The dissertations on the lion, the ecology of ungulates in Kedarnath musk deer sanctuary, habitat ecology of ungulates in Gir protected area, feeding ecology of ibex, ecology of Nilgiri langur, habitat use by sympatric small carnivores in Sariska Tiger Reserve and effect of forestry practices on bird species diversity in Satpura hill ranges were positively evaluated, and the students have been awarded Ph.D degrees. The theses on behavioural ecology of elephants and sloth bear are being written up.

 

Have been involved with the research projects in the Himalayas. Projects include the study of black bear in Dachigam National Park in Kashmir in 1989; on the ungulates and vegetation in the Kedarnath Musk deer wildlife sanctuary in the Uttar Pradesh Western Himalayas from 1989 to 1992; on the habitat use by goral in Majathal Wildlife Sanctuary in the Himachal Pradesh, Western Himalayas and on the ecology of ibex in Pin Valley National Park in the Himachal Pradesh Trans Himalayas. In April 1993, May 1997 and May 1998, I also did a survey of wildlife in Kumaon Himalayas along the trail where Jim Corbett had hunted the man-eating tigers in the early part of this century. I have assessed the status of golden mahseer (Tor putitora) in the Gangetic system of Garhwal Himalaya. These studies have given me opportunities to understand the habitat of various Himalayan species. I could also obtain first hand information on the conservation problems in the Himalayas.

 

All the above experiences have developed my ability to analyse complex technical issues, and communicate clearly and concisely both orally and in writing. My capability for planning, organising and supervising the work of others has also grown tremendously. I have also developed the competency to establish and maintain effective working relationships with people of different national and cultural backgrounds.

 

2.         OCTOBER 1982 TO FEBRUARY 1985; PROJECT SCIENTIST, ELEPHANT PROJECT, BOMBAY NATURAL HISTORY SOCIETY, BOMBAY-23.

 

My major accomplishments during this period are the status survey of elephants in Kalakadu-Mundanthurai Tiger Reserve, South India, training of two wildlife biologists in elephant research and beginning an ecological and behavioural study on elephants in Mudumalai Wildlife Sanctuary, South India. Other major tasks related to the project were administration of funds and co- ordination of research with the officials of the Forest Departments of Tamil Nadu, Karnataka and Kerala.

 

Visited Tiger Tops, Chitawan National Parks, Nepal four times as study leader of Ecotourist groups from the Smithsonian Institution, Washington DC., USA.

 

3.         JUNE 1980 TO OCTOBER 1981; POST-DOCTORAL FELLOW, FRIENDS OF THE NATIONAL ZOO FELLOWSHIP, SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION, WASHINGTON DC 20008.

 

During this period, besides learning to trap, radio collar and track animals, I also had an excellent opportunity to gainfully interact with wildlife biologists and conservationists from different countries. Major field work was done on racoon and opossum under the able guidance of Dr. John Seidensticker.   

 

 

4.         AUGUST 1976 TO MAY 1979; PH.D RESEARCH FELLOW, FIELD WORK ON THE ECOLOGY OF DHOLES (Cuon alpinus) IN BANDIPUR TIGER RESERVE, KARNATAKA, SOUTH INDIA.

 

This assignment gave me the opportunity to administer the funds given by the World Wildlife Fund, India and International, and work along amicably with the Bandipur Tiger Reserve officials. Detailed information was collected on dhole for the first time. Extensive information on other species such as the tiger, leopard, chital and sambar were also collected.

 

 

5.         OCTOBER 1968 TO JULY 1976; JUNE 1979 TO MAY 1980; ASSISTANT PROFESSOR IN ZOOLOGY IN AYYA NADAR JANAKI AMMAL COLLEGE, A FIRST GRADE COLLEGE, AT SIVAKASI, TAMIL NADU, SOUTH INDIA.

 

During this service, I had an excellent opportunity to interact with undergraduate students and understand their problems through the 'personal care system' that the college had in practice.  Each year each faculty was given the bio-data of 20 students, which helped the faculty understand the problems of the students. This understanding between the faculty and students enabled the college to run its programmes without any major problems such as strikes which are common in most colleges.

 

During this period I did several short and long-term field studies.

 

Ø      1979-1980. Studied the ecology and behaviour of white-headed babblers (Turdoides affinis) in Sivakasi, Tamil Nadu.

 

Ø      1976-1978, field work on the ecology and behaviour of dhole (Cuon alpinus) in Bandipur Tiger Reserve.

 

Ø      1976, Nilgiri tahr (Hemitragus hylocrius) survey in Tamil Nadu.

 

Ø      1975 and 1976, brief observations on Indian fox (Vulpes bengalensis) and Indian pea fowl (Pavo cristatus) in Tamil Nadu.

 

Ø      1974 and 1975, a short field study on the ecology and behaviour of dholes in Mudumalai Wildlife Sanctuary, South India. 

 

Member         

                       

1.      Life member, Bombay Natural History Society.

2.      IUCN Canid Specialist Group.

3.      IUCN Asian Elephant Specialist Group.

4.      IUCN Cat Specialist Group.

5.      IUCN Caprinae Specialist Group.

6.      IUCN Bear Specialist Group.

 

 

Member, Editorial Board, Review Committee.                  

