Pack 381 Ceremonies

Tiger Cubs, Bobcats, Wolfs, Bears, Webelos, Arrow of Light, Multiple Cub Ranks, Leaders, Special Awards, Opening Ceremonies, Closing Ceremonies, Flag Ceremonies, Closing ThoughtsReligious Ceremony & Words of Wisdom

For Tiger Cubs:

TIGER TRACK INDUCTION CEREMONY

This ceremony is for welcoming new tiger Cubs and their partners. It also introduces them to the Tiger Cub Promise.

Equipment: candle holder or arrangement of five candles and table.

Personnel: Tiger Cub coach and or Cubmaster.

Arrangement: The candle holder or similar arrangement of candles is on the table. The lights are dim. The presenter stands next to the table.

Presenter: The Tiger Track is an important symbol in Tiger Cubs BSA. As you Progress through each big idea, you will be presented a tiger track to iron on your shirt. The Tiger Track has a special meaning. Listen Carefully and you will hear about the special meaning.

The palm of the track represents the spirit of scouting. (The presenter lights the candle in front) The spirit of Scouting is one of helping and friendship. Each toe of the track represents a point in the Tiger Cub Promise.

The first point is "I promise to love God." (The presenter lights the first candle on left.) Your parents and religious leaders teach you to know and serve God. By following these teachings, you show your love to God.

The Second point is "I promise to love my family." (The presenter lights the second candle.) A Tiger Cub should always be kind and helpful to his family. By helping to make your home a happy place, you should show love to your family.

The third point is "I promise to love my country." (The presenter lights the third candle.) This means that you are a good American. You help your community in any way that you can. By being a good citizen, you show your love to your country.

The fourth point is "I promise to learn about the world." (The presenter lights the fourth candle.) The world that we live in is a big and beautiful place. There are many things to learn. As a Tiger Cub, you will learn a lot about your world.

Now each time you see a Tiger Track, it will help you to remember the Tiger Cub Promise. Would all Tiger Cubs and their adult partners please step forward and repeat the Tiger Cub Promise and Motto:

Promise: I promise to love God, my family, and my country, and to learn about the world.

Motto: Search, Discover, Share.

At this time it is with great pleasure that I present your adult partner with your Tiger Cub Totem and beads earned to present to you.

Congratulations to each and every one of you on your accomplishments as a Tiger Cub!


TIGER CUB GRADUATION CEREMONY 1

Equipment: Tiger Cub Certificates, patches, five candles---a tall white one, two black ones, & two orange ones, a bridge (see plans for one under  other misc. items) , candle holders.

Arrangement: Arrange the five candles on the table--the white candle in the center with two black candles on one side of it and two orange candles on the other side.

CUBMASTER: Tonight, we will honor Tiger Cubs. Will our tiger Cub coach, ___________, come forward to introduce them please.

TIGER CUB COACH: Please hold applause to the end.  Comments (if any), Introductions, (TC & parents come forward as they are introduced, TC coach hands TC certificate to boy, congratulates him, & shakes his hand as he & parents step forward. The Cubmaster then presents the patch to the parent to give to their son, congratulates them and shakes their hand. Then the TC & parents line up in semi circle behind table with candles. After all are in place, the Tiger Cub Coach lights the candles as he or she speaks the following:) White is for the purity of living. Black is for strength and courage to face the unknown. Orange is for knowledge and joy. These are the colors of the Tiger Cubs. You have completed your tenure in Tiger Cubs BSA. The certificates & patches are for all to see what you have accomplished. As your Tiger Cub Coach, I congratulate you on your accomplishments this year and wish you well... I show you the path of a new challenge----the challenge of Cub Scouting.

(Cubmaster stands at the far end of bridge, TC and parents wait at beginning of bridge until the Cubmaster welcomes them to pack.)

CUBMASTER: Parents, you will work with your son on his achievements and electives?

PARENTS: We will.

CUBMASTER: Do you wish for your son to participate in the pack activities?

PARENTS: We do.

CUBMASTER: do you understand it is your responsibility as parents to help your son work on his rank and encourage him to help the pack go?

PARENTS: We do.

CUBMASTER: Welcome to Pack ___!!! (Applause) TC and parents cross the bridge, Webelos line up behind Cubmaster to shakes their hand & welcome the boys to the pack as they reach the other side and are then seated with the audience.


TIGER CUB GRADUATION CEREMONY 2

Equipment: A large box made like a doorway (or a blanket or curtain) A pot with dry ice and some water to make it smoke.

Akela: (Calling the boys and parents forward.) You have taken part in the past few months in the Tiger Cub Motto; Search, Discover, Share. Together you will join the Cub Scouting family. Together you will grow and learn new things while earning each badge. You will support and strengthen your Cub Scouting and own family in each step that is taken. Your parents will help and support you in each step of your journey. Before you step through together the doorway of Cub Scouting you must make a promise to the Pack. The most important part of this promise is to "Do Your Best". You will be expected to do your best in everything you do, including Cub Scouts, at home and in school. Will you make the Cub Scout Promise with me? (Demonstrate the sign and lead them in a repeat after me fashion through the Promise.) Parents, as you step through the door way of Cub Scouting with your son, you will be accepting the parental responsibilities of Cub Scouting. If you are willing to accept these responsibilities, signify by saying "I will." Please face your son, place your left hand on his shoulder, give the Cub Scout sign with your right hand and repeat after me: I ______ promise to do my best to help my son to be a good Cub Scout, to encourage him to fulfill the Cub Scout promise and obey the Law of the Pack. I promise to assist him in his Cub Scout achievements and electives, to cooperate with the den leader, Cubmaster, and Pack Committee members, and to participate actively in Cub Scouting. Parents, I urge you to seal your promise with your special sign of affection. (Call boys one at a time with his parents to step through the doorway. Boy should go first and have his Cub scout shirt slipped on while he is inside the doorway. proceed when each family has crossed through.) As you can see, you now have a son who is ready to join the tribe. Please help him by presenting him with his Wolf Scarf. (Parents put scarves on boys.) Pack, these new Wolves have joined our pack. See them, Get to know them, and protect them, for now they are your brothers.


For Bobcats:


AKELAíS SCALE

PERSONNEL: Cubmaster, Den Chief, Den Leader, Bobcat candidates and parents.

EQUIPMENT: Ceremonial Board consisting of arrow with three candles on a balance, Bobcat pins and advancement certificates.

CUBMASTER: Will the candidates and their parents please come forward and face the pack. (They do so.) You boys and your parents have come to be inducted into our Cub Scout family as members of Pack ______. You are ready to start your adventure along Akelaís trail, together with your friends and their parents."

Here is the arrow (points to ceremonial board) that points the way along the trail. The awards you can earn along the trail are: the Wolf, the Bear, the Webelos and the Arrow of Light awards. The pans of the Cub Scout program that cannot be seen are the value of things you will learn and the good times you will have.

This is the scale of Akela. Both the parents and the Cub Scouts are important to keep the scale in balance.

(To Den Chief): (Name), will you light the candle representing the Cub Scouts. (Candle on feather)

(To Den Leader): (Name), will you light the candle for the parents. (Points to the candle on the arrow point.)

If the boy does not do his part, the scale is out of balance and the program goes downhill. (Removes candle representing boys, then replaces it.) On the other hand, if the parents part is taken away, the scale is out of balance in the other direction and the Cub Scout loses his way along Akelaís trail. (Removes candle representing parents, then replaces it.)

So, you see, to keep the Cub Scout program in perfect balance, both Cub Scouts and parents must take part in the activities by coming to all meetings, following the leaders, and advancing from point to point along Akelaís trail.

Now, boys, give the Cub Scout sign, and repeat the Promise with me. (They repeat Cub Scout Promise.)

And, parents, will you please repeat the following: We, as parents, will do our best.. .to aid and assist our son... in his Cub Scout activities. We will encourage him with enthusiasm... criticize him with fairness... and judge him with lenience. And, realizing that the Cub Scout program... is one of equal participation for boys and parents... we will assist as we are able... in serving as leaders, advisors or workers.


THE CUB SCOUT COLORS

PERSONNEL: Akela, two Assistant Cubmasters dressed as Indian braves, narrator.

EQUIPMENT: A tripod with a large cooking pot suspended over a fire. A small pot fits inside the large one and contains a yellow Wolf neckerchief and a blue Bear neckerchief and awards. Pack dry ice around the small pot to give a smoking effect (smoke increases as water is added). Two small clear bottles, one filled with diluted yellow food coloring and the other with diluted blue coloring; an Indian headdress; awards.

ARRANGEMENT: The boys are seated in a semicircle. Akela, wearing the headdress, stands behind the boiling pot. The awards are under the neckerchiefs in the small pot.

Narrator: Many, many moons ago the great chief Akela called a council to see what could be done to make the Bobcat tribe the best of all tribes. After many hours he called his two most trusted braves to the council fire. (He pauses as two braves come in and stand, one on each side of their chief.) He told the first brave to climb the mountain and tell the great eagle to fly high into the sky and bring back part of the beauty of the sun. (The first brave leaves.) He told the second brave to go to the forest and tell the sparrow to fly high into the sky and bring back part of the sky. (The second brave leaves, and both return immediately. One carries a bottle of blue water and the other a bottle of yellow water. They take positions, one on each side of the fire, kneel, and hold bottles up for everyone to see.)

Akela: (Addressing the first brave.) Pour some of the beauty of the sun into our council mixing pot. (The brave pours the liquid over the dry ice, being careful not to get any in the small pot. Akela signals the second brave.) Pour some of the beauty of the sky into our council mixing pot. (The second brave responds, and the boiling action increases.) (Raising his right hand, Akela speaks again.) From this day forward, blue will stand for truth and loyalty. Yellow will stand for warm sunlight, happiness, and good cheer. (Akela stirs the pot, reaches in, and pulls out the yellow and blue Cub Scout neckerchiefs. He holds them open for all to see, and speaks.) And that is why Cub Scouts use the colors blue and gold. (Akela stirs the pot again and takes the awards from the small pot.) With the help of your parents, you have completed the first test of a Cub Scout.... a Bobcat. Are you now ready to follow the Wolf, Bear and Webelos trail? (The boys answer yes.) You have answered that you are ready. Then please stand, raise your right hand with the Cub Scout sign and seal that pledge by giving the Cub Scout Promise and the Law of the Pack. (They do.)

( I promise to do my best, to do my duty to God and my country, To help other people, and to obey the Law of the Pack.)

(The Cub Scout follows Akela, The Cub Scout helps the pack go, The pack helps the Cub Scout grow, The Cub Scout gives goodwill.)

It is now my pleasure and joy to call you a "Bobcat" & to give this badge to your parent to present to you.

Now let us meet the parents and Cub Scouts who helped keep the blue and gold of Cub Scouting alive and growing. Would the parents of these cubs please step forward and join your sons.

Parents please pin this Bobcat Badge on your Son's Left pocket. Please note.. that it is upside down for now. Only when your son does a good deed may you turn it right side up and sew it into place.

(The Cubmaster gives the badges to parents to pin on the boys.)

In the Cub Scout Promise, you promised to do your best. If you always remember to do your best, you will successfully walk the trail of the Wolf, Bear & Webelos. Go now and do your best, and return to me as an honorable Wolf, Bear, and Webelos Scouts.


HOWLING BOBCAT

Equipment: "Campfire", Indian Costume

Setting: Campfire is turned on, other lights are dimmed. New Bobcats are outside the room with an Assistant Cubmaster. They give the howl of the Bobcat, a long drawn-out wail.

Akela: I hear the calling from beyond our Pack council . It sounds like a Bobcat! Shall we answer with the call of the Wolf Pack? (Pack howls like wolves. This is the ACM's cue to enter with the Bobcats.)

Akela: Who comes here?

ACM: Boys, hunting for the fun and companionship of Cub Scouting.

Akela: But whom do you seek?

ACM: Akela, the great Spirit of the Cub Scout.

Akela: Are these boys wise in the ways of the Bobcat?

ACM: They are, Akela.

Akela: Show me.

ACM: Show Akela what you have already learned. Raise your arm in the Cub Scout Sign and say the Cub Scout Promise. (They do.)

Akela: I can now call you Cub Scouts because you have completed the requirements necessary for your participation in this great Brotherhood we call Cub Scouting. Tonight you have repeated before me the Cub Scout Promise. You have assumed a very important responsibility. You have agreed to "do your best" and to "do your duty to God and your country", "to help other people" and "to obey the Law of the Pack", These are things which are not always easy, but I think you will enjoy them. All that we ask is that you do your best. Do you agreed to do your best? (Wait for answers) Good! Please let your parents pin your bobcat badge on your uniform.


JUNGLE BOOK CEREMONY

Personnel: Cubmaster, Assistant Cubmaster, Den Leader and Assist. Den Leader.

Cubmaster calls forward the new Bobcats and their parents.

ACM: Mowgli, the man-cub came to live with the wolf pack when he was very young. When he had learned enough to run with the other cubs, he was brought to the great council of the Pack to be accepted as a member of the Pack. Akela, the leader of the Pack, said...

CM: Look well O Wolves. Get to know him.

ACM: From outside the circle of the Pack, Shere Khan, the mighty Tiger spoke out, "The man-cub is mine. Give him to me!" Several of the wolves joined in with Shere Khan because they were afraid. Knowing the Law of the Pack required 2 people to speak for a cub when there was a question about him joining, Akela said....

CM: Who speaks for this Cub?

ACM: Baloo, the sleepy brown bear, spoke up.

DL: I will speak for the man-cub. Let him join the Pack. I will teach him the Law of the Pack.

ACM: Knowing the Law of the Pack required 2 people to speak for the Cub, Bagheera, the black panther, spoke.

ADL: If there is a question about the right of a Cub to join the Pack, his life may be bought at a price. I will add fresh meat if you will accept Mowgli into the Pack.

ACM: The wolves all joined in saying, "Let him join!" They all looked him over before departing the council. Akela said to the mother and father Wolf, and to Baloo and Bagheera...

CM: Take him away and teach him the Law of the Pack. (Lead the boys in the Cub Scout Promise. Then award their Bobcat badges to their parents and have them pin them on the boy.)


KEY TO CUB SCOUTING

Equipment: Oversized key cut out and painted gold, written on it is "Scout Spirit", and an old key on a string.

CM: We have with us tonight someone who has just joined the Cub Scout program. Will ______ and his parents please come forward? The Cub Scout program will face you with many challenges. You will be required to attend weekly den meetings and monthly pack meetings. You will need to work with leaders and also at home with your parents. In order to achieve the highest rank in Cub Scouting, you must now set your sights on the Arrow of Light. Many times you may get discouraged because the trail seems steep and hard to climb.  There is a key to achieving each of these goals. The key to Cub Scouting. Do you know what the key is? (Wait for answer of no and then produce the oversized key.) The key to Scouting is "Scout Spirit." Scout Spirit includes teamwork. It includes fair play and good sportsmanship. It includes that "something special" that makes scouts want to be the best they can be at everything they do. This key will unlock the door of achievement. Remember, with this key to Scouting - "Scout Spirit" - you can now step on the Scouting trail. This small key is a reminder of the Key to Cub Scouting. (hang key around his neck.) And that first step is rewarded with the Bobcat rank. I will present this award to your parents in token of the help they have given you. They may pin it on your uniform. (Do so.)


For Wolfs:


HEADRESS CEREMONY FOR BOTH WOLF & BEAR

Equipment: Wolf & Bear Headdresses

Akela: This is the ceremonial Wolf Headdress. It represents the origin of Cub Scouting as told in the story of Mowgli in the Jungle Book. The Wolf Pack adopted the "Man Cub" and taught him the ways of the Pack. So have we done to each of the members of our Pack. The erect ears of the wolf are symbolized by the Cub Scout sign. In some tribes, the Indian Scout was called a Wolf, and wore the skin or head of the wolf when beginning a scouting expedition. Tonight, we have _____ Cub Scouts who have earned the rank of the Wolf. Will they and their parents please come forward. (Read names and wait till all are present.) You are not beginning your expedition, but ending it. You have earned the rank of Wolf. Now you will begin a new expedition, on the trail of the Bear. To your parents I present the Wolf badge. They may present it to you as the Wolf skin that marks you as a member of the Wolf Pack.

ACM: I wear on my head the ceremonial bearskin. The Bear is respected by all other animals because of his size, loyalty to its young, and hunting ability. The Bear Baloo, taught Mowgli the Law of the Jungle. Tonight we have ____ Cub Scouts who have earned the rank of Bear. Will they and their parents please come forward. (Read names and wait till all are present.) You too will be respected by your fellow Scouts as you have attained greater stature tonight. Continue to obey the Law of the Pack and you will soon join the ranks of the Webelos Tribe as a warrior Scout. To your parents I present the Bear badge. They may present it to you as the Bearskin that marks your stature in the Pack.


