Ric Werme's Guide to
Watts Up With That

Anthony Watts' Watts Up With That? blog is hosted by Wordpress, a blog host that works best for bloggers who post a few articles each week. Anthony and his crew post several articles per day, and trying to hunt down old articles is a bit frustrating. There is a search mechanism, but that seems limited to keywords in the original article. You can also look at a day's posts, but that's an inefficient way to browse through old articles.

People making comments have no hints as to how to format them. There used to be the barest of hints below the comment box, but it was a poor list, even wrong in places, and no longer displays. See the bottom of this document for better guidance.


WUWT Navigation Bars

Every so often, please take a break from reading the recent posts and comments to check the two navigation bars.

The top bar (with labels from "Home" to "WUWT stuff" goes to permanent posts that are updated frequently, sometimes automatically, sometimes manually. The most important label is "Resource Pages". When you hover the cursor over it, a submenu appears listing the the various domains WUWT covers. The most popular of these is the Sea Ice Reference Page. Many readers like to follow the progression of Arctic sea ice extent each summer because of the frequent handwringing from Al Gore and the NSIDC about how soon we'll have an ice free Arctic. Given that we've only had good data for this since polar satellites started returning images of ice cover, no one can make authoritative predictions for the current season, let alone the next.

The right side nav bar is a potpourri of information and links to internal and external sites. The search box searches the content WUWT posts but not the comments. It's a good way to hunt down some post on a subject you remember reading about. Some links go to Anthony's business, Weather Shop (please buy stuff there!), some have current images of a subject and a link to more information. Anthony's lists of other blogs is unique in that he links to blogs that are major detractors of WUWT, most of which disparage WUWT but don't link to it.

Everything else is pretty much self explanatory. It changes frequently enough so a periodic check is worthwhile to see what's new and what you've forgotten about.

WUWT Tables of Contents

Two series of ToCs are available:

Monthly - This is good to check if you know approximately when something happened and want to look for relevant posts. Even better, this is a good way to see what else was happening then.

Categories - This is good to check if you are interested in particular topics. Even better, if you are looking for topics to be interested in, check out the list.

You can also use the right side nav bar to find the same information displayed as WordPress see fit. This includes some text at the beginning of each post. My pages only have the title, and everything is in a single web page. They both have their merits.

WUWT Classics

Here are some posts that deserve to used as reference works, not just as comment-du-jour. The real reference is usually elsewhere, but a lot of us heard it first here.

Guest poster Willis Eschenbach always comes up with fascinating posts. Even his autobiographical posts are remarkable. He's collected An Index to Willis's Writings up to May 2011 and deserves this special entry here.


Titles and Links for the Last Two Weeks

Information here (and in the monthly and category pages) is collected soon after midnight Pacific time (which is WUWT time, at least as far as dates go). The "Recent" column is the number of comments made yesterday and may be most useful for finding older posts that are still active for some reason. Sometimes those reasons are an interesting exchange of information and collaboration. Sometimes it's just two pig-headed bores who don't know when to stop. Sometimes you can't tell the difference!

