Henderson County Newspaper Abstracts


July 1, 1905

HENDERSON GLEANER

 

James C. Moore is $700 Short In His Accounts

Shortage Originally appeared as $2,000 But He Returned $1,300 To Employers

 

Efforts He Made to Repay the Money Brought About Disclosure of the Silent Borrowing

 

A shortage of $2,000 has been discovered in the books of James C. Moore teller and bookkeeper of the Henderson County Savings Bank.

 

The shortage has been lessened by the payment of $1300 into the hands of the officials of the bank by Mr. Moore.  The directors have notified his bondsman that he has defaulted in the sum of $700.

 

The shortage was discovered last Thursday.  The disclosure came about through the efforts of the teller to repay the bank for the money he had appropriated to his own use.

 

The public announcement of the shortage has not been previously made thought it has become noised about the streets to some extent.  The rumor was at first received as impossible and later it took such form that even the bank directors could not deny it when approached.  However the directors did not decide to make a public announcement of the facts until Friday afternoon when they met.  So far the bonding company has taken no action but it is supposed that it will, at the close of today, if the young man is unable to raise the money necessary to cover up his shortage.

 

Several days ago Mr. Moore was offered a position as bookkeeper and teller in the Union Bank and Trust company and resigned his position in the Henderson County bank.  Early last week he went to David Banks, cashier of the bank with which he had accepted a position, and borrowed $2,000 on a house and lot which he owned.  He represented to Mr. Banks that the title of the property was clear and the money was placed to his credit on the books of that institution.

 

The following day he gave a check in the Henderson County bank for $1,000 and was paid.  Following the payment of the check Mr. Banks instituted an investigation into the title of the property on which the $2,000 had been loaned and found that the young man had misrepresented it to him, he discovered some prior items.  The day following the cashing of the first check Moore gave a second one in the sum or $1,000 and Mr. Bank refused to pay it.

 

When the check was returned unpaid the suspicious of the Cashier G.W. Crutcher was aroused and the investigation into the matter which followed disclosed the fact that Moore was trying to cover up his shortage.  He was  called into the office of James Yeaman, the attorney for the bank, Saturday night and readily confessed that he had appropriated the money for the bank to his own use.

 

Mr. Moore gave the directors of the bank a signed statement showing the dates on which he had taken money and the amounts appropriated.  He did not seem worried and asked for time to make good his shortage.  Cashier David Banks, of the Union Bank and Trust company was called in Saturday night and Mr. Moore gave him a deed to the property in question the $1,000 check being the consideration to the deed.  The Union Bank was thereby given protection.

 

Moore has $300 in his own savings and deposit in the --- National Bank.  He gave the Henderson County bank a check for that sun and in this manner raised $1,300 of the $2,000 he desired  The directors of the bank gave him until Friday afternoon to cover up the remaining shortage.  At the meeting held in the office in the rear of the bank building the directors decided to turn the matter over to the bonding company which furnished Moore with bond.  The notice of the shortage had already been sent to the company when it was first discovered.

 

The United States Fidelity and Guaranty company of Baltimore, Md., had furnished Moore with bond.  The local agents asked leniency for the young man.  It is understood that unless he can raise the money by this afternoon that the company will close down and Moore will be placed under arrest.  There seems to be a good chance for the money to be raised.  Several of the friends of the young man have offered their assistance and it was given out by them last night that the money would probably be raised.

How Shortage Occurred

The money appropriated by the teller was taken in a lump sum.  At the close of each days business Moore would check up from the day book the deposits made during the banking hours with G. W. Crutcher, cashier of the bank.  He would fail to read the full amount of one of the deposits and then take the balance between the correct amount and the one he had read from the cash book so that when the currency was counted the day book would balance with the cash and deposits.

 

When the sum reached $2,000 it is said, the teller bought the property which he mortgaged to the Union Bank and Trust Company.

 

It is probably that the shortage would not have been discovered for a long time or at least for several months, had not Mr. Moore been offered the position in the Union Bank.  His efforts to return the money to his employers before he left lead the directors to the conclusion that he had no malicious intent when he took the money but was merely borrowing the sum with the idea of returning it when his investment brought the profits he anticipated.  Had the title to the property which he mortgaged been clear and the second check for $1,000 been paid it is also probably that he would have left the Henderson County bank, accepted his new position and never experience the least trouble.  James Yeaman, attorney for the Henderson county bank stated last evening that the institution would not lose one cent through the transaction as the bonding company would make the sum good.  Neither will the Union bank, as the deed given for the property in question covers fully the amount of the first check that was given and the only one paid.

 

Will Be Surprised

As said before the news of the transaction had been rumored on the streets for several days.  The amount of the shortage was placed at different sums and it is generally supposed to be much larger than $700.  The Gleaner has been in possession of the facts almost from the time the discovery was made but for the sake of Mr. Moore withheld them, hoping he would be able to raise the sum needed by the time the directors met Friday afternoon.

 

Had a Fine Record

James C. Moore has always been regarded as a most exemplary young man.  He graduated from the Henderson High school about five years ago and shortly afterward entered the employment of the Henderson County bank.  His habits were always of the best and he was always faithful and diligent in the discharge of his duties.  The news of his shortcoming will be received with the utmost surprise by his many friends and acquaintances.

 

Mr. Moore could not be seen last evening.  Previously he had refused to make a statement concerning the affair for publication.

 

NEW TELLER SELECTED

Hughes Farmer, formerly with H. B. Jarvis has accepted a position as teller in the Union Bank and Trust company.  He is a well known young man and the bank officials feel that he will be successful in his new position.

 

Personals

 

Mrs. Julia Cobb, of Sebree, spent the day in the city yesterday.

 

Rev. J. J. Pike of St. Mary, Ky, was a guest of Rev. E. J. Lynch yesterday while enroute home from Uniontown.

 

Miss Mary Muncaster, of Wilson, returned home yesterday.

 

Dr. J. J. Lynn and wife, of Boardley, Ky were guests of Mr. and Mrs. W. F. Christian yesterday while en route to Louisville.

 

Mrs. W. T. Quinn and daughter, Miss Fanny, of Corydon, were in the city shopping yesterday.

 

Mr. J. Y. Mitchell and little son, of Nebo, Ky., returned home yesterday from a visit to Mr. and Mrs. Charles Silcotte on Alves Street.

 

J. M. Ligon, of Cypress, Ind., was in the city yesterday en route to Robards.

 

Mrs. Anna Rupcke of Bowling Green, was in the city yesterday enroute to Metropolis, Ill., to visit her brother, A. H. Austin.

 

Mrs. N. W. Henry and daughter, Miss Ronie and son, Willia, of Ashbyburg, Ky., returned home yesterday from a visit to Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Hester.

 

Mr. Olivia Orr spent the day with friends in Sebree.

James Keefe returned from Providence, Ky., Yesterday.

Mrs. Olivia Orr spent the day with friends in Sebree, Yesterday.

J. A. Justice, of Providence, returned home yesterday.

A B Trible went to Robards yesterday.

T. B. Miller of Morganfield, was in the city yesterday on business.

J. A. Dean, of Owensboro, was in the city yesterday on business.

Miss Clara Hays returned from Sebree yesterday.

 

Mrs. Anna Rupcke, of Bowling Green, was in the city yesterday enroute to  Metropols, Ill; to visit her brother, A. H. Austin.

 

Rev. and Mrs. W. H. Archey and daughter, Miss Willie, or Robards, returned home yesterday from a visit to Rev. B. F. Orr and family on Clay Street.

 

Mr. J. W. Wilkerson and little son, Jesse, of the county, went to Sebree yesterday to visit Mrs. Bettie Walker for a few days.

 

Mrs. F. W. Denton went to Robards yesterday to visit her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Mc Mullin.

 

Miss Mabel McLaughlin left yesterday for Mattoon, Ill., to visit relatives for a few days.

 

Mrs. Jerome Silvey and daughters and Miss Grave Hall, of Atlanta, Ga., werethe city yesterday en route to Owensboro to visit relatives.

 

Dr. T. W. Gardner, of Madisonville was in the city yesterday en route home from Hardinsburg, Ky.

 

Miss Mary Arvin Owensboro, returned home yesterday from a visit to her parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. M. Arvin.

 

Everett Bingham, of Grove Center, Ky., was in the city yesterday on business.

 

Mrs. T. C. Williams and little daughter, Miss Salena, and Mrs. Mary Henderson, of Baskett, were in the city yesterday.

 

J. M. Richardson and little daughter, little Miss Vera, of Spottsville, were  in the city shopping yesterday.

 

Miss Virgie Melton, of Dixie,  returned home yesterday from a visit to her sister, Mrs. W. E. Galloway.

 

Pierce Randolph, of Corydon returned home yesterday from a visit to his grandmother, Mrs. John Pierce.

 

Rev. H. E. Speers, of Danville, was in the city yesterday the guest of William Soaper while en route to Louisville.

 

Miss Eva Baskett and her grandmother, Mrs. J. B. Kimsey, of Baskett, returned home yesterday from a visit to Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Baskett.

 

D. B. Sparks returned yesterday from Louisville to spend a few days with his wife and her father, J. A. Sandefur, of the county.

 

E. G. crabtree, of Morganfield,w as in the city yesterday to meet his wife and little sons, Winstead and Elmore, Jr., on their return from a visit to Mrs. Crabree’s mother, Mrs. E. M. Winstead, of Omaha, Neb.

 

Hon J. T. Pride and wife, of Morganfield were in the city yesterday en route home from Lexington,w here they were married last Wednesday at four o’clock by Rev. U. G. Foote of the M. E. Church.

 

Rev. M. Seals, of Cookville, Tenn., was in the city the guest of Rev. W. L. Livingston, yesterday while en route home from a trip through the North.

 

Gibney Oscar Letcher went to Owensboro yesterday.

G. W. Sypert, of Madisonville, was in the city yesterday on business.

E. L. Brooks, of Sebree, was in the city yesterday on business.

N. K. Toy went to Owensboro yesterday on business.

 

Mrs. J. J. Reed and son, Ingram, went to Stanley yesterday to visit relatives.

 

Mrs. A. K. Major went to Owensboro yesterday to visit Mrs. John T. Hathway.

 

Mrs. James Dyer and children, of Louisville, were in the city yesterday en route to Morganfield to visit relatives.

 

Mrs. Eliza Royster, of Robards, spent the day with Mrs. Peachy Royster on Third Street yesterday.

 

Mr. and Mrs. N. Powell Taylor and little son, Powell, Jr., left Yesterday for San Francisco, Cal., to visit Mrs. Taylor’s father, Mrs. George Partridge, and other relatives.  They will go by way of Seattle and Portland and return by way of Grand Canyon of the Coloado.  They will be gone a month or six weeks.

 

Miss Elizabeth Ward left yesterday for St. Louis.

A.   B. Jarvis made a business trip down the L. & N. yesterday.

 

W. J. Hanahan, of Chicago, Fourth Vice President and General Manager of the Illinois Central railroad, passed through the city yesterday on a special train from a trip through the South.

 

J. H. Hanna, of Washington, D. C. returned home yesterday from a visit to his parents, Dr. and Mrs. W. M. Hanna, on Powell Street.

 

July 1, 1905

 

Sensational Divorce Suit At Owensboro

OWENSBORO, Ky., July 1. – A sensational divorce suit was filed her today.  F. B. Taylor sues his wife Mrs. Hawsie Taylor for divorce on the grounds of immoral conduct.  Both parties are of prominent families.  F. B. Taylor is a nephew of Judge E. P. Taylor the Democratic nominee for county clerk.

 

Fell From Scaffold

Is Badly Injured

Employe of Coquillard Wagon Works Badly Hurt While Repairing Shaft Saturday Afternoon

Charles Talbott, an employe of the Coquillard wagon works, fell eighteen

Feet from a platform Saturday afternoon.  One rib was broken and large gash was cut over his left eye.

 

Talbott was trying to repair a belt shaft in the wood finishing department and had rigged up a temporary platform on which he was standing.  The shaft fell and he was thrown violently to the floor, alighting on his head.

 

The young man was removed to his home in Audubon where Dr. Bethel dressed his injuries.  Last evening he was suffering considerably but it is thought he will recover without trouble unless internal injuries develop.

 

Coquillard Works Is Closed Down

Management Takes Advantage of Dull Season to Make Repairs and Give Employes Vacaton

The Coquillard Wagon Works was closed down Saturday afternoon and will be idle until July 17.  The shutdown is made in order that necessary repairs can be undertaken and the employes enjoy a vacation.

 

The factory has been busy for several months getting out the large number of orders received for the output.  This is a dull season and the owners find it necessary to make a number of needed re---  the machinery in the place.  All the employes of the factory will take advantage of the close down to enjoy the summer vacation.

 

Last night Mr. and Mrs. W. L. Dodge left for South Bend., Ind., to visit and this morning Joseph Fisher, T. V. Alexander, John Zimmerz, John Batdin leave for South Bend, where they will remain until the factory is opened.  Clarence G. Morgan another employe of the factory and little daughter, Florence Mabel will leave this morning for Cannelton, Ind., where they will spend the vacation visiting relatives.

 

Much Excitement At Scottsville

Mob Violence Is Feared

Two Negroes Spirited Away to Bowling Green

SCOTTSVILLE, Ky Jul 1. The greatest excitement prevails here today, and the officials fearing mob violence, are making arrangements to remove from the county jail to Bowling Green all the negroes confined in prison.  Two negroes Ike Buell and George O’Nell, charged with murder, were taken to Bowling Green this morning, and it is probably that before the end of the day the four negroes charged with starting the fire who did so much damage here will also be transferred.

 

Night before last there was considerable talk of mob violence, but the crowds were dispersed and it was thought that the trouble had passed.

 

The negroes however, precipitated more feeling by making threats of ciolence if any attempt was made to lynch the alleged  incidinaries, and the white people have been greatly stirred up.

 

If a mob should attempt to break into the jail it is feared that a race riot would result and the blacks are determined to protect the members of their race who are now in prison.

 

Every precaution is being taken by the sheriff to ward against any trouble, and extra heavy guard has been placed around the jail.

 

Farmer With Jag Visited Police

Made Himself Obnoxious to Officers and Was Lead to Cell Where He Mainly Cussed Some

 

George Workins, farmer, ambled into the police station Saturday afternoon causing a well developed and a fully --- jag.  Workins had one of his queer intoxicated notions that it was up to him to pay his respects to members of the force and called  vo---ously for the chief as he half fell and half walked up the station house steps.

 

The farmer entered the building as a guest and had not been for the --- he had on board he would have been a welcome guest but the welcome was worn into a frazzle before he had been in the building three minutes and when he awakes this morning he will find that the room to which he has been assigned is occupied by several species of lower animals and has a beautiful decoration of iron bars.

 

When Workins couldn’t find the chief he oozed his way through the air until he --- against a chair next a small t-- where several of the station lounged and Patrol Drive Martin Loftus was enjoying a festive game of 7 up.  Workins proceeded to deliver a lecture of card playing and  found a whole lot of fun in trying to lie down on top of the table top.

 

The persuasion of Driver Loftus and the cardsters was lost on the corn juiced farmer and he would not refrain from attempting his contortion act.  Having exhausted his patience in trying to inculcate the rules of the game into the farmer, Driver Loftus arose in an angry passion and with the assistance of Patrolman Beckham hustled the obnoxious farmer of the soil in the direction of the dark cave.  When the door to the frequently visited portion of the staff house was opened and that bars showed up before Working and  he gave them a mighty tussle ensued before he was landed in the parlor cell.

 

Once inside Loftus made the cell, the building, the neighborhood and the welkin ring with a variegated and choice brand of cuss words which were directed especially towards the ears of the two officers.  But the bars refused to bend before his anasthemas and instead of watering the mules and milking the cows of his farm near Zion this morning Workins will rest on his hard bunk and drink river water for his hot box.

 

Fought Over Card Game

Al Tate and William Staffe quarreled over a card game in a First Street saloon Saturday night.  Tate swung his good right on Staffe’s jaw and the officers rushed in.  Both were charged with disturbing the peace and will be in police court Monday.

 

Elks Ready For The Great Fourth

Busy Attending To Many Minor Details of the Big Celebration For Tuesday

First Regiment Band Has Benn Contracted For to Furnish Music Day and Night

With only two days remaining for preparations the local Elks are the busiest people on earth just now preparing for their big celebration at Atkinson Park Tuesday, July 4.

 

All the attractions have been booked and a great mass of the work necessary to the preparation has been cleared away, but there remains thousands of the smaller details which have to be attended to and the members of the lodge are working overtime just now making ready for the greatest Fourth of July Henderson folk and the people of the section have ever known.

 

There can be no doubt of the success of the day provided the weather makers will do their good share.  Already the celebration is the talk of the town and county and thousands of people will visit the park if the weather is good.  If it should happen to rain the celebration will go on just the same, the band will be there, shelter will be provided and the balloon man will make his ascension.  The speakers will speak and the people will have fun even though Jupiter Pieuvius does try to butt into the arrangements. 

 

One of the first attractions offered is the First Regiment band of Louisville, which has been contracted to spend the entire day and night in the park.  A concert will be rendered in the afternoon and in the evening the band will furnish music for dancing in the pavilion.

 

Another fine attraction is the balloon ascension which Prof. Baldwin, the “human bomb” will make in the afternoon.  Mr. Baldwin has a balloon to which a cannon is attached.  Just before the anchoring ropes to the ballon are cut loose Baldwin rams a charge of powder into the cannon’s mouth and then crawls in himself.  He draws a parachute in after him.  The ropes are cut and the balloons sails away into space.  At a height of 8,000 feet Baldwin pulls a trigger which causes the powder charge to explode and he is hurled from the mouth of the cannon.  For a few minutes the man and the parachute tumble over one another out there in the misty air and the people begin to feel that he will be dashed to death, but just as the feeling takes hold the parachute rightens and with the death defying aeronaut hanging to the bar sails gracefully down to the earth.  Baldwin plans to make his descent on the river this time if he can catch a breeze that will carry him in that direction.  Boats will be ready to pick him up.  The sight will be worth going miles to see and the act is one that those who have seen it will never forget.

 

Several famous orators have been engaged to speak in the afternoon.  Several hundred heads of hogs, sheep and beef will be barbecued and other refreshments will be provided.  One of the mot pleasing features of this part of the entertainment is the fact that the young ladies of the city will preside over the booths.  They have offered their services and the Elks knew that the presence of the women in the stands would make the day a success if nothing else was provided.

 

The dance in the evening to the music provided by the First Regiment musicians will close the day of fun making and festivity.

 

All children will be admitted free to the Elks Fourth of July celebration in Atkinson Park.

 

Personal

Miss Florena Wallace, quit an attractive young lady, of Maiden, Mo., arrived in the city yesterday to spend the summer with her aunt, Mrs. R. J. McCaslin on Holloway Street.

 

Dr and Mrs. James H. Letcher and son, Oscar Letcher, left yesterday for a trip through the Northwest.  Dr. Letcher will attend a meeting of the American Medical association at Portland Oregon.  They will sail from Seattle for Alaska on July 18th.  On their return trip they will visit Yellowstone Park.

 

Mrs. M. A. Moore and Miss Anna Bell Miller went to Reeds yesterday to visit Mrs. J. W. Wathen.

 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Marshall and little daughter, Miss Mary Anna went to Owensboro yesterday to visit their aunt, Mrs. George Little.

 

J. H. Wathen, of Reeds, was in the city yesterday.

H. H. King, of Corydon, was in the city yesterday.

Rev. J. P. Williams went to Owensboro yesterday.

Miss Inah Cabell left yesterday for New York.

Dr. J. Louise Miller returned from Chicago yesterday.