 

 

1.                  Journal Bombay Natural History Society.

2.                  Journal “Biosphere Conservation” Japan.

2.         Have edited manuscripts for Journal Tropical Ecology, and Mammalia.

3.         Have reviewed several proposals for National Geographic and The Wildlife Conservation Society.

                                               

Awards                                   

 

1.         Government of India merit scholarship to pursue higher studies as I had secured second rank in B.Sc. Zoology examination in Madras University in 1965.

 

2.         World Wildlife Fund - India fellowship for doing a study on the ecology of dhole in Bandipur Tiger Reserve, 1976-1979.

 

3.         Friends of the National Zoo Fellowship to do post-doctoral research with the Smithsonian Institution 1980-81.

 

4.         Awarded the best presentation for the work on the goral by the 'Oasis' magazine Italy at the World Conference on Mountain Ungulates, Camerino, September 1989.

 

 

 

PUBLICATIONS

 

Papers                        

 

1.         Fox, M.W. and Johnsingh, A.J.T. 1975. Hunting and feeding in wild dogs. J.Bombay Nat. Hist. Soc. 72:321-326.

 

2.         Cohen, J.A., Fox, M.W., Johnsingh, A.J.T. and Barnett, B.D., 1975. Food habits of the dhole in South India. J.Wildl. Mgmt. 42:933-936.

 

3.         Johnsingh, A.J.T. 1978. Some aspects of the ecology and behaviour of the Indian fox Vulpes bangalensis Shaw. J.Bombay Nat. Hist. Soc. 75:397-405.

 

4.         Johnsingh, A.J.T. and Murali, S. 1980. The ecology and behaviour of the Indian Peafowl (Pavo cristatus Linn) in Injar. J.Bombay Nat. Hist. Soc. 75(Supplement): 1069-79.

 

5.         Johnsingh, A.J.T. 1982. Reproductive and Social behaviour of dholes. J.Zool.Lond. 198:443-463.

 

6.         Johnsingh, A.J.T. and Paramanandham, K.1982. Group care of White Headed Babblers Turdoides affinis for a Pied Creasted Cuckoo Clamator jacobinus chick. Ibis, 124:179-183.

 

7.         Johnsingh, A.J.T. 1983. Large mammalian prey-predators in Bandipur. J.Bombay Nat. Hist. Soc. 80:1-49.

 

8.         Johnsingh, A.J.T. 1985. Status and distribution of dhole (Cuon alpinus) in South Asia. Mammalia. 49:203-208.

 

9.         Johnsingh, A.J.T. 1986. Diversity and conservation of Carnivorous mammals in India. Proc. Indian Acad. Sci. (Animal Sci) Suppl., 73-89.

 

10.       Johnsingh, A.J.T. 1986. Impact of fire on wildlife ecology in two dry deciduous forests in South India. The Indian Forester. 112:993-938.

 

11.       Johnsingh, A.J.T., M.H.Martin, J. Balasingha and V.Chelladurai 1987. Vegetation and avifauna in a thorn scrub habitat in South India. Trop.Ecol. 28:22-34.

 

12.       Seidensticker, J., O'Connell, M.A., and Johnsingh, A.J.T. 1987. Virginia Opossum, pp. 247-263. In Wild furbearer Management and Conservation in North America. (Eds.) M.Novak et al, Min. of Nat.Res. Ontario.

 

13.       Sale, J.B. and Johnsingh, A.J.T. 1988. Counting Asian Elephants. Paper submitted to Asian Elephant Specialist Group meeting, Chiangmai, Thailand 19-21 Jan. 1981.

 

14.       Seidensticker, J., Johnsingh, A.J.T., Ross, J., Sanders, G. and Webb, M.B. 1988. Raccoons and Rabies in Applachian Mountain Hollows. National Geographic Research. 4:359-370.

 

15.       Johnsingh, A.J.T. and Vickram, D. 1988. Fishes of Mundanthurai wildlife sanctuary, Tamil Nadu. J.Bombay Nat. Hist. Soc. 84:526-533.

 

16.       Joshua, J. and Johnsingh, A.J.T. 1988. Observations on birds on Mundanthurai Plateau, Tamil Nadu. J. Bombay Nat. Hist.Soc. 85:565-577.

 

17.       Johnsingh, A.J.T. and Joshua, J. 1989. The threatened gallery forest of river Tambiraparani, Mundanthurai wildlife sanctuary, South India. Biol. Conserv.  47:273-280.

 

18.       Prasad, S.N., Sathyakumar, S., Rawat, G.S. and Johnsingh, A.J.T. 1989. The conservation of montane bamboo in Western Himalaya, India. Proc. Int. Symp. on Conservation Phytecology. Institute of Botany, Academic sinica, Beijing, China.

 

19.       Johnsingh, A.J.T., Prasad, S.N. and Goyal, S.P. 1990. Conservation status of the Chilla-Motichur corridor for elephant movement in Rajaji-Corbett National parks area, India. Biol. Conserv. 51:125-138.

 

20.       Krausman, P.R. and Johnsingh, A.J.T. 1990. Conservation and wildlife education in India. Wildlife Society Bulletin. 18:342-347.

 

21.       Johnsingh, A.J.T. and Shankar, K. 1991. Food plants of chital, sambar and cattle on Mundanthurai Plateau, Tamil nadu, South India. Mammalia. 55:57-66.