Daily summary Total WUWT
views to date
TitleCommentsRecent
WUWT index page for 2015 Jan 24217,978,918
An Unexpected Admission from Dana Nuccitelli at SkepticalScience 146146
State of the Sea Ice – January 2015 9191
The Icebox Heats Up 3232
WUWT index page for 2015 Jan 23217,884,601
Friday not so funny – ‘off with their heads’ ! 18773
Super-Heated Air from Climate Science on NOAA’s “Hottest” Year 15829
Into and Out of the Icebox 27546
WUWT index page for 2015 Jan 22217,777,224
Ocean ‘Global Warming’ is not actually ‘global’ at all 1676
MCID: Minimal Climatically Important Difference 1138
Study: climate change accounts for only 1/3 of crop yield variation 1092
Learning From The Argonauts 1792
WUWT index page for 2015 Jan 21217,672,937
Cornell University’s Greenland ice melt hype 1254
Penn State researchers miss obvious visual clues on “glacier melt” – black carbon and sublimation 950
2014: Among the 3 percent Coldest Years in 10,000 years? 3333
Climate change falling so far off the public radar, a major polling house didn’t even bother asking about it this year 1350
WUWT index page for 2015 Jan 20217,556,940
Stemming ice loss, giant atmospheric rivers add mass to Antarctica’s ice sheet 1790
2014: The Most Dishonest Year on Record 3870
WUWT index page for 2015 Jan 19 
Claim: Melting glaciers have big carbon impact 2270
GISS & NCDC Need to Be More Open with the Public when Making Proclamations about Global Warming Records 1701
Bigger problems than global warming – NASA discovers 8 new dangerous near Earth asteroids 1920
Weekly Climate and Energy News Roundup #164 140
WUWT index page for 2015 Jan 18217,317,861
December 2014 Global Surface (Land+Ocean) and Lower Troposphere Temperature Anomaly & Model-Data Difference Update 510
The Merchants of Smear 1381
Four Stories, Two Worlds 1900
WUWT index page for 2015 Jan 17217,209,346
Saturday silliness – it’s the Warmist Year Evah! 1400
On the Biases Caused by Omissions in the 2014 NOAA State of the Climate Report 1980
WUWT index page for 2015 Jan 16217,095,808
Calamities Oversold 902
Does the Uptick in Global Surface Temperatures in 2014 Help the Growing Difference between Climate Models and Reality? 3240
Peer-reviewed pocket-calculator climate model exposes serious errors in complex computer models and reveals that Man’s influence on the climate is negligible 8302
Aussie Green plans to kayak to Paris, to ‘deliver a message’ – could it be “greens go by air”? 1900
Breaking science news: Yak dung burning pollutes indoor air of Tibetan households 1294
A Taxonomy of Science Blogs 1730
WUWT index page for 2015 Jan 15216,942,489
Forgive Us Our Transgressions 1440
On Migrating Moose and Migrating Temperature Trends 990
Faux polar bear figures 990
Status and last chance for Josh 2015 Climate Skeptic Calendars 210
WUWT index page for 2015 Jan 14216,813,731
Climate Risk Map – Mainly Countries Hostile to the USA 1790
Cool high speed video: Rainfall can release aerosols, study finds 960
Claim: Acceleration in sea level rise ‘worse than we thought’ 3440
1 million tons of pressurised CO2 stored beneath Decatur, Illinois 3691
WUWT index page for 2015 Jan 13216,685,420
Anticipation 2050
Al Gore, wrong again – Polar ice continues to thrive 1840
Claim: Social cost of climate change too low, Stanford scientists say 2660
Cold kills: Summer no sweat for Aussies but winter freeze fatal 1180
WUWT index page for 2015 Jan 12216,557,417
Another bias in temperature measurements discovered 1950
Charlie Hebdo, Climate Skepticism & Free Speech 1760
Monday Mirthiness – More ‘skeptical science’ kids scienz 940
WUWT index page for 2015 Jan 11216,426,782
Weekly Climate and Energy News Roundup #163 230
32,757 year old survey participant skews Lewandowsky paper – Defective data, demonstrably defective conclusion 2110
Alarmists Bizarrely Claim “Just what AGW predicts” about the Record High Global Sea Surface Temperatures in 2014 1470


Formatting in comments

Neither WUWT nor WordPress provide much documentation for the HTML formatting permitted in comments. There are only a few commands that are useful, and a few more that are pretty much useless.

A typical HTML formatting command has start and end pieces and has general form of <name>text to be formatted</name>. A common mistake is to forget the ending. Until WordPress gets a preview function, we have to live with it.

N.B. WordPress handles some formatting very differently than web browsers do. A post of mine shows these and less useful commands in action at WUWT.

NameSampleResultNotes
b (bold) This is <b>bold</b> text This is bold text Command strong does the same
i (italics) This is <i>italicized</i> text This is italicized text Command em (emphasize) does the same
a (anchor) See <a href=http://wermenh.com>My home page</a> See My home page A URL by itself (with a space on either side) is often adequate in WordPress, e.g. See http://wermenh.com
blockquote (indent text) My text
<blockquote>quoted text</blockquote>
More of my text
My text
quoted text
More of my text
Quoted text can be many paragraphs long. WordPress italicizes quoted text (and the <i> command enters normal text).
strike This is <strike>text with strike</strike> This is text with strike  
pre ("preformatted" - use for monospace display) <pre>These lines are bracketed<br>with &lt;pre> and &lt;/pre>
These lines are bracketed
with <pre> and </pre>
Preformatted text, generally done right. Use it when you have a table or something else that will look best in monospace. Each space is displayed, something that <code> (next) doesn't do.
code (use for monospace display) <code>Wordpress handles this very differently</code> Wordpress handles this very differently See http://wattsupwiththat.com/resources/#comment-65319 to see what this really does.
iframe <iframe src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/yaBNjTtCxd4" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe> Useful for including Youtube videos, see below.