L. F. Royster, of Evansville, was in the city yesterday on business.

Joseph Fisher, of Madisonville, was in the city yesterday.

J. A. Clark, of Owensboro, was in the city yesterday on business.

Mrs. G. D. Woodward went to Reeds yesterday to visit relatives.

Charles Mc Atee went to Owensboro yesterday to spend the Fourth.

John M. Hawkins went to Louisville yesterday.

 

Miss Passie and Carrie Aton, of Corydon were in the city shopping yesterday.

 

Miss Katie McHugh left yesterday for New York, where she will spend a few days and then she goes to Newport, R. I., to visit her sister.

 

Mrs. L. W. Childress and baby of St. Louis are guests of H. P. Turner and family.

 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter Allen and baby of Sebree were in the city yesterday en route to Cloverport to visit relatives.

 

Mrs. R. C. Hancock, of Louisville, was in the city yesterday en route to Uni9ontown to visit her mother, Mrs. M. A. Clements.

 

Mrs. John Rodman, of Louisville returned home yesterday accompanied by her mother, Mrs. John Young Brown, who will visit her for a short while.

 

Miss Mamie Sallee, of Beeville, Texas, is a guest of Mr. and Mrs. Walter Brashear.

 

Mrs. John Guggenbuhl, of Evansville, is visiting her mother, Mrs. Henry Lee.

 

Misses Bertha and May Schoonover of St. Louis, were in the city yesterday en route to Morganfield to visit their parents.

 

Mrs. A. R. Mullins, of Covington, returned home yesterday from a visit to her daughter, Mrs. Dr. Wilson.

 

Mrs. Ote Baldwin, of Kokomo, Ind., returned home yesterday from a visit to her parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Labry, on Ingram Street.

 

Mrs. Robert Cartwright, of Hot Springs, Ark., was in the city yesterday the guest of her sister, Mrs. Thomas E. Ward while en route to Corydon to visit her sister, Mrs. R. F. Willett.

 

Mrs. J. R. Dowden and children, little Miss Josephine and J. R. Dowden, Jr., of Sebree were in the city yesterday en route home from Louisville.

 

Mrs. L. Roehn and Miss Martina Schwiermann, of Louisville, are guests of Mr. and Mrs. J. D. Jenson, on Main Street.

 

Mr. and Mrs. E. B. Crockett and daughter little Miss Nancy, went to Sebree Springs yesterday.

 

O. N. Boswell went to Owensboro yesterday.

Mr. and Mrs. Sam J. Alves went to Sebree Springs yesterday.

E. G. Sebree went to Earlington yesterday.

 

Mr. and Mrs. John Tully and children of Louisville were in the city yesterday en route to Dekoven, Ky., to visit relatives.

 

Miss Caroline Harris, of Corydon, was in the city yesterday en route home from Hardinsburg, Ky.

 

Mrs. Charles Day and little son, Roth, of St. Louis, are visiting Mr. and Mrs. W. B. Day, on Third Street.

 

Miss Bernice Rickman, of Hopkinsville, returned home yesterday from a visit to Miss Jessica McCartney, on Green Street.

 

Mrs. A. A. Winfree and children, of Hopkinsville, returned home yesterday from a visit to Mrs. Mary B. Jeffreys.  She was accompanied by Miss Hallie Rodman, who will visit her for several weeks.

 

Mr. and Mrs. Luther Townsley and daughter, little Augusta Maud, went to Owensboro yesterday.

 

Mrs. J. T. Bennett and daughter, Miss Jessie, of Beech grove, Ky., were in the city yesterday en route home from a visit to relatives at Jackson, Miss.

 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Ternes and children left yesterday for Wichita, Kas., to reside.

 

J. H. Shanks and daughter, Miss Vernia, of Madisonville, were in the city yesterday en route home from a visit to relatives at Morganfield.

 

Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Mc Graw returned from Marion yesterday.  They will remain at home til after the Fourth.

 

V. M. Slaton and little daughter, Miss Corinne, of Madisonville, were in the city yesterday en route home from a visit to relatives at Corydon.

 

Mrs. G. W. Goodrum left yesterday for Covington, Tenn., to visit relatives.

 

Rev. J. W. Zerchery, editor of the Phohibitory Federation, of Lexington, Ky., was in the city yesterday en route to Paducah.

 

Mrs. R. A. Quinn and daughter, little Miss Eula, went to Morganfield yesterday to visit Rev. and Mrs. H. K. Berry.

 

Miss Lena Ashby, of the county, went to Sturgis yesterday to visit relatives.

 

Elder T. T. Robards, of Morganfield was in the city yesterday en route home from Paint Lick, Ky.

 

Mrs. M. A. Cowan and son, A. H. Cowan went to Morganfield yesterday to visit relatives.

 

Mrs. Clem Knox and daughter, Miss Jewell, of Owensboro, and Miss Sue Talbott, of Utica, Ky., were in the city yesterday en route to Corydon to visit Mrs. W. M. Gaddis.

 

Owen Ligon, Fred Cox and Lee King, of Robards, were in the city yesterday.

 

Mrs. M. C. Sandefur, of Geneva returned yesterday from Chicago.  She was accompanied by her little grandson, Roy sandefur, of Evansville.

 

Mrs. J. F. Daringer and children went to Owensboro yesterday to visit her mother, Mrs. J. A. Hillis.

 

Dave Mc Farland went to beech grove yesterday to spend Sunday with his parents.

 

Mrs. Martha Anderson and grand daughter, Mrs. Pearl Sigler, went to Earlington yesterday to visit Mrs. Martin for a week or ten days.

 

Mrs. W. S. Forwood and daughter, Miss Elmore, left this morning for Baltimore, Md., to visit Mrs. Forwood’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. William Matthews, for a month or six weeks.

 

A J Howard, of Sebree, was in the city yesterday to see his brother, W W Howard, who is ill.

 

Mrs. R. H. Royster and son, Byron, of Sebree, were in the city yesterday en route to Hardinsburg, Ky.

 

Miss Ira Gardner, of Louisville, was in the city yesterday en route home from a visit to friends at Uniontown.

 

Mrs. Fannie Bradley, of Spottsville was in the city shopping yesterday.

Dr. C. T. Hickman of Evansville, was in the city yesterday on business.

F. M. Hutcheson went to Sebree Springs yesterday.

 

Little Miss Joyce Adams, of Madisonville, is visiting Miss Ruth Orr, on Clay Street.

 

Little Misses Mary and Martha Shcackleford and little brother, Johnnie, of Nashville, Tenn., are visiting their grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Bennett, at Zion.

 

Mrs. B. Taylor and her little grandchildren, Volinda and Benjamin Moore, of Uniontown, were in the city yesterday en route to Owensboro to visit Hon. And Mrs. Martin Yewell.

 

S. E. Mc Millin, of Robards, was in the city yesterday en route to Hardinsburg, Ky.

 

Mrs. G. W. Robertson and little daughter returned yesterday from a visit to relatives at Beech Grove, Ky.

 

W. H. Allen, wife and little child of Sebree, were in the city yesterday en route to Owensboro to visit relatives.

 

Mrs. Mary Bransford, of Owensboro, is guest of her daughter, Mrs. Fred Mann, on Maple Avenue while en route to a trip through the North.

 

John G. Nordaner, the well known carpenter and upholsterer, leaves with his family Monday for a visit to friends and relatives in Cincinnati, Hamilton and Dayton, Ohio.  They will be absent about three weeks.

 

THE COURTS

New Suits Filed.

Carrie Hancock vs. Fleming Hancock in the circuit court for divorce.  Abandonment alleged for cause.

 

J. H. Lyne vs. George and Becky Busby in the circuit court.  Suit on a note for $200.

Case is Appealed

The suit of Dr. M. C. Sandefur against William Harrington has been appealed from county Judge Hart’s court.  The appeal was filed with Clerk Moseley Saturday.

Marriage License

 

B H  Henderson and Miss Syrta L. Krite, of Mattoon, Ill., were granted a license to marry Saturday.  The ceremony was performed here.

 

No Developments In Moore Case

Young Man Fails to Make Up Shortage But no Action Will Be Taken By Bondsman For Few days

There were no new developments in the case of James C. Moore’s shortage as teller of the Henderson County Savings Bank Saturday.  Mr. Moore did not make good the $700 which he owes the bank or more properly speaking the Fidelity and Guaranty Co., of Baltimore.

 

The agents for the company in this city, Lambert and Weaver, said that they did not expect any immediate action would be taken.  A great deal of sympathy was expressed for the young man and it is very probably that the shortage will be made good.

 

The announcement of the shortage on the part of Mr. Moore was received Saturday morning with no little surprise.  It is thought that some of his friends will lend him assistance in making up the sum of money he has failed thus far to raise.

 

 

Took Shot At Sneak Robber

Deputy Sheriff Abbott Foils Attempt of Negro to Take Bundle From Buggy On First Street

A negro sneak thief was foiled in his attempt to steal a bundle from a rear of George Vogel’s buggy Saturday night on First Street by Deputy Sheriff A. H. Abbott.  Deputy Abbott took a shot at the negro with the result that the black fellow dropped the bundle and did a hot foot for the river where he lost himself in a lot of willows.

 

Mr. Abbott was walking along First Street next to the court house when he noticed the negro run up behind the buggy driven by Mr. Vogel and take out a bundle.  The deputy rushed after the thief but the fellow as too nimble for him and darted down the Street.  The officer saw that the negro was out distancing him and pulling his pistol fired into the air.  The thief dropped the bundle and scooted.

 

Deputy Jailer and a number of young men chased the thief to the river front.  He dodged into a lot of willows and escaped.

 

The shot created no end of excitement and people rushed to the side entrance to the court house.  Mr. Abbott and Mr. Vogel were kept busy for several minutes answering questions.  The bundle contained several articles which Mr. Vogel had just purchased.

 

Our Sick

Mrs. George Klauder, Sr. is some better.

Mr. W. W. Howard was not so well yesterday.

Dr. W. M. Hanna’s condition shows improvement.

Mr. George Coomer is thought to be some better.

Rev. J. Hl. Early, at the City Hospital, is some better.

 

Barbeque By Younger Set

Availing themselves of the privileges which are accorded the gentle sex only once in four years, but which they would like to exercise oftener and sometimes, as in this instance they usurp, in spite of customer, the younger set of girls gave a barbeque in honor of the young men at Atkinson Park on Friday evening.

 

The viands prepared by their dainty hands that accompanied the delicious barbecued meat, were exceedingly toothsome, and to their credit be it said that no more delightful function ever was given in the park.

 

A string band came out at 6 o’clock and played during the meal and afterwards for a dance at the pavilion, with twhich the evening was rounded up.

 

A severe storm came up at eleven o’clock but to the gay strains of the music the light hearted young people danced on as indifferent to the raggin elements as they are to fate.  The faces of the chaperones betokened more anxiety though, but just at midnight, as the band played the strains of “Home Sweet Home” as if ordained by a special providence, the storm ceased, as if by magic, and allowed the guests to reach the cars in waiting, with no other discomfort than muddy boots.

 

There were about fifty present which made the dance unusually enjoyable, as the hall was not crowded.

 

Here’s to Many Happy returns of the day.

 

Entertain For Misses Barton and Griffin

The pavilion at Atkinson Park was the scene of a large and notable gathering on Tuesday morning when Mrs. H. C. Boaz entertained her friends in honor of her guests, Misses Belle Barton and Mayme Griffin.

 

With a very little stretch of the imagination one could have believed that she was at some Eastern summer resort, whose chief attraction is heralded with glittering electric letters in the most frequented parts of New York as being “Swept by ocean breezes,” the breeze from our own Ohio being stiff enough to warrant the delusion.  It was so cool that some of the guests had to resort to wraps, a very unusual but delightful sensation at this season of the year.

 

Refreshing lemonade was served at one end of the pavilion while the guests were arriving.

 

At the conclusion of a number of interesting games of euchre the prizes were awarded to Mrs. Starling Thompson and Mrs. Charles Dallam after which delightful refreshments were served.  There were about a hundred guest present.

 

Entertains for Mrs J. Rudy Smith

On Wednesday morning at her beautiful country home, Mrs. Strachan Barret entertained at bridge in honor of Mrs. J. Rudy Smith of Little Rock.

 

When the guests first arrived refreshing drinks were served and at the conclusion of the game an elaborate two course luncheon.  Mrs. Barret’s guest were:  Mesdames --- Redman, Susan Beatty, --- Johnson, William Neal, R. D. --- , Henry Waetzel, Starling Thompson, A. G. Crutchfield, Eugene --- kett, carl Schlamp, Sterling ---- ace, E. A. Jonas, Charles Dallam, Josie Smith and Maggie Waetzel.

 

Mrs. A. G. Crutchfield and Mrs. B. L. Powell Entertain

On Friday morning the pavilion at Atkinson Park was again the mecca for the devotees of pleasure in response to a summons from Mrs. A. G. Crutchfield and Mrs. Beverly Powell to spend the morning at this picturesque spot.

 

The pure air. The cool breeze, the brief respite from daily care, the friendly exchange of greetings, the pleasure of the game that for awhile made one forget the monotony of live – surely there can be no harm in this.  On the other hand, the bright faces and pleasant words at parting indicate that the occasion had been a very wholesome and delightful one.

 

At the conclusion of the games Miss Ethel Hutcheson had the highest score and was awarded the price, a gold hat pin.

 

Mrs. John Elam received the consolation prize, a dainty picture.

 

Mrs. Crutchfield and Mrs. Powell’s guests were:  Mesdames J. rudy Smith, Starling Thompson, Eugene B. Crockett, Mason Dyer, John L. Dorsey, Joseph H. Clore, Robert D. Vance, Susan beatty, W. S. Johnson, Robert C. Soaper, William Soaper, William H. Soaper, Henry Waetzel, Larking White, Ben White, James H. Letcher, Charles E. Dallam, Strachan Barret, Laz W. Powell, Jessie Baskett, H. C. Boaz, James W. Clay, James L. Lambert, James L. Lambert, Jr., Bernard Witt, W. O. Roberts, W. W. Williams, R. M. Herndon, Annie K. Major, S. I. M. Major, John W. Lockett, John F. Lockett, B. B. Beverley, W. W. W. Wilson, W. W. Agnes, Hamilton Stites, Carl Schlamp, Willard Redman, Dan Rudy,, Ezra Ward, Add Young, A O Stanley, Geroge Barnett, Thomas Buckner, James Dempsey Johnson, Mary Rankin, L. H. Walker, Given Rudy, Cyrus Graham, Will Harding, Sherley Clore, J. Henry Powell, David Banks, Starling Marshall, William Barret, Hodge Alves, A. S. Elam, Simeon Green, Hawkins Hart, Sterling W. Price, Campbell Johnson, W. H. Fitzhugh, John L. Cross, Mary Rudy, N. Powell Taylor, Oscar Clore, Thomas Alves, Joseph Rudy, A. B. Jarvis, William Elliott, A. P. Harness, W. W. Shelby, Clint Elliott, E. D. Powell; Misses Bessie Allen, Katie Hodge, Sara Beverley, rose Rudy, Ann Rudy, Ellen Worsham, Marianna Sneed, Kate Sneed, Mamie Griffin, Belle Barton, Mallie Stoner, Maggie Waetzel, Fannie Kimmel, Lucy Harrison, Josie Smith, Sallie Eakins, Jo Eakins, Annie Soaper, Julia Rudy, Sallie Lockett, Virginia Lockett, Augusta McCormick, Hattie Powell, Lucy Towles, Katie Alves, Fannie Elliott, Eva Lockett, Sudie Reeve Hart, Annie Starling, Kate Atkinson, Emmie Fitzhugh, Marianna Sugg, Nannie Cross, Marrianna Reigler, Alice Dorsey, Lucy Beverley, Fannie Alves, Lucy Powell, Ethel Hutcheson and Eugennia Johnson.

 

The out of town guests were: Mrs. William P. Cooper, of Shelbyville, Tenn., Mrs. William Field, Mrs. William H. Field, of Evansville, Ind.; Mrs. Robert M. Morgan of Martinsville, Va., Mrs.  H. L. Cooper, of Smith’s Mills, Ky; Mesdames H. A. King, Z. H. Hughes and P. E. King, of Corydon, Ky.; Misses Mary and Annie Norris, Margaret and Mary Wilson of Corydon, Ky.; Misses Taylor and Kline, of Frankfort, Ky.; Miss Mamie Griffin, of Gallatin, Tenn.; Misses Ellouise Fenly and Franklyn Fealy of Corydon, Ky.; Misses Mary Powell and Nine Rene Powell of Smith’s Mills, Ky.

 

There have been a number of small family and neighborhood affairs, that the hostesses hardly deemed of sufficient importance to chronicle given the past week in honor of Mrs. Rudy Smith, of Little Rock, who is visiting Mr. Smith’s family.  Mrs. Smith was also entertained by Mrs. Strachan Barret and Mrs. Starling Thompson.

 

Freeman – Martin Wedding

On Monday evening at the home of Mrs. James Blair, a cousin of the bride, in Evansville, Mrs. Nannie Freeman and Mr. James Martin, of this city, were united in marriage.

 

The bride and groom entered the parlor to the strains of the wedding march unattended, and in the presence of the family and a few friends spoke the words that bound them together until “death do us part.”

 

The rooms were tastefully decorated in pink and green and elegant supper was served to the guests.

 

Mr. and Mrs. Martin returned from a brief honeymoon on Thursday and will go to housekeeping shortly.

 

Mrs Nancy Huston Banks’ New Book

Mrs. Nancy Huston banks/ new book “The Little Hills.” Is just from the press of McMillan & Co.  The title is taken from a scriptural verse and typifies the daily small trials one has.

 

Mrs. Banks’ evident love for her native state has prompted her to describe again memories of her childhood.

 

The scene of her new book is laid in the “Pennyrile district” among the same tranquil environments as “Oldfield,” and in comparison with the peaceful scenes of its village life in Henderson would seem strenuous.

 

Mrs. Banks is now in London having been ordered there for her health and a much needed rest.  After remaining in London several months she will visit the continent going wherever fancy dictates.  She will be absent a year or more.

 

Sneed – Rankin Wedding

Mr. and Mrs. Stephen K. Sneed have announced the approaching nuptials of their daughter, Marianna Soaper, and Mr. James Ewing Rankin, Jr.  The wedding will take place on July 26 at the home of the bride and will be very quiet, only the immediate families being present.

 

The ceremony will take place at 7 a.m. and they will leave on the 7:40 train for an extended trip.  After several weeks spent in the north and east they will return via Chicago and while there will be the guest of Mr. and Mrs. George Getz.

 

The good wishes of a host of friends will follow them.

 

Entertained At Bridge

Mrs. Starling Thompson entertained at bride whist on Saturday morning at the home of her mother, Mrs. Stephen Sneed, on Terrace Hill.  The guest of honor was Mrs. Rudy Smith of Little Rock.

 

At the conclusion of the game delightful luncheon was served.

 

Lawn party For Miss Pearl Jones

Wednesday evening Jun 28, a lawn social was given by How—Pentecost and Miss Annie Stapp at the residence of Mrs. M. J. Pentecost, Corydon, Ky., in honor of their cousin, Miss Pearl Jones, of Grandberry, Texas, who is visiting her sister, Mrs. Percy Utley, of Smith’s Mills.  A very pleasant evening was enjoyed by the young people until 11:30 p.m. when refreshments were served.