 

22.       Johnsingh, A.J.T., Panwar, H.S. and Rodgers, W.A. 1991. Ecology and conservation of large felids in India. pp. 160-166. In Wildlife conservation present trends and perspectives for the 21st century. N.Maruyama et.al (eds.). Proceedings of the International Symposium on wildlife conservation in Tsukuba and Yokohama, Japan August 21-25, 1990.

 

23.       Joshua, J. and Johnsingh, A.J.T. 1992. Status of endangered grizzled giant squirrel (Ratufa macroura) and its habitat. pp 151-159. In Tropical Ecosystems: Ecology and Management. K.P.Singh and J.S.Singh. (eds.) Wiley Eastern Limited, New Delhi.

 

24.       Johnsingh, A.J.T. 1992. Elephant corridors in Uttar Pradesh. pp. 75-80. In The proceedings of the Asian Elephant Specialist Group meeting, 20-22nd May 1992, Bogor, Indonesia. Compiled by Asian Elephant Conservation Centre of IUCN/SSC Asian Elephant Specialist Group.

 

25.       Johnsingh, A.J.T. 1992. Prey selection in three large sympatric carnivores in Bandipur. Mammalia 56:517-526.

 

26.       Johnsingh, A.J.T. 1992. Protected areas and elephant conservation in India, pp 137-147. In The Asian Elephant. Ecology, Biology, Diseases Conservation and Management, E.G.Silas et al. (eds.). Proceedings of the National Symposium on the Asian elephant held at Kerala Agricultural University, Trichur, India from 16 to 19 Jan., 1989.

 

27.       Johnsingh, A.J.T. and Panwar, H.S. 1992. Elephant conservation in India - problems and prospects. pp 36-56. In Mammal Conservation in developing countries. Per Wegge (ed.). Proc. of a workshop held at Vth Theriological Congress in Rome, Italy, August 1989.

 

28.       Sathyakumar, S., Prasad, S.N., Rawat, G.S. and Johnsingh, A.J.T. 1992. Ecology of kalij and monal pheasant in Kedarnath Wildlife Sanctuary, Western Himalaya. pp. 83-90. In D.Jenkins (ed.). Proc. Int. Symp. Pheasants in Asia 1992. World Pheasant Association. Reading U.K.

 

29.       Ravi Chellam and A.J.T.Johnsingh. 1993. Management of Asiatic lions in the Gir forest, India.pp: 409-424. In  Symp. Zool. Soc. Lond. No. 65. Mammals as Predators. N.Dunstone and M.L.Gorman, (eds.) The Zoological Society of London, Clarendon Press, Oxford.

 

30.       Johnsingh, A.J.T., Joshua, J., Chellam, R. Ashraf, N.V.K., Krishnamurthy, V. and Khati, D.V.S. (1993). Etorphine and acepromazine combination for immobilizing wild Indian elephants (Elephas maximus). J. Bombay nat.Hist.Soc. 90:45-49.

 

31.       Ashraf, N.V.K., A.Kumar and Johnsingh, A.J.T. 1993. Two endemic viverrids of the Western Ghats, India. Oryx 27:109-114.

 

32.       Ashraf, N.V.K., Kumar, A. and Johnsingh, A.J.T. 1993. On the relative abundance of two sympatric flying squirrels of western ghats, India. J.Bombay nat.Hist.Soc. 90:158-162.

 

33.       Joshua, J. and Johnsingh, A.J.T. 1994. Impact of biotic disturbances on the habitat and population of the endangered grizzled giant squirrel Ratufa macroura in South India. Biol. Conserv. 68:29-34.

 

34.       Johnsingh, A.J.T. and Joshua, J. 1994. Avifauna in three vegetation types on Mundanthurai Plateau, South India. Journal of Tropical Ecology 10:323-335.

 

35.       Johnsingh, A.J.T. and Joshua, J. 1994. Conserving Rajaji and Corbett National Parks -using the elephant as a flagship species. Oryx 28:135-140.

 

36.       Khan, J.A., Rodgers, W.A., Johnsingh, A.J.T. and Mathur, P.K. 1994. Tree and shrub mortality and debarking by sambar Cervus unicolor (kerr) in Gir after a drought in Gujarat, India. Biol. Conserv. 68:149-154.

 

37.       Sathyakumar, S., Prasad, S.N., Rawat, G.S. and Johnsingh, A.J.T. 1994. Conservation status of Himalayan Musk deer and livestock impacts in Kedarnath Wildlife Sanctuary, Western Himalaya. pp. 240-245. In High Altitudes of the Himalaya. Y.P.S.Pangtey and R.S.Rawat (eds.). Gnanodhaya Publications, Nainital, India.

 

38.       Johnsingh, A.J.T. and Dung, Nguyen Huu. 1995. Conservation status of felids in Vietnam. Cat News 22:16-18.

 

39.       Ceballos-Lascurain, H. and Johnsingh, A.J.T. 1995. Ecotourism: what works and what does not. pp. 191-194 In Integrating people and wildlife for a sustainable future. John A.Bissonette and Paul R.Krausman (eds.). The Wildlife Society, Bethesda, Mayland.

 

40.       Johnsingh, A.J.T., Ravi Chellam and Rawat, G.S. 1995. Prospects for Ecotourism in India. pp.198-202. In Integrating people and wildlife for a sustainable future. John A.Bissonette and Paul R.Krausman (eds.). The Wildlife Society, Bethesda, Mayland.