PAINTED PAWS

Equipment: Black water based paint, brush, badges

CM: When a boy joins our Cub Scout pack, he earns the Bobcat badge and starts on an upward trail. This trail will lead him through the ranks of Wolf, Bear, Webelos and on to the highest award of Cub Scouting, the Arrow of Light. Tonight we are honoring boys who have made significant advancement along this journey. Would the following boys and their parents please come forward? (Read names and wait till all are present.) I understand that you seek the rank of Wolf, is that so? (response) Please recite the Cub Scout Promise.

Cubs: I, ___, promise to do my best to do my duty, to God and my Country, to help other people, and to obey the Law of the Pack.

CM: I can see by your knowledge of the Cub Scout Promise and the achievements that you have completed that you have worked hard along with your parents. These achievements are very important as they have helped you gain a deeper appreciation of many things. You are now ready to become a Wolf -cub. (With paint draw on the back of the Cubs hands the 1st toe) The first toe of the Wolf paw is for your growth through feats of skill and having fun with your family. (Draw 2nd toe.) The second toe of the Wolf paw represents that you have learned about your home, community, country and your religious beliefs. (Draw 3rd toe.) The third toe stands for the skills you have gained in handling tools, trying new things, and making collections.  (Draw 4th toe.) The fourth toe represents your new appreciation for conservation and safety. (Draw the footpad.) The pad of the Wolf paw represents your growth as a Cub and the increased responsibility you are now capable of handling. Wolf Cubs, remember the inscription of this paw. It shows you are ready to move along the upward trail of Scouting. (Present parents with badges and have them pin them to their sons. Shake hands with boys.)

CM: Would the following boys and their parents please come forward. (Read names and wait.) You are climbing even higher on the trail to the Arrow of Light. Do you seek the rank of Bear? (response.) Then recite the Law of the Pack.

Cubs: The Cub Scout follows Akela, The Cub Scout helps the Pack go, the Pack helps the Cub Scout grow, The Cub Scout gives goodwill.

CM: I see that you have worked hard with your parents and Den Leaders to achieve your rank. You are ready to become Bear-cubs. (Draw the first toe on the back of the Cubs hands.) The first toe of the Bear paw symbolizes your increased understanding of God. (Draw 2nd toe.) The second toe of the Bear paw symbolizes your new knowledge of your country, its folklore and heritage. (Draw 3rd toe.) The third toe shows your increased appreciation of your family. (Draw 4th toe.) The fourth toe stands for your increased understanding of your own self worth. (Draw footpad.) The palm of the Bear paw represents your growth as a Cub, and the increased responsibility you are now capable of carrying. The climb up the Scouting trail is getting shorter, but steeper. Not everyone will finish. Follow the Promise and the Law so that no harm will come to you along the trail. (present badges to the parents and have them pin them to their sons. Shake hands with the boys.)


WOLF GRADUATION TO BEAR

Personnel: Cubmaster & Cub Scouts.

Equipment: Candles or penlights, Bear neckerchiefs, copies of the Bear Cub Scout Book, electric council fire.

Cubmaster: The wolf was greatly admired by the Indians for his swiftness, his hunting ability, and his endurance. In fact, the Indian scout was called a wolf, and the sign was two fingers spread apart, symbolizing the erect ears of the wolf. The wolf was considered a great "medicine animal," and in some tribes, the Indian scout wore the skin and head of the wolf when on a scouting expedition.

(The Cubmaster calls the Cub Scouts forward who are going to be Bears. They are handed a lighted candle or penlight and stand in front of the council fire.)

You have followed the trail of the Indian by attaining the rank of Wolf Cub Scout. You have proven yourself brave, swift, and alert, as your Indian brothers of the past, Now you must go on to greater honors for yourself and your parents by earning the Bear badge to prove your greatness. Learn the ways of our animal friends. Learn about the earth and how to grow food. Look up to our skies and learn the stories the stars tell.

Let this light be a sign to others that you are now a Bear!

Congratulations!

(Blue neckerchiefs and Bear books are handed to the boys (or parents to present to the boys) as they blow out their candles or turn off their penlights.)


For Bears:  

see above under Wolf ceremonies also.


AKELAíS BEARS

EQUIPMENT: Orange candle and advancement board

PERSONNEL: Cubmaster, Den Chief, Bear candidates, their parents (Den Chief escorts candidates and their parents; may light candle)

CUBMASTER: Will Den Chief(s) ___________ bring forward the following Cub Scouts and their parents: (Name boys)

From the kindly bear, Akela learned the secret name of the trees, the call of the birds, and the language of the air. Just as Akela learned things that required a little more skill, so have these Cub Scouts, as they have achieved the Bear rank.

Just as Akelaís parents helped him to accept a little more responsibility as he grew older, so have your parents helped you to achieve your new rank as a Bear Cub Scout.

You too, have proved yourself worthy of being called braves in Akelaís tribe. I hope you will continue to be worthy Scouts and to advance to our Webelos den some day.

(Hands badges to parents as Den Chief lights orange candle.)

Parents, we appreciate the help you have given your sons toward earning this badge. Among other things, Scouting teaches teamwork. Continue to work with them and it will pay big dividends. We now ask that you present these badges to your son(s).


THE SECOND GREAT STEP ALONG THE CUBBING TRAIL

Characters: Cubmaster, Den Chiefs, Advancing Cubs and parents, Den Leaders

CUBMASTER: Will the den chief who has Cubs ready to receive their Bear Rank, please come forward. (This is all arranged in advance). Now, will you please give the names of the advancing Cubs from your Den and bring them forward.

(Den Chief announce names and take boy to Cubmaster at front).

CUBMASTER: Cubs, we are happy to see that you have made the second great step along the Cubbing trail. You have completed the Bear Achievements, and you have proved yourselves worthy of membership in our Pack. The advancing Cubs will face their fellow Cubs and parents step forward two paces. Cubs, Iím going to ask Den Chief to lead your in a cheer for these new members of our Bear rank.

(Den Chief leads cheer and advancing Cubs return to their places in line but remain facing audience.)

CUBMASTER: Now, Den Chief, I understand the parents of these Cubs are present tonight, and Iím going to ask you please to bring them forward. (Den Chief brings parents to Cubmaster and places them so that each Cub is standing between his mother and father.)

CUBMASTER: These Cubs have done a splendid job in our Pack. They have climbed the Cubbing ladder well. But this could not have been possible had not interested parents helped. These Cubs have passed their achievements to their parents. Now Iím going to ask just the parents in the audience to stand and give these fine boys a hand.

(Cubs in audience remain seated, but all parents stand and applaud).

CUBMASTER: There are other people in addition to this fine Den Chief who have contributed to the advancement of these Cubs. Iím going to ask each advancing Cub to call out the name of this Den Leader: and as their names are called, Iíd like them to stand while we all sing "Theyíre Jolly Good Fellows".

CUBMASTER: And now we are ready to award the Bear badges to these Cubs. As Cubmaster, I do not claim the privilege of presenting the badge. Iím going to present the badge to each parent and allow them to present it to their son. (Present badges to their sons and congratulate them.)


Bear to Webelos - BROKEN ARROW

Equipment: An Arrow per boy with their name on it. Notch each arrow on the top and bottom about 3" apart.

Call Bear Scouts and their parents forward.

Cub Master: You and your family have worked together to develop the skills of the Wolf and Bear. Together, you have strengthened your family and the Scouting Family. You will now start on the Trail of the Webelos, your goal is the Arrow of Light.  This group of arrows represents you, your family, your adult Scouting Leaders, the Pack, and the Chartering Organization. Without any of these people, Scouting would not be strong. Take this group of arrows. Together, as a group, the arrows are strong. As you have noticed, your names are on the arrows. When your arrow remains in the group, the strength of the group is added to it. Without any of the other members, Scouting will break as easily as I break this arrow. (Break each boy's arrow over his shoulder. Hand the point to the parents and the fletched end to the boy.) Parents, you have received the head of the arrow. This signifies that you and the Webelos Leaders will guide these scouts over the next two years. New Webelos, you have received the flight feathers. This signifies your travels during the next two years. your journey will end in two years with most of you reaching the Arrow of Light. At the end of that journey, you will have enabled this arrow to fly straight and true again.

When the time for their Arrow of Light ceremony comes, collect the arrows, fit the notches back together and with glue and twine wrap them to become whole again. Present them to the boys at their Arrow of Light Ceremony.


GRADUATION OF BEARS TO WEBELOS WITH NECKERCHIEFS

EQUIPMENT: Spirit of Scouting candle and holder, badges, colors and neckerchiefs. PERSONNEL: Cubmaster, Webelos den and den leader, den chief.

Webelos den leader, Mr.______ , will you and the den please come forward and join me on stage. Tonight we have (number) Bear Cub Scouts who have entered the fourth grade and are joining our Webelos den. Den Chief, _______, escort Bear Cub Scouts,______ , and their parents to our awards table please. (Cubsí names) you have shown yourselves worthy of joining our Webelos den by working hard through the ranks of Wolf and Bear. We would now like to present to you the new parts of your Cub Scout uniform. (Webelos den leader presents parts as they are explained.) Mr._______ please remove their neckerchiefs and replace them with the Webelos neckerchief Next, place the Webelos badge of colors on their right shoulder. These colors will tell everyone that you are an older boy preparing for the adventures of Boy Scouting. The badge of colors will hold the activity badges that you earn as you explore some of the 20 Webelos activities with your den. Mr. & Mrs. _____ you have helped your sons along the Cub Scout trail this far. It is important that you continue to go along with your sons and learn about the Boy Scout trail in his Webelos den. We know that we will soon have the pleasure of seeing you present your son with activity badges, the Webelos badge, and finally, the Arrow of Light award, the highest in Cub Scouting, Congratulations _____ & _____and remember to keep the spirit alive in all that you do.

We have a very active Webelos den. Since our last meeting, every one of our Webelos has earned a new activity badge. As I call your names, would each boy and his parents please come forward. (Call all Webelos)

Each boy, in order to earn his Webelos badge, must earn three activity badges, be an active member of the Webelos den for three months, know and understand the requirements to be a Boy Scout, know the parts of and meaning of the Webelos uniform, and lead a flag ceremony in his den. We have (number) Webelos Scouts that have earned their badges this month. Would and their parents please come forward. (List activity each boy has earned to qualify for badge, and present to parents to pin on his chest.) Congratulations to all of you, and keep up the good work.

Pack, how about a cheer for the Webelos, their parents, and especially for Mr._________ their leader.


GRADUATION CEREMONY BEARS TO WEBELOS

Personnel: Bear Den Leader, ACMs, Committee Chairman, Cubmaster (Indian Chief), 1st year Webelos den members and graduating Bear Den members.

Equipment: Indian drum, artificial campfire, peace pipe, Indian costumes, Webelos neckerchiefs, slides & books.

Arrangement: The 1st year Webelos (after being congratulated) sit on the floor in a semi circle around the campfire. The Indian Chief stands in the middle of the semi circle.

Cubmaster: (patrol name of 2nd yr Webelos) Patrol, you have in the past worked on the Wolf and Bear trails, in your most recent adventures you have been working on the Webelos trail. You are well on your way to earning the highest honor in Cub ScoutingÖ. The Arrow of Light and becoming a Boy Scout. You have now earned the honor of joining our Webelos council fire.

Would the following Webelos please step forward and be escorted up to join me in our council fire:

(The Webelos only no parents step forward, are escorted up by Committee Chairman and Assistant Cub Masters which are dressed up as Indians and seat the boys in a semi circle around the campfire)

Congratulations young braves. You will find lots of fun and adventures ahead of you.

Bear Den Leader: (as the drum is sounded with a soft "boom, boom." the bear den leader comes to the center of the room.) Scouts of the Webelos Tribe, we have 14 boys who wish to enter the Webelos circle.

2nd yr Webelos Patrol: Who do you have?

Bear Den Leader: I have Bear Cub Scouts.

2nd yr Webelos Patrol: Have them escorted to our Chief.

Bear Den Leader: Would the following bears please stand up to be escorted to our Chiefís side.

(Each member of the 2nd yr Webelos Patrol takes turns escorting the Bears up to the right of the Chief)

(When the bears are escorted forward they stop to give the Chief the Cub Scout salute & handshake then line up to his right)

Cubmaster: Do I hear the South wind?

Assistant CM 1: I am the south wind. I wish you good Scouting. Over hill and dale I have carried stories of you and your Cub Scout experiences. As Cub Scouts you have been happy, game, and fair, and a credit to your pack.

Cubmaster: Do I hear the East Wind?

Assistant CM 2: I am the East Wind. I wish you well. I have spread the story of your fun and happiness as Bobcats, Wolves, and Bears in Cub Scouting with Pack 498, and how you lived up to the Cub Scout promise.

Cubmaster: Do I hear the West Wind?

Committee Chairman: I am the West Wind. I would like everyone to know that these Cub Scouts going into the Webelos den did not walk the trail of Cub Scouting alone. Each had the wonderful help of his parents. Please continue to help your Cub Scouts go, and also to grow.

Cubmaster: What are all the winds saying?

Assistant CMs & CC: (All in unison) We will be with you forever. We wish you the best of luck in the Webelos Den.

Cubmaster: The purpose of the Webelos den is to help our boys earn the Webelos Badge and Cub Scoutingís highest award, the Arrow of Light Award, and to help them become Boy Scouts when they are eligible. With the continued help of their parents they will be able to obtain these honors. At this time would the parents of these boys please step forward to present their son with their Webelos neckerchief, slide & book.  


For Webelos:


FEATHER "W"

Equipment: Indian Headdress for each boy, using 3 blue feathers alternated with 2 yellow feathers. Fan the feathers so that the blue ones look like a "W". Use Velcro to hold band around the head. Campfire and Indian Music.

CM: Tonight we have ___ Scouts who have earned the Webelos badge. Will (Read names) and their parents please come forward and sit at the place of honor at the head of the campfire? (You may have the rest of the Webelos Den come and sit around fire too.) I have here an Indian headdress that was designed especially for the legendary Webelos Scout who completed each of his five major tests of endurance. Notice how the blue feathers form a "W". Each of the five feathers has a special meaning. Feather #1 represents the meaning of the Webelos badge and Uniform. The blue "W" on the Webelos badge shows you are moving from Cub Scouting into Boy Scouting. Feather #2 represents the three activity badges you must earn, of which one has to be Fitness. A Warrior Scout also had to pass a fitness test along with many others. Feather #3 shows you have led your Den in a flag ceremony that you planned yourself. Feather #4 stands for the requirements of Boy Scouting, which you have learned along with the Boy Scout Oath, the Scout Law, the Salute, sign and handshake. Feather #5 represents your efforts to serve God and live up to your religious beliefs. I shall now place this headdress on your head. (Do so to each boy.) Wear it proudly, Webelos Scouts! You've earned it. I present this patch to your parents to present to you. Please give them the proper salute! (The proper salute to a mother is a kiss.) Now I salute you, Webelos Scout! (Scout returns salute.)


THREE CANDLES

Equipment: Parent's Pin, Webelos badge, a Green Candle, a Red Candle, and a Yellow Candle

CM: Will the following Cub Scouts and their parents please come forward? (Read names) Tonight you are to receive the Webelos rank. This rank is the next to last step in Cub Scouting. It requires that a boy begin to learn skills of the adult world. You have begun to learn about Boy Scouting and have agreed to live by its Promise and Law. Your parents have continued to support you in this effort. As token of their help, please pin this Parent's pin on them. (Boy does.) The rank of Webelos entitles you to wear the Webelos Colors. These three ribbons are green, red and yellow. To symbolize your achievement in earning this rank, we have three candles here tonight. (Chose three parents to stand behind the candles and light them as each color is explained.) Green indicates knowledge of the Scout oath and Law and signifies the learning of manhood skills.Red signifies the achievement of three activity badges.Yellow indicates you have been an active Cub Scout for at least three months in your Webelos Den, and have performed many good turns, helping your den, pack and family. Now parents, you may pin the Webelos badge on your son's uniform. Congratulations new Webelos Scouts. Thank you parents for your help to your son. Continue to help him as he completes the last step of his Cub Scout trail. Pack welcome these new Webelos with a Grand Howl.


WEBELOS PATCH

Cubmaster: When our boys became Cub Scouts, they work to earn four badges to form a diamond on their left pocket. First they must earn their Bobcat badge. Next they earn the Wolf badge and then they go on to achieve the Bear badge. The final part of the Cub Scout diamond is earned as they move up the Scouting trail into the Webelos den. Would our 1st Yr Webelos Leader & her assistants please come forward.

Webelos Den Leader: Would the boys and parents of the _____ Patrol please come forward. (have them line up with boy in front of his parent)

Cubmaster:  I will now present the Webelos Badge and activity Badges earned by the boys to their parents, who in turn, will present them to their son.

(after presentation)

We are very proud of the Scouts who have received the Webelos Badge tonight. The final step as a Cub Scout before graduating to a Boy Scout troop will be to earn the Arrow of Light Award. I look forward to presenting this to you in the future.