 

Those participating in the evenings amusement were:  Misses Mary King, Mamie Denton, Addie Randolph, Blanche Harness, Annie Norris, Edna Ball, Fannie Norris, Ida Ball, Ethel Sigler, Franklyn Fenley, Camile Buckman, Carrie Aton, Tommie Ringo, Lizzie Quinn, Lillian Turner, Janette Abel, Mrs. Maud Cook, Annie and Ruth Thomas, Sammie Powell, Lucy Minton, Annie Stapp, Pearle Jones; Mesdames, F. J. Pentecost, H. H. King, J. W. Minton, C. A. Stapp; Messrs. George and Robert Royster, William Judson, and Sam Wilson, Bert, Ralph and Clifford King, George Mc Clure, Bernie, Willie and Seth Posey, Thornton Posey, Harry Thomas, John Powell, C. E. Harness, F. J. Pentecost, H. L. King, William Norris and W. F. Pentecost.

 

Mr. and Mrs. Mac Lieber came down from Louisville to attend the birthday of their mother, Mrs. B. Lieber.  This venerable and good woman will be eighty-one years of age on the 4th of July, and it is hope she may live to celebrate many  more years.  Mrs. Lieber is one of the best business ladies and one of the most charitable.

 

On Tuesday evening a gay party rowed up to the island and enjoyed a chicken roast.  Mrs. Rudy Smith, of Little Rock, was the guest of honor.  The other guests were:  Misses Josie Smith, Rene Clay, Virginia Lockett, Besssie Allen, Katherine Hodge; Messrs. McClain, Stanley, Arthur Katterjohn, Leslie Clay, Irving La Rue and Paul Barnett.

 

Mrs. Haydon M. Young and daughter, Miss Susan, of Chatham, Virginia arrived Friday to visit Mr. and Mrs. S. K. Sneed.  Miss Young has just graduated from the Chatham College with the honors of saluatorian.  She will joing her aunt, Mrs. Malcolm Caruthers, of Chicago in New York, and sail July 20 for a three months sojourn to Europe.

 

Mr. and Mr. C. O. Rutsch have issued invitation to a card party to be given at their handsome home on Monday evening in honor of Miss Virginia Norris, who graduated recently from the high school.  An invitation from Mrs. Rutsch always awakens the keenest expectancy, as her entertainments always have some unique Features.

 

Mr. Strother Banks gave a delightful picnic on Tuesday evening for Misses Mary Belle Taylor and Juanita Kline, of Frankfort.  They rowed up to the island and after supper drifted back to town.  Mr. Banks’ guests were Mr. and Mrs. James Yeaman, Misses Taylor and Kline, Miss Margaret Sebree; Messrs Paul Banks and Stephen Sneed.

 

Misses Annie and Mattie Ryan, two very attractive and pretty young ladies, left for New York to spend the summer.  They will also visit Asbury Park, Bridgeport, Conn., and a great many other places before returning home.

 

Mrs. Lester Baldin, of New York is expected soon to visit her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Robert C. Soaper.  She will stop in Washington for a brief visit to her sister, Mrs. Jack Hanna and will bring little Miss Nancy Hanna with her.  They will be here until the first of September.

 

Banker From Sturgis Missing From Home

Missing Kentucky Banker is Alleged to Have Deserted His Wife For a Schoolday Sweetheart

STURGIS, Ky., July 1 – Claude Slater, Assistant Cashier, of the First National Bank is mysteriously missing.  Two weeks age he left ostenslly for Boonsville, Ark., to accept the management of a new bank in which he was also to be a stockholder to the extend of $2000.  He was just seen in Princeton, Ky. By Bernett Holt, who bought Slater’s fine blooded horse and trap for $400.

 

Before leaving Slater had cashed checks for $500 and he had a draft for $400 in addition to endorsements by his father and father in law for $3,5000.  He also had costly jewelry on his person.

 

Reports from Booneville,are that the expected bank cashier has never reached there.  While his family and friends here at first suspected foul play there are rumors now of a woman in the case, and that he has left his young wife and child to run away with a former sweetheart of his school days in another Kentucky town.  Officers last night levied on the horse and trap which Holt claimed.  The father in law of Salter, who is a wealthy farmer and business man alleges that the horse does not belong to Slater, but to his wife.

 

Owing to the prominence of all concerned the affair has created a big sensation and the element of mystery in the case adds to the excitement.

 

FOURTH OF JULY RATE ON STEAMER JEWEL will be 25 cents for round trip.

 

Jewel will leave Henderson at 9:45 a.m., 5 p.m. and 8 p.m.

 

The trips from Evansville wil be 8:45 a.m’ 2 and 7 p.m.

 

The attractions at the parks will be very entertaining and the boat’s time card is so arranged as to give everyone an opportunity to visit these pleaces, if so desired, and return home in good time in the evening.

 

Jewell will leave Atkinson Park for Evansville at 10:15 p.m. on last trip of the day.

 

FOURTH OF JULY RATES Via Illinois Central R.R.

One and one-third fare for the round trip to all points South of the Ohio river.  Dates for sale July 1, 2, 3, and 4th, return limit July 8th.  Tickets at Union Station.

                     L. W. Rogers, Tkt. Agent.

B.   W. Scheike, G. P. A. Evansville

 

BIG BARBECUE

Given at Zion on Saturday, July 8, 1905, in Walden’s Grove.  A good tongue and grooved floor 50x50 has been secured for this occasion and Green’s celebrated hand will furnish the music for those wishing to dance.  Refreshments of all kinds on the grounds and a good time assured all who attend.  Everybody invited to come and spent an enjoyable day with us.  Dinner, adults 35 cents; children under 12 – 25 cents.  Managers, C. A. Sawyer, J. T. Hatchett, W. B. Norment, A. M. Smith, J. S. Taylor and C. A. Moss, John and Chester Cunningham proprietors.

 

Ice Cream Parlor Opened By Charles Parissi

Charles Parissi has opened his ice cream parlor at his place, No. 223 Second Street near Hotel Henderson, and is prepared to deliver and serve ice cream made of pure cream.

 

Also my soda water fountain is opened.  Give me a call.

 

LOST – a lodge book, Fraternal Order of Eagles, Arie Lodge No. 394, Frank T. Gaskins, Return to Gleaner office and receive reward.

 

LOCAL BREVITIES

 

J.A. Robine returned from Owensboro last night.

J. S. King, of Candalia, Ill is visiting Mrs. H. Maggenheimer.

 

Mrs. D. V. Davis and Miss Richmond went to Howell, Ind., last night to visit Mrs. Davis’ daughter.

 

J.W. Todd has purchased the Gillegan residence on Center Street and will move in with his family in a few days.

 

Mrs. W. B. Caldwell went to Evansville this morning to spend the Fourth with her parents.

 

Mrs. J. A. Robine, Jr., returned tonight from a visit to her mother in law, Mrs. J. A. Robine, Sr. of St. Louis.

 

Mrs. E. E. Stodghill and children of Morganfield, where in the city yesterday enroute to Madisonville to visit her mother, Mrs. H. D. Hill.

 

J. S. Book, of Utopia, Ind., was in the city last night to spend the Fourth with his mother, Mrs. Boo, on South Green Street.

 

Failed to Pass Physical Examination

J. Thomas Wilson, Jr., who was appointed to the naval academy at Annapolis failed to pass his physical examination on account of trouble with his throat.  This is a matter of deep regret to his many friends here.  Some weeks ago he stood an excellent menial examination.

 

Father Brutally Slapped Daughter

E. H. Head of Audubon Arrested Tuesday Afternoon for Chastising Girl on the Street

E. H. Head, who reside on Holloway Street in Audubon, was arrested Tuesday afternoon by Patrolman Fillmore Jones for slapping is daughter while they were walking along Elm Street near the fire department here.  He was locked up and remained in the station house all  night.

 

It seems that Head’s daughter accompanied two of her girl friends on an excursion on the steamer Louisiana Tuesday afternoon.  When the boat landed at the local whart Head was there and roughly jerked his daughter away from her companions and slapped her in the face.  They walked on up town and were passing the fire barn when he slapped her in the face again.  Patrolman Jones was in the barn and at once arrested Head.

 

At the station the print of Head’s hand could be seen on the cheek of his daughter.  He failed to give band and was locked up.

 

Head is a loom repairer at – mills.  His daughter is sixteen years of age.

 

Moved Proved To Be Rescue Party

RUSSELLVILLE, Ky. July 5, -

Not for years has Russellville been so greatly stirred as it is today.  The discovery having been made by officials on what they claim is undoubtedly proof that the supposed attempt to lync the alleged assailants of Mary Gledder was in realty, an effort to release the prisoners.  Only the fact that the prisoners themselves were not cognizant of the plot prevented its successful conclusion.

 

James Lyon, the prisoner, who was supposed to have been taken out by the mob, was found hidden in the jail this morning, where he had taken refuge during the excitement, while John –acra, who was wounded by the officers while he was trying to escape may not be able to stand trial today.

 

In order to prevent any further attempts at violence Jim and Gus Lyon and “Colt” Fletcher were taken to the Bowling Green jail this morning.

 

The mob, which it developed, attempted to release the prisoners formed last night just after dark, and at 8:30 o’clock a number of masked men appeared at the jail and demanded the keys, which they obtained by threatening the jailer’s life.  The four men accused of the assault on the Gledder girl immediately hid near the rear of the jail rearing that they would be taken out and lynched and even calls to “Come out and escape”failed to move them.  John Sacra alone decided to take a change, and dropping from his hiding place to the floore started for the door.  He was immediately pursued by officers who had reached the scene, and although he made a fast spirit for the   outskirts of town, was captured after being wounded.  The mob in the meanwhile  was dispersed by officers and a search of the jail was made by the officials, resulting in the finding of Guy Lyon and “Colt” Fletcher, Jim Lyon was not to be found and it was thought that he had been taken by the mob.  This morning, however, he was discovered in his hiding place, and was taken to Bowling Green for safe keeping.  It was decided to keep Sacre, who is now on trial, in the jail here, and Judge Sindidge has ordered that he be brought into court again today if he is able.  It is hardly probably, however, that he can be removed today, although he will be out in a short time.

 

A heavy guard has been placed around the jail, and every precaution will be taken to protect the prisoner either from mob violence or to prevent another attempt at rescue.

 

None of the members of the gang which was responsible for last night’s work is know but if any is captured it is feared that violence will be attempted as the people of the city are thoroughly aroused.

 

Women’s Bravery Saves Man’s Life

But For Them Martin Steffen Would Have Been Burned To Death

He was Frightfully Burned About Face – His Condition is Very Critical

COVINGTON, Ky., July 5, - A quartet of women demonstrated remarkable bravery today and saved the life of Mr. Martin Steffen, a retail oil dealer.  He was filling the tank of a gasoline stove at the home of Mr. Fred Reichert in Ludlow and failed to notice that the stove was lighted.  An explosion followed and Steffen was enveloped in flames.  Mrs. Reichert and three neighbor women, who heard the victim’s cries, rushed to his assistance and with the aid of dressed and blankets smothered the flames.  Several women were badly burned as their dresses having caught fire.  Steffen was frightfully burned about the face and inhaled flames.  His condition is critical.

 

Flung Brick Into Merry Party

Of Hay Riders – Sadie Vaughn, a Negro Girl Arrested on That Charge

Last night Deputy Jailer Eblen arrested Sadie Vaughn, a sixteen year old negro girl.  She is charged with having “flung” a brick into a merry party of “hayriders” at the corner of Washington and Holloway streets.  The brick struck one of the young ladies badly gashing her lip.

 

Said was placed behind the bars of the city cooler.  She denies that she threw the rock.  Judge Walker will pass on her case at this afternoon’s session of the city court.

 

Personal

W. R. Mullins of Indianapolis, Ind., after a brief visit to his parents, Dr. and Mrs. W. S. Mullins, left yesterday for Chicago, Ill., where he will spend a month.

 

Rev. A. A. Niles leaves Saturday for Gilbertsville, Ky. To conduct a Holiness camp meeting.

 

Washington Flexner, of Louisville is a guest of Mr. and Mrs. Julius L. Baldauf.

 

Miss Georgia Anderson, of Nicholasville, Ky., is a guest of her cousin Miss Laura Holloway, on Center Street.

 

B L Rodgers and children, Misses Madoline and Lynda and Master Lysle, of Harrisburg, Ill., spent the Fourth with his brother, R. A. Rodgers on Jefferson Street.

 

Mrs. Frank W. Wolfe and little sons, Frank W. Jr., and William Coffman left yesterday for Chalyheate, Ky., to spend a month or six weeks, when they go to Lexington to visit relatives.

 

Mr. and Mrs. Mace Lieber and Mrs. William Wolfe and daughter, Miss Dewly, of Louisville, returned home yesterday from a visit to Mrs. B. Lieber, on Green Street.

 

Miss Pearl Eblin, or Robards, returned home yesterday from a visit to Mrs. C. E. Sugg, on First Street.

 

Mrs. S. Arnold, of Owensboro returned home yesterday from a visit to her son, Joe Arnold, on Elm Street.

 

Mrs. L. M. Roeahm and daughter Miss Catherine and Miss  Martina Scheierman, of Louisville, returned home yesterday from a visit to Mr. and Mrs. J. D. Jensen, on Main Street.

 

Mrs. R. H. Royster and little son, Byron, of Sebree, were in the city yesterday en route home from Hardinsburg, Ky.

 

Boone Beckham went to Madisonville yesterday on business.

 

S. H. Mc Mullin, of Robards, was in the city yesterday en route home from Hardinsburg, Ky.

 

Miss Fannie Clark of Robards, returned home yesterday from a visit to Mrs. Jennie Denton, on Second Street.

 

H. E. Rodgers and sister, Miss Ethel, and Miss Floria Price, of Mt. Carmel, Ill., spent the Fourth in the city the guest of friends.

 

Miss Eula Cates, of Robards, returned home yesterday from a visit to Miss Verble Book, on Adams Street.

 

Miss Daisy Baskett returned from a visit to friends at Corydon yesterday.

 

Street L. A. Clark and children returned yesterday from a visit to friends at Uniontown.

 

Street Rudy Smith and little daughter, Miss Natalie, of Little Rock Ark., who have been visiting Mr. Smith’s parents, Street Stephen P. Smith left yesterday for a visit to friends in Iowa.

 

Mrs. Hattie Griffith and children and her mother, Mrs. Dunning, left yesterday for Princeton, Ky., to spend the summer with friends and relatives.

 

Miss Mamie Sallee, of Beeville, Texas left for her home yesterday from a visit to Street Walter Brashear.  Miss Salle sails for China, October 10th, where she goes as a missionary.

 

W. E. Galloway went to Dixon yesterday to spend a few days.

 

P.C. Dix, of Louisville, was in the city yesterday en route to Morganfield.

 

Street H. C. Gill, of Morganfield returned home yesterday after a visit to friends in the city.

 

Misses Mary and Nellie Moberly, of Owensboro returned home yesterday from a visit to Mrs. John F. Lockett on Elm Street.

 

E. W. Jewell, of Dayton, Ohio, was in the city yesterday en route to Uniontown to meet his wife who is visiting her parents, Street J. C. Hambleton.

 

L. G. Hall returned from Dixon yesterday.

F. M. Hutcheson returned from Sebree Springs yesterday.

Mrs. Catherine Nelson returned from Corydon yesterday.

 

Mrs. George Clark and little daughter, Miss Lucile, and Miss Pauline Carr, of Morganfield, were in the city yesterday en route to Madisonville to visit relatives.

 

Master C. B. Morrow, of Owensboro, returned home yesterday from a visit to Master Duncan graham, on Green Street.

 

Mrs. D. C. James, of Morganfield was in the city yesterday en route to Madisonville to visit her daughter Mrs. Parrish.

 

Mrs. Phil Levy and little son, Jerome Sickles, and Miss Sadie Hartfield left yesterday for Olny, Ill, to visit Miss Esther Freeman.

 

Mrs. Katie K. Miller and sister, Miss Lucile Katterjohn, of Louisville, are visiting their brother, C. A. Katterjohn, on Green Street.

 

Fielding Jones and Richard Robinson, of Smith’s Mills, were in the city the Fourth en route to Degonia Springs, Ind., for a week.

 

Miss Jessie McKenny, of Evansville, spent the Fourth with friends in the city.

 

T. W. Buckner and George D. Givens left Tuesday for Hot Springs, Ark.

 

Miss Fieta Wheeler, of Chicago, returned home yesterday from a visit to Miss Jessica McCartney, on green Street.

 

Street L. W. Childress, and little child, of St. Louis, returned home yesterday from a visit to Street H. F. Turner.

 

Miss Zula Griffin, of Evansville, spent the Fourth with the Misses Williamson, on Elm Street.

 

Misses Bertie and Frankie Jennings, of Terre Haute, Ind., are guests of the Misses Williamson, on Elm Street.

 

Mrs. W. E. Bennett spent the day with Mrs. H. A. Powell, of Corydon yesterday.

 

Street W. B. Caldwell returned yesterday from a visit to Mrs. Caldwell’s parents, Street W. M. Martini, of Evansville.

 

Street W. E. McGrew went to Marion yesterday.

 

Dr. and Mrs. Frank Lynn, of Bordley, were in the city yesterday en route home from Louisville, where the Doctor graduated Monday night from the college of medicine.

 

Street George De Jarnett and little daughter, Miss Opal, of Dixon were in the city yesterday en route home from Hawesville.

 

Street Herschelman and little son, of Evansville, returned home  yesterday from a visit to Street Henry Metzner.

 

Mrs. S. S. Smith and child, of South mc Allister, I. T. are guests of Street J. S. Smith, on the Spottsville pike.

 

Mrs. Sue Talbott, of Utica, Ky., and Mrs. C. J. Knox and daughter, Miss Jewell, of Owensboro, were in the city yesterday en route home from a visit to friends at Corydon.

 

Dr. and Mrs. H. L. Rodgers and little grandchildren, of St. Elmo, Ill., returned home yesterday from a visit to their son, Street R. A. Rodgers.

 

Miss Mary Evans, of St. Louis, is a guest of Mrs. Oscar Staton on Letcher Street.

 

Walter Carter, of the county, returned from cannelton, Ind., yesterday.

 

Mrs. John J. Spidel and daughter, little Miss Eblin and little son, Josh returned yesterday from a visit to Mrs. Thomas Jones of Hansen.

 

 

Advertised Letters

Ella brown, E. R. Bacon, Mr. J. Bierkortte, Jr., Mrs. Rhoda Ballard, John barber, Charlie Claycomb, Miss Addie Chorile, Floddy Dilback, J. S. Dennis, Miss Ollie Dempsey, Sam Gillman, Miss K. W. Henderson, Arthur Elkins, Henry Morton, Wening Mosley, Mrs. Pearl Mation, Miss belle Marshall, J. F. Phillips, Mrs. Sallie Phea, Anna Belle Rorse, Ciara Smith, William Slaughter, Mr. Steiner, Gen. Harvey S. Shelton, Jeffrey Todd, Mrs. Joe Thompson, Eddie Tinsley, M. E. Taylor, Miss Alice Veris, Mrs. Laura Wilson, Mr. Artha Wathen.

 

Advertised at the Henderson post office, July 6, 1905.

 

Carrie Nation In Trouble

CARMI, Ill, July 5 – Five thousand Red men celebrated the Fourth here yesterday.  Speeches were made by Great Chief of Records.  Will H Bluedorn, of East St. Louis, and Charles Waweford, President, of Norris City, Ill.

 

Carrie Nation, in a speech, characterized the rEd Men as dogs and rascals.  Twelve Indians from Evansville pulled her from the stand and trouble was averted by official intervention.

 

News Of The Neighborhood

Cairo

CAIRO, Ky., July 5 – With yesterday passed away another glorious Fourth of July, and the day was a very quiet pleasant one in Cairo, after the several nice good rains that have fallen here in the last two weeks.

 

Wheat threshing was delayed some but it progressing nicely now.