 

41.       Sharma, D., Manjrekar, N., Mukherjee, S., Katti, M.V., Rawat, G.S. and Johnsingh, A.J.T. 1995. The Takin (Bovidae, Caprinae) in Arunachal Pradesh, India. Mammalia, t.59, n0 2,: 1-3.

 

42.       Khan, J.A., Ravi Chellam and Johnsingh, A.J.T. 1995. Group size and age-sex composition of major ungulate species of Gir lion sanctuary and National park, Gujarat, India. J.Bombay nat.Hist.Soc. 92:295-302.

 

43.       Joshua, J. and Johnsingh, A.J.T. 1995. Ranging patterns of elephants in Rajaji National Park: Implications for Reserve Design. pp. 256-260. In A week with elephants. J.C.Daniel and Hemant S.Datye (eds.) Proceedings of the International seminar on the Conservation of Asian Elephant held in Mudumalai Wildlife Sanctuary, South India, 13-15 June 1993. Bombay nat.Hist.Soc., Oxford University Press, Oxford.

 

44.       Sunderraj, S.F.W., Mishra, B.K. and Johnsingh, A.J.T. 1995. Elephant use of Rajaji-Corbett Forest Corridor, North West India. pp. 261-269. In A week with elephants. J.C.Daniel and Hemant S.Datye (eds.) Proceedings of the International seminar on the Conservation of Asian Elephant held in Mudumalai Wildlife Sanctuary, South India, 13-15 June 1993. Bombay nat.Hist.Soc., Oxford University Press, oxford.

 

45.       Raman, T.R.S., Mishra, C. and Johnsingh, A.J.T. 1995. Survey of primates in Mizoram, North-east India. Primate Conservation. 16:59-62.

 

46.       Trivedi, P. and Johnsingh, A.J.T. 1996. Roost selection by Indian Peafowl (Pavo cristatus) in Gir Forest, India. J.Bombay nat.Hist.Soc. 93:25-29.

 

47.       Sunderraj, S.F.W. and Johnsingh, A.J.T. 1996. Impact of flash flood on the gallery forest and arboreal mammals of river Servalar, Mundanthurai Plateau, South India. J.Wildl.Res. :89-94.

 

48.       Mishra, C., and Johnsingh, A.J.T. 1996. On habitat selection by the goral Nemorhaedus goral bedfordi. J.Zool.Lond. 240:573-580.

 

49.       Khan, J.A., Ravi Chellam, Rodgers, W.A. and Johnsingh, A.J.T. 1996. Ungulate densities and biomass in tropical dry deciduous forests of Gir, Gujarat, India. J.Trop. Ecol. 12:149-162.

 

50.       Williams, A.C. and Johnsingh, A.J.T. 1996. Status survey of elephants and their habitats in Garo Hills, North East India. GAJAH. 16:43-60.

 

51.       Williams, A.C. and Johnsingh, A.J.T. 1996. Threatened elephant corridors in Garo Hills, North East India. GAJAH. 16: 61-68.

           

52.       Williams, A.C. and Johnsingh, A.J.T. 1996. Elephant capture in Meghalaya, North East India - The past and the future. GAJAH. 17:1-7.

 

53.             Fox, J.L. and Johnsingh, A.J.T. 1997. India. pp. 215-231. In Wild Sheep and Goats and their relatives. David M.Shackleton (ed.) Action Plan IUCN/SSC Caprinae Specialiat Group.

 

54.             Rawat, G.S., Goyal, S.P. and Johnsingh, A.J.T. 1997.  Ecological observations on the grasslands of Corbett Tiger Reserve, India. Indian Forester. Vol. 123(10): 958-963.

 

55.             Madhusudan, M.D. and Johnsingh, A.J.T. 1998. Analysis of habitat-use using ordination: The Nilgiri tahr in southern India. Current Science, Vol. 74:1000-1003.

 

56.             Mishra, C.D., Raman, T.R.S. and Johnsingh, A.J.T. 1998. Habitat hunting and conservation of rupicaprines in Mizoram, Northeast India. J.Bom. Nat. Hist. Soc. 95(2):215-220.

 

57.             Raman, T.R.S., Rawat, G.S. and Johnsingh, A.J.T. 1998. Recovery of tropical rainforest avifauna in relation to vegetation succession following shifting cultivation in Mizoram, north-east India. Journal of Applied Ecology. 35:214-231.

 

58.             Johnsingh, A.J.T., Ravi Chellam and Sharma, D. 1998.  Prospects for conservation of the Asiatic lion in India. Biosphere Conservation. 1(2):81-89.

 

59.             Mishra, C.D. and Johnsingh, A.J.T. 1998.  Population and conservation status of the Nilgiri thar Hemitragus hylocrius in Anamalai Hills, South India. Biological Conservation 86:199-206.

 

60.             Chundawat, R.S., Gogate, N. and Johnsingh, A.J.T. 1999.  Tigers in Panna: preliminary results from an Indian tropical dry forest. Pp. 123-129. In Riding the Tiger, Tiger conservation in human-dominated landscapes. John Seidensticker, Sarah Christie and Peter Jackson (eds.) The Zoological Society of London, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, U.K.

