FREDERIC W. NESS BOOK AWARD
FOR CONTRIBUTING TO 
LIBERAL EDUCATION
1980-2002
 
SAM WEINBURG 

Each year under the auspices of the Association of American Colleges and Universities (AAC&U), the Frederic W. Ness Book Award recognizes a book that contributes to the understanding and improvement of liberal education. The Award was established in 1979 to honor AAC&U's president emeritus, Frederic W. Ness. The Award was first made in 1980.

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2002 Sam Wineburg Historical Thinking and Other Unnatural Acts: Charting the Future of Teaching the Past
2001 No Award  
2000 No Award  
1999 Martha C. Nussbaum Cultivating Humanity: A Classical Defense of Reform in Liberal Education
1998 Jane Tompkins A Life in School: What the Teacher Learned
1997 James O. Freedman Idealism and Liberal Education
1996 Morris H. Shamos The Myth of Scientific Literacy
1995 Athanasios Moulakis Beyond Utility: Liberal Education for a Technological Age
1994 Gerald Graff Beyond the Culture Wars: How Teaching the Conflicts Can Revitalize American Education
1993 Rudolph H. Weingartner Undergraduate Education: Goals and Means
1992 Frederick S. Weaver Liberal Education: Critical Essays on Professions, Pedagogy, and Structure
1991 Elizabeth Kamarck Transforming Knowledge
1990 Robert E. Proctor Education's Great Amnesia: Reconsidering the Humanities from Petrarch to Freud with a Curriculum for Today's Students
1989 Betty Jean Craige Reconnection: Dualism to Holism in Literary Study
1988 Bruce A. Kimball Orators and Philosophers: A History of the Idea of Liberal Education
1987 Howard Bowen & Jack Schuster American Professors: A National Resource Imperiled
1986 Barbara Miller Solomon In the Company of Educated Women
1985 No award  
1984 Warren Bryan Martin A College of Character
1983 Howard Bowen The State of the Nation and the Agenda for Higher Education
1982 No award  
1981 Charles Wegener Liberal Education and the Modern University
1980 Frederick Rudolph Curriculum: A History of the American Undergraduate Course of Study Since 1636

 
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