 

Rufe and Ab Heck delivered two wagon loads of hogs in Henderson Tuesday, which they had sole to Gen Denton for 3 3/4 cents.

 

H. T. Floyd, the road supervisor, wants his log chain that was taken from one of his wagon’s last Saturday or Sunday, and says he will do nothing if the chain is returned soon, but if not he can, and will trace it up, and prosecute the one who took it.

 

Arch Melton met with a painful accident Tuesday, while fixing fence a nail was driven in his left knee, causing severe pain and soreness, but it is hoped the wound will heal rapidly.

 

Quite a number from Cairo attended the annual basket picnic at Mc Mullin’s Chaptel Tuesday.

 

Misses Sallie Arnett and Florence Royster visited Misses Annie Addie and Daisy Powell near Robards last Saturday and Sunday.

 

Miss Zula Royster was the recipient of a nice organ from her father last week.

 

Two of Cairo’s very prominent young people, Mr. Herman Galloway and Miss Nellie Allgood, stole a march on their riends, and were secretly married, in Henderson, the second Sunday in June.  The secret leaked out only a few days ago and they produced their marriage certificate, made full confessions and received parental blessings.  They started as if hey were going to church that Sunday morning, but went to Henderson instead.  They were accompanied by Mrs. James Isaac Hancock and miss Eula Cates, and returned in the afternoon.  He left her at her home and went home to his father’s house, where they continued to live until last Sunday, when Mr. Galloway took his bride home.

 

Mr. Galloway is the oldest son of Dr. and Mrs. Charley Galloway and has many friends.  He is a steady ,energetic young farmer.  The bride is the grand daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ben Denton, with whom she has lived sometime.  She is a very popular young lady.  They just wanted to surprise their friends and they did.  Mr. Galloway had been paying court to Miss Allgood for quite a while and it was thought by some that they would marry some day.  They have the good wishes of their many friends.

 

Miss Celia Grayson and niece, little Miss Mamie Grayson, returned to their home near Wanamaker last Thursday after two weeks visit with Mrs. Alice Davis and family.

 

Mr. G. O. Hoggard and Miss Lola, of Henderson, spent last Friday in cairo, and were entertained at dinner by Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Phillips.

 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Royster  spent last Thursday at Smith’s Mills with Dr. and Mrs. J. W. Cooper their son, Mr. Willie cooper and wife, of Tennessee who were visiting them.

 

Mrs. Alice Davis and son, Norman Royster, Mrs. Nettie Royster, of Hendderson, and niece, Miss Florence Royster and Misses Sallie aRnett and Sarah Melton attended the entertainment by little Miss Emily Squires, at Poole, last Thursday evening.

 

Miss Tapp Gibson, of Corydon, after three weeks visit among relatives and friends here returned home Wednesday.

 

Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Phillips spent Thursday with Mr. and Mrs. Thomas, Near Corydon.

 

Mr. Preston Konsler and sister, Miss Lizzie, Mr. Rufe Heck and sister, Mrs. E. N. Powell, heard Miss Emily Squires at Dixie Friday evening.

 

Rev. Alex Royster spent several days at home last week, and returned Saturday to his pastoral work at Lamasco, Ky., where he has been the past two years.  The writer was wrongly informed, Rev. Royster has been located at Lamasco all  the time instead of Lawrenceburg, Ky.

 

Mrs. Mary Niles returned to Henderson Saturday morning.

 

We have been somewhat put on with the distribution of the mail here the past few days.  It came all right Friday, but Saturday it never come at all, owing to damage done to some Bridges Friday night by the heavy rain and we never receive mail on Sunday, and Monday there was a substitute carrier, who couldn’t find where to put everybody’s mail and Tuesday no mail at all, it being a holiday, but tomorrow we hope to receive our mail from the hands of our kind and accommodating carrier, Mr. Sandefur.

 

Miss Lizzie Sights went to Henderson Monday to visit her sister, Mrs. C. E. Sugg and family, and will also visit Mrs. Compton, near Wilson Station before returning home.

 

Several from this neighborhood attended the barbecue in Hendcerson, the fourth.

 

Mrs. J. R. Sabiston was summoned to Henderson last Saturday to attend the bedside of her son, Mr. D. W. Wayland, who is ill with typhoid fever at his home on First Street.  Mrs. Sabiston returned home Tuesday evening.

 

Mrs. Ann Royster spent Sunday with Mrs. R. L. Melton and family.

 

Mr. and Mrs. Bennett Phillips and little son, Andy spent Tuesday in Henderson.

 

A fine baby girl came to Mr. and Mrs. Arch Denton Monday afternoon.

Little Miss Vera Phillips was quite ill Tuesday.

Mr. L. M. Arnett is still improving.

 

Mr. Jack Royster who was suffering with neuralgia, last week, is very much improved.

 

Dr. Gus Baldwin moved his family to Earlington, Ky., last week, where he will extract and fill teeth and cure toothache.

 

Hebbardsville

HEBBARDSVILLE, Ky., July 5, Mrs. H. M. Hall sent to Henderson today.

 

Mr. Scranton Hicks and wife, Mrs. Eliza Willingham and daughter went to Henderson today.

 

Mr. John Dick Madden who lives on Hugh Boswell’s place, below Bluff City, had a hog killed by lightning Sunday.

 

Mr. R. S. Hart and little daughter, Bonnie, went to Henderson Monday.

Dr. L. O. Jones went to Henderson Monday.

Dr. O. F. Lewis went to Henderson Tuesday.

 

What is the matter with the Gleaner with its 44 pages.  Looks like a Chicago or New York Paper.  Hurrah for the Gleaner and the Fourth of July.

 

Mr. Sam Denton and wife visited in this neighborhood Sunday.

We had a very hard rain Friday night.

Rev. Henry Gynn filled the pulpit at the Presbyterian church Sunday.

Mrs. Harp Jones was quite sick Sunday.

Mr. J. T. Hust, of Mason’s Landing is on the sick list.

 

Mr. Sam Polk, who has been ill for some time, we are sorry to say, is no better.

 

Elder Josephus Cheaney, of Dallas, Texas, lectured at the Hebbardsville Baptist church Sunday evening, preached Monday evening, lectured Tuesday and Wednesday evening.

 

Mr. Herbert Crafton and wife, of near Henderson spent the day Monday with J. M. Haynes and wife.

 

Mrs. Albert Butler is visiting her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Howell Willingham, at Baskett Station this week.

 

The infant child of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Griffin had the misfortune last Saturday morning to fall and fracture its arm.  Dr. Jones and Lewis set the arm.

 

Mr. F. Priest bought a saddle when he was seventeen years old.  He rode it for fifty four years. He bought another one lately from Zimbro and told him if he could sell him one that would last as long as the first one he would ride bare back the rest of the time.

 

The hardest rain that we have had for a long time fell here Sunday evening.  The low lands were flooded, crops were greatly damaged and the creek, half a mile below us, on the Henderson road, was impassable, even to those in buggies, they would drive to the water, but had to return.

 

During the rain here Sunday evening lightning struck a tree close to the Baptist church, there was services at the time.  Some of the people were badly frightened.  The tree was set on fire.

 

Mr. Bud Denton and wife visited her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Elijah Willingham here Sunday.

 

Miss Cordie Moss, of Zion, and  Miss Beulah Boswell, of Henderson, visited Mr.Jim Gregory and wife last week.

 

Mr. Dick Hicks and wife visited her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Allie Hazelwood Sunday.

 

 

Mr. Howell Williams, of Baskett Station was in our midst from Saturday evening to Monday  morning last.  He started home Sunday evening, but was waterbound.

 

 

Excursion to Shawneetown

Next Sunday July 9th

On Next Sunday, July 9th, the side wheel excursion steamer Louisiana, will run an excursion to Shawneetown.  Leaves Henderson 6:30 a.m. promptly, Mt. Vernon 9 a.m., Uniontown 10:30 a.m. arrives at Shawneetown 12 p.m.  Returning leaves Shawneetown 5 p.m. Music and dancing on board.  Roud trip on 50 cents.  Don’t miss this delightful river trip.

 

Local Brevities

E. G. Sebree went to Earlington last night.

Sterling Weiner leaves this afternoon for Los Angeles, Cal.

R. A. Rodgers left last night for a trip down the L. & N.

c. G. Morgan and little daughter returned last night from Cannelton, In.

 

George Gibson, of Corydon, has accepted a position in the Amiet news and lunch stand at the Union Station.

 

Mrs. G. H. Williams, of Nashville, who has been in the city for a few days, left last  night for Madisonville.

 

Mrs. Ellen Lehrbach and Emma Sezawer, of New York, arrived in the city last night and will spent the summer with Dr. and Mrs. A. J. Lieber.

 

Charles pariiissi has opened his ice cream parlor his place, No. 223 Second Street near Hotel Henderson, and is prepared to deliver and serve ice cream made of pure cream.

 

Also my soda water fountain is opened.  Give me a call.

 

July 7, 1905

 

Car Company Breaks Records

7,333 Cash Passengers Carried to Atkinson Park Tuesday Without Accident or Delay

Superintendent K. R. Battin, of the Henderson Street railway company, has announced that his company carried 7,333 cash fares to Atkinson Park Thursday.  It was one of the biggest crowds ever handled by the company and the fact that there was not a single accident or the slightest delay in the schedule adopted for the day, is a credit to Mr. Battin and the men working under him.

 

The schedule was so arranged that the cars ran by threes and the delay between the incoming and outgoing cars on the Park line was barely noticeable.  The other lines were not forgotten in the rush and all the trains coming in to the city were met by cars.

 

The Elks were given a percentage on the fares by the management of the company as a donation to help defray the expense of their celebration.  The sum came in nicely when the committee appointed by the lodge checked up their receipts and disbursements and it was duly appreciated.

 

 

Opinion Today in Powers Case

Motion to Transfer Case to the Federal Court Will Be Decided This Morning

LOUISVILLE, Ky, July 6, - the attorneys for Caleb Powers left a 1 o’clock this afternoon for Cincinnati from which place they will go to Maysville tomorrow morning to be present when United States Judge A.M. J. Cochran of the eastern district, delivers his opinion on a motion to transfer Powers’ case to the United States court.  The opinion will be delivered at 10:30 o’clock.

 

Should the opinion be favorable to Powers the prosecution has the right to apply to the Supreme court for a writ of mandamus directing Judge Cochran to send the case back to the State court for trial.  Should the Supreme court refuse to issue the writ, the procedure then will be to arraign Powers before the United States court for the Eastern district of Kentucky and plead the pardon issued to Powers by Gov. W. S. Taylor.

 

As the executive officers of the government recognize Taylor as the defacto Governor during the Goebel-Taylor contest, there could be no question of the validity of the pardon.

 

Murderer Begs People To Leave Him in Last Hours

Crowd Around Owensboro Jail Worries Robert Mathley Who Will Be Hanged In That City Early This Morning –

Expected To Collapse

OWENSBORO, Ky. – July 6 – “Please go away good people.  I have only a few hours to live and want to rest.  Goodbye.”

 

Those were the words of Robert Mathley, who will die on the gallows in the Daviess county jail yard, at sun rise Friday morning, as he addressed a number of people who had gathered in the gloomy side Street under his cell.  They were spoken at 10:30 o’clock and after the doomed man had fretted for several hours at the noise made by the curious throng.

 

Mathley will be hanged for the murder of Emma Watkins, his sweetheart, whom he found in a room with James Gregson at her home on June 24, 1904.  He shot the woman and also killed Gregson.

 

The murder’s cell in the jail over looks a side Street and the light from the narrow room could be plainly seen by the people who gathered around th prison shortly after dark.  At times a fleeting glance of the prisoner could be had by the throng as he paced bank and forth up and down the little room and would walk to the window and gaze down on the Street.  The noise of the hundreds of  voices and the foot-falls worried Mathley exceedingly and he spoke to the members of the death watch about the curiosity of the people several times.  Finally it seemed that he could not stand the noise longer and walking to the window he shouted down the request that he be allowed to spend the last hours of his life in quiet.

 

A few of the people immediately acceded to the request and withdrew from the Street.  The entire crowd fell back at first but in a short while a number of the more curious pressed up to a point where they would be within range of the light from the cell and waited for glimpse of the murderer as he paced back and forth across the room where he is spending his last moments.

 

It is believed that Mathley will break down and will have to be carried to the scaffold which has been erected and awaits his arrival tomorrow morning.

 

He has been in jail over a year and the confinement has reduced his physical strength almost beyond conception.  Constant worry over his case has almost ruined his nervous system and the members of the death watch expect a collapse when the time for the march to the scaffold arrives.

 

An effort was made by Mathley’s attorneys tonight to have Governor Beckham grant Mathley a reprieve, but it failed, the governor declaring he would have nothing to do with the case.  The governor was communicated with over the long distance telephone and one of the attorneys read an affidavit purporting to be from a man who claimed that he heard James Gregson say in his dying statement that he had shot Mathley in the thumb in the struggle which preceeded the killing.  The attorneys for the prosecution made the point that the conviction had been secured on the charge of murdering Emma Watkins and not Gregson.

 

Sheriff Short has feared that an attempt would be made to liberate Mathley by his friends, and a heavy guard was placed around the jail Wednesday night.  It was doubled this evening and the strength of the death watch was also increased.  Wednesday evening several suspicious characters were seen prowling about the jail yard wall and this fact lead to the extra guard.

 

Mathley declares that he has forgiven all mankind and has received spiritual consolation from Dr. Campton, a minister of the city.  On Wednesday afternoon Mrs. William Warren, a sister of Gregson, and the one person who swore at the trial that she had seen Mathley shoot her brother and the Watkins girl, visited Mathley.  The murderer maintained throughout the interview that she could not possibly have seen the shooting but the woman would not admit she was mistaken.  After she had left, Mathley announced that he had forgiven her, the only person against whom he had held malice and at once asked that a minister be allowed to visit him.

 

All the arrangement for the hanging have been completed.  The execution will be the second held here within a few months.  Roy Green, a negro boy having been hanged in January.  The same scaffold on which he died will be used Friday morning.

 

Mathley is 41 years of age and was a contracting carpenter before he was arrested.  He was always considered a substantial citizen before the trouble arose.  He built the American Tobacco warehouse in the city which is on of the largest warehouses in the state.

 

Frank M’Mahon In Trouble Once More

Arrested in Evansville On charge of Embezzlement and Case is Strong Against Him

EVANSILLE, In., July 6 – Frank Mc Mahon, of Henderson, was arrested here tonight on a charge of embezzling money from a keeper of an immoral resort.  He secured only a few dollars but the case against him is a strong one and it is believed by the police that he will be sent to the penitentiary.

 

Mc Mahon has been here for several weeks and has made his home in several low places in the city.  He was regarded by the police as a desperate character on account of his criminal record in Henderson.

 

Mc Mahon stole a bicycle in this city about two years ago and fired on former Chief of Police Elijah Henry when the latter went to the home of his mother in Henderson to arrest him.  He escaped a posse of officers who went to Corydon after him and went to Webster county.

 

A posse followed the young man in to that county and he was arrested only after a battle in which several shots were fired and he was filled with buckshot.  He was given a jail sentence and was released from the county prison about four months ago.

 

Sacra is Taken to Russellville

Where His Trial is Resumed In Spite of Wounds He Had Received

Attorneys Were Surprised By His Removal From

Bowling Green

BOWLING GREEN, KY., July 6. – John Sacra, who was wounded at Russellville by the mob and officers Thursday night, was this morning sent back to Russellville for trial.  Neither Mr. Sims nor Judge Grider, his attorneys, knew he was expected to be sent back.  Mr. Sims had gone to Covington as Caleb Powers’ chief attorney to hear Judge Cochran tomorrow rule on the motion to transfer Powers’ case from the State to the Federal court.  Judge Grider knew nothing of Sacra’s being taken back until after the train had been gone several hours.  He went down on a freight train.

 

A prominent Russellville man said it would be unsafe for either Judge Sam Crewdson, Mr. Sims of Judge Grider, all attorneys for the men the mob want to return to Russellville and engage in a trial.  The lawyers expected a continuance or a change of venue after the mob’s actions Tuesday night.

 

Pope Fletcher and Guy Lyon are still in jail here.  They pronounced as assured the story send out from Russellville to the effect the mob was a crowd of their friends who were attempting to rescue them.

 

Sacra who was returned to Russellville for a continuance of his trial, is still suffering from his wounds and was removed against the advice of the jail officials.  Two Logan county physicians accompanied the Russellville officers and decided Sacra was able to be moved.

 

On A Freight Train

Judge Grider Reached Russellville in time

RUSSELLVILLE, Ky., July 6- Judge John Grider, one of the attorneys for John Sacra, after learning he had been returned to Russellville to finish the trial, succeeded in catching a freight train and reached Russellville in time to take part in his defense.

 

Drs. Pipe and Haberer accompanied the sheriff to Bowling Green last night and testified that the wounds were flesh wounds and that the prisoner was able to be present in the court room and go through the trial.  Dr. Rinolds of Bowling Green, the jail physician of Warren county, came down and testified that the wounds were very painful and the prisoner could not without great suffering and pain, go through the trial.  The court decided that the trial should proceed, and Mary Gladder was called to the stand and cross-examined.

 

Vincent Gladder, her father, is now being examined.  Gus Lyon and Polk Fletcher were not brought down this morning, but are still in jail at Bowling Green.  It is optional with them, under the law, whether they testify for Sacra or not, and it is not believed after the experience of Tuesday night, that they will venture into Logan county without being forced to do so.

 

Young Man Fined For Cursing J. T. Moore

Arrested and Fined, For the Second Time on Same Charge and Spends Few Minutes in Jail

 

Selvey Jacobs, a young man, was fined #2 and cost Thursday afternoon by Judge Hart on a charge of cursing J. T. Moore.  The trouble occurred between Moore, who is a farmer, near Weaverton.

 

Some time ago Jacobs was arrested and fined in the city court on the same charge.  The trouble between the young man and the more elderly farmer has existed for several months and arose over a trivial matter.  After being fined by Judge Hart Jacobs was sent to jail but had been there only a few minutes when several of his friends came to his rescue and gave a replevin bond for him and he was released from custody.

 

Personal

Dave Browning and son, of Owensboro, were in the city yesterday en route to Providence, Ky.

 

Mrs. John Holloway and little son, John R., returned yesterday from a visit to her father, r. W. Jett, of Adams, Tenn.

 

Mrs. Lucy Cobb and children and her mother, Mrs. Martha Ashby, went to Onton, Ky, yesterday to visit relatives and attend the Webster county Sunday school convention.

 

Mrs. R. C. Hall and children, of St. Louis, returned home yesterday from a visit to her parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Spann, of the county.

 

Mrs. Ben Lowenstein and daughters, Misses Flossie and Elsie, of Nashville, Tenn., are guests of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Kraver, on Maple Avenue.

 

W. F. Holzgrafe vice president of the Indiana Collar company, of Evansville was in the city yesterday on business.

 

Bryan C. Dyer, of Decatur, Ill, who has been visiting his brother Wallace C. Dyer, returned home yesterday.

 

W. S. Robards, of Knoxville, Tenn., returned home yesterday from a visit to Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Lambert on South Main Street.

 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Howard and son, Master Coleman, went to Owensboro yesterday to visit relatives.

 

Mrs. S. E. Stephens, of Earlington, returned home yesterday from a visit to Mrs. Mary E. Dennis.

 

Dr. H. J. Poole, of Robards, was in the city yesterday on business.

 

Washington Flexner, of Louisville, returned home yesterday from a visit to Mr. and Mrs. Julius L. Baldauf.

 

Miss Rosalie Hartfield went to Hopkinsville yesterday to visit Mrs. T. Frankie for a few days.