 

61.             Johnsingh, A.J.T. and Williams, A. Christy 1999.  Elephant corridors in India: lessons for other elephant range countries. Oryx Vol. 33(3): 210-214.

 

 

Training Manuals

 

1.         Johnsingh, A.J.T. 1994. Manual for the instruction of protected area forest guards. United Nations Development Programme and Viet Nam Global Environment Facility Project, Conservation Field Training Programme, Hanoi. pp163.

 

2.         Johnsingh, A.J.T. (ed.). Manual for the instruction of protected area managers. United Nations Development Programme and Viet Nam Global Environment Facility Project, Conservation Field Training Programme, Hanoi, December 1994, (first draft, pp250).

 

Reports for conservation action

 

1.         Khan, J.A., Rodgers, W.A., Johnsingh, A.J.T., and Mathur, P.K. 1990. Gir Lion Project: Ungulate Habitat Ecology in Gir. Project Report. Wildlife Institute of India, Dehradun, India. pp214.

 

2.         Saberwal, V., Ravi Chellam, Johnsingh, A.J.T. and Rodgers, W.A. 1990. Lion-human conflicts in Gir forest and adjoining areas. Wildlife Institute of India, Dehra Dun, India. Report submitted to Gujarat Forest Department and Government of India.

           

3.         Rai, N.D. and Johnsingh, A.J.T. 1992. Survey of Nilgiri tahr Hemitragus hylocrius in Kalakadu-Mundanthurai Tiger Reserve, Tamil Nadu. Wildlife Institute of India, Dehra Dun, India. Report submitted to Tamil Nadu Forest Department. pp12.

 

4.         Sunderraj, S.F.W. and Johnsingh, A.J.T. 1993. Impact of flash flood on the gallery forest and arboreal mammals of river Servalar, Mundanthurai Plateau, South India. Wildlife Institute of India, Dehra Dun, India. Report submitted to Tamil Nadu Forest Department. pp18.

 

5.         Rai, N.D. and Johnsingh, A.J.T. 1993. A preliminary survey of clouded leopard Neofelis nebulosa in Mizoram and Sikkim. Wildlife Institute of India, Dehra Dun, India. Report submitted to Mizoram and Sikkim Forest Department, India. pp15.

 

6.         Johnsingh, A.J.T. 1994. An action plan for the conservation of the Asian elephant in north-west India. Wildlife Institute of India, Dehra Dun, India. Report submitted to Uttar Pradesh Forest Department, Govt. of India and IUCN Asian Elephant Specialist Group. pp21.

 

7.         Mishra, C., Shankar, T.R. and Johnsingh, A.J.T. 1994. Survey of primates, serow and goral in Mizoram. Wildlife Institute of India, Dehra Dun, India. Report submitted to Mizoram forest department. pp36.

 

8.         Mishra, C. and Johnsingh, A.J.T. 1994. Status and conservation of the Nilgiri tahr (Hemitragus hylocrius Ogilby, 1838) in Anamalai hills, South India. Wildlife Institute of India, Dehra Dun, India.  Report submitted to Tamil Nadu and Kerala Forest Department. pp27.

 

9.         Ravi Chellam, Joshua, J., Williams, C.A. and Johnsingh, A.J.T. 1995. Survey of potential sites for re-introduction of Asiatic lions, Wildlife Institute of India, Dehra Dun, India. Report submitted to Government of India, and the states of Gujarat and Madhya Pradesh. pp36.

 

10.       Sharma, D. and Johnsingh, A.J.T. 1995. Impacts of management practices on Lion and Ungulate habitats in Gir Protected Area. Wildlife Institute of India, Dehra Dun, India. Report submitted to Gujarat Forest Department. pp95.

 

11.       Athreya, Vidya R. and Johnsingh, A.J.T. 1995. Survey of the clouded leopard (Neofelis nebulosa) in North-East India. Wildlife Institute of India, Dehra Dun, India. Report submitted to Arunachal Pradesh and Meghalaya Forest Departments. pp40.

 

 

12.       Williams, C.A. and Johnsingh, A.J.T. 1996. A status survey of elephants (Elephas maximus), their habitats and an assessment of elephant-human conflict in Garo hills, Meghalaya. Wildlife Institute of India, Dehra Dun, India. Report submitted to Meghalaya Forest Department and Government of India. pp27.

 

13.              Johnsingh, A.J.T., Rawat, G.S., Sathyakumar, S., Karunakaran, P.V. and Kaur, J. 1998. Prioritisation of Areas for Biodiversity Conservation of Trans and Greater Himalaya, India. Wildlife Institute of India, Dehra Dun, India. Report submitted to various Government and Non-Government Organizations. pp31.

 

14.              Johnsingh, A.J.T. and Williams, C.A. 1999. Elephant Reserve No. 11; Rajaji-Corbett Elephant Reserve. Report submitted for National Elephant Conservation Action Plan, Ministry of Environment & Forests, Government of India, New Delhi. pp7.

 

15.              Johnsingh, A.J.T., Rajvanshi, A., Williams, A.C., Kakati, K., Dasgupta, J. and Hazra, A. 1999.  Ecological assessment of the rafting camps of the river Ganga. Report submitted to Forest Department Government of Uttar Pradesh. pp11.