The following commands appear to work only in replies to comments or in block quotes. There seems to be no explanation of why or how WordPress does this. I assume it's a bug, I assume they meant to prevent these commands from passing through at all. It may be that they let almost anything else through too. Oh my, these only work for me if I'm logged into my WordPress account (they don't work if I use my FaceBook account). It may be they work only because I have the ability to post new articles.

Bottom line: don't expect the following to work....

NameSampleResultNotes
u (underline) This is <u>underlined</u> text This is underlined text Why, WordPress, why?
hr (horizontal rule) <hr>This has hr commands before and after the text<hr>
This has hr commands before and after the text
There's no ending command. You're expected to use <hr /> commands.
h1 <h1>Header size 1</h1>

Header size 1

These are used for section headers in long web pages, so may not be all that useful or welcome on WUWT. On my browser they display large blue sans-serif text.
h2 <h2>Header size 2</h2>

Header size 2

 
h3 <h3>Header size 3</h3>

Header size 3

 
h4 <h4>Header size 4</h4>

Header size 4

Levels 4, 5, and 6 all seem to do the same thing. They display small black text, subsequent text is normal size and hence bigger. In a reply, the header is in a serif font, in a block quote, it's a sans serif font like the rest of the quote.
h5 <h5>Header size 5</h5>
Header size 5
 
h6 <h6>Header size 6</h6>
Header size 6
 

Youtube videos

Using the URL for a YouTube video creates a link like any other URL. However, YouTube accepts the HTML for "embedded" videos. From the YouTube page after the video finishes, click on the "embed" button and it will suggest HTML like:
<iframe width="560" height="315"
        src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/yaBNjTtCxd4"
        frameborder="0" allowfullscreen>
</iframe>

You can change the size of the frame to display by selecting one in the "Video size" menu below, I suggest not copying the width and height attributes, WordPress should choose a large size.

Copy and paste the HTML into your comment and it WordPress will generate something like:

Special characters in comments

Those of us who remember acceptance of ASCII-68 (a specification released in 1968) are often not clever enough to figure out all the nuances of today's international character sets. Besides, most keyboards lack the keys for those characters, and that's the real problem. Even if you use a non-ASCII but useful character like ° (as in 23°C) some optical character recognition software or cut and paste operation is likely to change it to 23oC or worse, 230C.

Nevertheless, there are very useful characters that are most reliably entered as HTML character entities:

Type thisTo getNotes
&amp;&Ampersand
&lt;<Less than sign
Left angle bracket
&bull;Bullet
&deg;°Degree (Use with C and F, but not K (kelvins))
&#8304;
&#185;
&#178;
&#179;
&#8308;

¹
²
³
Superscripts (use 8304, 185, 178-179, 8308-8313 for digits 0-9)
&#8320;
&#8321;
&#8322;
&#8323;



Subscripts (use 8320-8329 for digits 0-9)
&pound;£British pound
&ntilde;ñFor La Niña & El Niño
&micro;µMu, micro
&plusmn;±Plus or minus
&times;×Times
&divide;÷Divide
&ne;Not equals
&nbsp; Like a space, with no special processing (i.e. word wrapping or multiple space discarding)
&gt;>Greater than sign
Right angle bracket
Generally not needed

Linking to past comments

Each comment has a URL that links to the start of that comment. This is usually the best way to refer to comment a different post. The URL is "hidden" under the timestamp for that comment. While details vary with operating system and browser, the best way to copy it is to right click on the time stamp near the start of the comment, choose "Copy link location" from the pop-up menu, and paste it into the comment you're writing. You should see something like http://wattsupwiththat.com/2013/07/15/central-park-in-ushcnv2-5-october-2012-magically-becomes-cooler-in-july-in-the-dust-bowl-years/#comment-1364445.

The "#<label>" at the end of the URL tells a browser where to start the page view. It reads the page from the Web, searches for the label and starts the page view there. As noted above, Wordpress will create a link for you, you don't need to add an <a> command around it.

Climate Audit Assistant

Another approach to dealing with this is a Firefox add-on that replaces the edit window with a better one that has buttons for formatting text. It's a two piece install, see the web page for details. It coexists okay with the "It's all Text" extension that lets you send the text in a text edit window to your regular editor.


Contact Ric Werme or return to his home page.

Written 2009 Dec 5, last updated 2014 December 28.