 

Mrs. R. E. Yonts went to Robards yesterday to visit relatives for a few days.

 

John R. Moore, wife and son, of Paducah, Ky., are visiting Squire John T. Moore and family in this city.

 

W. J. Jones and wife leave this morning for Clarksville, Tenn., to visit relatives.

 

Miss Willie Archey, of Robards, is visiting Miss Ruth Orr on Clay Street.

 

E. C. Willingham, of Robards, was in the city yesterday.

R. O. Mc Clure of Corydon was in the city yesterday.

 

G. W. Martin, of Owensboro was in the city yesterday en route home from Princeton, Ky.

 

Mrs. C. O. Harris and children of New Decatur, ala, were in the city yesterday en route to Cannelton, Indiana to visit her parents, Dr. and Mrs. C. E. Cox.

 

G. L. Dial, proprietor of the Peerless Sebree Springs, was in the city yesterday.

 

Mrs. J. Thomas Sandefur, of the county, returned yesterday from a visit to her sister, Mrs. Ben T. Sandefur, of New Berlin, Ill.

 

Hone. John W. Lockett returned from Dixon yesterday.

James Reddy, deputy sheriff of Union county, was in the city yesterday.

Rev. B. F. Orr went to Owensboro yesterday.

Robert Soaper went to Mr. Vernon yesterday.

Rev. W. H. Bell left yesterday for Degonia Springs, Ind.

W. H. Stites left yesterday for Portland, Oregon.

P. D. Posey went to Providence yesterday.

Miss Ellen Headley left yesterday for Louisville.

C J Fleming went to Sebree Spring yesterday.

 

Mrs. Annie Bogard, of Morganfield, was in the city yesterday en route to Louisville.

 

Miss Mollie Mason left yesterday for Versailles, Ky., to visit her sister, Mrs. Ed Wise.

 

Mrs. Strother Hancock, of Earlington, who has been ill at the city sanitarium for the past few weeks was able to be carried home yesterday.  She was accompanied by her mother, Mrs. J. K. Hawes, of Madisonville.

F. J. Pentecost, of Corydon, was in the city yesterday on business.

 

Miss Ellen Trice, of Cadiz, Ky., is a guest of Miss Kate Atkinson on Third and Elm streets.

 

Mrs. J. H. Nelson and little daughter, Miss Rosina, of Bandana, Ky., is visiting her sister, Mrs. Dr. Griffin on Second Street.

 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Garrett and little daughter, Miss Florence Mabel, went to Owensboro yestgerday to visit her father, J. W. Garrett.

 

Mrs. Max Layne, of Helena, Ark., arrived yesterday afternoon on a visit to Mrs. Margaret R. Neal.  Before her marriage Mrs. Layne was Miss Anna Weir of Greenville, Ky.

 

Mr. and Mrs. J. D. Haffey and children, of Evansville, returned home yesterday from a visit to Mrs. Haffey’s mother, Mrs. M. Haffey, on Ingram Street.

 

Mrs. Charles Frankey and children, of Evansville, returned home yesterday from a visit to her sister, Mrs. George Goodley.

 

Mrs. F. K. Mc Donald and son, Master Frances, of Princeton, Ky., returned home yesterday after a visit to Mr. and Mrs. Ed Mc Donald.

 

Miss Mattie Savage, of Uniontown, was in the city yesterday from a visit to her uncle, N. R. Green.

 

Mrs. Mary Boardley, of Spottsville, was in the city shopping yesterday.

 

Miss Eva Coleman, of Fort Gibson I. T. left for her home yesterday from Mr. and Mrs. Ryan W. Powell, on Third and Alves.

 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Tapp returned yesterday from a visit to relatives at Dixie.

 

Father Releases Girl From Control

Man Who Slapped Daughter on Street Released From Lock Up on Promise to Give Up Control of Her

E. H. Head, who was arrested Tuesday, on the charge of publicly slapping his daughter, Susie V. Head, was released from the city lockup Tuesday afternoon on the promise that he would release his claim for the control of the young lady.  Accordingly he went before County Judge Hart and asked for the issuance of an order giving the girl right to own and control her property and her actions as though she was twenty one years of age.

 

The girl is but sixteen years of age and did not desire to see her father prosecuted.  She asked clemency for him and Judge Walker was prevailed upon to release Head on the promise that he would not again attempt to control the girl.  It was shown that Miss Head had a better opportunity to manage her affairs without the assistance of her father.

 

News Of The Neighborhood

WHEATCROFT

WHEATCROFT, Ky, - July 6, - In a drunken carousal here on the Fourth Jack James a local miner was shot through the arm by Patrick Bartley, foreman of the Rock Spring Coal Co. 

 

After the shooting Bartley became very abusive and tried to shoot John Groves who promptly knocked him down and some one succeeded in getting the pistol away from him.  Groves was not concerned in the first affair and was sober and minding hos own business.  When attacked by Bartley who is a quiet and peacable man when sober, but dangerous when he gets too much liquor.

 

The Providence and Wheatcroft ball teams played a match game here on the Fourth resulting in a victory for the Wheatcroft team by a score of 15 t0 7.

 

Mr. Dudley Gray, of Morrison, Illinois is visiting his father this week.

Mr. Luther Tapp, of Tilden, Ky, is visiting relatives in this place.

 

A great many of our people went to the Sturgis celebration on the  Fourth.

 

Owing to the threatening weather the ice cream supper given here Saturdaay night was a failure.

 

Mr. Lynn Gray and family of Clay are spending the Fourth visiting friends here.

 

DELAWARE

DELAWARE,Ky – July 6th

Mr. Edward Augustine, of Owensboro, came out Saturday to see his wife and children who are spending a few weeks with her father and mother, Mr. and Mrs. J. G. Cravens.

 

Mr. Edward Johnson is spending a few days with his grand parents Mr. and Mrs. A. M. Alley.

 

Mr. L. B. Duncan of Henderson, was in this section calling on old friends Saturday and Sunday.

 

The Barbeque Saturday across the river here was a success from both a social and financial point of view.

 

Messrs. Judge J. Hawkins Hart and Robert Vance attended the barbecue here Saturday.

 

Rev. Randolph preached two very able sermons at the M. E. church Sunday.

 

Two chairs were stolen off of Walker Brothers stone porch last Sunday night a week ago.  The thief finding he was spotted returned the chairs the following Friday night.

 

Mr. S. H. Mills was in town Saturday looking for a shipment of stock.

Charlie Brody, of Curdsville, was in town Saturday.

 

Mr. Press Bennett, of Beach Grove, was in town Saturday trying to dispose of a very find pair of horses.

 

We had a fine rain here Friday night and another one Sunday which will greatly benefit the growing crops.  As these are the first rains of any consequence we have had since the latter part of May.  There is a very small crop of tobacco planted and a very poor stand.  So with favorable conditions from now on it cannot be possible that more than 60 per cent will be raised.

 

Local Brevities

 

Bertram Mann went down the L. & N. last night.

C N Boswell returned last night from Hartford, Ky.

W. C. Payne, of Cloverport, Ky., was in the city last night.

 

Mrs. S. V. Pence, of Madisonville, was in the city last night from Frankfort.

 

Rev. George E. Foskett, of Morganfield, will preach at the Methodist church Sunday morning at 11 o’clock.

 

Patrol Driver, Martin Loftus, has been granted a leave of absence for several weeks, in order that he might go through the country on a wheat threshing tour.  His place will be filled by Robert Law.

 

 

The first load of new wheat received by Henderson buyers was delivered Thursday at the Sandefur mill by A. G. Norment.  The load consisted of twenty bushels and the price paid was eight-five cents.

 

County Treasurer Ingram Crockett filed his report on the condition of the county funds, the report covering until the close of June 30.  The statement shows an overdraft of $67.38 in the county levy fund and balances of $4,199.40 and $187.18 in the funds for grave roads and Bridges.

 

Ruth, India and Hugh Benn Orr will give a birthday party at Atkinson Park Friday, July 7th from 9 1o 12.

 

Births

Born Thursday to the wife of C. L. Williams, a fine boy.

 

A daughter was born Thursday to the wife of Dr. John Young Brown, in St. Louise.

 

A fine baby girl was born to Mr. and Mrs. James Carroll at the home of Mrs. Carroll’s mother, Mrs. Mc Hugh, at 735 First Street, Thursday morning.  The little Miss weighs eleven pounds.

 

July 8, 1905

 

Webster County Notes

Webster County Teachers’ Institute will be held at Dixon July 24 to 28, inclusive.  It will be conducted by Prof. Charles Evans, of Marion.

 

The Webster county grand jury was enrolled as follows:  J. J. Aldridge, foreman; George Sparks, H. B. Chandler, Gord Ezell, John Adams, B. F. Hobgood, Jeff Burton, John H. Lambert, P. Mc Clain, John Johnson, Mat Polley and John Wilson.

 

After a delay of several months caused by a failure of the L & N to supply the rails the steel for laying the track over the switch of the Webster County Coal company at Providence arrived last week and a crew of men were put to work laying track Friday and the new coal company will soon be loading coal on cars at its tipple.

 

The Glorious Fourth passed off very quietly in Providence.  No arrangements were made for any celebration of the event here and many of our citizens went to Madisonville and various other places to celebrate the day.  The business men showed their patriotism by displaying flags and bunting on their buildings.

 

Union County Notes

Work was begun yesterday on the second story of the postoffice building at Uniontown and will be pushed rapidly.  When completed a portion of this floor will be occupied by the telephone exchange.

 

The condition of Mary Dade, the little daughter of Mr. and Mrs. R. L. Mallory at Uniontown, is much improved.

 

The residence of John Fenwick located about one miles from Uniontown on the Uniontown and Waverly road, was destroyed by fire Monday afternoon.  The fire caught from the flue.

 

The formal opening of Morganfields new ball park occurred Tuesday under favorable circumstances.  William Wynns the promoter of the celebrant and to whose efforts is due the existence of the ball park deserves great credit for the success of the enterprise.  A large crowd attended the celebration, the gate receipts for the day amounting to about four hundred dollars.

 

The Farmers Bank will probably be in its new building by nest week.  The safes have already been moved and the furniture and fixtures will follow as soon as possible.  The room left vacant by this move will be repaired and put in excellent condition and will be occupied by the Uniontown Savings Bank.

 

Mrs. Henry Rudy, of Uniontown returned Saturday evening from a visit to Clarksville, Tenn.  Mrs. Rudy was in the receiving line at the entertainment given on the 26th ult. By Mr. and Mrs. Richard Wynn Courts, of that city, in honor of the tenth anniversary of their marriage.

 

Personal

Miss Karen Frederick, of Owensboro, is a guest of Misses Clara and Mabel Schlamp, on Green Street.

 

Miss Addie Sparks, of Whitesville, Ky., is visiting her sister, Mrs. R. S. Brooks, of the county.

 

W. F. Ennis, mananger of the Sweeney quarry company of Bowling Green, was in the city yesterday on business.

 

R. P. Henry, of Madisonville, is visiting Mr. and Mrs. W. M. Farless, on South Main Street.

 

Mrs. Thomas McEwin, of Earlington, was in the city yesterday en route home from a visit to friends at Louisville.  She was accompanied by Mrs. T. A. Lyons, who will visit her for a short while.

 

Hon. Montgomery Merrit made a business trip up the Henderson Route yesterday.

 

Mrs. P. A. Buckner, of Abiline, Texas is visiting Mrs. E. J. Young at the Young Hotel.

 

Mrs. R. H. Trigg, of Corydon, was in the city yesterday the guest of her parents, Rev. and Mrs. G. H. Hays, while en route to Hanson to visit her brother, Dr. and Mrs. Jesse K. Hays.

 

Misses Mattie and Naomi Smith went to Hopkinsville yesterday to visit Mr. and Mrs. J. R. Stull and family.

 

Mrs. Aaron Waller and daughter, little Miss Elizabeth, went to Morganfield yesterday to visit relatives.

 

Mrs. Annie Baker, of Henshaw, Ky., is visiting her daughter, Mrs. James I. Cates on Clay Street.

 

Rev. T. C. Gebauer returned yesterday from Onton, Ky., where he attended the Webster County Sunday School convention.  He reports that the meeting was the best held in that county.

 

Mrs. E. N. Dupuy and Miss Nellie Lambert, of Lewisport, Ky., returned home yesterday from a visit to Mrs. George Goodley.

 

Rev. B. L. Patterson, of Mt. Vernon, Ill, is visiting his father in law Rev. A. A. Niles on Alves Street.

 

Paul F. Harris, district superintendent of the Kentucky Childrens Home society of Louisville, was in the city yesterday en route to Morganfield with a little girl who he will place in a Union County Home.

 

Miss Mamie Griffin of Gallatin, Tenn., returned home yesterday after a visit to Mrs. H. C. Boaz.

 

Mrs. Oscar Tender and little child, of Madisonville, were in the city yesterday en route home from a visit to her parents at Owensboro.

 

Misses Ermile, Mary, Iona, Nellie and Della Beal went to Onton, Ky., yesterday to visit relatives and attend the Webster County Sunday School convention.

 

Miss Mallie Stoner, of Bardstown, Ky., who has been visiting her sister Mrs. James W. Clay for the past few weeks, returned home yesterday, accompanied by Mr. and Mrs. James W. Clay and little child, who will visit her and other relatives for several weeks.

 

Judge William B. Noe, of Calhoun, Ky., was in the city yesterday from Marion, Ky.

 

Mrs. J. W. Stewart and children returned yesterday from a visit to her father, Mr. N. H. Aton, of Morganfield.

 

Mrs. J. M. Lyddane and little daughters, Misses Viola and Helen, of Owensboro, returned home yesterday from a visit to her sister, Mrs. C. C. Sugg, on Third Street.

 

Messrs Charley Brandt and Paul Wendermann left for St. Louis after a short visit to Mr. F. Selle, on Third Street.

 

Mr. and Mrs. Boyce Thompson and little child, and Misses Margaret and Agnes Thompson, of Flournoy, Ky., were in the city shopping yesterday.

 

Samuel P Spaulding of Morganfield, was in the city yesterday from Owensboro.

 

Miss Della Niles went to Onton, Ky., yesterday to attend the Webster County Sunday school convention.

 

Mrs. F. M. Gobin went to Corydon yesterday to visit her mother, Mrs. Sarah Polly.

 

Rev. W. P. Thurston, pastor of the Cumberland Presbyterian church, of Owensboro, was a guest of Rev. W. L. Livingston, yesterday.

 

Mrs. J. D. Clark, of Louisville, returned home yesterday from a visit to her parents, Mr. and Mrs. H. F. Dade, Sr., on Main Street.  She was accompanied by her niece, Miss Blanche Dade, who will visit relatives in the upper part of the State for a few weeks.

 

Miss Laura London left yesterday for Pittsburg, Kas., to visit her sister, Mrs. W. C. Orr, for a month.

 

Misses Effie and Sallie Hall went to Onton, Ky., yesterday to attend the Webster County Sunday School convention.

 

Dr. T. N. Compton, of Owensboro, was in the city yesterday en route to Providence, Ky. To visit his mother.

 

Mrs. J. W. Powers, of Madisonville was in the city yesterday en route to Owensboro, to visit her sister, Mrs. T. W. Birkhead.

 

Elder H. C. Ford, of Nebo, Ky., was in the city yesterday en route to Owensboro.

 

John Eblin, of Robards, was in the city yesterday on business.

W. H. Ryan went down the I. C. yesterday.

R. L. Cinnamond, of Spottsville, was in the city yesterday.

W. H. Jenkins, of Madisonville, was in the city yesterday on business.

A G Roberts returned yesterday from Marion, Ky.

Miss Annie Laurie Rudy returned from Newburg, Ind. Yesterday.

Lafe Clore, Jr., returned yesterday from Atoka, Tenn.

W. A. Williams has returned from Horn Springs, Tenn.

Mr. Henry Baldauf left yesterday for Louisville.

Mr. and Mrs. T. M. Head went to Mattingly yesterday to visit relatives.

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Bailey went to Sebree Springs yesterday.

Mr. and Mrs. H. F. Dade, Jr., left yesterday for St. Louis.

George Reichman made a business trip up the Henderson Route yesterday.

 

 

Negro Held to Grand Jury For Cutting Girl

Fisherman Charged With Peddling Spoiled Fish By Competitor is Dismissed in Police Court

There were several cases in the city police court Friday afternoon but owing to the absence of witnesses most of them were postponed.  Joseph Parker, a negro charged with cutting Mollie Walker with intent to kill, was bound over to the grand jury in the sum of $2,000.

 

John Level, a fisherman was charged by Dave Carleton, who also peddles the finy tribe for a living, with selling spoiled fish.  The charge was not sustained by the evidence and Level was dismissed.

 

Two Murderers Die On Gallows Friday Morning

Negro Walked Boldly To Scaffold But White Man Weakened and Even Attempted to End His Life By Digging At Artery With Finger Nails

HOPKINSVILLLE, Ky., July 7   - George Holland, colored, was hanged this morning for complicity in the murder of an unknown white man near Pembroke in November, 1903.  The trap was sprung by Sheriff L. R. Davis at 6:15 o’clock and at 6:30 o’clock physicians pronounced Holland dead.  His neck was broken by the fall, and physicians say his death was as painless as electrocution.

 

There was not a hitch in the proceedings, the automatic trap in the execution room of the new jail working to perfection.

 

To the last Holland protested his innocence and claimed to know nothing of the crime for which he was being hung.  His nerve never failed him.  He took his place on the trap without any assistance, and as the black cap was being adjusted he complained of his shoes hurting him.  He spent a reasonably good night and ate sparingly at breakfast.  He was attended by a colored preacher, and stated to him while he was being bound that he was at peace with his Maker.

 

The execution was witnessed by fifty people.  Holland’s body was taken possession of by a colored undertaker, and, as his relatives have forsaken him, it was buried in the potters’ field here.

 

CRIME A BRUTAL ONE

George Holland was one of nine negroes, who on the night of November 13, 1903, murdered and robbed an unknown white man, who was sleeping by a camp fire near the town of Pembroke, Christian county.  The strangers dead body, horribly mutilated and partially devoured by hogs, was found three days later.  The people of Pembroke and the authorities offered a reward of $400 for the arrest of the murderers.  The case was taken in hand by Town Marshal J. E. Jackson, of Pembroke, assisted by Detective R. L. Moore, who after a month’s work succeeded in ferreting out the guilty parties and landing them in jail.

 

The first man captured was Holland, who was arrested on account of suspicious actions following the murder.  He was watched closely, but not taken into custody for about three weeks after the killing.  He made a confession implicating Frank Sherman, Dick Carney, Frank Meriwether, Bill Garrott, Frank Massie, Ed Holland, Charles Finch and Ed Moseley.

 

At a special term of court in January, 1904, five of them were tried and given death sentences.  All except Holland were given new trials, and they with the others (Except Moseley, who turned State’s evidence), have since been give life sentences.  Holland, was sentenced to be hanged last January but was granted a respite of six months, in order that he might testify against some of the others.  This he flatly refused to do, and repudiated his former confession.

 

The identity of the murdered man has never been established.  He was seen in Pembroke the afternoon before he was killed , but was a stranger to everybody.  He exhibited a roll of money in purchasing a bottle of whiskey, which was seen by some of the gang of negroes.  While asleep in the woods near Pembroke they crept upon him, and Meriwether struck him on the head with a heavy stick.  Holland then sprang upon the quivering body and cut the man’s throat, while others of the gang held his feet.  They then cut away the flesh from his face to prevent identification of the body, which was concealed under a pile of rails and leaves, from which it was subsequently dragged out by hogs.  There was much excitement at the time and threats of lynching.  A mob actually formed at one time to hang them, but the leaders were persuaded to let the law take its course and the men were brought to jail.