Congratulations!!!


WEBELOS BADGE ADVANCEMENT

Cubmaster: When our boys became Cub Scouts, they work to earn four badges to form a diamond on their left pocket. First they must earn their Bobcat badge. Next they earn the Wolf badge and then they go on to achieve the Bear badge. The final part of the Cub Scout diamond is earned as they move up the Scouting trail into the Webelos den and earn the Webelo badge.

Will the Webelos leaders, the following Webelos and their parents please come forward...

Den Leader: As part of earning the Webelos badge you had to learn the Scout oath. Please raise the Boy Scout sign and repeat the Boy Scout Oath.

All Boys: Repeat the oath: On my honor, I will do my best, To do my duty to God and my country, To obey the Scout Law, To help other people at all times, To keep myself physically strong, Mentally awake, and morally straight.

Den Chief: On my honor.

Den Leader: An assurance I make, a pledge to do right, I keep it before me, a bright shining light.

Den Chief: I will do my best.

Den Leader: I'll try my best to do it, though difficult it may be, and if I keep my promise, then folks will believe in me.

Den Chief: To do my duty to God and my country.

Den Leader: To God the creator and a country so mighty, my reverence, my loyalty forever I guarantee.

Den Chief: To obey the Scout Law.

Den Leader: The 12 points of the Scout Law are the rules of the game; to become a useful citizen that is my aim.

Den Chief: To help other people at all times.

Den Leader: The young, the old, many people need me, a cherry smile a helping hand of service I will be.

Den Chief: To keep myself Physically strong.

Den Leader: Building endurance, building strength, being careful my body will serve me well if I am thoughtful.

Den Chief: Mentally awake.

Den Leader: My mind is important, a tool to keep keen, to be always alert and ready to learn.

Den Chief: And morally straight.

Den Leader: I'll strive to be honest, clean and faithful, my character unblemished. All good and true values I want a part of me when I've finished.

Cubmaster: I am very pleased to present this Webelos badge and activity pins to your parents to put on your uniform. We are very proud of the Webelos Scouts who have received the Webelos badge tonight. The final step as a Cub Scout before graduating to a Boy Scout troop will be to earn the Arrow of Light Award. I look forward to presenting this to you in the future.


FOR ARROW OF LIGHT


ARROW OF LIGHT AWARD

Webelos Den Leader: Tonight we honor those Webelos Scouts who have completed the requirements for the Arrow of Light Award, THE HIGHEST RANK IN CUB SCOUTING!

Will the following Webelos Scouts come forward with their parents:_________________

(As the room lights are dimmed the tom-tom Beats offstage. Akela the Cubmaster appears in Indian Costume and stands partly facing the Pack & the Arrow of light candidates.)

Narrator: Many moons ago these braves joined the Webelos tribe to enjoy the fun and advancement activities of the Cub Scout Trail. To Become A Webelos Scout each boy had to fulfill certain requirements. You Cub Scouts have learned to follow Akela, which means the leadership of your Cubmaster, parents, teachers, Webelos den leader, or others who are striving to help you become good citizens. Now you have earned the Arrow of Light Award. All these people have guided you along the Scouting trail. (Points to the candles.)

(Cubmaster lights Candles as narrator explains meaning)

The Blue candle represents your experiences as Cub Scouts, The white one reveals a bright new trail ahead filled with many thrilling Boy Scout experiences. The yellow candle is to remind you that a little work, along with good hearty fun, can produce rich rewards.

Cubmaster: I am very pleased to present this Arrow of Light Award to you with the help of your parents. There is also an arrow of light pin for you to present to your parents.

(Present award to parents as Webelos den leader hands them a safety pin which one parent uses to pin the award to the left pocket flap of the boy's shirt.)

Good luck as you enter Boy Scouting. Keep advancing, and remember that a good Scout makes a good citizen.


BROKEN ARROW

Equipment: An Arrow for each boy, two council fires, awards

Setting: Cubmaster at first fire, boy scouts at second. Award is attached to arrow.

Akela: Will (Read names) and their parents please come forward and take their place of honor at the Council Fire? Tonight (Read names) have achieved two high honors. They will receive the Arrow of Light award and graduate from Cub Scouting into Boy Scouting. I hold in my hand an arrow. As you can see, it is straight and true, for only an arrow that is straight and true will hit its mark. (Hold up arrow so Scout can see its shaft.) In order to fly straight, it must also have at least three feathers. These represent the first three ranks of Cub Scouting you achieved; Bobcat, Wolf and Bear. With these awards in place you began to ascend along the shaft, toward the tip of the arrow, the Arrow of Light Award. This is the culmination of all your Cub Scouting efforts. Without a hard, sharp tip, the arrow is not a very effective weapon. Since you have achieved this, the highest rank in Cub Scouting, you will now be a more effective Boy Scout as you take with you the things you've learned and continue to progress along the Scouting trail. Please stand. I now present you with this arrow, to which is attached your award. Parents, please pin the Arrow of Light on your son. now give your parents the proper salute. (The proper salute to a mother is a kiss.) Since you are graduating form Cub Scouting tonight, you will no longer be a Cub Scout, except in memory. Because this arrow represents the path along which you have come, but not the path along which you must now go, I will ask you to return the arrow. (Take the arrows and break them over your knee, just enough to crack, but not completely in two.) This broken arrow will now be forever a reminder to you, that you achieved every rank in Cub Scouting, and graduated with honor. It will no longer fly, just as you will no longer be a Cub Scout. But you will always wear the Arrow of Light symbol on your uniform, as a reminder of your accomplishment. You now may keep this broken arrow for your trophy skin. I give you one last salute before you leave our council fire to join your new Boy Scout brothers at their council fire. (Salute.) Always be straight and true! Now walk to your new council fire.


EAGLE FEATHER

Equipment: "Eagle" Feather, Arrow of Light Light box, Drum, Akela Costume.

Webelos Leader: Tonight we have our Arrow of Light presentation. The Arrow of Light is the highest award a Cub Scout can achieve and is the only Cub Scout award that can be worn on the Boy Scout uniform. Will the Arrow of Light candidates and their parents please come forward? (Read Names) To help with this presentation we would like to call on the great chief Akela, chief of all the Webelos. But before I can call the great chief we must have complete silence. Let's give this great man the respect he deserves. (Beat drum when silence is obtained to bring in chief.)

Akela: Why have I been summoned?

WL: Chief Akela, (Read names) is (are) ready to receive the Arrow of Light award. Do we have your approval to present this award?

Akela: Does he (Do they) have Scout spirit?

WL: Yes.

Akela: (to Scouts) Raise your right hand in the Cub Scout sign and repeat the Cub Scout Promise for all of those present tonight. (Scouts do.) Do you plan on living up to the promises in the Cub Scout Promise? (Scouts answer) You have battled the Bobcat, trapped the wise Wolf and wrestled the great Bear. You have passed the trials of strength to join the mighty Webelos tribe. You have climbed the great mountain and reached into the sky to grasp the Arrow of Light. This is one of the Feathers you will wear in your war bonnet as you continue to climb higher until you are worthy to soar with the Eagle. (Present feather with award attached to the parents.) Parents pin this award on your son. It is an honor to have you as members of the Webelos tribe. Be proud of your accomplishments.

WL: Please remain silent while the chief leaves us. (Drum beats softly while chief exits.)


THE STORY OF THE SIX ARROWS

Setting: Center stage, Cubmaster, Webelos, and Council Fire.

Many years ago there lived a tribe of Indians who had a peculiar method of choosing their chief When the chief of a tribe became too old and knew he had only a short time to live, he would call before him all the braves of the tribe and give to each a bow and six arrows.

When these arrows hit an object they were so constructed they would break and could not be use again. Each brave took a bow and arrows and promised that he would eat no meat except that killed with the six arrows. He was to remain away from camp as long as he could and the one remaining away the longest would be made chief

Now it so happened that there was a young Indian by the name of Arrow of Light who wished very much to be chief and for many moons had spent much time practicing with the bow and arrows and learning the ways of the wild animals. When his chief sent out word that he was about to choose a new chief, Arrow of Light secured the bow and arrows.

It was late in the afternoon when he started out and he went at once to a place where he had often seen deer come down to drink. He was obliged to wait all night but he had a great deal of PATIENCE. Just as it was getting light he saw a fine deer on the waterís edge near him. He shot the deer. Then he took stone, skinned the deer, prepared the skin for clothing, and hung the meat where the wild animals could not reach it. He lived here for many days but finally the meat was almost gone so he resolved to start out again.

He had not traveled far when he came face to face with a huge bear. The bear growled and started toward him, but Arrow of Light was very BRAVE. He waited until the bear was near him. With his second arrow he shot and killed him. He used the skin to make a fine robe to sleep under in cold weather and the meat supplied him for a long time. But at last the food was gone and he was obliged to start out again.

He was walking along the path thinking how well he had done to kill such big animals with his arrows when suddenly he saw an Indian lying on the path before him. He bent over him and saw that it was one of his friends who had started out at the same time he had, but who had used up all his arrows and was starving. He knew that his friend must have food at once or he would die. He looked around but all he could see was a squirrel.

He had been saving his arrows for bigger game but he showed his FRIENDSHIP for his Indian friend by shooting this squirrel and cooking it for him. The next day the Indian was able to walk slowly so they went on together. Soon they saw a huge panther ready to spring upon them. Arrow of Light knew that he could escape but his friend was so weak that he would easily be killed so he used up another arrow to kill the panther, thus showing his UNSELFISHNESS.

As they went on together looking for a deer, they heard a wolf in hot pursuit of one. Before long they came upon a freshly killed deer. Arrow of Lightís friend said to him, "Here is some meat all ready for you," but Arrow of Light had promised that he would eat only the meat that he had killed for himself He showed his HONESTY by refusing to eat it.

Arrow of Light now had only one arrow left and wanted to kill a deer with it. Soon he saw a deer but just as he was about to shoot, the deer gave a jump and the arrow missed him. Now Arrow of Light was very much discouraged so he walked by himself into the woods. He still had FAITH IN THE GREAT SPIRIT and he looked up and prayed, "Oh, Great Spirit, I have tried to do my best. I have been helpful and honest but here I am many days journey from home and I know I shall starve before I reach there unless you help me." As he prayed he suddenly felt something press against his foot and looking he saw the arrow that had missed the last deer. It had not hit any object and was whole. He felt the Great Spirit had helped him. He took this arrow and killed a deer and he and his friend arrived home safely.

When the old chief heard his story he spoke thus, "Oh, Arrow of Light, you have showed, Patience in waiting for the deer, Courage in facing the bear, Friendship in helping your friend, Unselfishness in killing the panther, Honesty in refusing to eat the meat you did not kill, and Faith in the Great Spirit in asking his help. These are the qualities we need in our chiefs and it therefore gives me great pleasure to declare you to be chief of our tribe." Arrow of Light proved his worthiness to be made chief

A great arrow, the symbol of the tribes leadership, was presented to him. Because of his great leadership it was named after him. This is where we got the Arrow of Light award.

Tonight we have a boy who has earned this great award. Will ______________ and his parents please come forward.


WEBELOS GRADUATION TO BOY SCOUTS

Equipment: Cross-over bridge, red light, flags.

Setting: Darkened room, with red light shining on the bridge. The American and Pack flags flank the bridge. To the left of the bridge are assembled the parents and Webelos Den Leaders, on the right are the Scoutmaster and troop members.

CM: Tonight we mark a great occasion - the graduation of Webelos Scouts from our Pack. We are sad to see them leave because they have been a great help to our Pack. But we are happy for them because they are going on to the great adventure of Boy Scouting. They have worked hard for this night and have advanced well. Please escort _____ to the front. (The named scout is escorted to the front by a first year Webelos Scout. He takes his place with his parents. The escort returns to his seat. The CM repeats this step until all graduating scouts are presented.)

Webelos Leader: It is with a great sense of pride that I now ask you for your Webelos neckerchief. (After removing scarf, Leader escorts them to the end of the bridge.) You have done well in our den, but our den is no more, you are about to move on to the troop. You will be a part of a new patrol. Thank you for all the hard work you put in and all the fun as well.

CM: I am pleased to see that you are wearing the Arrow of Light, the highest award in Cub Scouting. This is the only Cub Scout badge which you will be permitted to wear on your Scout uniform. And now you take the final steps. As you stand on the bridge between Cub Scouts and Boy Scouts, please give your pack one last salute, then turn and salute your new Scoutmaster. (Boys cross one at a time, stopping to salute the CM and then the SM.)

SM: We are happy to welcome you to our troop. I can see by the Arrow of Light that you are prepared to join the great fellowship of Scouting. Please repeat after me the Scout oath. ( Scouts do, then exchange scout handshakes.) As a token of this important occasion, I would like to present you with the Troop neckerchief.  (Parents move to front of the bridge, where SM joins them.) SM: Welcome to our Troop. I congratulate you on the fine work you have done with your son in Cub Scouting. I am sure you will find new adventures in our troop. (Red Light is turned off. House lights turned on. Participants leave the stage.)


For Multiple Ranks:


AMERICAN FOLKLORE

PROPS: Four candles in holder, each candle a different length.

CUBMASTER: Our history is filled not only with the tall tales of American Folklore, but also with the true deeds of some very brave men who explored, fought and in some cases died, to extend the frontiers of our country. Men like Davey Crockett, Daniel Boone, Kit Carson, Lewis and Clark, Buffalo Bill Cody, and many more.

The Scouting trail is much like the trail these famous men followed and so, at this time, we will recognize those Cubs in our Pack who have advance along this trail. As I call your names, please come forward with your Parents. (call names)

As you Cubs can see, the candles get taller as you advance. This represents the additional skills that you must learn as you earn each higher rank. (Light Shortest Candle).

The Bobcat is the start of the trail and the simplest to earn. (light next candle.) The Wolf is a big step forward and harder as is (light the next candle) the Bear.

Finally, at last, (light the tallest candle) you became a Webelos Scout, an earn the highest rank, the Arrow of Light. And so with the spirit of the great explorers, folklore heroes and frontiersmen to guide you, may you continue to climb the Scouting Trail. (Present awards by Den and congratulates Cubs and parents).


BADEN-POWELL ADVANCEMENT CEREMONY

Tonight we are celebrating the birthday of Scouting. Many of you know that Scouting started in England in 1907 when Lord Baden-Powell took 7 boys to Brownsea Island for a camping experiment. But the roots go even farther back. In 1899, Baden-Powell was a Colonel in the British Army fighting the Dutch Boers in South Africa. Colonel Baden-Powell was in charge of a town called Mafeking. It was under siege by the Boers. The Boers shelled the town every day except Sundays. When that happened, everyone had to hide in trenches until the shelling stopped. Baden-Powell noticed that the last ones into the trenches and the first ones out were the young boys. He needed to keep these young lads from doing risky things and getting wounded. So he organized them into a Boys Corps. They ran messages from Headquarters to the troops and citizens, and they practiced Army Scouting skills. This helped him enforce discipline on them in a way that they could accept. The food was running out, the Boer force was 10 times the size of the British force, but Baden-Powell used his cunning to hold the town for 217 days, until British reinforcements could arrive and rescue the town from the Boers. When he got back to England, he found himself a National hero and a small book he had written for the Army, "Aids to Scouting", was being used by British boys to play games of scouting. He remembered those boys in Mafeking and what his Boys Corps did for them. He rewrote his book into "Scouting for Boys" in 1908 and Boy Scouting was born. The tradition Baden-Powell started in Mafeking, we are continuing tonight. When the boys in Mafeking learned their scouting skills, they were rewarded with a promotion in rank. So too, do Cub Scouts, after showing their abilities in certain skills, earn their ranks of Bobcat, Wolf, Bear and Webelos. Would the following Scouts and their parents please step forward? (read names of award winners) You have learned new skills and have shown yourselves ready for promotion. Wear your new rank proudly like all Scouts have for the last 94 years. (Read the name and award given, exchange the Cub Scout Salute, and let the parent pin on the award.)


DIMMING CAMPFIRE

Equipment: Electric Campfire with dimmer switch, which Akela may operate unseen. Start with it dim.

Akela: Tonight we have gathered at the ceremonial campfire to hear an ancient tale. It was once believed that a campfire had great magic. Of course it cooks our food, lights our way and wards off wild animals, but the magic of this Pack Council Fire is that it can light up our future! But only when we approach it after making a great accomplishment. Will (Read names) and their parents please stand by their chairs? See how the fire burns only dimly when there are no advancing Scouts nearby? Now please come forward and join me at the fire's side. See how it has begun to burn brighter now! The fire tells us that you have completed all the requirements for your ______ rank. You have worked hard to be worthy of this great honor, so the fire has given us a sign that you will continue to find great joy and success in Cub Scouting. You will soon be on your way to earning the next rank in Scouting. The fire tells us you will do so! Please stand. I present this award to your parents to present to you. Congratulations! (Akela sits again so he can work the controls to dim fire as Scouts leave.) I now dismiss you to your seats, and watch the fire as you leave its side! (Repeat as many times as needed for awards.)


