Fruit Jelly Squares

Ever wondered what happens if fruit jelly gets a little too thick? Welcome to these jelly squares. You can pretty much adapt them to any fruit, but regardless of what fruit you use, beware! These squares stick to everything! They are the first (and only) thing I've found that will even stick, at least in part, to parchment paper. Here are the flavors I've tried:

The recipe is from the Sugarcrafter web site.


Rhubarb Jelly Squares

History - Ok, ignore the rather off-putting color of these jelly candies. That's entirely because the rhubarb I have is one of the varieties that is almost all green rather than the dark red you usually find in the stores. If you can get past that, you won't regret it because these candies have a great flavor - strong, tart rhubarb flavor tempered by the sweetness of the sugar in the candy. It's like rhubarb jam except more flavorful and in solid form. The consistency is like a very soft gummi bear. And they are very, very sticky. In fact, this is the first food I've ever seen that will hold onto parchment paper. Overall, they're pretty tasty, but what intrigues me the most about this recipe is the potential it has for other fruits. I am so very much looking forward to substituting other types of fruit for the rhubarb as the summer harvests come around!

The recipe is from the Sugarcrafter web site.

Rating - okay

Ingredients

Instructions - Line an 8x8 inch baking dish with parchment paper. Puree the rhubarb, and then strain the juices through a mesh sieve into a sauce pan. You'll have to press down on the pureed rhubarb to get all of the juice out. Heat the rhubarb and lemon juices, along with 1/2 cup of the sugar, in a saucepan over medium heat until the mixture reaches 113 degrees F. Add the remaining sugar and boil. It will foam a lot so use a saucepan big enough to hold the extra volume. Once the mixture reaches 238F, pour in the pectin. Continue to boil and stir 1-2 minutes more. Remove the pan from the heat and immediately pour the hot mixture into the prepared dish. Sprinkle lightly with granulated sugar and let set for 2 hours. When set, carefully lift the confection out of the pan. Cut into 1" squares and roll in sugar until well coated. Or leave them sitting on the parchment paper - but be aware that any surface of the jelly squares either not coated in sugar or covered by parchment paper will stick to EVERYTHING it touches.


Raspberry Jelly Squares

History - Wow. Talk about intensely sweet raspberry flavor. There's nothing subtle about these raspberry jelly squares at all. I tried this basic recipe several months ago using rhubarb and figured at the time it'd make a good candidate for raspberries once my garden was churning them out. Next time, it might be worth trying a raspberry-something else mix just to turn down the intense sweetness, or possibly add some additional lemon juice or peel to the mix.

Just like the rhubarb jelly squares, these stick to everything so don't go trying to stack them up in a container unless you put a couple of layers of parchment paper between them.

Rating - okay

Ingredients

Instructions - Line an 8x8 inch baking dish with parchment paper. Heat the puree and lemon juices, along with 1/2 cup of the sugar, in a saucepan over medium heat until the mixture reaches 113 degrees F. Add the remaining sugar and boil. It will foam a lot so use a saucepan big enough to hold the extra volume. Once the mixture reaches 238F, pour in the pectin. Continue to boil and stir 1-2 minutes more. Remove the pan from the heat and immediately pour the hot mixture into the prepared dish. Sprinkle lightly with granulated sugar and let set for 2 hours. When set, carefully lift the confection out of the pan. Cut into 1" squares and roll in sugar until well coated. Or leave them sitting on the parchment paper - but be aware that any surface of the jelly squares either not coated in sugar or covered by parchment paper will stick to EVERYTHING it touches.

Storage

Room temperature - okay
Refrigerator - unknown
Freezer - unknown

I'd keep this one at room temperature. I suspect the high humidity of the refrigerator would turn it to slush - same with the freezer upon thawing. At room temperature, you've got maybe two days before the sugar on top gets crusty and maybe a few more days before the jelly itself either dries out or goes squishy, depending on the humidity.