 

OWENSBORO, Ky. July 7th..

After making a desperate effort to commit suicide in his cell a short time before the march to the scaffold began Robert Mathley was hanged in the Daviess county jail yard this morning at 4:46 o’clock.

 

The prisoner was able to walk to the scaffold without assistance but had to be supported by deputy sheriff while the black cap was being adjusted.  Sixteen minutes after the drop fell Mathley was pronounced dead:

 

Shortly after 2 o’clock Friday morning Mathley feigned sleep and stopped pacing his cell.  He lay down on the narrow couch and the guards thought he was sleeping soundly.  Shortly before 4 o’clock he was awakened by the guards who discovered blood on the bed and the prisoner’s shirt.  He had pricked at the flesh of his wrist and had made a desperate effort to open an artery that he might bleed to death.  The wound was but a slight one.  After it was bound up the prisoner dressed and prepared for the end.

 

Mathley had made an effort to escape jail by having a woman friend send him saws into the jail concealed in bananas.  His brothers Daniel and Michael Mathley, had contended to their friends that the condemned man would not die on the gallows and it is now believed that the effort to open the artery was the plan the three men had decided on for him to cheat the law.

 

Mathley refused to eat breakfast after he had dressed and spent the time before the march began in prayer.  He walked steadily down the jail corrider at the side of the two guards who had watched at the door of his cell for the past week and up the scaffold steps.  He made a short talk before the noose was adjusted in which he said that he had forgiven all his enemies and wished to meet his friends in heaven.  He did not refer to his crime but to the last protested that Mrs. Emma Watkins, the sole eye witness to the double murder, had sworn his life away.

 

After concluding his talk Mathley stepped to the trap.  When the work of fastening his arms and adjusting the noose and black cap began he trembled violently and had to be supported.  The bolt was shot by a deputy sheriff and the body of Mathley lunged through space to death.

 

At one minute after 5 o’clock the physicians pronounced Mathley dead.  The body was left hanging at the end of the rope for five minutes longer when it was cut down and turned over to his brothers who had it prepared for burial.

 

There was only a small crowd in the jail yard at the time of the execution the demand for tickets of admission having been exceedingly small.  A small piece of the rope was carried out by the crowd and there were rushes to secure portions of it.  Aside from the scramble there was nothing unusual connected with the execution.

 

The body was taken in charge by Mathley’s brothers and taken to an undertaking establishment.  It will be buried Saturday at a local cemetery.  The services will be attended only by the family members.

STORY OF MATHLEY’S CRIME

The crime of which Mathley was hanged was committed Sunday evening june 26, 1904, and consisted of the murder of Miss Emma Watkins.  AT the same time he killed James Gregson, though he was never tried for the latter crime.  Miss Watkins came to Owensboro from Grayson county, Ky.  She was the daughter of a farmer and had found country life irksome after a visit to the city.  She secured employment as a housekeeper for Robert Mathley, a widower, contractor and builder, the inmates of whose home were his aged invalid mother and his two little children.  The girl was warned of Mathley, but believed that his mother would be a sufficient protection to her.

 

Within a few weeks her employer wished to maker her his wife and she asked the advise of her cousins, James Gregson.  She had seen enough of Mathley to be doubtful of her happiness.  Gregson advised her not to marry Mathley, but to leave his home at once for her own safety.  She did so on the day before the killing, going to the home of Mrs. Will Warren, a sister of Gregson.  On Sunday evening Mathley went to the Warren home and demanded admission.  The two women were alone and dared not refuse.  Mathley urged that the girl go with him and that she marry him.  She refused him and he swore that she should be his wife or be buried.  After an hour James Gregson came to the Warren home.  His sister heard his step and went to the front of the house to warn him.  Mathley having followed the girl in her effort to escape him to the kitchen.  Mathley followed Mrs. Warren, and when the front hall was reached, without a word drew his pistol and shot James Gregson through the abdomen.  Turning on Emma Watkins he said, “You too,” and shot her through the heart.

 

The girl died instantly, while Gregson ran into the garden which was attached to the house and fell at the gate.  He died the next morning.  Mathley sat down by the body of the girl and attempted to shoot himself but lacked the nerve to pull the trigger of the revolver that had served his murderous purpose so well.  He was arrested and placed in jail, and exactly two months afterward was indicted for both murders separately and placed on trial for the murder of the girl.  The trial lasted a week and at its close the jury returned a verdict of guilty, fixing the death penalty in fifteen minutes.

 

Lon Beard Was Lynched By Mob

Criminally Assaulted Mrs. Chester Crawford Last Thursday Night

Was Shot to Death By a Mob of Twenty-Five at Normandy, Kentucky

SHELBYVILLE, Ky., July 7

Lon Beard, the negro arrested on the charge of assaulting Mrs. Chester Crawford, of Normandy, was lynched at that place this afternoon.

 

He was being taken from Taylorville to Shelbyville for safe keeping, but when the train arrived at Normandy, a mob of about twenty-five men entered the day coach and riddled Beard with bullets as he sat in the seat.

 

TAYLORVILLE, Ky., Juy 7

Lon Beard, a young negro, was placed in jail here by Sheriff Bucknere this afternoon charged with an attempted assault on Mrs. Chester Crawford, of Normandy.  The negro went to Mrs. Crawford’s home at 11 o’clock last night and forced an entrance through a window.  She was alone in her home with the exception of several children, and was awakened by the negro springing upon her in bed.  She resisted as best she could, and called the oldest child, aged 8, to summon help.

 

The child ran to go out the front door when the negro left his victim and attempted to stop the child.  Mrs. Crawford then escaped by a back door and cried for help.  Neighbors soon arrived, but not before the negro made his escape.  Mrs. Crawford was bruised, but escaped serious injury.  The negro was captured by Lee Vandyke this morning on his farm and held until the arrival of officers.  When questioned the negro would neither affirm nor deny his guilt.  He had been fully identified.  There are some threats of lynching, and the negro will probably be taken to Louisville this afternoon for safe keeping.

 

Speeches Being Made At Russellville

RUSSELLVILLE, Ky., July 7 – The hearing of the testimony was concluded last night in the trial of John Sacra, one of the four men charged with criminally assaulting Mary Gladder, and the defendant was placed in jail here, which was heavily guarded last night.  Thirty armed men were placed around the jail and no attempt at violence was made.

 

Jim Lyon, who made the confession, was carried to the Todd county jail at Elkton.  His confession has not been heard in court as yet.

 

The speeches are being heard today.

 

Kentuckians Drowned In West

While Out Rowing Near Fort D. A. Russell, in Wyoming, and Other Have Narrow Escape

HOPKINSVILLE, Ky., July 7 – A communication to the New Era from Fort D. A. Russell, Wyoming, states that on July 3 Private Luther Sizemore , of Hyden, Ky; Albert Henderson of St. Charles Ky., and Daniel Tate of Blandburg, Pa; were drowned while out rowing, and Private Millard Poole, of Clarksville, Tenn; and Joe Woods of Cumberland Gap Ky; narrowing escaped by clinging to the boat.  The men were rowing on a lake near Cheyenne, Wyoming and the boat was overturned in a storm.

 

Sizemore, Henderson and Tate attempted to swim to shore, but drowned before reaching it.  Poole and Woods clung to the boat and were rescued.  All of the men were members of Company E Eleventh Infantry.

 

Caleb Powers’ Case Is In The Federal Jurisdiction

Judge Cochran Hands Down decision In Noted Case –

Commonwealth Has Recourse To United State Supreme Court – Bail Asked

MAYSVILLE, Ky., July 7 – In an opinion handed down here this morning, United States Circuit Judge Cochran has decided that the Federal court has jurisdiction in the case of Caleb Powers, charged with complicity in the killing of William Goebel.

 

This decision means that the case which was to have been tried in the Scott Circuit court, at Georgetown will be removed to the United States court, and that Powers will be tried before a Federal jury, in the Eastern district of Kentucky.

 

In this trial the pardon granted by Gov. Taylor will not be considered.

 

The court holds that the prosecution against Caleb Powers, pending in the Scott Circuit court, has been removed to the United States Circuit court for the Eastern District of Kentucky, by the removal proceedings taken in Powers behalf under Section 641, United States Revised Statues, and sustains his motion for a writ of habeas corpus to transfer his custody from that of the State of Kentucky to that of the United States.

 

The ground upon which the court so holds is that it appears from the petition for removal and the transcript for the record in the State courts that the defendant has been, and is, denied the equal protection of the laws by the Scott Circuit court and cannot enforce his right thereto in the Court of Appeals because of section 281 of the Criminal Code, as constructed by the court.  The court further holds that the decision of the state courts against the validity of Taylor’s pardon is not a ground for removal, as it feels bound by the decision as to the validity of the pardon, and the validity thereof is not secured by the equal protection of the laws clause of the Fourteenth amendment.

 

The opinion, which is very lengthy, covers every feature of the case, and was attentively listened to by a crowd which packed the courtroom to overflowing.

 

Judge Cochran in his opinion, said; “If I decide to take jurisdiction my action is not final.  Application can be made to the Supreme court for a mandamus, commanding me to restore defendant to State custody, and the whole question can be settled for all time to come.”

 

Judge Cochran said:  “I will permit Mr. Powers to remain in the custody of the State authorities until trial in the Federal court.”

 

The attorney for the Commonwealth this afternoon made an application for an appeal to the United States Supreme court, which is now being argued.

 

Motion For Bail

MAYSVILLE, KY, July 7, - After Judge Cochran rendered his opinion, the attorneys for Caleb Powers made motion for a date to be set to hear the questions of bail.

 

Judge Cochran declared it was not advisable to pass upon a question of bail until the matter of jurisdiction was settled by the Supreme Court which cannot be done before next November.

 

Judge Cochran then ordered Powers’ removed at once from the jail at Georgetown to the jail at Newport.

 

Fisherman Hunts For Missing Wife

Asa Carleton Goes to Evansville to Search for Spouse Who Went There Tuesday On a Visit

Asa Carleton, a fisherman, who resides on the part of the river front known as Fishtown has lost his wife.  He was in Evansville Friday searching for her but was not successful.

 

Carleton told the police of Evansville that his wife left here on the Fourth of July and went to that city to visit relatives.  She had not returned and he eared that she had deserted him.  The fisherman told the Hoosier police that he did not believe his wife had met with foul play and that he did not like to accept the desertion theory as he had lived in perfect harmony with his wife for sixteen years. 

 

The local police have not been asked to help locate the missing wife.

 

Four Year Old Whiskey $2,00 a Gallon

Jugs Free

Every Package Contains a 4 Full Quarts to Gallon.  Quality Guaranteed.

 

Make selection of any of the following brands, send postal note, money order or cash to C. E. Miller, Henderson, Ky., and recive by return express just as pure good as can be found any where.  Prompt attention to all mail orders.  If goods are not as represented will buy them back:

 

Following Brands Kept:

Monarch sour Mash Whisky, Daviess County and Peerless, Rich Grain Sour Mash Union County Whiskey, Winstead's Silk Velvet Whisky, Nelson's County Whisky, Anderson County Whisky, White Corn Whisky, Fine Wines, etc.  Also fine Brandies, "Pach and Honey," Rock and Rye" and Gin.  Prices from $1.50 to $2.00 per gallon.

 

As to reliability, I refer to any bank of Henderson and the editors of the Gleaner.

QUICK LUNCH

134 Second Street

One Door Above My Old Stand

For our Midday Dinner -- Good Roast Beef and Potatoes 15 cents.

FOR MY FARMER FRIENDS AND CITY FRIENDS

Ohio River Fish and Green River Fish, Right out of the water, and good strong Cofee.

 

Special orders served in a hurry.

 

 

AT LAMBERTS

 

One Solid car load of the finest watermelons of the season.  Don’t fail to order a cold one for dinner.

 

We will continue to sell the finest and largest lemons at 20 cents per dozen.

 

Extra large supply fruits, vegetables, produce, etc.  Also Fancy Kalamazoo celery.

 

Fresh eggs 12 ½ cents per dozen.

 

Fancy tomatoes 20 cents per basket.

 

Pineapples, Oranges, Lemons, Bananas, Watermelons, Blackberries, Peaches, etc., Apricots, Plumbs and Peaches, Extra Fine, from California.

 

Cauliflower, Cucumbers, Okra, Butter beans, Squash, Tomatoes, Corn, Cabbage, Beets, Etc. Etc.

 

Try us on boiled ham and dried beef, we seel the best to be had at 25 cents per pound.

 

Cheese, pickles, olives, cracker, cake and all luncheon goods.

 

Salted peanuts and stuff.  Ed Dates Just Received.  Call 95.

 

Slaton Heard From

STURGIS, Ky., July 7 – Mark E. Eastin, cashier of the First national, informed us that he had received a letter from Claud Slaton Wednesday night.  But no information could be had as to his whereabouts, as the letter had been mailed on train and the mark was blurred.  He stated he was a long ways from home and still going and never expected to come back.  The supposition as to his now going off with a woman has been considerably weakened.  A doctor in Texas wrote to his wife here that he met him in Texas, but that Claud denied his name and would not recognize the doctor.  In his letter to Mr. Eastin he asks that as little as possible be said, about the matter, as he could not be hurt any worse than he is already.  This we have done for the sake of his and his wife’s family.

 

Married And Was Dismissed

H. C. Newcomb, a Traveling Man, Makes Good His Promise

Case Dismissed From Court

The warrant against H. C. Newcomb, traveling representative of the Underwood Typewriter company, charging him with persuading Miss Fannie Hardman, of Madisonville, Ky., to leave her home on the promise of marriage, was dismissed in the police court this morning upon motion of the city attorney, the couple having married at the county court house today, says the Paducah News- Democrat.

 

According to the story of the girl’s mother, Mrs. F. N. Hardman, Newcomb persuaded her daughter to leave Kuttawa, where they were spending the summer and come to Paducah, where they would be married.

 

Upon investigation at the instance of the mother, the police authorities in Paducah found Newcomb and the young woman at a resort on Kentucky avenue Tuesday night where Newcomb was arrested and the girl turned over to her mother.  Newcomb and the girl had been at the New Richmond hotel for several days, where they were registered as man and wife.

 

Newcomb was locked up at the city jail Tuesday night pending the trial.  Meantime the marriage agreement had been arranged and the couple, accompanied by the mother and Detective Baker, went to the county court house and procured a license and were married by Rev. J. S. Cheek.

 

Newcomb is well known in Paducah, having visited here many times in the interest of the Underwood Typewriter company.  His home is said to be in Morganfield.

 

Local Brevities

Alexander Mayer returned from Louisville last night.

A G Delker returned last night from a business trip through Indiana.

 

Miss Eva M. Bryan, of Syracuse N. Y. is visiting Dr. and Mrs. J. P. Williams on Center Street.

 

Mrs. A. B. Jarvis returned last night from a visit to her mother, Mrs. W. E. French, of Evansville.

 

Rev. Cecil V. Cook will spend August studying at the University of Chicago.  He will leave for Chicago the last of this month.

 

Mrs. L. J. Rosenfield and little daughter, Miss Gladys, of Louisville, are guests of Mr. and Mrs. L. B. Rosenfield and Mr. and Mrs. Sam Mayer.

 

Dr. Cyrus Graham and wife leave this morning for Buffalo, N. Y. to attend the Elks’ Nation reunion.  Dr. Graham goes as the representative of Henderson Lodge, No. 206.

 

 

July 9, 1905

Money and Women Ruin A Farmer

Allie Freels Borrows $200 On His Crops an Proceeds To Spend It In a Wild Way

Went to Owensboro and Fines Cost Him $65

Wife in Town Looking for Him Saturday

 

A new acquired bank roll and numerous friends with whom to spend the cash has caused Allie Freels, a cropper on Col. Peter Manion’s Robards Station farm to desert his wife, family and crop.

 

His wife came to the city Saturday afternoon to search for him.  She learned of his riotous associations with questionable characters and the free hand with which he was spending his money but could not find her wayward husband so went back home.  It is believed by the police that Freels is in Evansville where he is probably spending the tag end of the roll possessed when he started on the jag.

 

Freels came to town Monday morning from the Manion farm.  He put up at the Green River Hotel on First and then hunted up Col. Manion and had him endorse a note for $200 in the Nation Banks.  To secure Mr. Manion he gave a mortgage on his mules, farming utensils and interest in the crop he was raising.  Then he disappeared with the roll.

 

Tuesday the farmer left the hotel and when he paid his bill gave Charles Vowells, the proprietor, a check for #11 and was given cash for the balance between the amount of the bill and the check.  The farmer and the money again drop out of the story for a few hours.

 

Wednesday morning Mr. Vowels attempted to cash the check and was told that Freels had no money in the bank.  He went to the police station and secured a warrant for the farmer.  In company with the patrolman Satterfield Vowels went to the Union Station Wednesday afternoon to look for the wayward farmer.  They saw him enter the station with a woman known to the police as an inmate of a low resort and purchase tickets for Owensboro.  When accosted by the proprietor of the hostelry Freels ripped several bills from his roll and made the check good.  He was allowed to go on to Owensboro with his female companion.

 

The pair evidently cut a pretty wide swath in Owensboro for they fell into the hands of the police of the place and were fined in police court Thursday.  The fines assessed against Freels amounted to $65 and again the wad of bills came into play and the fines were paid.  It seems that the female became separated from her soil tilling and money spending friend in Owensboro for he came through here Friday afternoon on a Texas train in company with two brothers whom he had evidently met in Owensboro.  They were en route to Evansville and it is supposed were bent on seeing the sights of another city before the money gave out.

 

Saturday a local merchant received a telephone message from Freels.  He said he was talking from Owensboro but the police think he is still in Evansville.

 

Mrs. Freels was considerably worked up over the behavior of her husband.  She has four small children to care for and is worried for fear that Freels will stay away from home so long that the crops will go to ruin.

 

The police think he will be ready to go home when the money gives out and the headache begins.  Mrs. Freels has also refused to accept the theory that her husband has forsaken her for all time to come.

 

Young Man Seriously Ill

Adolph Unverzagt, a well known young man who has been seriously ill for some time at his home on Second Street was reported in a critical condition Saturday afternoon.  He was resting easily late in the evening but there was little hope for his recovery.

 

Little Girl Injured

Florence Mabel Morgan, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Morgan, of Fletcher Street, had the fingers on her right hand severely bruised by a window screen falling on them Friday afternoon.  While the injury is not serious it is exceedingly painful.

 

Married And Was Dismissed

H. C. Newcomb, a Traveling Man, Makes Good His Promise

Case Dismissed From Court

The warrant against H. C. Newcomb, traveling representative of the Underwood Typewriter company, charging him with persuading Miss Fannie Hardman, of Madisonville, Ky., to leave her home on the promise of marriage, was dismissed in the police court this morning upon motion of the city attorney, the couple having married at the county court house today, says the Paducah News- Democrat.

 

According to the story of the girl’s mother, Mrs. F. N. Hardman, Newcomb persuaded her daughter to leave Kuttawa, where they were spending the summer and come to Paducah, where they would be married.

 

Upon investigation at the instance of the mother, the police authorities in Paducah found Newcomb and the young woman at a resort on Kentucky avenue Tuesday night where Newcomb was arrested and the girl turned over to her mother.  Newcomb and the girl had been at the New Richmond hotel for several days, where they were registered as man and wife.

 

Newcomb was locked up at the city jail Tuesday night pending the trial.  Meantime the marriage agreement had been arranged and the couple, accompanied by the mother and Detective Baker, went to the county court house and procured a license and were married by Rev. J. S. Cheek.

 

Newcomb is well known in Paducah, having visited here many times in the interest of the Underwood Typewriter company.  His home is said to be in Morganfield.