EXPLAINING THE RANKS

Need: 1 1X14 cards picturing the rank badges. Tape these little explanations of rank on the back of the appropriate card. Five Cubs representing each rank.

Have the 5 Cubs come forward, hold up the cards for the audience to see as they read the explanation on the back.

BOBCAT: I had to make some promises, To become a bobcat Scout. To Follow, help, and give goodwill, Thatís what Cub Scoutingís all about.

WOLF: The back and front rolls were easy, Making games was fun. But when it came to giving directions, I almost didnít get done. I had to earn the Wolf badge, It meant a lot to me. Finally I learned my directions, And a Wolf Cub Scout I would be.

BEAR: I never wrote a letter before, Let alone a 100 word essay. Or ever learned to throw a rope, To hit a marker 20 feet away. And now that Iíve earned the Bear badge, All that and a whole lot more. Makes me feel that much smarter, Than I ever felt before.

WEBELOS: Now that Iím a 9 year old, I belong to a Webelos den. Activity badges Iíll try to earn, Like Athlete, Forester, and Outdoorsman.

ARROW OF LIGHT: The Oath and Law are memorized, Graduation day is in sight. I am prepared for whatís ahead, Iíve earned the Arrow of Light! Itís hard to say goodbye to friends. Cub Scoutingís meant a lot to me, But itís time I start the upward trail, For itís an Eagle Scout I want to be.

CUBMASTER: Now that we have had the ranks explained, we would like to recognize those boys in our Pack who have earned those ranks. (At this time you will have the advancing boys come forward with their parents and award the badges.)


KNIGHTS OF THE ROUND TABLE

Equipment: Wooden sword; eight ceremonial candles; badges and awards.

Cubmaster: Just as the Knights of old had their code of conduct, so the young Knights of Cubscouting have their code,.... the Cub Scout Promise. (Someone dressed as a page lights the candles on the table as the Cubmaster reads the lines.)

To obey the Law of the Pack (Light candle)

A Cub Scout promises to do his best: (Light candle)

To do his duty to God and his country (Light candle)

To help others (Light candle)

Just as the Knights of old abided by the laws of his land. The young Knight also abides by the Law of the Pack.

The Cub Scout follows Akela. (Light candle)

The Cub Scout helps the Pack go. (Light candle)

The Pack helps the Cub Scout grow. (Light candle)

The Cub Scout gives goodwill. (Light candle)

These precepts help to light the young knightís way through life.

In the days of old, as the Knights of the Round Table traveled together, certain of their members performed tasks so well that they earned special recognition from their king. Today in Cub Scouting we continue that tradition for our modern knights.

We do this with the use of ranks and special awards.

There are four ranks in Cub Scouting with many special awards.

Order of the Bobcat Ė is for all boys just entering Cub Scouting.

Order of the Wolf Ė is for a Cub Scout that has completed all 12 of the Wolf achievements.

Order of the Bear Ė is for the Cub Scout who complete all 12 Bear Achievements.

Order of the Webelos - is for the Cub Scout who completes 3 activity badges and various other requirements.

The most important award in Cub Scouting is the...... Arrow of Light Award, it is for the Webelo Scout to earn before leaving Cub Scouting and becoming a Boy Scout. This is the highest award in Cub Scouting.

While waiting to become of age to pass to the next rank for which he is eligible, a Cub Scout may earn additional honors called arrow points for Cubs and activity badges for Webelos. Tonight at our roundtable, we will welcome new knights and recognize those earning special honors.

As knights of these groups, we will expect you and your family to help in all our activities. Our Round Table can be no stronger than its weakest member. You will be expected to follow your leaders and give goodwill.

The following candidates have fulfilled all of the requirements for the order of the Bobcat. Young knight, when called upon please step to the front and center and kneel on your left knee with your parents behind you. (Announce their names one at a time)

I dub thee Sir Bobcat. (Knight them with the sword Left, Right, Left )

(Give the badge and awards to parent to present to scout)

Will the Knights for the order of the Wolf from Den # __ please step forward with their parents to the left side of the hall.

Young knight, when called upon please step to the front and center and kneel on your left knee with your parents behind you. (Have all candidates line up on left of stage, then have each step forward as their names are announced.)

(As they are stepping forward announce the rank and/or awards that they have earned.)

I dub thee Sir Wolf (Knight them with the sword Left, Right, Left )

(Give the badge and awards to parent to present to scout)

The following Knights have performed their tasks so well that they have earned recognition in the order of the Bear. Den # __ please step forward with their parents to the left side of the hall.

Young knight, when called upon please step to the front and center and kneel on your left knee with your parents behind you. (Have all candidates line up on left of stage, then have each step forward as their names are announced.)

(As they are stepping forward announce the rank and/or awards that they have earned.)

I dub thee Sir Bear (Knight them with the sword Left, Right, Left )

(Give the badge and awards to parent to present to scout)

The following Knights have faithfully served this court and have earned their Webelos badge. Will the __ patrol please step forward with their parents to the left side of the hall.

Young knight, when called upon please step to the front and center and kneel on your left knee with your parents behind you. (Have all candidates line up on left of stage, then have each step forward as their names are announced.)

(As they are stepping forward announce the rank and/or awards that they have earned.)

I dub thee Sir Webelo. (Knight them with the sword Left, Right, Left )

(Give the badge and awards to parent to present to scout)

We have many knight that have served the Round Table well in the past. They have earned many activity badges improving their skills for the day they earn the highest award in Cub Scouts..... THE ARROW OF LIGHT and cross over to become a Boy Scout. Will the Webelos and their parents please step forward. (Call out names and awards earned, again present awards to parent to present to scout)

Congratulations to each and every knight. May you earn many more recognitions of tasks well done. As you leave this great hall of the Round Table may you carry with you the spirit of true knighthood.


THE MEANING OF THE COLORS BLUE AND GOLD

CUBMASTER: Blue and Gold, the Cub Scout colors stand for some of the good things Cub Scouts gain through the process of advancement as they make progress through the ranks.

Gold stands for Good Cheer. The boys here tonight who have learned the basics of Cub Scouting and have earned their Bobcat badge are full of the good cheer of Cub Scouting. Will these boys and their parents please come forward? (Call the names of the boys receiving Bobcats - give the award to the parents to pin on the boy.)

Gold also stands for happiness, and no one seems to be more full of happiness than these bright young men, who have completed the twelve achievements necessary for the rank of Wolf Will these boys please come forward with their parents? (Call names of boys receiving Wolf Badges and Wolf Arrows. Give awards to the parents and have them present them to the boys.)

Blue, the other color of Cub Scouting stands for truth. Truth begins to shine through strong on the faces of these Cub Scouts, as they have completed the achievements for the rank of Bear and have learned that Cub Scout Honor really is important and truth is always the best.Will these boys please come forward with their parents. (Call the names of the boys receiving Bear badges and Bear Arrows. Give the badges to the parents to present to the boys.)

The other meaning for the color Blue is loyalty. This is one of the most important traits a boy can learn in the process of becoming a man. Loyalty to family, God, country, friends, and the most important, loyalty to his beliefs and convictions. There are many adults who do not display this trait, but the boys who have progressed to the rank of Webelos have developed or are developing this trait of loyalty. The boys who have earned honors as Webelos are: (Call off names and at this time graduate boys into Webelos, award activity pins, and also the Arrow of Light and graduate boys into Boys Scouts. Just say a few words about the accomplishments of each boy. Honor the Arrow of Light recipients and graduates into Scouting with more ado than the activity badge recipients.)

These boys honored tonight have been true to the Gold and the Blue by showing the traits represented by our Cub Scout colors... .Good cheer, Happiness, Truth and Loyalty. Letís show them and their parents how much we admire their efforts with a Pack cheer.

"Whoís the best in Blue and Gold? Pack ____ so weíve been told!"


SHERE KHAN ADVANCEMENT CEREMONY

Equipment: Large signs to identify the characters; badges to be, awarded.

Personnel: Father Wolf, Mother Wolf, Shere Khan, the tiger, Akela (Cubmaster); man-cubs (boys who have earned badges); and their parents.

(The Cubmaster calls forward all Cub Scouts and Webelos Scouts who have earned badges at the proper time.)

AKELA: Our scene opens in the cave of Mother Wolf and Father Wolf. They and the man-cubs have just settled down for the evening. Shere Khan, the tiger, lurks outside. Suddenly the great head and shoulders of Shere Khan block the moonlight shining in at the cave entrance.

FATHER WOLF: What does Shere Khan want?

SHERE KHAN: The man-cubs. Give them to me!

FATHER WOLF: The wolves take orders only from Akela, the head of the wolf pack. The man-cubs are ours.

SHERE KHAN: The man-cubs are mine. Give them to me!

MOTHER WOLF: The man-cubs are ours. They shall not be harmed. They shall live happily, to run and hunt with the pack.

SHERE KHAN: We shall see what the pack will say about that.

FATHER WOLF: Shere Khan is right to wonder. What will the pack say?

AKELA: Our scene now shifts to the pack meeting.

SHERE KHAN: Akela, the man-cubs are mine. Give them to me!

AKELA: (motioning boys who have earned the Wolf rank to step forward) These man-cubs have shown themselves worthy of the Wolf rank in our pack. They belong to the pack, not to Shere Khan. The members of the pack want them to have the mark of the Wolf.

(The Cubmaster asks the parents of the Wolf candidates to join their sons. He gives the Wolf badges to the Parents to present to their sons.)

AKELA: We also have man-cubs who have shown themselves worthy of the Bear rank. Our pack wants them to have the mark of the Bear. (The Cubmaster asks the parents of the Bear candidates to present the Bear badges to their sons. The Cubmaster then repeats the words and actions for the Webelos Scouts who have earned activity badges and Webelos badges. After all advancing boys have been recognized, the Cubmaster leads the whole pack in the Law of the Pack.)

Scouts, would you please recite the law of the Pack with me

The Cub Scout follows AkelaÖÖÖÖ..The Cub Scout helps the pack go.

The pack helps the Cub Scout growÖ.. The Cub Scout gives goodwill.


STORY OF THE CUB SCOUT COLORS

PERSONNEL: Akela, two Cub Scouts dressed as Indian braves narrator.

EQUIPMENT: A tripod with a large cooking pot suspended over a fire (fake). A small pot fits inside the large one and contains a yellow Wolf neckerchief and a blue Bear neckerchief and awards. Pack dry ice around the small pot to give a smoking effect (smoke increases as water is added). Two small clear bottles, one filled with diluted yellow food coloring and the other with diluted blue coloring; an Indian headdress; awards.

ARRANGEMENT: The audience is seated in a semicircle. Akela, wearing the headdress, stands behind the boiling pot. The awards are under the neckerchiefs in the small pot.

Narrator: Many, many moons ago the great chief Akela called a council to see what could be done to make the Webelos tribe the best of all tribes. After many hours he called his two most trusted braves to the council fire. (He pauses as two braves come in and stand, one on each side of their chief.) He told the first brave to climb the mountain and tell the great eagle to fly high into the sky and bring back part of the beauty of the sun. (The first brave leaves.) He told the second brave to go to the forest and tell the sparrow to fly high into the sky and bring back part of the sky. (The second brave leaves, and both return immediately. One carries a bottle of blue water and the other a bottle of yellow water. They take positions, one on each side of the fire, kneel, and hold bottles up for everyone to see.)

Akela: (Addressing the first brave.) Pour some of the beauty of the sun into our council mixing pot. (The brave pours the liquid over the dry ice, being careful not to get any in the small pot. Akela signals the second brave.) Pour some of the beauty of the sky into our council mixing pot. (The second brave responds, and the boiling action increases. Raising his right hand, Akela speaks again.) From this day forward, blue will stand for truth and loyalty. Yellow will stand for warm sunlight, happiness, and good cheer. (Akela stirs the pot, reaches in, and pulls out the yellow and blue Cub Scout neckerchiefs. He holds them open for all to see, and speaks.) And that is why Cub Scouts use the colors blue and gold. Now let us meet the parents and Cub Scouts who helped keep the blue and gold of Cub Scouting alive and growing this month. (Akela stirs the pot again and takes the awards from the small pot. The boys and the parents are called forward and the awards are presented.) With the help of your parents, you have completed the first test of a (Cub Scout - Bobcat). It is now my pleasure and joy to present this badge and to call you a ("Bobcat").(The Cubmaster gives the badges to parents to pin on the boys.)

Are you now ready to follow the [Wolf, Bear, or Webelos] trail? (The boys answer.) You have answered that you are ready. Then seal that pledge by giving the Cub Scout Promise. (They do.) Let me now, as the leader of this tribe, give you a reminder of the tests that lay before you. (The Cubmaster places a strip of white adhesive tape on each boy's forehead.) Remember that some do not successfully complete the tests. In the Cub Scout Promise, you promised to do your best. If you always remember to do your best, you will successfully walk the trail of the [Wolf, Bear, or Webelos]. Go now and do your best, and return to me as an honorable [Wolf, Bear, or Webelos] Scout.


TAIL CEREMONY

Equipment: Tails made of fake fur for each Cub. Bobcat tail is spotted tube about 3" long. Wolf tail is long, grey, narrow at the top and wider past the center, then back to a point. Bear is brown/black ball of fur. Each tail should have a string to attach it to the boy's belt loops.

Candidate and his parents are called to the front. The Cubmaster explains which award has been earned, but before the Scout can get his award he must look like a Bobcat/Wolf/Bear! "What is missing?" (turn him around) "A TAIL!" Present tail to parents and have them attach it to his belt loop or belt in back. Explain that in order to remove his tail he must do something first. Can he tell you what it is? Ask the rest of the pack. "A GOOD DEED!" Explain that if he does not find a good turn to do before he goes to bed, he must wear it on his pajamas and then to school until he does one! (Some cubs like to wear it for a few days!)

NOTE: This ceremony works well alone for either rank advancement, but would be most meaningful if all three tails could be earned while a member of the Pack to add to the Scouts Trophy Skin upon graduation.


For Leaders:  


LEADER INDUCTION

Equipment: Each Cub Scout who will be in the den of the new leader should have a card with is name, birth date, address and phone number and parent's names. Attached to this card is a string with a slip knot in the loose end. Also needed is a Cub Scout Leaders' Book.

CM: Tonight we have the pleasure of offering to some parents a position of leadership that will give them some of the most memorable experiences of their lives. Will (Read names of Den Leaders and Assistants) please come forward and join me? We want to welcome you as the new Den Leader and Assistant Den  Leader of Den ____.

Committee Chair: I too want to welcome you to a position of  leadership in our Pack. I want you to know that we are all here to help you in any way an I am sure all of the parents of the boys in your den will give you any assistance they can and that you need. I would like to present to you the Den Leader's patch and Assistant Den Leader's patch to sew on your uniforms on the left sleeve. And also the Cub Scout Leader's Book which is a very valuable aid.

CM: Now so that you won't forget to remember all that you need to know about your new position we have (Number of boys in the den) strings to tie around your fingers. Will the boys of Den ___ please come forward? (Boys come up and slip their card's string over the Den Leader's fingers. Then lead the leaders back to where their den is sitting.)


LEGEND OF THE THUNDERBIRD LEADER INDUCTION

Equipment: Thunderbird shield made of posterboard and decorated with feathers.

CM: Will (Read names of new leaders) please come forward? (They do.) Thunderbird has visited us here tonight and left an important message. You must understand that he has great powers, including the power to cause lightening and rain. His message tonight is to wish us all health and good luck for future generations. We feel that it is you, who have brought Thunderbird here tonight. We wish to thank you for accepting the Cub Scout challenge as a new Leader for a (Wolf, Bear or Webelos) Den. May Thunderbird cross your path many times. (Detach a feather from the edge of the shield and present it to each leader.)


Special Awards:


ARROWHEAD CEREMONY

Equipment: Arrowhead on a thong, Arrow for demonstration, Arrow Points to be awarded

Akela: Will (Read Names) and their parents please come forward? Tonight we honor these Cub scouts who have gone the extra mile and earned Gold Arrowpoint/Silver Arrowpoints. (Hold up arrow.) Here is an arrow. Have you ever shot an arrow? What makes the arrow fly straight? Answer: a straight shaft and feathers on the end.  What helps it enter its target? Answer: a sharp point and speed.  In order to be effective an arrow must have be all of these things. Straight and true, feathered for guidance and stability, fast and sharp. In order to be an effective Cub Scout, you too must remain straight and true, receive guidance and stability from good leaders, a program that is designed to help you move quickly through the ranks of achievement, and sharp attention on your part in order to make it to the Arrow of Light rank.  (Holding up arrowhead on a thong.) Here is an arrowhead. Making arrowheads requires skill and practice, and a lot of patience, as they are chipped of stone. Your Cub Scout Leaders and parents have chipped away at you to make you a sharp young man. I present this award to your parents to present to you. Now I will place around your neck this arrowhead, which you may keep as reminder of your hard work. You may wish to add it to your trophy skin. Congratulations!


