Date: October 17, 1994

Published: Globe & Mail, Toronto

The proposals to shift the cost of university education from society to the benefiting student represents yet another breakdown in the intergenerational compound that has sustained our country over 150 years (Power To The Students -- editorial, Oct 8).

Those of my generation (I am 54) who advocate the user-pay philosophy are in many cases the beneficiaries of the cheap and plentiful education opportunities of the later fifties and early sixties. These csts were paid by our parents; it is only right that we should pay the cost for our successors.

The proposals for reform should initially focus on ensuring that the current beneficiaries of a university education make an additional conctribution so that our successors can enjoy thir schooling without the spectre of a significnat debt at the end of their four years at university.

Martin G. Evans, Toronto