 

Young Henry Lyne Dies Last Evening

Young Son of Mr. and Mrs. J. Henry Lyne Passes Away After Long Illness Last Night

Henry Lyne, aged 14 years and the son of Mr. and Mrs. J. Henry Lyne died at 9:30 o’clock Saturday evening at the home of his parents, 713 Center Street.  Rheumatism and heart trouble was the cause of his death.

 

The deceased had been ill for several weeks.  He was possessed of a most lovable disposition and was a general favorite with his brothers and sisters and the friends of the family.  Besides his parents he leaves behind three sisters and two brothers.

 

The funeral services will occur at 10 o’clock Monday morning from St. Paul’s Episcopal church.

 

No Clash Over Powers’ Custody

He Will Be Delivered To The Federal Officers On Demand

Attorney General Hays Gives Out a Statement

Judge Stout’s Course of Action

FRANKFORT, KY., July 8 – Commonwealth’s Attorney Franklin has wired the jailer of Scott county to release Caleb Powers into the custody of the United States Marshall for the Eastern district of Kentucky upon presentation to him of the writ issued yesterday by Federal Judge Cochran.  When the Scott circuit court meets in special session on Monday next this will be noted of record and the term closed.

 

Attorney General Hays, for the State, today gave out the following statement:

 

“There will be no effort upon the part of the Commonwealth to resist the order of the Federal Court, or to keep the marshal of that court from taking Mr. Powers from the custody of the Scott county jailer and delivering him to the custody of the Campbell county jailer pursuant to the order of said court except by appeal and suit in the Supreme Court.  Powers will be surrendered to the marshal when he presents the jailer of Scott county with a copy of Judge Cochran’s order.  The Commonwealth appealed from the order of the Federal Court removing the case from the State Court and the Issuance of the writ of habeas corpus.  This appeal will be filed in the Supreme Court at once, and when the court convenes in October it is the purpose of the Commonwealth to have the case advanced and tried as soon as possible.  However there will also be filed a suit in the Supreme Court against Judge Cochran to compel him to remand the case to the State Court”

 

Will Give Powers Up

Georgetown’s Jailer Says He will Comply With Federal Orders

GEORGETOWN, Ky., July 8 – The press correspondent in an interview with jailer Finley, is told that there is no disposition to deny or conflict with Federal authority, but that he stands ready at any moment to hand Powers over to the properly constituted Federal authorities whenever they demand his surrender.  He expects such action today and is holding his prisoner in readiness.

 

Canning Factory Starts AT Dixon

First Product Delivered at Its Doors Was 450 Gallons of Blackberries Picked in County

DIXON, Ky., July 8 – the new canning factory which was organized here several months ago began operations today.  The first product brought to the factory was 450 gallons of black berries picked in the county by the country folks.

 

The industry will prove a big thing for this place.  It is estimated that over 100 people will be given work during the canning season.  Good prices will be paid for local products.

 

The company was incorporated with a capital stock of $10,000 several months ago.

 

Investigation Will Begin Monday Night

Cemetery Sexton Will Be on the Carpet on Charge of Conduct Unbecoming a City Official

The investigation into the conduct of Cemetery Sexton John Held will begin next Monday evening at the council chamber.  The investigation will be held by the members of the cemetery committee and Mayor Powell.

 

It is understood that no formal charges have been made by the members of the committee against Mr. Held.  The investigation was ordered by the council.

 

The investigation grows out of the fact that Mr. Held has been sued by his wife for divorce, she charging him with cruel and inhuman treatment.

 

 

PEERLESS SEBREE SPRINGS

One-half mile south of Sebree, Ky, 27 miles south of Evansville, Ind., and 17 miles south of Henderson, Ky., on the Nashville Division of L. and N. 130 miles north of Nashville.

 

A delightful Heath Pleasure and Rest Resort approved, appreciated and praised by all people who truly test its merits.

HOTEL AND FURNITURE New

And Now Open For Guests

The limpid freely flowing Chalybeate Springs, seven feet deEp, clear as crystal, believed by experienced travelers to be the finest and best on earth, within thirty paces of the hotel.  Guests have access to the entire grounds include Springs.

 

A fine tonic of Stomach, Liver and Kidneys.

 

Why not spent your summer vacation at Sebree Springs, close to home, easily reached by all passenger trains on L. and N. R. R. Trains, leaving Evansville, Ind., at 7:45 a.m. and 12:40 p.m. stop right at the gate to the spring.

 

Traveling men are cordially invited to spin their y arns in the beautiful grove around these springs.

 

BUSINESS MEN – rest your weary brain and tired body by patronizing nature’s own restoratives, pure air, pure water and complete rest.

 

Tables first class at all times.

 

Give us a chance to show you we mean what we say.

 

Liberal rates on application.  Liberal rates to picnic parties and lodges.

Address.        G. L. DIAL, Proprietor

 

SOCIETY NEWS

 

Mr. and Mrs. Rutsch Entertain

Mr. and Mrs. C. O. Rutsch entertain the younger set very delightfully on Monday evening in honor of Miss Virginia Norris.

 

The decorations were in the patriotic colors – a profusion of flags, both small and large; shields and red, white and blue draperies being used very effectively.  Flowers were in every available place, and from the handsome mirrors were graceful garlands of green arranged with artistic effect.

 

The first part of the evening was devoted to the fascinating game of euchre, at the conclusion of which the hostess announced that there was no “prize” but instead a “surprise” for the guests.  The tables and chairs were quickly removed and the embryo beauty and chivalry of Henderson were soon enjoying the rhythm of the waltz and two step.  Punch was served during the evening and at mid night a delightful lunch after which an evening of unalloyed pleased was rounded up by an hilarious ushering in of the glorious “Fourth” with a magnificent pyrotechnic display.

 

There were about fifty guests who enjoyed Mr. and Mrs. Rutsch’e hospitality.

 

The Glorious Fourth

“The Glorious Fourth” was turned over to the Elks this year, and the good things they provided for their friends grew so as the story spread, that one small urchin was heard to remark to another, that they were to barbecue three thousand sheep; and from the crowds that thronged the highways bound for Atkinson Park, in Street cars and traps, autos and wagons, the little fellow’s estimate could not have been so much out of the way.

 

Everybody had a good time.  There was good music, dancing, and a ballon ascension, and an abundance of good things to eat, and not withstanding the enormous expense of such an undertaking the Elks hope to have cleared at neat sum for charity, and while we –

Hurrah for the Fourth, and the red, white and blue,

Hurrah for the Elks a little bit too.

 

Miss Powell Entertains

An invitation to the hospitable Powell home always carries with it the assurance of a good time, and Miss Harriet Powell’s guests on Wednesday morning found this occasion no exception to the rule.  The spacious rambling rooms of the old fashioned southern home with its delightful situation, makes it a charming place to entertain at any time, but on this summer morning it seemed unusually attractive.  Four hand euchre was the form of entertainment, and the guests were soon absorbed with the soliloquy – with apologies to Hamlet:

 

“To make it next or not – that is the question”

Whether ‘tis nobler in the mind, to suffer

The stings and arrows of outraged partner

(When you make is next on the seven spot)

Or to take arms against a sea of troubles.

(By letting the opponents make it.)

 

At the conclusion of a number of interesting games, Mrs. John Elam was found to have the highest score and was awarded the prize – a handsome plate.  Miss Sudie Reeve Hart, who is really a very excellent player, but for some reason had a poor score, was much consoled by a copy of one of Mrs. Alice Hegan Rice’s stories “Sandy.”

 

A delightful two-course luncheon was served.

 

Boating Party Last Wednesday

On Wednesday evening a merry party rowed up to the island, a resort that vies with Atkinson Park in popularity and spent the evening having a picnic lunch and later drifted back with the current.

 

Those who enjoyed the delightful affair were Misses Ellen Worsham of Terre Haute, Ind.; Irene and Bessie Clay, Mallie Stoner, of Bardstown, Ky; Belle Barton, of Franklin, Ky; Mamie Griffin, of Gallatin, Tenn., and Lucile Katterjohn, of Louisville.

 

Messrs. Robert Johnston, Herbert Robertson, Phelps Lambert, Gilbert Johnston, Charles Williams, Arthur Katterjohn and H. S. Kerby.

 

Mrs. Fitzhugh Entertains

Miss Emma Fitzhugh entertained a few friends on Thursday evening at cards.  At the conclusion of the game a dainty luncheon was served.

 

Miss Emmie’s guests were Misses Susan Young, Frances Riley, Sallie Lockett, Nannie Cross and Virginia Norris, and Messrs. Robert Eakins, Hickman Lockett, Davis Powell and William Williams.

 

House Party by The Misses Banks

Misses Joy and Marguerite Banks of near Trenton, Ky., are entertaining a very delightful house party this week.

 

While this spacious old southern plantation is roomy, it is not large enough to accommodate so many comfortably, so the gentlemen will camp to the extent of occupying a tent picturesquely pitched in a nearby grove.

 

Escursons to Clarksville and Dunbar’s cave are some of the plans for the amusement of the guests who are Misses Mary Belle Taylor and Juanita Kline, of Frankfort; Margaret Sebree and Virginia Lockett, of Henderson, Miss Gracey, of Clarksville and Messrs, Irving Thompson, Paul David Banks, Jr., and Elijah Sebree, Jr.

 

Dr. and Mrs. Edwards Entertain

On Thursday evening July 6th, Dr. and Mrs. H. W. Edward entertained very delightfully at a patriotic party in honor of their guest, Miss Annie Laurie Helfenstein, of Springfield, Mo.  The house was elaborately decorated with the national colors, flags and a profusion of cut flowers.  Patriotic guessing games was the form of entertainment and the prize, a handsome bon-bon box in the form of a shield bearing the stars and stripes was awarded to Miss Julia Rudy, Miss Lucy Nunn presided at the punch bowl.

 

The color scheme was carried out in every detail even the refreshments having a patriotic flavor.

 

The guests who enjoyed Dr. and Mrs. Edward hospitality were Misses Ellis Chipman, Julia, Annie and Carter Rudy, Wilda Herndon, Sue Dixon, Josie Smith, Maud Webster and Lucile Katterjohn, of Louisville.

 

Messrs. Phelps Lambert, Arthur Katterjohn, E. C. Walker, frank Adams, Irving La Rue, James Rash, H. S. Kerby, W. I. Thompson, Dr. S. O. Marshall and Rev. Thomas Cummins.

 

Entertained for Mrs. Whittington

Judge and Mrs. J. Hawkins Hart entertained at cards on Friday evening in honor of Mr. and Mrs. George C. Whittington, of Booneville, Mo.  At the conclusion of a serious of absorbing games, the prizes were awarded to Miss Sarah Barret and Mr. Edward E. Jonas.  A delightful two course luncheon was served.

 

Besides the guest of honor, there were present Mr. and Mrs. Edward Jonas, Dr. and Mrs. Cabell Moseley, Mr. and Mrs. James Yeaman, Mr. and Mrs. William Barret, Mrs. Joe C. Dixon, Misses Juliet and Mary Marrs, Sarah Barret, Annie Soaper, Sue Dixon, Virginia Lockett, Christie and Jessie Clark, Margaret Sebree, Annie and Mabel Hart, Cornetta Lyne, Sudie Reeve Hart, Cora South Brown, Margaret Dixon; Messrs. James Hodge, Ed Walker, H. S. Kerby, William Lambert, Lambert and Singleton Kimmel, Phil Smith, Thomas D. Hodge, Lloyd Meter and Irving Thompson.

 

Miss  Williams to Enertain

Miss Irma Williams who has just concluded a very delightful visit to Miss Alreene Herr, of Louisville, is now a member of a house party at Miss Mary Lewis’ in Owensboro.  Miss Williams will return home the twentieth of this month, when she will entertain a charming bevy of girls until August first, when she and her brother Mr. Charles Williams will go east for the rest of the summer.  They will visit Niagra falls, New York and Boston, but most of the time will be spent among the picturesque Berkshire Hills, of Massachusetts, among which nestle such well known places as Lenox and Stockbridge.  The ruins of Hawthorne’s home will stand half way between Stockbridge and Lenox and the inspiration for some of his most beautiful descriptions of nature was gathered from the scenery around this home.

 

The Hartfield – Clark Wedding

On Wednesday evening, July twelfth, at the home of the bride in Frayser block, Miss Irma Hartfield, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ben J. Hartfield and Mr. J. Louis Clarke, of Atlanta, Ga. Will be married.  The wedding will be a quiet tone, only the families of the contracting parties being present.  The ceremony will be performed at 7:30 by Rabbie Lowenthal of Ashville, after which dinner will be served for the guests.  They will leave on the 10 o’clock Dixie Flyer for an extended southern trip.

 

Entertained For Miss Helfenstein

On Friday afternoon Mrs. H. W. Edwards entertained a number of her friends in honor of her guest, Miss Helfenstein of Springfield, Mo.

 

The house was artistically decorated with roses and sweet peas.

 

It was an advertising party, the object of which was to guess the nature of the advertisement from the pictures presented.  The prize, a dainty water color picture, was given to Miss Ethel Bailey.

 

Punch was served during the afternoon and at the conclusion of the contest delightful ices and cake.

 

MISS LAURA HOLLOWAY entertained a number of friends after the dance on Friday  evening at luncheon in honor of her guest, Miss Georgia Anderson of Nicholasville, Ky.

 

Mr. Hamilton Hopkins

A Vocalist of Note

The following clipping from an Evansville paper will be of interest here where Mr. Hamilton Hopkins has a large circle of relatives.  He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles F. Hopkins of Newburg, Ind., but formally of Henderson and is only twenty-four years old.  His musical education was obtained in the east, where he sang in one of Boston’s most prominent churches.

 

There is a probability that in the fall he will go to Italy to study for a year, although he has very flattering offers to continue with the “Parsifal” company.

 

At the evening service at St. Paul’s an elaborate musical program was presented which included some especially fine numbers.

 

The feature of the program was the offertory solo rendered by Mr. Hamilton Hopkins, of the Parsifal opera company which was an unusually fine rendition of that superb number, “It is Enough,” from “The Elijah,” of Mendelssohn.

 

Mr. Hopkins displayed a rich baritone of exceptional range and timbre his interpretation of the selection equaling in many respects that of some of the noted professionals with whom the interpretation of “The Elijah” is usually considered an achievement testing the highest effort of the artiste.

 

Mr. Hopkins, whose vocal development and success in the musical world have been rapid and pronounced since his entering professional lines somewhat more than two years ago, as is amply evidenced by his engagement with the Parsifal company, with whom last season in addition to taking the part of one of the Grail knights he was also selected as understudy for the part of the King Amfortas.

 

- - -

 

A rare musical treat was enjoyed Tuesday evening in the admirable program presented for the musicale given at the Riverside avenue home of Grace Albert Greene in behalf of the Woman’s guild of St. Paul’s church.

 

There were several notable features of the program among which was the initial appearance in concert program before an Evansville audience of Mr. Hamilton Hopkins of Newburg, now of the Parsifal grand Operal company and the production for the first time here of several numbers from the “Daisy Chain” if Liza Lehman, which has been such a popular feature of eastern concert repertoire during the pas season.

 

Mr. Hopkins selection was the beautiful song cycle of Von Fellitz to which an additional interest was given by the little sketch of the story to be musically interpreted which was given by Mr. Hopkins preceding the rendition.

 

Mr. Hopkins exceptionally fine baritone, possibly the best heard from of some time, was a genuine revelation to the audience.

 

In his rendition of the “song cycle” Mr. Hopkins disclosed a voice the timbre of which is distinctively that of grand opera in breadth and richness equaling if not surpassing any recently heard in this city in operatic roles.

 

In addition to his evident endowment with the artistic temperament, Mr. Hopkins renditions presented all the smoothness and Grace of the artistic whose training has been such as to develop all its native richness, his mezzo voice as well as the full lower tones being especially fine.

 

Mr. Hopkin is a member at the well known Charles Hopkins family of Newburg, and his success since entering operatic lines but a short time ago has been quite remarkable.

 

 - - -

 

Miss Mallie Stoner; of Bardstown, who has been the guest of her sister, Mrs. James W. Clay for several weeks left Friday morning for home much to the regret of a host of friends and admirers.  Miss Stoner’s charming personality and winding ways have secured for her a very warm spot in the hearts of her Henderson friends.

 

Another charming guest, Miss Mayme Griffin, of Gallatin Tenn., left for her home on Saturday afternoon leaving an aching void in the hearts of several of Henderson’s bachelors.

 

A number of Miss Sue Baskett’s friends gave her a surprise party in honor of her birthday on Monday evening.  Each guest took a pound of something and a merry time they had.

 

Miss Kate Kitchell and Mr. Jack Bodine left last week for Greenville, Ky to attend a house party at the home of Mr. Bodine’s sister, Mrs. Clarence Martin.  Miss Kitchell will be gone all of July.

 

 

Commissioner’s Sale

By order of the Henderson Circuit Court, rendered at its May term, 1905 in the consolidated case of:

City of Henderson               Plaintiff

Vs No. 268

Mrs. Sarah A. Sandefur          Defendant

And

City of Henderson               Plaintiff

Vs) No. 871

Mrs. Sarah A. Sandefur          Defendant

 

I will as Commissioner on the 24th day of July 1905, same being the first day of July term of the Henderson county court sell at the Court House door in Henderson, Ky., to the highest and best bidder the following described property or enough thereof to satisfy the judgment in said case of amounting to $322.39., viz:

 

A house and lot of ground in the City of Henderson, Ky., fronting 41 feet on the West side of Green Street, between Second and Third streets running back 105 feet and is the property known as the Sandefur residence.

 

Said property will be sold on a credit of 6 months purchaser to execute bonds with approved security bearing interest of 6 per cent from date until paid having the force and effect of a judgment and retaining a lien on said property until the purchase money is paid.

 

Witness my hand this June 16, 1905.

                           GEORGE D. GIVENS, commissioner

 

Sale about 1 p.m.  Purchasers must execute bonds as soon as sale is over or the property will be immediately put up and resold.

 

Additional Society

 

Mrs. Vance Entertains

Mrs. Robert D. Vance entertained a few friends very informally on Saturday afternoon from five to six to meet Mrs. Margaret Neal and Mrs. Max Layne of Helena, Arkansas.

 

Mrs. Neal and Mrs. Layne will leave soon for Chautauqua, N. Y. for the rest of the summer and in September Mrs. Neal will sail for Europe.

 

Mrs. Layne was formerly Miss Anna Weir, of Greenville, Ky.

 

 

Miss Lucy McElwain Powell spending two weeks with Mrs. Adam rankin and the Misses Deacon at their home on Green Street.

 

Madame Scott of Clarksville, Tenn., is the guest of Mr. and Mrs. S. A. Young.  Madame expects to spend several weeks in Henderson visiting her old friends.

 

Commissioner’s Sale

By order of the Henderson Circuit Court rendered at its May term 1905, in the case of

Fletcher Dixon, etc. vs         Plaintiff

Effie Barnett,  etc.            Defendants

 

I will as Commissioner, on the 24th day of July, 1905, same being the first day of the July term of the Henderson County Court, sell at the Court House door in Henderson, Ky., to the highest and best bidder, the following described property, for all it will bring viz:

 

The beginning at a stake, corner to Louis Posey lot and in the middle of the Diamond Island road; thence N. 30-1-2 E 25 poles and 7 1-2 links to another corner of said – Louis Posey lot; thence N 60 1-4 W: 6 poles and 8 links to a stake corner to Solomon Toy’s lot; thence with the middle of the Diamond island road, south 16 1-4 East 6 poles and 8 links to the beginning containing one acre; it being the same property conveyed to Francis Hopkins by J. T. Wilson and wife on April 16, 1886, by deed of record in Deed Book No. 13 page 289 in the Henderson County Clerk’s office.