TALKING FEATHER

Equipment: Talking Feather, Campfire

Akela: Tonight we have a special award to present. Would ______ and his parents please join me around the campfire? Would the Den Leader also come forward to the Council Fire? (All sit Indian style around the fire.) I hold in my hand a Talking Feather. Does anyone know what a Talking Feather is? ( If anyone speaks, ignore them. When someone raises his hand, give them the feather.) A Talking Feather gives the person holding it the right to speak. Everyone else must listen, until the feather is passed to them. (Akela sits.) Since we are honoring _____ tonight, we will pass the Feather around the circle and each of us will in turn tell about something he has done or learned as we watched him make progress along the Scouting trail. I will begin. (Each person takes the feather, says something nice about the Scout and then passes it on. Even the Scout himself is given a chance to talk.) Please stand now to receive your award. I present this award to your parents to present to you. Please give them the proper salute. (The proper salute for a mother is a kiss.) Now I salute you too, ________Scout!


Opening Ceremonies:


CAMPFIRE/CANDLE OPENING

Equipment: 'Campfire' built of logs around a yellow light bulb, electric candle with blue light, tape of crackling fire sounds.

Setting: Fire is dark as Akela enters and 'lights' candle (turns bulb).

Akela: We will light our council fire tonight with this candle that represents the Spirit of Cub Scouting, and the Cub Scout's promise to do his best. This light is a symbol of a Cub Scout's promise to do his duty to God and his country. This light is a symbol of a Cub Scout's promise to help other people. This light is a symbol of a Cub Scout's promise to obey the Law of the Pack. (Akela stops, touches 'campfire' with the 'candle.' Someone off stage then plugs in the fire and starts the tape.)

Akela: I now declare this council fire open. Let the ceremonies begin! (At this point you may want the whole pack to stand and repeat the Cub Scout Promise.)


4 WINDS OPENING

Equipment: Campfire, Indian costume, gourd or rattle.

Setting: Akela enters dressed as Chief, approaches unplugged campfire. Standing behind it, facing the audience, he raises his arms and faces skyward, rattle in one hand.

Akela: To our Father, who has granted us many blessings. (shakes rattle once), (Facing the ground and reaching his arms downward) To the earth, which has given us rich harvests. (Shakes rattle once), (Facing North - arms slightly raised.) To the north wind, with its cold breath of winter that teaches us endurance. (Shakes rattle once), (Facing East) To the East wind, which comes from the land of the rising sun and carries morning light over plains and mountains. (Shakes rattle once), (Facing South) To the South wind, from the land of warm sunshine that gives us courage and hope. (Shakes rattle once), (Facing West) To the West wind, from the land of the tall mountains that provide us with water and game to hunt. (Shakes rattle once), (Facing Audience) Now that we have called to the Great Spirits, we are ready to light our Council Fire.....(Stoops to light the fire while some one off stage plugs it in.) I now declare this Council Fire open! Let the ceremonies begin! (Long rattle)


Closing Ceremonies:


AMERICAíS ANSWER

America needs men with a concern for the common good -- men who have the understanding and insight to help solve her problems and those of the changing world around us. she needs citizens of integrity who value their great heritage and who are determined to pass on to others an enduring faith in the ideals and methods of our free society.

How does a boy come to know and to appreciate his heritage as a citizen of this nation? How does his sense of responsibility and his concern for others unfold?

Begin with him when he is a Cub Scout as he promises with all the solemnity of an 8-year old "to do my duty to God and my country..." Watch the pride and loving care with which he handles the flag as he is taught to fold it. He may not fully understand all that it stands for, but someday he will... with help.

Observe him later as he stands tall, alert and proud in his kaki uniform as the flag is lowered at Scout camp. He is living everyday experiences as a good citizen and showing concern for the needs of others. He is growing and practicing the fundamentals of citizenship. All of this time he is under the friendly guidance and companionship of men who care about him.

Now he is grown tall.. in high school.. an Explorer. He ponders the words of the Explorer Code. There is conviction in his voice as he says: "I will treasure my American heritage and will do all I can to preserve and enrich it."

And so this young American comes to manhood. He has grown through his Scouting experiences and though the influences of many men and women who have helped him. He has a job and a family and is making himself count in his community. He is a citizen of a great nation. He understands his heritage and cheerfully accepts his future obligations to all men.

He has been a Scout. He is Americaís answer!


AMERICA THE BEAUTIFUL

CUBMASTER: This evening we have shared our respect for our great country. We have seen some of the glory that is the United States. The most fitting end to our meeting is to sing "America the Beautiful". In this great song we sing of the glory of our great land, but the last two lines of every verse have an acknowledgement of God who guides us all. Just to recall the last two lines of the first verse.

"America, America, God shed his grace on thee. And crown they good with brotherhood, From sea to shining sea."

Everyone please stand and join me in singing "America the Beautiful."


FAMILY CLOSING CEREMONY

Equipment: A set of fifteen or twenty toy building blocks and a table.

Personnel: Cubmaster, Cub Scouts and their families.

Arrangement: The Cubmaster asks the boys and their families to pace blocks one at a time on the table to form the shape of a pyramid. As the cubs & families are building the pyramid the Cubmaster says the following:

Cubmaster: Cub Scouts, we're not really losing our minds. We're playing with these blocks to build something that has a lesson in it for us. (When Pyramid is finished, the cubmaster then says:)

There! Let's say this pyramid represents our country. If this is the whole country, where is your family?

Cub Scout: One of the bottom ones.

Cubmaster: That's right, you and your family are the one of the bottom blocks. Why? Because families are the foundation of the country. Without families our society would collapse. That's why families are so important to our country.

Of course, your own family is very, very important to you too. Your family gives you food, shelter, a chance for an education, and most important, your family gives you love.

In return, you give your family some things. You give your parents respect and obedience--- at least I hope you do! I also hope you do your share of the chores around the house. And I hope you return your family's love.

Now on the count of three, I want to hear every boy here who loves his family and obeys his parents to shout "I'll do my best!" Ready! One, two, three, I'll do my best!


LORD BADEN-POWELLíS FAREWELL MESSAGE

(This letter was found among Baden-Powellís papers after his death on January 8, 1941.)

Dear Scouts,

If you have ever seen the play, "Peter Pan", you will remember how the pirate chief was always making his dying speech, because he was afraid that possibly when the time came for him to die, he might not have time to get it off his chest.

It is much the same with me, and so, although I am not at this moment dying, I shall be doing so one of these days, and I want so send you a parting word of goodbye.

Remember it is the last you will ever hear from me, so think it over.

I have had a most happy life, and I want each one of you to have as happy a life, too.

I believe that God put us in this jolly world to be happy and enjoy life. Happiness doesnít come from being rich, nor merely from being successful in your career, nor by self-indulgence.

One step towards happiness is to make yourself healthy and strong while you are a boy, so that you can be useful, and so you can enjoy life when you are a man.

Nature will show you how full of beautiful and wonderful things God has made the world for you to enjoy.

Be contented with what you have, and make the best of it; look on the bright side of things instead of the gloomy one. But the real way to get happiness is by giving out happiness to other people.

Try and leave this world a little better than you found it, and when your turn comes to die you can die happy in feeling that at any rate you have not wasted your time but have "done your best".

"Be Prepared" in this way, to live happy and die happy; stick to your Scout Promise always--even after you have ceased to be a boy--and God will help you to do it.

Your friend,

Baden-Powell


NATURE AND THE GOOD VISITOR

COMMITTEE CHAIRMAN: Our pack meeting tonight brought us all together to think about nature. We can enjoy the great outdoors but we must think of others who will follow us. Wherever you go in the great wide world of nature, try to be a "good" visitor who will leave the plants and the creatures for others to enjoy after you leave.

FIRST CUB: The only shots I took were snapshots.

SECOND CUB: I tried to walk on pathways to keep off plants.

THIRD CUB: When I see animals or birds, I try to remember that I am a guest in their living place and I donít do anything to them but look at them.

FOURTH CUB: The one big thing I always do when I am ready to go home is to look and see that all fires are out in natureís backyard.

CUBMASTER: With Cubs and Webelos like you to help keep our friends on the ball, Iím sure that the beauties of nature will be around for years to come. Thanks Cubs, Good night.


CLOSING - ANNIVERSARY CLOSING

EQUIPMENT: Candelabra with three candles; one larger candle.

PERSONNEL: Cubmaster and all present and former Cub Scouts.

CUBMASTER: Tonight we have had a lot of fun at the ____ th birthday of Cub Scouting and the ____ birthday of our own pack. As Cub Scouts and leaders, we are following a trail blazed by millions of other boys, men, and women.

All of them have had the Cub Scout spirit, which we symbolize with the flame of this one candle. (Light larger candle. Extinguish room lights.) What is the Cub Scout spirit? Thatís easy. Itís the three things we promise to do in the Cub Scout Promise. We say, "I promise to do my best to do my duty to God and my country." Thatís the first part. (Light one candle on candelabra.)

The second part is, "To help other people." (Light second candle.) And the third is, "To obey the Law of the Pack." (Light third candle.) Now, while these candles burn as a reminder to us, will all Cub Scouts, and former Cub Scouts who are with us tonight, please stand, and repeat the Promise with me. (Lead Promise.)


Flag Ceremonies:  


PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE PRELUDES:

Unless thought is given to it, the Pledge of Allegiance can become rote and boring. Here are some short intros to make the ceremony different and meaningful each time.

Thomas Jefferson said, "The God who gave us Life, gave us Liberty at the same time." As we repeat the Pledge of Allegiance, Let us remember that our flag is a symbol of this precious Liberty.

We have Good Government only when We, The People of the United States of America, play an active part in making it good. Let us say our Pledge with that in mind.

The greatest Public Document of the American People in the Constitution of the United States. Our Flag represents our Constitution in Action. Let us now Pledge our Allegiance to that Flag.

The U.S. Flag is the emblem of our Nation. The Leader of the Free World. Let us now say the Pledge of Allegiance to that Flag.

13 Stripes and 50 Stars ...This phrase can only refer to our American Flag. Let us remember the history behind those stars and stripes as we say the Pledge of Allegiance.

"Long may it wave."... Let us remember the history behind this famous phrase as we Pledge our Allegiance to the Flag.

The Flag flies before our eyes as a Bright Gleam of Color and a Symbol of Ourselves. Let us join in Pledging the Flag of the United States of America.

As we salute the Flag, Let's remember the words from the American's Creed that is..."It is my duty to my country: To love it, To support its Constitution, To obey its Laws, To respect its Flag and To defend it against all enemies."

The Red in our Flag stands for Courage and Bravery. Today as we Salute our Flag, let 's remember our men and women in the Armed Forces who are serving us and our country.

So long as the Principles of Truth, Justice, and Charity for All remain deeply rooted in Human Hearts, Our Flag shall continue to be the enduring Banner of the United States of America. Let us join in the Pledge of Allegiance to our Flag.

For more than 200 years, our Flag has been the Emblem of Liberty for generation after generation of Americans. Let us look at it with pride as we Pledge our Allegiance to it.

This Stars and Stripes are our Dreams and our Labors. In these unsettled times, Let us Pledge our Allegiance to our American Flag with new hope.

Our Flag is bright with Cheer, brilliant with Courage, and firm with Faith. Let us add this with our sincere Pledge today.

We, The People...That's what Our Flag stands for. Let us say the Pledge of Allegiance.

In the Flag Pledge, there is no comma or pause after the word "Nation". The Concept of "One Nation Under God" is a precious thing. To weaken it with an unwanted comma or pause is an affront to the Patriotic Heart as well as the Poetic Ear. Let's say the Pledge correctly.

Because we are Thankful and Appreciative of such Leaders as Abraham Lincoln, Let us Pledge our Allegiance to the Flag and at the same time, remember the Great Presidents of our Land.

As we say the Pledge today, Let's remember George Washington, the Father of our Country, and the Heritage of America.

For the Opportunities our Country offers to the Youth of America, Let us now say our Pledge to the Flag, the emblem of our Nation.

In the Fold of our Flag are enshrined every Ideal, Hope, and Opportunity made possible because Someone has lived. Let us say the Pledge of Allegiance.


I Am The Flag  by Ruth Apperson Rous

I am the flag of the United States of America.

I was born on June 14, 1777, in Philadelphia.

There the Continental Congress adopted my stars and stripes as the national flag.

My thirteen stripes alternating red and white, with a union of thirteen white stars in a field of blue, represented a new constellation, a new nation dedicated to the personal and religious liberty of mankind.

Today fifty stars signal from my union, one for each of the fifty sovereign states in the greatest constitutional republic the world has ever known.

My colors symbolize the patriotic ideals and spiritual qualities of the citizens of my country.

My red stripes proclaim the fearless courage and integrity of American men and boys and the self-sacrifice and devotion of American mothers and daughters.

My white stripes stand for liberty and equality for all.

My blue is the blue of heaven, loyalty, and faith.

I represent these eternal principles: liberty, justice, and humanity.

I embody American freedom: freedom of speech, religion, assembly, the press, and the sanctity of the home.

I typify that indomitable spirit of determination brought to my land by Christopher Columbus and by all my forefathers - the Pilgrims, Puritans, settlers at James town and Plymouth.

I am as old as my nation.

I am a living symbol of my nation's law: the Constitution of the United States and the Bill of Rights.

I voice Abraham Lincoln's philosophy: "A government of the people, by the people, for the people."

I stand guard over my nation's schools, the seedbed of good citizenship and true patriotism.

I am displayed in every schoolroom throughout my nation; every schoolyard has a flag pole for my display.

Daily thousands upon thousands of boys and girls pledge their allegiance to me and my country.

I have my own law, Public Law 829, "The Flag Code" - which definitely states my correct use and display for all occasions and situations.

I have my special day, Flag Day. June 14 is set aside to honor my birth.

Americans, I am the sacred emblem of your country. I symbolize your birthright, your heritage of liberty purchased with blood and sorrow.

I am your title deed of freedom, which is yours to enjoy and hold in trust for posterity.

If you fail to keep this sacred trust inviolate, if I am nullified and destroyed, you and your children will become slaves to dictators and despots.

Eternal vigilance is your price of freedom.

As you see me silhouetted against the peaceful skies of my country, remind yourself that I am the flag of your country, that I stand for what you are - no more, no less.

Guard me well, lest your freedom perish from the earth.

Dedicate your lives to those principles for which I stand: "One nation under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all."

I was created in freedom. I made my first appearance in a battle for human liberty.

God grant that I may spend eternity in my "land of the free and the home of the brave" and that I shall ever be known as "Old Glory," the flag of the United States of America.


PRISONER OF WAR CEREMONY

Equipment: American Flag mounted to a blanket. Personnel: 2 Scouts to hold flag, and a reader.

Reader: On a summer day in a prison camp during World War II, the prisoners were just completing a talent show when, without any announcement, two soldiers stood up in front of the group holding a rolled up blanket. They looked quickly but carefully in all directions to make sure no guards were watching. Then, holding the blanket high, they let it unroll. Fastened to the inside of the blanket was the beautiful Stars and Stripes of the flag of the United States. (Scouts match actions to story.) At the time of their surrender, one of the soldiers had taken down the flag and somehow managed to wrap it around his body. Covered by his uniform, it had not been discovered during the inspection of his personal belongings. He had been able to keep it hidden until he had arrived at the prison camp. As the blanket was unrolled, the other prisoners saw the flag. A ripple of wonder and amazement ran through the group, followed by a deep silence that comes only when the heart is too full to permit words to be spoken. With their eyes still gazing upon this beautiful banner the soldiers rose to their feet and began to sing softly, but with pride. They sang our National Anthem. Will the audience please rise and join in singing our National Anthem.


Closing Thoughts:

A Cubmaster's minute or a Closing Thought is a good way to bring a meeting to a quiet close. Here are a few short passages to use before retiring the Colors.


Gettysburg

There's a battlefield at Gettysburg where swords and sabers rust. And brothers who were flesh and blood are scattered in the dust. But every night at Gettysburg when everything is still. They say a golden bugle blows on Cemetery Hill. Who was the unknown bugle boy at Gettysburg that day? And was he wearing Yankee blue or wearing Southern gray? Why did he die? What was his motive? He loved the country of his birth. And Government by the people, and for the people shall not perish from the earth.


Reach for the Stars

Col. Edwin 'Buzz' Aldrin, the second man to walk on the moon, told a group of Eagle Scouts that man's exploration of space is as old as man himself. He has explored, conquered, and studied the secrets of the jungles, mountains and oceans. He urged them to obtain a well-rounded background in many fields of knowledge, then to select one field and strive for excellence in it. "Set your goals high and settle for nothing less than accomplishment," he said. If you want to aim for the stars, you must remember that you are building your launching pad right now by your willingness and initiative in every task you tackle...at home, in church, in school, and in Cub Scouting.