 

16.              Johnsingh, A.J.T., Stuwe, M., Rawat, G.S., Manjrekar, N. and Bhatnagar, Y. 1999.  Ecology and Conservation of Asiatic ibex in Pin Valley National Park, Himachal Pradesh, India; Wildlife Institute of India, Dehra Dun, India. Pp133.

 

 

Notes             

 

1.         Johnsingh, A.J.T. 1973. Mudaliar ootu: A last stronghold for the rare Nilgiri tahr. J.Bombay Nat.Hist.Soc. 70:376-377.

 

2.         _________________ 1975. Crow pheasant and Finch larks. Ibid. 72:846.

 

3.         _________________ 1975. Peacocks and cobra. Ibid. 73:214.

 

4.         _________________ 1978. An incident of wild boar (Sus scrofa) sharing Wild dogs' (Cuon alpinus) Kill. Ibid. 75:211-213.

 

5.         Barnett, B.D., Fox, M.N., Cohen, J.A. and Johnsingh, A.J.T. 1978. A preliminary examination of the parasites recovered from the Indian wild dog (Cuon alpinus). Ibid. 75:515.

 

6.         Johnsingh, A.J.T. 1979. Evidence for a tiger eating a panther cub. Ibid. 76:152.

 

7.         _________________ 1979. An interesting behaviour of three Nilgiri tahr (Hemitragus hylocrius Ogilby 1833) Kids. Ibid. 76:154.

 

8.         _________________ 1979. A note on the predation of Jungle Myna (Acriotheres fuscus Wagler) on field mouse. Ibid. 76:159.

 

9.         _________________ 1979. An instance of wild dogs scavenging on a tiger's kill. Ibid. 76:360-361.

 

10.       _________________ 1981. Importance of fruits in the fare of chital in the dry season. Ibid. 78:594-595.

 

11.       Thangamani, A., Paramanandham, K. and Johnsingh, A.J.T. 1982. Helpers among Black Drongo (Dicrurus adsimilis) Ibid. 78:602-603.

 

12.       Murali, S., Paramanandham, K. and Johnsingh, A.J.T. 1982. Changes in roosting sites of White Headed Babblers indicate habitat deterioration in Sivakasi, Southern India. Environmental Conserv. 18:368.

 

13.       Johnsingh, A.J.T., Sathyakumar, S. and Sunderraj, S.F.W. 1991. Ariankavu Pass, a lost elephant corridor in South India. Environmental Conserv. 18:368.

 

14.       Trivedi, P. and Johnsingh, A.J.T. 1995. Diet of Indian peafowl, Pavo cristatus Linn, in Gir Forest, Gujarat. J.Bombay Nat.Hist.Soc. 92:262-263.

 

15.       Shankar Raman, T.R., Mishra C.D. and Johnsingh, A.J.T. 1995. Observations on Pallas's squirrel Callosciurus erythraeus Pallas and other squirrels in Mizoram, Northeast India. J.Bombay Nat.Hist.Soc. 92(3):412-415.

 

16.       Johnsingh, A.J.T., Sankar, K. and Mukherjee, S. 1997. Saving Prime Tiger Habitat in Sariska Tiger Reserve. Cat News 27:3-4.

 

17.              Johnsingh, A.J.T. and Negi, A.S. 1998.  Only disturbance-free well-managed habitats can save the tiger. Cat News 28:4.

 

18.              Ravi Chellam and Johnsingh, A.J.T. 1999. Asiatic lion, Translocating Asiatic lions, India Newsletter of the Re-introduction Specialist Group of IUCN’s Species Survival Commission (SSC). No. 18:11-13.

 

Popular Articles on Conservation and Wildlife

 

1.                  Beautiful bird sanctuary near Tirunelveli. Indian Express, March 19, 1972.

 

2.                  Lovely picnic spot near Rajapalayam. Indian Express, September 14, 1972.

 

3.                  Stuffed peacocks for sale. Indian Express, January 4, 1975.

 

4.                  Much ravaged Mundanthurai. Indian Express, January 12, 1975.

 

5.                  Johnsingh, A.J.T. and Fox, M.W. 1974. Dens and wild dogs cities. Science Reporter, January 12.

 

6.                  Mudumalai should be cleared of piedogs. Indian Express, March 1, 1975.

 

7.                  Poisoning in the jungle. Indian Express, March 15, 1975.

 

8.                  Vanishing black buck. Indian Express, April 26, 1975.

 

9.                  Johnsingh, A.J.T. and Fox, M.W. 1975. In defence of wild dogs. Science Reporter, July 12.

 

10.              Johnsingh, A.J.T. 1976. The hedgehod - the mulleli of Tamil Nadu. Science Reporter, February 13.

 

11.              Johnsingh, A.J.T. 1976. Black buck - India's beautiful antelopes. Science Reporter, September 13.

 

12.              Johnsingh, A.J.T. 1977. Encounter. Hornbill 2:39-41.

 

13.              Johnsingh, A.J.T. 1977. Are wild dogs wanton killers. Hornbill 5:12-13.

 

14.              Johnsingh, A.J.T. 1978. Can a solitary dhole bitch raise her litter. Hornbill 7:15-16.

 

15.              Johnsingh, A.J.T. 1978. Tiger, tiger, burning bright. Hornbill 8:33-35.

 

16.              Johnsingh, A.J.T. 1978. `Bent Ear'. Hornbill 9:33-35.

 