Freedom

Freedom is a breath of air, Pine-scented or salty like the sea. Freedom is a field new-plowed With furrows of democracy. Freedom is a forest, Trees tall and straight as men. Freedom is a printing press, The power of the pen. Freedom is a country church, A cathedral's stately spire. Freedom is a spirit That can set the heart on fire!


One Good Deed

One day in the year 1909 the city of London was in the grip of a dense fog. An American businessman, William D. Boyce, paused under a street lamp to locate himself. Out of the gloom a boy approached him and asked if he could be of help. Boyce told the boy that he was trying to find a certain business office in the center of the city. "I'll take you there," the boy said. When they got to the office, the American reached into his pocket for a tip. But the boy stopped him saying, "No thank you, sir. I am a Scout. I can't take anything for helping." Of course Boyce was curious. So the boy told him about himself and his brother Scouts. Boyce was interested and asked the boy to take him to the British Scout Office when he was finished with his errand. There the boy disappeared. At the office, Boyce met Baden-Powell, the famous British general who had founded the Scouting movement. Boyce was impressed. And so, on Feb. 8, 1910, in Washington, DC Boyce and a group of outstanding men founded the Boy Scouts of America. But what happened to the boy? No one knows. He was never heard of again, but he will never be forgotten. In the British Scout Training Center at Gilwell Park, England, a statue of a buffalo was erected in honor of that "Unknown Scout". His Good Turn to one man became a Good Turn to millions of American boys. You can never tell...


A Thought for the Flag

Have you ever thought of the blood, and sweat, and tears That have been shed for our nation throughout the years? We've won many wars, helped lands small and great. But we haven't learned to conquer our fears and our hates. No, it hasn't been easy to keep our land free. Now that challenge is passed on to you and me. So be proud you're an American. Hold your head high And think of these things as our Flag passes by.


Religious Ceremony:


RELIGIOUS KNOT CEREMONY

LANTERN OF FAITH

Required equipment: candle type lantern

(Call the boys and their parents to the front. Light the lantern.)

You are here to receive your religious award(s). But before we do that I would like to talk with you for a few minutes. A long time ago, before electric flashlights, people would use lanterns like this to get around. When the sun went down, and it was very dark, they would bring out their lanterns, light them up, and use the light to find their way.

I would like to compare your faith in God with this lantern in three ways.

First, this lantern provides light were there is none. It helps us find our way through the dark when there is no other light . Your faith is similar to the latern in that it helps you to find your way in life, to guide you in the darkest of times. It is our biggest comfort and is most apparent when it's all we have.

Second, this lantern provides light when there's a lot of other light around. The light that this lantern makes is almost lost in the rest of the light in this room. I doubt that anyone noticed that the room was any brighter when I lit it,......although it was. Your faith may not seem as bright, or provide as much direction, as what you read, see on TV, or what your friends say. There's a real danger in this. Keep in mind that your faith is always there and you should follow it although it may not be the most popular thing to do.

Third, your faith in God should not be like this lantern in one important way. When this lantern is not needed, it's put away. You should never be without your faith. It should never be put away. Keep it with you in every thought and deed as you live your life.

You've worked hard in completing the requirements of this award. Congratulations on your accomplishment! Now you may wear this religious knot with pride, reflecting those accomplishments. (Present religious knot to them and ask them if they would like to tell you something about what they did to earn it.)


Words Of Wisdom


A Lesson for Us All

A frail old man went to live with his son, daughter-in-law, and four-year grandson. The old man's hands trembled, his eyesight was blurred and his step faltered. The family ate together at the table. But the elderly grandfather's shaky hands and failing sight made eating difficult. Peas rolled off his spoon onto the floor. When he grasped the glass, milk spilled on the tablecloth. The son and daughter-in-law became irritated with the mess.

"We must do something about Grandfather," said the son. I've had enough of his spilled milk, noisy eating, and food on the floor. So the_husband and wife set a small table in the corner. There, Grandfather ate alone while the rest of the family enjoyed dinner. Since Grandfather had broken a dish or two, his food was served in a wooden bowl. When the family glanced in Grandfather's direction, sometime he had a tear in his eye as he sat alone. Still, the only words the couple had for him were sharp ones when he dropped a fork or spilled food.

The four-year-old watched in all the silence. One evening before supper, the father noticed his son playing with wood scraps on the floor. He asked the child sweetly, "What are you making?" Just as sweetly, the boy responded, "Oh, I am making a little bowl for you and Mommy to eat your food when I grow up." The four-year-old smiled and went back to work.

The words so struck the parents that they were speechless. Then tears started to stream down their cheeks. Though no word was spoken. both knew what must be done. That evening the husband took Grandfather's hand and gently led him back to the family table. For the remainder of his days he ate every meal with the family. And for some reason, neither husband nor wife seemed to care any longer when a fork was dropped, milk spilled, or the tablecloth soiled.

On a positive note, I've learned that, no matter what happens how bad it seems today, life does go on, and it will be better tomorrow. Iíve learned that you can tell a lot about a person by the way he/she handles three things: a rainy day, lost luggage, and tangled Christmas tree lights. I'.ve learned that, regardless of your relationship with your parents, you'll miss them when they're gone from your life. I've learned that making a "living" is not the same thing as making a "life. " I've learned that life sometimes gives you a second chance. I've learned that you shouldn't go through life with a catcher's mitt on both hands. You need to be able to throw something back. Iíve learned that if you pursue happiness, it will elude you. But, if you focus on your family, your friends, the needs of others, your work and doing the very best you can, happiness will find you. I've learned that whenever I decide something with an open heart, I usually make the right decision. Iíve learned that even when I have pains, I don't have to be one. I've learned that every day, you should reach out and touch someone. People love that human touch, holding hands, a warm hug, or just a friendly pat on the back.

I've also learned that I still have a lot to learn. I've learned that you should pass this on to everyone you care about. I just did. Sometimes they just need a little something to make them smile. People will forget what you said. People will forget what you did. But, people will never forget how you made them feel.


 

When Mt. St. Helens Walked the Earth Webelos Ceremony

CUB SCOUT ADVANCEMENT, NATIVE AMER. THEME
(Story Rock, Pacific NW Indian references)
by Rick Clements

People Required:

  • Akela (Cubmaster)
  • Baloo (Asst. Cubmaster)

Props:

  • Mountain scene with broken bridge
  • Badges (with tape affixed to the card the badge is on)

Akela: Long ago, a group of braves from a tribe went out hunting. One brave sat on a rock to rest.

Baloo: He heard a voice speak to him.

Akela: The brave jumped up, trying to figure where the voice was coming from.

Baloo: It was the rock. The rock told him a story about when Mt. St. Helens, Mt. Adams and Mt. Hood walked the earth. They were a family like people have families today.

Akela: For many days the brave listened to the stories from the rock. The other braves wondered why he was catching so little and followed him one day.

Baloo: The other braves heard the rocks stories too. It told them that the bridge of the gods once was a rock bridge over the Columbia River. But, the tribes began to fight. Mt. St. Helens was so mad, it threw rocks at the bridge and broke it. This left the two tribes on opposite sides of the river with no way to fight each other. The rock told them to tell this story to their children, so it would not be forgotten.

Akela: The Webelos we are honoring tonight and the Webelos we honored previously are now the oldest boys in our pack. It is their job to tell the stories of our pack to the younger boys. They can tell them about the (list activities) (i.e. space derby, bike rodeo, the Christmas tree mulch, the hikes, Day Camp) and the many other activities they have enjoyed. Baloo, please call up the boys we are honoring tonight.

Baloo: Will (names) please come forward with their parents?

Baloo: To earn the Webelos badge each scout must earn the Webelos fitness activity pin and two others. These scouts have learned about Boy Scouting and respect for God.

(Hand badge to the parents.)

Akela: Parents, would you please present to your son his Webelos badge? Please attach the badge to his uniform upside down, with the tape. Once he performs a good deed, it may be permanently attached right side up. The pin is worn by the parents as an indication that Cub Scouting will always be a family activity.

Baloo: Since you boys are the youth leaders of our Pack, I want to leave you with a challenge. Over this next year, help me find ways to make the Pack even more fun. Will the Pack join me in the Cub Scout cheer? After I say Cub, you reply Scout.

 

A Webelos Ceremony

Assistant Cub Master:
In fourth and fifth grade, Cub Scouts are brought into the tribe of Webelos. Webelos stands for `we'll be loyal scouts'. In the tribe of Webelos, boys prepare themselves for Boy Scouting. Webelos work on 20 different activity badges from five skill groups: physical, mental, outdoors, community, and technical skills. After three months in the Webelos Den, earning three activity pins and learning about Boy Scout ways, they have completed all the requirements for the Webelos badge.

Cub Master:
There are Cub Scouts among us tonight who have earned their Webelos Badge. Would the following boys please come forward with your parents to be recognized and honored by the Pack.

List of boys.

You have completed all the requirements for your Webelos badge, have moved along the Cub Scout trail and have earned a place in the Webelos Tribe. Receive now the mark of the Webelos Tribe, a BLUE mark, symbolizing vigilance, perseverance and justice.

[Mark each boy with BLUE face paint.]

Assistant Cub Master:
[Present Webelos badges to parents as Cub Master paints faces] It is our pleasure to award your Webelos badge to your parents, who have been your Akela in completing these requirements. Parents, please pin the Webelos badge to your son's left shirt pocket and congratulate him on a `Job Well Done'. Parents, as your son's Akela, you are entitled to proudly wear the parent's Webelos pin enclosed with your son's Webelos badge.

Cub Master:
It is my pleasure to congratulate each one of you on earning your Webelos badge. Boys please step over to the Advancement Ladder and move your clothes pin to the Webelos level. Parents and Scouts please return to your seats.

Compass Badge Presentation

PERSONNEL: Cubmaster, Webelos Leader

EQUIPMENT: Compass badge and compass point.

CUBMASTER: Tonight we have boys receiving Webelos recognition. (number) earning the compass and (number) earning the compass point. To earn the compass, a Webelos Scout has to earn his Webelos badge and four additional activity badges -- a total of seven activity badges. Once the compass has been earned, besides working on the Arrow of Light; the boy can work on earning compass points. He can earn one gold compass point for each four activity badges. To fill his compass a boy needs to earn nineteen of the available 20 activity badges. Would Mr./Mrs._______, the Webelos leader please come forward and present the awards.

WEBELOS LEADER: The compass badge is not an award that is sewn onto a boy's uniform. It is attached to his right pocket button under the flap. The points are given to the boy to put in any position he chooses. Tonight (names) have earned their compass and (names) have earned their compass point. Will they please come forward. This shows that the boys are working hard toward the end of their Cub Scout trail. Congratulations boys!!!!

 

Webelos Geologist Activty Badge

EQUIPMENT: Activity pins Webelos will be receiving.
PERSONNEL: Webelos Den Leader, Cubmaster, Webelos Scouts.

WEBELOS DEN LEADER: Webelos "We Be Loyal Scouts." Our goal is to be loyal scouts. We try to do our best even tough the road appears difficult at times, we are striving to meet that goal.

The Geologist activity badge has been earned by the following Webelos Scouts. (List the Webelos to earn the pin.)

Will these boys please come forward.

While the Webelos leader is presenting the pins to the boys the Cubmaster notes the requirements.

CUBMASTER: To earn the Geologist pin a boy must do five of the following: Give examples how rocks and minerals are used in the products we use in our society. Collect five geologic specimens that have important uses. List some geologic materials used in building your home. Make a drawing that shows the causes of volcano, geyser or an earthquake. Explain one way mountains are formed. Make a scale of mineral hardness and show the relative hardness of three rock samples.

WEBELOS DEN LEADER: Let's stand and give these boys a round of applause.

 

Webelos Badge Advancement Ceremonies


A number of Webelos Badge Advancement Ceremonies are presented here.


Native American Ceremony

Each boy recieving the WB is given "warrior marks", i.e., 2 stripes of EASILY WASHABLE paint on each cheek. When our pack did it, we used the colors blue and yellow (gold). The colors should be in the same order on both cheeks.

Round Table Ceremony

The cubmaster is dressed as a king (Arthur, maybe) and "knights" each boy recieving the WB.

Those ideas can also be used for ANY Cub rank advancement.

Spirit of Akela Ceremony

The den(s) gather at stage right. Across the front of the room are standard issue poster pictures of Bobcat, Wolf, Bear, and Webelos badges (large enough to be seen). Each was attached to a pole in a flag stand about five feet from the ground. Below the poster an arm made from plastic plumbing extended out with an elbow up to hold a candle (all painted in blue and gold of course). At stage left was a large rectangular shape shrouded by a gold colored cloth. A flood light was situated below on the floor pointing up. Cubmaster has a single lighted candle with a paper wax catcher.

Lights dim. Cubmaster standing by Bobcat asks Cubs to advance and circle around. Cubmaster announces that he as Akela was proud when each joined the Pack and became a Bobcat - light Bobcat candle.

Cubmaster passes candle to their old Wolf Den Leader, who asks them to follow and form a circle in front of the Wolf Poster. Tells them how proud they have made their parents when they became Wolves and lights candle.

Wolf Den Leader passes candle to Bear Den Leader, who asks them to follow and form a circle in front of the Bear Poster. Tells them how much they grew and how they should be proud of their accomplishments in becoming Bears and lights candle.

Bear Den Leader passes candle to Webelos Leader, who asks them to follow and form a circle in front of the Webelos Poster. He explains to all what they have done and asks parents to come forward and stand behind sons. Patch is presented to parents to pin on uniform upside down until a good turn is accomplished.

Wait until all presentations have been finished. Parents may be seated, Scouts remain. All lights are extinguished except candles.

Deep voice from behind the shrouded emblem. "Scouts, I am the spirit of Akela and I congratulate you on having earned your Webelos Badges. Please turn and face this direction." All turn - hopefully :).

"You have accepted many challenges and proven yourselves, now will you accept another challenge - the challenge of earning the Arrow of Light?"

At this point the shroud is withdrawn and the floodlight switched on illuminating a large golden arrow of light against a blue background (they used gold glitter to improve on light reflection).

"If you will accept this challenge, please give the Cub Scout Sign and repeat after me: I will do my best ----- to learn ---- to accept responsibility ---- and to fulfill ----- the requirements ----- for the Arrow of Light."

Applause!!!!

Lights on - Scouts Seated.


When Camelback Mountain Walked the Earth

(Story Rock, by Rick Clements)

People Required:

  1. Akela (Cubmaster)
  2. Baloo (Asst. Cubmaster)

Props:

  1. Mountain scene with broken bridge
  2. Badges (with tape affixed to the card the badge is on)

Akela: Long ago, a group of braves from a tribe went out hunting. One brave sat on a rock to rest.

Baloo: He heard a voice speak to him.

Akela: The brave jumped up, trying to figure where the voice was coming from.

Baloo: It was the rock. The rock told him a story about when Camelback, Four Peaks, and the Superstition Mountains walked the earth. They were a family like people have families today.

Akela: For many days the brave listened to the stories from the rock. The other braves wondered why he was catching so little and followed him one day.

Baloo: The other braves heard the rocks stories too. It told them that the bridge of the gods once was a rock bridge over the Salt River. But, the tribes began to fight. Camelback mountain was so mad, it threw rocks at the bridge and broke it. This left the two tribes on opposite sides of the river with no way to fight each other. The rock told them to tell this story to their children, so it would not be forgotten.

Akela: The Webelos we are honoring tonight and the Webelos we honored previously are now the oldest boys in our pack. It is their job to tell the stories of our pack to the younger boys. They can tell them about the (list activities) (i.e. pinewood derby, the hikes, Day Camp) and the many other activities they have enjoyed. Baloo, please call up the boys we are honoring tonight.

Baloo: Will (names) please come forward with their parents?

Baloo: To earn the Webelos badge each scout must earn the Webelos fitness activity pin and two others. These scouts have learned about Boy Scouting and respect for God.

(Hand badge to the parents.)

Akela: Parents, would you please present to your son his Webelos down, with the tape. Once he performs a good deed, it may be permanently attached right side up. The pin is worn by the parents as an indication that Cub Scouting will always be a family activity.

Baloo: Since you boys are the youth leaders of our Pack, I want to leave you with a challenge. Over this next year, help me find ways to make the Pack even more fun. Will the Pack join me in the Cub Scout cheer? After I say Cub, you reply Scout.


Another Native American Ceremony

We rent a couple of Native American costumes complete with war bonnets. The Cubmaster and Webelos Den Leader Coach dress up. We lower the lights and the Webelos Den Leader Coach holds up a single candle and does the "Scouting Spirit" introduction. He announces to Akela, Chief of the Webelos Tribe, that some young braves have satisfied their requirements and are ready to be recognized.

The Webelos den leaders for the boys and their den chiefs serve as an honor guard. All of the Pack den leaders form a corridor of light with candles (lite from the single candle on stage). The rest of the unit leadership serves as our background (Native American song) chanters.

One of the honor guard (in front of procession) carries and beats a large tom-tom drum (slow rythem); another (at the rear of the procession) rings some slay bells in between each beat of the drum. If possible, we get a member of the local Order of Arrow to dress in full regalla and carry our wooden Arrow of Light symbol in front of the procession.

Once we get the boys (and parents) to the stage, the webelos den leaders lead the boys in "repeating after me" the stanzas of the Boy Scout Promise. Akela presents them with their patch. He explains the symbology of the flu-de-lee design and that this one Cub Scout patch is not turned upside down. Parents pin it on. Then Akela charges them with the challenge of earning the Arrow of Light.

At the end, we have the OA do a celebration dance and the audience applaudes.

Webelos Scout Bridging Ceremonies

 

 

 

A Bridging Ceremony from Troop 6,
Colonial Virginia Council

 

 

A darkened room, a single candle burning on a table. The Webelos Scouts (their parents behind them) are lined up near the Scoutmaster who is standing beside the flame.

 

SM: "The flame you see before you represents the Flame of Knowledge. You Webelos Scouts who are bridging over to Boy Scouts have shown me that you bring with you a hunger for Knowledge. The Scouting program offers you a special kind of knowledge that will serve you well as you walk the sometimes difficult Road to Manhood."

SM takes up another candle from the table where the Flame of Knowledge sits and holds it near the Flame but does not light it yet.

SM: "The Flame of Knowledge never goes out as long as there are people who are willing to seek knowledge. It burns eternally in the mind of Humankind as a beacon, casting it's rays to guide us as we seek a higher level of understanding or our world."

SM lights candle, saying: "This candle represents a Youth who seeks knowledge. Each of you Webelos here with me tonight is that Youth."

SM hands the newly-lit candle to the nearest Webelos Scout, saying: "You have sought to continue building upon your Scouting knowledge by finding a Boy Scout Troop that will help you gain your ample portion of this special knowledge. Take custody of the Flame." [Places candle in the>closest boy's hand.] "Hold this sacred Flame for a moment and then transfer this Flame to the next Webelos Scout. Hand it around from boy to boy until it reaches the last one of you in line who will return it to me."

As the Flame is transferred from Scout to Scout, the SM continues talking to the assembly, saying: "Knowledge, once gained, must be shared. Each Boy Scout must pass on to other Scouts what he has learned. As you grow more experienced in Scouting, we will ask you to begin to return to Scouting some of what you have received from it. Work diligently as you pass down your Trail to Eagle Scout and you will learn much that you can share with the others who come after you. Remember, you will receive from Scouting only what you put into it. I challenge you to work hard so that you will have much to give back."

When the candle has made it's way back to the SM, he places the second candle in a holder that was placed well away from the original Flame. After a moment, he blows out the second candle. NOTE: The Flame of Knowledge is left burning as long as possible.

SM: "See how easily that Youth's Flame was extinguished by the Breeze of Laziness? Don't let Laziness extinguish the Flame of Knowledge that burns in your own mind. Cherish your Flame by doing your best, by asking questions when you don't understand, and by living up to the Scout Oath and Law." [Pause for effect.] "But, notice how the Flame of Knowledge that burns in the mind of Humankind is still lit? From it you may always relight your own flame should the Breeze of Laziness blow too hard and snuff out your own Flame. Never stop learning. Never give the Breeze Laziness a chance to blow."

Now the Troop's SPL, who has been standing in the middle of a plywood bridge with an ASPL, calls across to the Webelos Scouts and their parents, "Troop 6 invites the Webelos Scouts and their parents to join us on the Boy Scout side of Scouting by crossing over this symbolic bridge."

As the Webelos reach the middle of the span the SPL and his assistant stop him to remove the boy's blue shoulder flashes and replace them with red ones his patent offers up behind the boy's back. After the red flashes are in place, the SPL then places the Troop's neckerchief OVER the boy's Webelos version, removes the boy's slide, puts it on the Troop neckerchief, and then slides away the old neckerchief. [Handing it and the blue flashings off to a parent.]

As the SPL removes the FIRST neckerchief the SM says, "Notice that we removed the Webelos neckerchief after we've placed the Boy Scout neckerchief on the Scout. We do this to be sure that there is no break in a boy's Scouting career."

As the new Boy Scout exits the bridge, he is welcomed by his new Troop's Assistant SM who's in charge of the New Scout Patrol, and by as many other boy leaders as the Troop can muster that evening. The parents are likewise greeted.

When all have bridged over, the SA asks the new Boy Scouts to take hold of the Troop flag with their left hand and raise the Scout sign with their right. He leads them in the Scout Oath, and the ceremony is over.

-- Thanks to Andrew Hagemann, SA, NSP, Troop 6, Colonial Virginia Council

 

 

Broken Arrow AOL

 

 

Equipment: An Arrow for each boy, two council fires, awards

 

Setting: Cubmaster at first fire, boy scouts at second. Award is attached to arrow.

Akela: Will (Read names) and their parents please come forward and take their place of honor at the Council Fire? Tonight (Read names) have achieved two high honors. They will receive the Arrow of Light award and graduate from Cub Scouting into Boy Scouting.

I hold in my hand an arrow. As you can see, it is straight and true, for only an arrow that is straight and true will hit its mark. (Hold up arrow so Scout can see its shaft.) In order to fly straight, it must also have at least three feathers. These represent the first three ranks of Cub Scouting you achieved; Bobcat, Wolf and Bear. With these awards in place you began to ascend along the shaft, toward the tip of the arrow, the Arrow of Light Award. This is the culmination of all your Cub Scouting efforts. Without a hard, sharp tip, the arrow is not a very effective weapon. Since you have achieved this, the highest rank in Cub Scouting, you will now be a more effective Boy Scout as you take with you the things you've learned and continue to progress along the Scouting trail.

Please stand. I now present you with this arrow, to which is attached your award. Parents, please pin the Arrow of Light on your son. now give your parents the proper salute. (The proper salute to a mother is a kiss.)

Since you are graduating form Cub Scouting tonight, you will no longer be a Cub Scout, except in memory. Because this arrow represents the path along which you have come, but not the path along which you must now go, I will ask you to return the arrow.

(Take the arrows and break them over your knee, just enough to crack, but not completely in two.) This broken arrow will now be forever a reminder to you, that you achieved every rank in Cub Scouting, and graduated with honor. It will no longer fly, just as you will no longer be a Cub Scout. But you will always wear the Arrow of Light symbol on your uniform, as a reminder of your accomplishment. You now may keep this broken arrow for your trophy skin. I give you one last salute before you leave our council fire to join your new Boy Scout brothers at their council fire. (Salute.) Always be straight and true! Now walk to your new council fire.

-- Written by Rick McNeal
-- Thanks to Ellen DeVilbiss

 

A Crossover Ceremony

 

This is the crossing over ceremony I used last year when I graduated my Webelos (including my older son) to Boy Scouts. This was separate from the Arrow of Light, which was done at the same meeting.

First you need to invite local community leaders to the cerremony. I had invited the City Manager, my Unit Commissioner, DE, Executive Officer from our sponsor and the State Senators & Representatives that serve the area where the boys live, as well as the SM, ASM & SPL from the troops the boys where joining. One Senator & one representative was unable to attend and sent the boys very nice congratulatory letters, which they were thrilled with. The state Senator even invited the boys to be pages for a day at the state capital.

You need for a prop, is a bridge that the boys can walk across from stage left to stage right (my BA is Theatre). The Cubmaster and ACM stand on the stage left side of the bridge. I didn't formally announce the ceremony but asked the representatives from the first troop to come forward and stand on the other side of the bridge to welcome their new scouts. I called down one boy to the bridge and his parents joined us, standing to the left of me. The graduating Webelos stands with his back to the bridge. I turned to the boy and silently removed his "signs of Cub Scouts". First I removed his hat, handed it to my ACM to hold upside down, I then removed his neckerchief slide, placed it in the hat, then the neckerchief placed into the hat and finally the navy blue epalets, also into the hat. I then took the hat from my ACM, turned and handed it to the mother, shook the parents hands and sent them in front of the bridge to the other side to greet their new boy scout. I turn back to the boy and my ACM shook hands with the boy using the Cub Scout handshake. I then shook the boy's hand using the Boy Scout handshake. At this point the boy turns to face the bridge and crosses over. On the other side, their SM presented the boy with his new hat (gift from the Pack), red epalets (from the parents) and new neckerchief from the troop.

The last one I graduated was my son and since I was staying on as the CM, only his father went over to the other side to greet him. This was done as a symbolic sign of me staying with the Pack and his going on to Boy Scouts.

After each boy graduated (and I graduated all the Webelos II) I then announced "New Boy Scouts of Troop 171 and Troop 271 dismissed. All the remaining Cub Scouts stood and saluted the boys as they filed out. The new Scouts and their parents formed a receiving line at the back of the church (our sponsor) and were greeted by everyone as they left to go downstairs for cake and punch. This ceremony was simple but very effective as there wasn't a dry eye in the audience. The state representative that was able to attend was very impressed and was also teary eyed.

-- Thanks to Dawn Moriarty , Cubmaster, Pack 168 Presque Isle, ME

 

 

A Bridging Ceremony by Dave Colangelo

 

 

Props: "Campfire", bridge, troop scarfs, numbers, Boy Scout hat, Patrol Patch(es), neckerchief, hat, shoulder tabs, Spotlight

 

Cast: Cubmaster, Webelos Leader(s), Scoutmaster, Senior Patrol Leader, Parents, Webelos, Patrol Leaders/Boy Scouts.

Scene: Boy Scouts are gathered around a "campfire" at the end of the bridge. Cubmaster, Webelos Leader and Webelos approach bridge (opposite from the Boy Scouts)

Cubmaster: Greetings, to our brothers from Troop ___!

ScoutMaster: Greetings Akela, it has been a while since our last meeting. Is everything going well in your lodge?

Cubmaster: Yes, thank you. I have Webelos worthy to join your Troop. Their Leader will assist them in their journey.

Webelos Leader: Greetings to our brother Scouts.

Scoutmaster: How many worthy braves will join our council fire tonight?

Webelos Leader: We have __ worthy and true boys to cross over to your council fire tonight.

Cubmaster: As each crosses the bridge to your council fire,I will tell of his achievements. We will miss them and their families as they move along the trail to Eagle.

Scoutmaster: We are ready, Akela, send them over. (On Cub side of bridge, the Webelos Leader assisted by Parents remove the scarf, [and blue tabs if wearing the khaki shirt], hat, and other Cub patches [removed and lightly tacked on prior to ceremony]. The boy moves to the middle of the bridge [in a spot light if available] while the Cubmaster recants the boy's history in Cub Scouting. After the Cubmaster ends, the family and boy cross over the bridge where they are greeted by the Scoutmaster)

Scoutmster: Welcome to Troop ______ we are glad to hear of your hard work in Pack ____. This is the Senior Patrol Leader, who will assist you on your quest for Eagle. He will welcome you into our council fire.

Senior Patrol Leader: I too welcome you to Troop ___ we hope that you and your family will enjoy your stay and will help the Troop. I present you with (Red Tabs, and/or Troop neckerchief, or, patrol patch, or Scout hat, or Boy Scout Handbook, or Troop neckerchief slide, etc depending on local and Troop customs) (During the presentation, the nex Cub is preped)

Scoutmaster: Who is the next Scout Akela? (The ceremony continues until each boy and familiy crosses over, after last boy)

CubMaster: That is the last boy for this year. I have enjoyed seeing you again and hope that your council fire will burn brightly and warmly.

Scoutmaster: Thank You Akela, the young men and their families will be a valuable part of our Troop. Until the next time our council fires meet, Good health to you and your tribe.

 

 

Crossover to Boy Scouts, by Don Tolin

 

Participants:

All 2nd Year Webelos Scouts
All Troop Boy Scouts
Cubmaster
Scoutmaster
Webelos Den Chief
Scouts' parents and families

 

Ceremony:

Webelos on one side of bridge working together like on activity pin, having fun. Webelos Den Flag in background. Den leaders and Den Chief with the boys. Webelos stand together and face audience. Have everyone stand. "We want to teach everyone a song we learned at Camp Buffalo Bill this summer" Sing the Beaver Song.

Beaver 1, beaver all, time to do the beaver call.
Beaver 2, beaver 3, let's all climb the beaver tree.
Beaver 4, beaver 5, let's all do the beaver jive.
Beaver 6, beaver 7, time to go to beaver heaven.
Beaver 8, beaver 9, STOP IT'S BEAVER TIME.
 

Webelos now ask everyone to join in and sing it one time together. Tell everyone to now sit down. Webelos remain standing.

When each scout is called to cross over, boys all give him high fives. The Cubmaster takes off the scout's Webelos neckerchief and his color tabs. The Cubmaster gives remarks. The Cubmaster shakes the scout's hand. The Den Chief accompanies the scouts across the bridge. The scout's parents and family crosses also.

Boy Scouts, in the mean time, have been sitting around a campfire on the other end of the bridge. Tent in background. Troop Flag and Patrol Flags in background. 12 points of Scout Law Displayed. When the scouts and the Den Chief cross-over the bridge, the boys stand up and fall in rank. The Scoutmaster greets them, shakes hands with their parents, and greets other family members. The Scoutmaster puts the troop neckerchief on the scouts, and puts on the red shoulder loops. He shakes the boy's hand. Boy Scouts welcome new scouts. The scoutmaster gives remarks. Applause or cheer.

BOY SCOUTS SING SCOUT VESPERS AT END OF CEREMONY.

Softly falls the light of day,
While our campfire fades away.
Silently each Scout should ask:
"Have I done my daily task?
Have I kept my honor bright?
Can I guiltless sleep tonight?
Have I done and have I dared
Everything to be prepared?"

-- Thanks to Don Tolin. Pack Meeting plan prepared in fulfillment of a ticket item for Wood Badge W5-638-95

 

 

A Space Theme Crossover, by Peter Farnham

 

 

We used an outer space theme this time. I have a Captain Picard suit I wear at Halloween, and a working toy ray gun. We started out by dimming the lights and playing over the speaker system at full volume Strauss' "Thus Spake Zarathustra," more familiarly known as the theme from "200l: A Space Odyssey."

 

I came out and tried to light the "campfire" but had no matches. "Great Denibian slime devils, I'm out of matches!" I bellowed in my most stentorian starship commander's voice. "I'll have to speak to Riker about this immediately!" But I solve the problem by lighting the campfire with a blast from my ray gun (my ASM turned the dimmer switch up to full slowly). Then I leisurely warmed my hands, and turned around and warmed my posterior (giggles here, as intended).

Then I turned to the WDL, and said, "Commander Keith, I understand you have seven graduates from the starfleet academy who are ready to join the crews of starships 113 and 1515. Bring them up here immediately!" Anyway, you get the idea. Bring the boys up, congratulate them on their accomplishments, wish them well in boy scouting, and then cross them over the bridge, where they are received by a representative from their new troops. We also give them boy scout neckerchiefs; my troop has a custom-made one we give each new scout.

Another thing we do--I have each boy sign our cross-over bridge with an indelible magic marker before they actually cross over. Who knows? We may have a president's signature on there someday.

At the end, we played the theme from "Star Wars", also LOUD. Very inspiring.

This is a fun ceremony and seemed to work well. The boys really liked it--didn't want me to turn off "Star Wars," so we played it as a finale when they were leaving the pack meeting.

Each of the seven boys also received his Arrow of Light in a separate ceremony earlier in the meeting.

 

 

Jungle Book Ceremony for Advancing to Scouts

 

 

by Edward A. Haluska

 

People required:

  • Akela, the leader of the wolf pack (the Cubmaster)
  • Scoutmaster and Boy Scouts from the patrol(s) that will be accepting the Cubs.

 

Props:

  • Bridge (a small symbolic one is adequate)
  • New Boy Scout bandannas
  • Suitable recorded music and tape player

 

Hints:

  • It is very common for the Boy Scouts to be responsible for the crossing over ceremony. If you want to use this ceremony for crossing over, be sure to discuss it with the leaders of the Boy Scouts who will be participating.
  • The music is mainly for the parents. During the crossing over, play something suitable like "Forever Young" or "Where Are You Going My Little One?"

Akela: The moon is full, just as it was long ago on that night in the jungle when Mowgli first joined the Seeonee wolf pack. It has been many years since Mowgli returned from living with the wolves. After he returned, he taught us many of the lessons he learned while in the jungle. The most important was that the strength of the wolf is the pack, and the strength of the pack is the wolf. That is why we are here tonight in this council ring. But just as Mowgli had to leave the pack, tonight we also have some man cubs among us who have grown strong and tall. The time has now come when they too must leave the pack to find their place in the world of men. They have learned many lessons as they have walked the trails of the bobcat, wolf, and bear. But tonight, because these cubs are ready to begin their next adventure on their way to manhood, we will not look to the way of the jungle for guidance. Instead, we will read from a book that men use when they seek wisdom.