17.              How far the tiger is safe in Tamil Nadu. Indian Express, November 9, 1978.

 

18.              Sambar - A magnificent deer. Deccan Herald, January 14, 1979.

 

19.              The gaur is coming back. Deccan Herald, August 5, 1979.

 

20.              Johnsingh, A.J.T. 1979. The gaur of my study area. Hornbill 10:30-32.

 

21.              Johnsingh, A.J.T. 1979. Hand off. Hornbill 11:31-32.

 

22.              A letter from the jungle. Indian Express, September 17, 1979.

 

23.              Johnsingh, A.J.T. 1980. An incident of tahr poaching. Hornbill 2:37-39.

 

24.              Johnsingh, A.J.T. 1982. Bandipur: Sanctuary Magazine, Vol.II:214-229.

 

25.              Steps needed to preserve a treasure trove of wildlife. Indian Express, August 5, 1982.

 

26.              Save this paradise for birds. Indian Express, September 25, 1982.

 

27.              The hope for the endangered. The Hindu, March 11, 1984.

 

28.              Magic spell of Mundanthurai. Indian Express, June 21, 1984.

 

29.              A threat to Kalakadu Sanctuary. Indian Express, July 12, 1984.

 

30.              Johnsingh, A.J.T. 1984. Dhole, Dog of the Indian jungle. Sanctuary IV:235-243.

 

31.              Johnsingh, A.J.T. Understand, assist, protect and conserve flora and fauna of Arunachal Pradesh. India Magazine 5:64-71.

 

32.              Johnsingh, A.J.T. 1984. Dholes. pp.80-81, In The encyclopaedia of Mammals. MacDonald, D.W. (ed.). George Allen and Unwin, London.

 

33.              Johnsingh, A.J.T. 1986. Living hills. A report on Kalakadu Mundanthurai hills. Sanctuary VI:114-121, 160-163.

 

34.              Johnsingh, A.J.T. 1986. The dholes, observing the wild dog as a predator. India Magazine 4:42-47.

 

35.              Johnsingh, A.J.T., Ravi Chellam and Sunderraj, S.F.W. 1986. Langurs of Mundanthurai Plateau. Hornbill 2:27-32.

 

36.              Johnsingh, A.J.T. 1987. Dhole - its habits and habitats. Vivekananda Kendra Patrika :98-100.

 

37.              Johnsingh, A.J.T. 1988. Peafowls. Cub 5(4):29-30.

 

38.              Johnsingh, A.J.T. 1989. The elusive goral. Frontline June 10-23:82-85.

 

39.              Johnsingh, A.J.T. and Kishore Rao. 1989. Enchanting Kaziranga. WWF-India, Kerala State Committee. Souvenir: 53-56.

 

40.              Johnsingh, A.J.T. 1990. Reserved for the tiger. Frontline February 3-16:73-81.

 

41.              Endangered civets of the Western ghats (with Dr.Ajith Kumar). Deccan Herald, May 27, 1990.

 

42.              Rajaji. Sanctuary XI:14-25. 1991.

 

43.              A dwindling species. The Hindu, September 1, 1991.

 

44.              Lost in a tiger reserve. The Hindu, September 8, 1991.

 

45.              Johnsingh, A.J.T. and Ravi Chellam. 1991. Asiatic lions. pp.92-93. In Great Cats: Majestic creatures of the wild. J.Seidensticker and S.Lumpkin (eds.). Rodale Press Inc., Emmaus, PA.

 

46.              Johnsingh, A.J.T. and Ravi Chellam 1991. India's last lions. Zoogoer 17:16-20.

 

47.              Johnsingh, A.J.T. 1991. Captivating Corbett, Hornbill 3:2-7.

 

48.              Johnsingh, A.J.T. 1992. The goral story. Sanctuary XII(5):32-35.

 

49.              Johnsingh, A.J.T. 1992. The Japanese serow: Lessons for the Himalayan serow conservation. Hornbill 4:28-32.

 

50.              Johnsingh, A.J.T. and Joshua, J. 1993. Rajaji-Corbett. Hornbill 1:32-35.

 

51.              Johnsingh, A.J.T. and Negi, A.S. Spring 1994. Mahseer fishing in Corbett Tiger Reserve. Corbett 1(1):6-7.

 

52.              Johnsingh, A.J.T. and Rawat, G.S. 1994. On Jim Corbett's trail. Blackbuck. 10:32-41.

 

 

53.              Johnsingh, A.J.T. 1995. Vietnam venture, The primordial world of Sao La and Mang. Frontline, April 21:94-97.

 

54.              Johnsingh, A.J.T. 1995. A dead elephant can leave a very long trail. Times of India July 27.

 

55.              Uniyal, V.K. and Johnsingh, A.J.T. 1995. Parambikulam Wildlife Sanctuary: a potential tiger reserve. Hornbill 1:1-9.

 

56.              Johnsingh, A.J.T. 1996. A barren stage - Efforts in China's Wuyishan Reserve. Frontline, April 5.

 

57.              Johnsingh, A.J.T. 1996. Call of the wild. The Hindu, June 23.

 

58.              Johnsingh, A.J.T. 1996. Tracking the lions of Gir. The Hindu, September 29.

 

59.              Johnsingh, A.J.T. 1997. Dhole, the whistling hunter of the Indian jungle. pp. 91-95. In In Danger. Paola Manfredi (ed.). Local colour Private Limited in association with Ranthambhore Foundation.