To everything there is a season,
A time for every purpose under heaven:
A time to be born, and a time to die;
A time to plant, and a time to pluck what is planted;
A time to kill, and a time to heal;
A time to break down, and a time to build up;
A time to weep, and a time to laugh;
A time to mourn, and a time to dance;
A time to cast away stones, and a time to gather stones;
A time to embrace, and a time to refrain from embracing;
A time to gain, and a time to lose;
A time to keep, and a time to throw away;
A time to tear, and a time to sew;
A time to keep silent, and a time to speak;
A time to love, and a time to hate;
A time of war, and a time of peace.

Akela: We have now come to the time and season when we must let go. So let us begin. Parents, bring forward these man cubs.

(Akela calls out the names of the Cubs who will be advancing to Scouts. Parents and Cubs come forward and face the rest of the pack.)

Akela: Akela of the humans!

Scoutmaster: What is it that you want, Akela of the man cubs. Akela: We have among us several boys who have grown tall in body and strong in character. They have learned well the ways of the pack, but now they yearn to run with other boys who are also between their childhood and manhood. They have been with the pack for many moons, and have been a source of pride for us all. But now it is now the season when they must leave us.

Scoutmaster: We understand. Bring them to the bridge between us.

(If you have recorded music, start it now.)

(Akela now leads the cubs, one at a time, to the center of the bridge between Cub Scouts and Boy Scouts. The boy is stopped at the center of the bridge, and Akela then removes the Cub's Webelos bandanna and any other Cub Scout insignias. The Scouts of the patrol that the Cub will be joining then place a Boy Scout bandanna on the boy and lead him to their group.)

Akela: Although these boys are no longer with our pack, we still call on the Great Akela of all Cub Scouts and Boy Scouts to always guide their way. We ask that the Great Akela watch over them as they learn to soar with the Eagles. And, in the fullness of time, after the great wheel of life has turned full circle, when the season again comes to the time to gather in, and the moon is full, we pray that these boys will return, tall and proud and strong, and present their own man cubs to be accepted into the pack. But until then, let us send them on their way with a last wolf howl.

(Akela leads pack in wolf howl.)

 

 

Crossover Ceremony

 

 

The O/A Ceremonies advisor was the Cubmaster for the Pack. The logistics of the event may seem a bit daunting but the ceremony worked very well.

 

Props:

  • 4 canoes
  • PFDs for everyone going into the canoes

Hints:

  • Make sure that you comply with the Safety Afloat requirements for qualified life guards.
  • Perform this during the day
  • The four winds and the chief and drummer are the O/A ceremonies team

Procedure: The Webelos Scouts have a brief ceremony in which their parents are asked to help them by putting on the PFD.

The Webelos are then lead to the end of a small pond (200m X 75m).

The Cubmaster calls to the four winds at the other end of the pond to let the crossover begin.

The drummer starts drumming, which is how the ceremony team knows it is time to paddle up to where the second ceremony is done.

The chief and four winds get out of the canoes and perform the brief ceremony.

The Webelos are then loaded into the canoes and paddled over to where the Boy Scout troop is waiting.

The troop then has their induction ceremony.

The entire crossover lasted about 45 minutes.

The Webelos and parents were awed by the ceremony.

The four winds are BSA or RC certified life guards.

-- Thanks to Jay Bemis

 

Magic Neckerchief Graduation Ceremony Script

 

 

This Ceremony is written for Webelos Graduation to Boy Scouts. With slight modification, it can be used for any level rank advancement. It is written assuming several scouts, but with minor changes could be used for a single scout.

 

 

 

 

 

Materials:

 

 

Neckerchief (if using Webelos neckerchief, the Webelos patch must be removed - it holds too much acetone, and will result in burning the part of the neckerchief above the patch)
2 coat hangers and 2 safety pins
1 large mouth Peanut butter jar with lid Acetone
Water
A lighted candle or advancement log with lighted candles Fire extinguisher

 

 

 

 

 

Setup:

 

 

Stretch out the hangers, attach one safety pin to each.

 

 

Mix the "Magic Water" in the jar. This should be done outside with good ventilation. Keep the lid tightly closed except when dipping the neckerchief. Magic water consists of EXACTLY 40% Acetone and 60% Water (2 parts Acetone to 3 parts Water)

 

 

You will need an assistant for lights, one for handling the dipping of the neckerchief, and one off-stage with the fire extinguisher (just in case)..

 

 

When it is time to dip and burn the neckerchief, use the following procedure:

 

 

1. Attach the corners of the neckerchief to the hangers with the safety pins.

 

 

2. Lightly shake the jar of Magic Water to remix the components. Tightly wad the neckerchief and dip it completely into the jar containing the Magic Water. The whole neckerchief must be wet or the dry part will burn.

 

 

3. Squeeze out the neckerchief and quickly extend it, holding the hangers. While this is being done, the lid must be replaced for fire safety.

 

 

4. Pass the neckerchief over the flame. Make certain the neckerchief is spread between the wire holders. It cannot be rolled or folded in any part.

 

 

Make certain that the neckerchief is well in front, or off to the side of you. We used an old broom stick, with the hangars attached to it so that no one had to be real close. If you work quick enough, the whole neckerchief will appear to be engulfed in flames, and the flames will extend several inches above the top of the neckerchief.

 

 

5. Shake gently when just the edges remain burning. This will extinguish the flames along the hems, which hold more acetone than the body, due to the additional fabric here.

 

 

You must move very quickly through steps 2, 3 and 4, or the acetone will evaporate before it can be ignited. The jar of acetone must be kept away from the flame, and be covered at all times except when actually dipping the neckerchief. Acetone is highly flammable. You might want an additional assistant or two to help with this.

 

 

Practice the steps above outside, before the meeting to make sure that you can get it right when the time comes. It will be embarrassing if the wet neckerchief doesn't burn due to evaporation of the acetone. This trick works because the acetone burns, while the water keeps the neckerchief from burning. Remember that the acetone will evaporate pretty quickly, or you will miss the effect.

 

 

 

 

 

Script:

 

 

(Dim house lights gradually while calling forward the graduating cub scouts and their parents. Leave only the lights in front on while telling the story.)

 

 

Tonight Webelos Scouts _____________________ are graduating to boy scouts. Will they come forward with their parents.

 

 

These young men have completed their Cub Scouting activities. There remains but one test before they may cross the bridge into Boy Scouts.

 

 

"Have they done everything they can to BE PREPARED?"

 

 

Deep in the heart of the mountains and deserts of New Mexico, there is an Indian village along side a small stream. The village and the area around it are very green and lush. This is very unusual, for the village is in the middle of a very harsh desert land.

 

 

While hiking in the area several years ago, I came across this village and stopped by the stream for a rest. There was an old Chief sitting in the sun by the stream, and I asked him:

 

 

"Why is this area so green and your people so healthy?"

 

 

The old Chief replied:

 

 

"The waters of this stream are magical. They assist all who come, by telling the people if they have done everything they need, to be prepared. By hard work with the assistance of these magical waters, my people have done the things needed to be prepared and prosper in life."

 

 

I thought for a while and said:

 

 

"I too could use these magical waters, for I know of many young men who are working hard to be prepared for life. Could I take some of these magical waters with me?"

 

 

The old Chief smiled and nodded.

 

 

"It is for the youth that these waters are most special."

 

 

"Take something special from one of the young men who are to be tested and dip it in the water. Pass the special item over the flame, and if the special item burns, but is not consumed, then they have done everything needed to be prepared."

 

 

(Turn out the lights.)

 

 

From one of the cub scouts before us, we take the Webelos Neckerchief.

 

 

(Clip the neckerchief to wire holders at corners. Be careful not to twist or fold the fabric. It must be smooth.)

 

 

And dip it in the Magic Water.

 

 

(Have the assistant dip the neckerchief while you hold the wire holders. Quickly take the neckerchief from the jar and spread it tightly between the wire holders. Your assistant covers the jar before you put the neckerchief over the candle, but you cannot wait too long. This part must be done quickly.)

 

 

Then pass it over the flame of the Spirit of Scouting.

 

 

(Do so.)

 

 

Scouts, you have passed the test and are prepared to cross over into Boy Scouting. May the Great Spirit of Akela go with you throughout your scouting days.

 

 

(At this point, it's not a bad idea to bring up the fire safety issue, and "Don't try this at home - only trained Cubmasters are allowed to perform this ceremony!" )

 

 

-- Thanks to George R. Davis

 

 

 

 

 

Webelos Graduation -- The Changing of the Shirt

 

 

This ceremony in which Webelos Scouts are graduated from the Pack to Boy Scout Troops, involves the whole Pack, including adult leaders. First, call forward the graduating Webelos Scouts and their parents. Next, form two lines (facing each other) as follows: nearest the graduates, pack committee members; then Cub Scout dens with leaders and den chiefs; then Webelos den and leaders. At the far end are Scoutmasters of the troops they boys will join.

 

 

As a variation to this ceremony, line everyone up as stated before except have the Webelos den begin a walk from the end opposite the Scoutmasters. As the boys proceed, they begin to remove their Webelos uniform shirt -- only to uncover their Boy Scout uniform shirt. Their Webelos uniform shirt has been taken care of by a designated adult during his (Webelos Scout) walk to be returned to later. At the end of the walk, applause and congratulations!

 

 

 

 

 

Crossing over to Scouting

 

 

Setting: A bridge is in the center stage. One side of the bridge is represented as the Cub Scout side and the other side as the Boy Scout side. You can use your imagination on how to symbolize each side so it is apparent which side is which. Use of Boy Scouts with candles lighting the path is very impressive. Cubmaster and Scoutmaster standing appropriate sides.

 

 

CUBMASTER: Tonight we mark a great occasion....the graduation of ______ Webelos Scouts into a boy scout troop. We are sad to see them leave because they have been a great help to our pack...but we are happy for them because they are going on to the great adventure of Boy Scouting. These Webelos have worked hard for this night and have advanced well. As a symbol of their hard work, each Webelos scout will be given an arrow. As I call your name, will each Scout come forward with your parents.

 

 

(Call each boys name off.)

 

 

Reader: The arrow alone gives meaning to each of these scouts. The wooden shaft gives the strength like the strength the Scout Promise gives each boy. The fletching helps guide the arrow on a straight and true path like the Scout Law guides the Scout on a straight and true path. The arrowhead points the way to the target like Webelos badge and Arrow of Light requirements have pointed the Scout to the ways of Boy Scouting.

 

 

Each arrow has these parts...but each arrow is different...it is individual. Each arrow represents their own trail through Cub Scouting. (Give each boy his arrow.)

 

 

It has been a long trail...As you look at the arrow you can look back and see how far you have traveled. Your first trail led you across the Bobcat Ridge, where Akela took you into the Pack as a Bobcat. The yellow mark tells that this boy completed his Bobcat requirements. You may have then climbed the steep Wolf Mountain. The red mark means he has completed the Wolf badge. After that there may be a gold and silver marks for the arrow points that you may have earned. After finding your way through Bear Forest, you may have earned your Bear rank. The green mark shows you have gained your Bear achievements, and again you may have earned a gold and silver arrow points. Your trail next may have led you to Webelos Rank...first earning three Webelos pins shown by three black marks, then your Webelos badge which is marked in blue. The Arrow of Light trail may have been hard and rugged. You first earned another four Webelos pins. Then came the highest Cub Scout Achievement, the Arrow of Light which is signified by the white marking on the arrow. The twelve beads will remind you of the twelve points of the Scout Law. The red and white feathers not only stand for the troops colors, but also for devotion and honor.

 

 

Your trail in Scouting does not end in Cub Scouting...it is only the beginning...for all of you have prepared yourself for the crossing over to Boy Scouts.

 

 

The bridge before you is a symbol of your crossing from Cub Scouting to Boy Scouting. The bridge is a structure carrying a pathway or roadway over a depression. It is a means of connection or transition from one side to another...as this bridge represents how our Pack is connected to our Troop . As I call each boys name, please come stand before Your Cubmaster where he will remove your Webelos neckerchief.

 

 

(Cubmaster is calling over to the Scoutmaster.)

 

 

CUBMASTER: Hello, Boy Scouts of Troop .

 

 

SCOUTMASTER: Hello, Cub Scouts of Akela. What do you desire?

 

 

CUBMASTER: We have several Webelos who have prepared themselves for entrance into your Troop.

 

 

SCOUTMASTER: Bring them and their parents forward to the bridge that joins our Pack and Troop. I will send two of my Scouts over to escort the boys and their parents over the bridge.

 

 

(Boy Scouts cross over to Pack's side and then escorts the new scout and their parents to the other side.)

 

 

Webelos leader speaking to the Scoutmaster: These are your new Scouts, ready for the adventures ahead of them. They are going to call themselves the patrol.

 

 

Webelos leader speaking to the boys: As I call each of your names, please come forward to your Scoutmaster, , where he will place on you the Neckerchief of Troop .

 

 

SCOUTMASTER: I'd like to welcome the new patrol and their families to our Troop . (Lights on)

 

 

SCOUTMASTER: Will Troop please form your patrols. (Have SPL lead all scouts in the Scout Promise)

 

 

Crossing the Bridge Ceremony Read by the Cubmaster

 

 

A BRIDGE is a structure carrying a pathway or roadway over a depression. It is a means of connection or transition from one side to another. During the years you and your son have been in Cub Scouting, we have had numerous opportunities to work together along the trail. Now, Boys' name is leaving the Pack to follow the trail of Boy Scouting. I am sure you are going to find the same satisfaction there that you have found in Cub Scouting.

 

 

As a symbol of the growth of your son and his entrance into Scouting, may I ask that he stand before me where I will divest him of his Webelos Handbook and neckerchief. (Take Webelos Handbook and Neckerchief from boy) You and he will slowly cross over the bridge into Scouting, pausing at each of the twelve steps. At the end of the twelve steps you will be welcomed by the Scouts of Troop # . (Dim the lights and have spot light shining on a bridge as the boy and parents cross the bridge.)

 

 

(As Cub takes each step, the Scouts call out loudly each of the Scout laws.)

 

 

1st - TRUSTWORTHY
2nd - LOYAL
3rd - HELPFUL
4th - FRIENDLY
5th - COURTEOUS
6th - KIND
7th - OBEDIENT
8th - CHEERFUL
9th - THRIFTY
10th - BRAVE
11th - CLEAN
12th - REVERENT

 

 

Read by Scouts -

 

 

We welcome you into Troop # , we meet each Day at Time at Place . We shall look forward to welcoming you at our next troop meeting.

 

 

Read by Scoutmaster -

 

 

(Hands Scout Handbook to new Scout) This book now replaces your Webelos book. Read and study it. Keep it handy for it is your guide through many adventures in Scouting.

 

 

Done by Assistant Scoutmaster - (Places Troop neckerchief around new Scouts neck and shakes his hand)

 

 

 

 

 

Crossover, The Final Steps

 

 

ARRANGEMENT: Darkened room, Red light is on bridge, which is centered between American and Pack flags. Assembled on stage to the left of the bridge are the parents and Webelos Leader, on the opposite end of the bridge is the Scoutmaster.

 

 

CUBMASTER: Tonight we mark a great occasion, ... the graduation of Webelos Scout (name) from our pack. We are sad to see him leave because he has been a great help to our Pack... but we are happy for him because he is going on to the great adventure of Scouting. He has worked hard for this night and has advanced well. Please escort Webelos Scout (name) to the front.

 

 

(Boy who has been standing on opposite side of room, is escorted to front by another Webelos Scout, who carries the den flag. They stop at front, the graduating Webelos Scout returns to his place.)

 

 

CUBMASTER: (Recaps information such as date boy joined pack, ranks he earned, awards he received, date joined Webelos den, etc.)

 

 

DEN LEADER: (Recaps activities in Webelos den, highlighting activity badges he has earned). Webelos Scout (name) it is with a great sense of pride that I now ask you for your Webelos neckerchief. (after removing neckerchief, Den Leader escorts him to end of bridge where Cubmaster is waiting.)

 

 

CUBMASTER: I am pleased to see that you are wearing the Arrow of Light, the highest award in Cub Scouting. This is the only Cub Scout badge which you will be permitted to wear on your Scout uniform. And now you may take the final steps. (Webelos Scout crosses bridge. He stops in center, turns to salute Cubmaster with Cub Scout salute. He proceeds across bridge to where the Scoutmaster is waiting. He gives him Scout salute).

 

 

SCOUTMASTER: (Name), we are happy to welcome you to our troop. I can see by the Arrow of Light that you are prepared to join the great fellowship of Scouting. (Short statement on what is expected of Scout). Please repeat after me the Scout Oath. (Scoutmaster and Scout exchange salute and shake hands). As a token of this important occasion, I would like to present you with the troop neckerchief. (Scoutmaster and parents meet in front of bridge.) Mr. and Mrs. (name), Welcome to our troop. I congratulate you on the fine work that you have done with your son in Cub Scouting. I am sure you will find new adventures in our troop.