 

60.              Johnsingh, A.J.T. and Negi, A.S. 1997. Writing an epitaph for the mahseer. The Hindu, October 19.

 

61.              Johnsingh, A.J.T., Ajith, V.P. and Nair, M.V. 1998. In troubled waters: Mahseer at Parambikulam and its conservation. ISCB Newsletter, Issue 3-7, January 1996-98.

 

62.              Johnsingh, A.J.T. and Sukumar, R. 1998. Surveying the Arakan Yoma. The Hindu, Sunday, May 31.

 

63.              Johnsingh, A.J.T. 1998.  Chitawan, Nepal Wonderland. Sanctuary Asia XVIII(4):22-29.

 

64.              Johnsingh, A.J.T. 1998. Policy makers and wildlife. Folio, (Sept.): 10-13.

 

65.              Johnsingh, A.J.T. 1998.  Memories of Bandipur. Pugmarks is a souvenir which was published by Karnataka Forest Department on the occasion of Bandipur completing 25 Years as a Tiger Reserve. Pp.33-36.

 

66.              Johnsingh, A.J.T. 1999. Among the Canids. Hornbill 1:4-8.

 

67.              Johnsingh, A.J.T. and Negi, A.S. 2000.  All for the mahseer. Hornbill (Jan.-March): 24-27.

 

            Please note that Indian Express, Times of India, The Hindu and Deccan Herald are India's leading English News Papers. Science Reporter is a magazine published by Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, Government of India. Hornbill is a publication of Bombay Natural History Society, a premier Non-Government Organisation in India. Sanctuary is the wildlife magazine of India and Cub is published by Sanctuary for children. Frontline and India Magazine are leading English Magazines which periodically publish wildlife articles. Zoogoer is published by the National Zoo, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC. Corbett is the Newsletter published by the renowned Corbett Tiger Reserve, India. Folio is a monthly magazine published by The Hindu covering various aspects.


PUBLICATION

 

 

Papers

 

1.      Johnsingh, A.J.T. 1986. Impact of fire on wildlife ecology in two dry deciduous forests in South India. The Indian Forester. 112:993-938.

 

2.      Johnsingh, A.J.T. and Vickram, D. 1988. Fishes of Mundanthurai wildlife sanctuary, Tamil Nadu. J.Bombay Nat. Hist. Soc. 84:526-533.

 

3.      Joshua, J. and Johnsingh, A.J.T. 1988. Observations on birds on Mundanthurai Plateau, Tamil Nadu. J. Bombay Nat. Hist.Soc. 85:565-577.

 

4.      Johnsingh, A.J.T. and Joshua, J. 1989. The threatened gallery forest of river Tambiraparani, Mundanthurai wildlife sanctuary, South India. Biol. Conserv.  47:273-280.

 

5.      Johnsingh, A.J.T. and Shankar, K. 1991. Food plants of chital, sambar and cattle on Mundanthurai Plateau, Tamil nadu, South India. Mammalia. 55:57-66.

 

6.      Johnsingh, A.J.T. and Joshua, J. 1994. Avifauna in three vegetation types on Mundanthurai Plateau, South India. Journal of Tropical Ecology 10:323-335.

 

7.      Sunderraj, S.F.W. and Johnsingh, A.J.T. 1996. Impact of flash flood on the gallery forest and arboreal mammals of river Servalar, Mundanthurai Plateau, South India. J.Wildl.Res. :89-94.

 

 

Reports

 

 

8.      Rai, N.D. and Johnsingh, A.J.T. 1992. Survey of Nilgiri tahr Hemitragus hylocrius in Kalakad-Mundanthurai Tiger Reserve, Tamil Nadu. Wildlife Institute of India, Dehra Dun, India. Report submitted to Tamil Nadu Forest Department. pp12.

 

 

Notes 

 

 

9.      Johnsingh, A.J.T., Sathyakumar, S. and Sunderraj, S.F.W. 1991. Ariankavu Pass, a lost elephant corridor in South India. Environmental Conserv. 18:368.

 

 

Popular articles

 

 

10.  Much ravaged Mundanthurai. Indian Express, January 12, 1975.

 

11.  Johnsingh, A.J.T. 1980. An incident of tahr poaching. Hornbill 2:37-39.

 

12.  Steps needed to preserve a treasure trove of wildlife. Indian Express, August 5, 1982.

 

 

13.  Magic spell of Mundanthurai. Indian Express, June 21, 1984.

 

14.  A threat to Kalakadu Sanctuary. Indian Express, July 12, 1984.

 

15.  Johnsingh, A.J.T. 1986. Living hills. A report on Kalakadu Mundanthurai hills. Sanctuary VI:114-121, 160-163.

 

16.  Johnsingh, A.J.T., Ravi Chellam and Sunderraj, S.F.W. 1986. Langurs of Mundanthurai Plateau. Hornbill 2:27-32.

 

17.  Johnsingh, A.J.T. 1990. Reserved for the tiger. Frontline February 3-16:73-81.

 

18.  A dwindling species. The Hindu, September 1, 1991.

 

19.  Lost in a tiger reserve. The Hindu, September 8, 1991.