 

Said property will be sold on a credit of 6 and 12 months, purchaser to execute bond with approved security being interest and 6 per cent from date until paid, having the force and effect of a judgment and retainment a lien on said property until the purchase money is paid.

 

Witness my hand, this June 1, 1905.

                                GEORGE D. GIVENS

                                Commissioner

 

Sale about 1 p.m. Purchasers must execute bonds as soon as sale is over, or the property will be immediately put up and resold.

 

Commissioner’s Sale

 

By order of the Henderson Circuit Court rendered at its May term, 1905, in the case of:

Mary H. Mc Clure’s Ex’or             Plaintiff

Vs

F. H. Martin, Etc.                   Defendants

I will as Commissioner, on the 24th day of July, 1905, sale being the first day of the July term of the Henderson County Court, sell at the Court House door in Henderson, Ky., to the highest and best bidder, the following described property, or enough thereof to satisfy the judgment in said case amounting to $776.01, viz:

 

A house and lot of ground now within the corporate limits of the city of Corydon, Ky., and is bounded as follows:  Beginning at the corner of the Griffin lot: thence N E with the road leaving from B. F. Willett to Robert Bicknell’s to the corner of the Walter’s lot 434 feet, thence from said Walter’s corner N. W. with the Walter’s line along said O’Briens line 228 feet to the corn of O’Brien and M Williams, thence S. E. along the lines of Hancock and King lost 242 feet to a stake near a cedar tree; thence s. W. along the line of the King lot 193 feet to a corner in the King lot; thence S. E. 193 feet, to the beginning.  It being a part of lot No. 2 sold and conveyed to Mrs. Mary Mc Clure by S. A. Young, Commissioner of the Henderson Circuit Court by deed dates the 23rd day of September, 1839, and recorded in deed book No. 28 in the Henderson County Clerk’s office at page 354.  The bond for deed from Mary H. McClure to F. H. Martin having never been recorded.

 

Said property will be sold on credit of a 6 and 12 months purchaser to execute bonds with approved security, being interest at 6 per cent from date until paid having the force and effect of a judgment and retaining a lien on said property until the purchase money is paid.

 

Witnessmy hand, this June 1, 1905.

                     GEORGE D. GIVENS, Comm’r.

Sale about 1 p.m.  Purchasers must execute bonds as soon as sale is over or the property will be immediately put up and resold.

 

Commissioner’s Sale

By order of the Henderson Circuit Court, rendered at its May term, 1905 in the case of

Clarence C. Crafton                  Plaintiff

Vs

Mrs. Mattie Williams                 Defendant

I will as Commissioner on the 24th day of the July term of the Henderson County Court sell at the Court House door in Henderson, Ky., to the highest and best bidder, the following described property, or enough thereof to satisfy the judgment in said case amounting to $624.09,viz:

 

A certain parcel or tact of land in Henderson County, Ky., beginning at a point in the middle of the Bluff City road, corner to Rouse; thence with Rouse’s line S 31 2 4,730 feet to a point in the middle of Lick Creek; thence with the meanders of the said creek to a point in Mat Stone’s line; thence with said Stone’s line and with the line of Barne’s N 31 E 1810 feet to a stake in said Barne’s line; thence N. 49 W 755 feet to a stake corner to 53 12-100 acres of land this day conveyed to said first part to the second parties; thence with the line of said tract N 31 E 3,065 feet to a stake in Bluff city road, corner to said 53 113-100 acres; thence with the middle of the Bluff City road N 59 W 15 feet to the beginning, containing --- acres being a part of 300 ¾ acres of land bought by the first party of M. C. Dunn; see deed of said Dunn recorded in deed book No. 23 page 312 in the office of the Clerk of Henderson County Court.

 

Said property will be sold on credit of 6 months, purchaser to execute bonds with approved security, being interest at 6 per cent, from day until paid, having the force and effect of a judgment and retaining a lien on said property until the purchase money is paid.

 

Witness my hand, this June 1, 1905.

                     GEORGE D. GIVENS, Com’r.

 

Sale about 1 p.m.  Purchasers must execute bonds as soon as sale is over, or the property will be immediately put up and resold.

 

Commissioner’s Sale

By order of the Henderson Circuit Court, rendered at its May term 1905, in the case of

Lizzie Smith                    Plaintiff

Vs

Booker Marks, etc               Defendants

 

I will as Commissioner on the 24th day of July, 1905, same being the first day of the July term of the Henderson County Court, sell at the Court House door in Henderson, Ky., to the highest and best bidder, the following described property, for all it will bring viz:

 

A certain house and lot of ground in the city of Henderson, Ky said lot fronting 50 feet on Gabe Street and running back 200 feet to the Klemeyer property, and bounded on the west by the property of Mollie Walker, and on the east by the property of Margaret Jordan.

 

Said property will be sold on a credit of 6 months purchaser to esecute bonds with approved security, being interest at 6 per cent from date until paid, having the force and effect of a judgment and retaining a lien on said property  until purchase money is paid.

Witness my hand, this June 1, 1905.

                     GEORGE D. GIVENS, Com’r.

Sale about 1 p.m. Purchasers must execute bonds as soon as sale is over, or the property will be immediately put up and resold.

 

Commissioner’s Sale

By order of the Henderson Circuit Court, rendered at its May term, 1905, in the case of

Patsey Cavenor’s Heirs               Plaintiff

Vs

Mary Cook etc.                       Defendant

 

I will as Commissioner on the 24th day of July, 1905, same being the first day of July term of the Henderson County Court, sell at the Court House door in Henderson, Ky., to the highest and best bidder, the following described property for all it will bring. Viiz:

 

One lot of three acres in zion, bound as follows:  Beginning at the corner of Moore and Marshall streets S 4/34 E 779 ½ feet to the intersection of said Street with the line of B.C. Moore and Mrs. Waldon; thence with said line N 30 ¾ E 457 feet in south line of Moore Street; thence S 15, degrees 1’ W 150 feet to the beginning containing three acres, see deed book 13, page 364.

 

And another lot of ground in Zion bounded as follows:  Beginning at a poplar tree, corner to Mrs. Walden in the center of Marshall Street and running with Mrs. Walden’s line N 30 ¾ E to B.C. Moore’s corner; thence N. 13 1/3 W with the said Moore’s line to its intersection with the center of Marshall Street; thence S 4 ¾ E with said Street 540 feet to the beginning.

 

And another lot of ground in Zion described as follows:  Beginning at a stake in the south line of Moore Street corner to his storehouse lot, thence westward 721 feet to the corner lot in the line of said Street thence with the line of said lot in southern direction 467 ½ feet, to Mrs. Walden’s corner; thence with her line north easterly 290 feet, corner to Mrs. Baird’s lot, thence with said line westerly 121 feet to another corner to said lot; thence with another line of said lot 295 feet to the beginning containing 1 1-2 acres.

 

All these parcels lie contigious to each other and form the parcel containing about five acres, with house and orchard.

 

Out of this is to be excepted a small lot of ground conveyed by Louis Cavenor and Patsey Cavenor to Emma Hatchett; on the 19th of January, 1890, and described as follows, to wit:

 

Beginning at a stake in the south side of Moore Street; thence west with the line of Moore Street 50 feet; thence south 120 feet; thence east 50 feet; thence north 120 feet to the beginning, containing about 1-8 of an acre.

 

Said property will be sold on credit of 6 and 12 months purchaser to execute bonds with approved security bearing interest at 6 per cent from date until paid, having the force and effect of a judgment and retaining a lien on said property until the purchase money is paid.

 

Witness my hand, this June 1, 1905.

                     GEORGE D. GIVENS., Com’r

 

Sale about 1 p.m.  Purchasers must execute bonds as soon as sale is over, or the property will be immediately, put up and resold.

 

Press Operator Breaks His Arm

S. Hodge Heilbronner Attempts to Break Jumping Record But Breaks His Arm Instead

S. Hodge Heilbronner, Associated Press operator for THE GLEANER had his right arm broken Sunday morning.  He was attempting to break the local broad jump record when he lost his balance and fell backward in such a manner that his full weight came on his right arm.

 

The accident occurred in the rear of the Hotel Henderson.  Mr. Heilbronner was assisted to the office of Dr. W. W. Wilson on Second Street, where the injury was dressed.  He will be unable to resume his duties as telegrapher for several weeks.

 

Sebree

SEBREE, Ky., July 8. –

The Webster County Sunday School Association met in annual session at Onton yesterday.  The session which lasted from 9:30 to 4:00 was by far the best every held in the county.  Fully one thousand people attended from over the county and the interest manifested was all that could be desired by the most enthusiastic workers.

 

The morning session opened at 9:30 with devotional exercises led by Rev. J. M. Horn, followed by one of the prettiest welcome addresses delivered by one of Webster’s prettiest girls, Miss Roxey Hancock of Onton.  The response and annual address by the County President, R. H. Royster of Sebree.

 

This brought the convention down to work in earnest.  The first was a conference.  “How to have a good Sunday School: led by Prof. E. A. Fox, State Secretary of Louisville.  This was discussed under various sub heads. The first being “Leaders introductory remarks.” By Prof. Fox – Second “The Parents – Part” in the absence of Mr. E. G. Thompson, who was to take this part, it was discussed by the audience.  Prof. Fox leading.  “ The Pastor’s Part” was disposed of by Rev. E. L. Cragi, of Onton.  “The Superintendents Part.” By Rev. J. M. Horn was well attended to “The Pupils Part,” by Rev. T. C. Begauer, of Henderson, was well delivered.

 

After the appointment of committees the convention was addressed by the Rev. Tarkaharsha, of Japan, after which the convention adjourned for dinner.  The entertainment committee escorted the delegates and friends to a beautiful grove near the church where there was a table erected for the purpose, one hundred and seventy-five feet long; this was laden with all those good things which the good women of Onton are noted for fixing on such occasions.  It was estimated that twelve hundred people was fed at the table and when dinner was over there was plenty left to have twice the number more.

 

The afternoon session began at 1:15 with devotional exercises by Rev. T. V. Mc Cain after which Prof. Arthur Floyd of Providence, spoke on “The Child and the Book.”  After the reports of the County Officers, which showed a nice gain in the work of the county in the last year, the Rev. Mc caul, delivered a very impressive talk on “Soul Winning in the Sunday School”.

 

After the reports of the committees the convention adjourned at 3:00 all feeling it was a good day well spent.  The Convention will meet at Providence nest year.  The following officers were elected for the ensuing y ear President, R. H. Royster, Vice President, J. W. Springfield, Secretary, Miss Fanny Conway; House to house visitation, Rev. W. A. Easley, Teachers training Arthur Lloyd; Supt. Primary Work, Mrs. Bettie Agnes.

 

 

Sentence of Guilty and Death

Against Sacra at Russellville

Jury Out But an Hour

Charged With Assault

RUSSELLVILLE, Ky., July 8 – at 5:15 o’clock yesterday afternoon after about an hour’s deliberation the jury in the case against John Sacra, charged with assaulting the German girl, Marie Gladder, returned a verdict of guilty and fixed the punishment at death.  The effect upon the defendant could not be seen as his face lay buried in his arms upon a table in front of him.  He had been in that position for a long time and once when the jury filed into the court room to ask for information about whether each member of the jury should sign the verdict he made no sign.

 

The arguments in the case were concluded at 4 o’clock.  The case was argued for the defendant by Judge S. R. Crewdson and Col. George S. Hardy and for the commonwealth by Hon. John S. Rhea and Commonwealth’s Attorney R. Y. Thomas.  The court house was crowded all day, but the crowd was orderly and quiet and there was no demonstration.

 

Sacra’s wife and two little girls were by his side all day.  When the verdict had been read, the crowd dispersed and the prisoner was returned to jail under guard.  Mrs. Sacra fainted as she was passing through a hallway of the court house on her way out following in the footsteps of her husband.  She soon recovered and was taken away by her father.  After reaching the jail Sacra said:  “it is hard, but I had rather die by law than be mobbed.”

 

Local Brevities

Mrs. Joe H. Arnold left for St. Louis last night.

Miss Julia Lambert returned from Evansville last night.

Mr. and Mrs. A. H. Arentz and children left for Quincy, Ill., last night.

 

Leroy Lightfoot went to Evansvillle last evening to attend the concert at Cook’s Park.

 

Mrs. G. W. Hancock and children, of Owensboro is visiting her sister, Mrs. H. W. Kohl, on Main street.

 

Mr. and Mrs. Eugene Tatum, of Cloverport are visiting Mrs. Tatum’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. R. Burns.

 

Josh Lightfoot has purchased the John Swope place on third Street, to which he has moved with his family.

 

Dr. D. O. Hancock has moved into his new office and residence on Second Street.  It is about completed, and is one of the prettiest homes in the city.

 

LOST LOST LOST

Aaron Ball (colored) aged 10 years, height about 4 feet, weight 50 pounds, light brown color, left home Monday July 3rd, wearing pair blue overalls, brown coat, and brown felt hat.  Last seen with the Swallow and Markell Street parade, July 34d.  Reward for any information on  his whereabouts. 

                E. H. Ball, Care of Henderson Elevator Company.

 

July 11, 1905

 

Here On A Visit

Alves Dixon, who has been in El Paso, Texas, for the past eighteen months came in Sunday night on a visit to his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph C. Dixon.  He has grown some, both perpendicularly and horizontally.  He will spend ten days here receiving the glad hand of his many friends.  He has an excellent position with the International Electric Light Co., and is doing well.

 

Obscene Letter Writer Caught

Man Wh Wrote Vile Stuff To Women Friends Arrested and Taken To Owensboro

 

James Weber, of Zion, Neighborhood Will Probably Have to Do Time in Federal Prison

James Weber, a white man and farmer living near Zion was arrested Monday afternoon by postoffice inspector Susong and taken to Owensboro and lodged in jail.  He is charged with sending obscene letters through the mails.

 

Weber’s offense consisted of writing letters of a vile nature to young girls in different parts of the county.  The fact that the letters were being sent through the mails was called to the attention of Postmaster A. J. Worsham last February and he at once notified the inspector.  Since then Mr. Susong has been at work on the case but had been unable to secure the evidence necessary on which to make the arrest until a few days ago.

 

Monday inspect Susong came here and drove out to the Weber home near Zion.  In the interview which followed between the two men Weber made a confession to the officer and was at once placed  under arrest.  He was lodged in jail at Owensboro to await the action of the Federal courts.

 

The letters written by Weber were unusually vile and it would hardly be believed that a sane man could put the thought he had in writing.  But little is known of Weber in this city.  He is 35 years of age and single.  Several of the letters written by him are in the possession of the officials.  The extreme penalty in the charge against Weber is a fine of $5,000 and five years in prison.

 

Wool Pulling By Jailer and Mayor

At Newport Dispute As To Which Cell Caleb Powers Should Occupy

Furniture of Prepared Celled Smashed and Confiscated

Judge Stout Continued Case

CINCINNATI, July 10 – In custody of a United States Marshal under orders from United States Judge Cochran, who last week assumed jurisdiction in his case, Caleb Powers was tonight lodged in the Newport jail where he will be held pending the decision of the various legal points arising out of his transfer from state to federal jurisdiction.

 

The trip was uneventful save for the large crowd which greeted the prisoner on his arrival in Newport.

 

When Powers arrived at the jail at 7:50 o’clock tonight a controversy arose between jailer Ploeger and Major Hembold, as to what cell the prisoner should occupy.  The Mayor insisted that a cell especially prepared for Powers was not the proper place.  Ploeger and Hembold finally came to blows, and the latter was knocked down.  During the fight the furniture in the cell prepared for the prisoner was confiscated by unknown person.  Subsequently Powers was placed in another cell with other prisoners where he will remain until Ploeger can secure other quarters.

 

On instructions from United States District Attorney Tinsley, warrants were sworn out late tonight for the arrest of Mayor Helmbold for interfering with United States officers.

 

CASE CONTINUTED

GEORGETOWN, KY – July 10 – When court convened at 10:15 this morning Judge Stout had Caleb Powers brought before him and read the order that he be confined in the Campbell county jail until further notice.  Commonwealth’s Attorney Franklin then moved that the Circuit court continue the case until the United States Supreme Court passes on the opinion rendered by Judge Cochran and the motion was sustained.

 

Powers after a chat with a few friends was taken in charge by Jailer Finley and returned to the jail.  United States Marshal Sharp arrived here at 10:30 a.m. and the Federal court writ was filed at once with the Circuit Clerk.  A similar writ will be served this afternoon on Jailer Finley and Powers will be given in charge of Marshal Sharp, who will leave with him over the Queen and Cresent at 3:30 p.m.

 

Young Men Held To Grand Jury

Serious Charge Against Two Young Countrymen Aired in Preliminary Trial Monday

Fred Johnson and Murray Jones, two of the three young men arrested a few days ago on the charge of detaining Eunice Farmer, a young girl living in the Hebbardsville neighborhood, were bound over to the September Grand Jury Monday afternoon by County Judge Hart.  Harry Burns, the other member of the trio arrested on the charge was released.

 

The offense was committed several days ago near the home of the girl’s parents.  On the witness stand the girl said that she went from her home to the rear of an old house on the farm to draw a bucket of water from a well.  While at the well Johnson and Jones came up and made indecent proposals to her.  She struggled to escape but they hsld her for several minutes.

 

The young men denied the girl’s statements when placed on the stand.  It was shown that Burns took no active part in the affair.  There was a large crowd in the court room on account of the prominence of the parties in the case in the neighborhood in which they live.

 

Mobs Searching For Negro Fiend

Attempted Assault On Wife of Minister At Central City and People Wild

 

Taken to Greenville and is Then Hurried to the Jail at Madisonville by Officers

OWENSBORO, Ky. July 10 – John Clark, a negro was arrested at Central City, Muhlenberg county, this morning on the charge of attempting to commit a criminal assault on the wife of Rev. William Woodson.  The news of the attempted assault spread rapidly and it is said, mobs are forming all over the county.

 

The Marshal at Central City removed the negro to Greenville, the county seat.  Excitement is high there and he was later moved to Madisonville, In Hopkins county.

 

Mrs. Woodson is a member of one of the most prominent families in Muhlenberg county.  The negro says his home is in New Orleans.

 

Thrown From Horse And Fatally Hurt

OWENSBORO, Ky., July 10 – Roy Milton, aged sixteen, was thrown from a horse at Habit receiving fatal injuries.

 

News of the Neighborhood

 

Smith Mills

SMITH MILLS, Ky., July 10, 1905 –

The younger set of boys and girls are enjoying an outing in the woods today.  They passed through town early this morning in a large wagon laden with happy youngsters and dinner baskets.

 

Mrs. Mary Hoskins has moved to the Seibert house having sold her residence to J. H. Gabbart, who with his family will shortly ake possession.

 

Mrs. J. W. Cooper delightfully entertained some of the little folks on Friday afternoon in honor of Master Prentice Cooper of Shelbyville, Tenn.  Those present were Frankie and Blanche Cooper, Miriam Agnes, Carolyn Cooper, Salibel Royster, Thomas and Lindsay Cooper, William Agnes and Pretice Cooper.

 

W. L. Royster has accepted the school at Allen and will begin teaching the last Monday in July.  The people of Allen are to be congratulated on securing him again as teacher.

 

There will be a lecture at the Baptist church Wednesday night, July 12, by a missionary who is a native of Japan.  He is a student in the seminary at Louisville, preparing himself to go back and preach to his people.  His lecture will be both instructive and entertaining.  He will appear in a fine native costume.  The price of admission is cheap enough for all to attend as it is only 10 cents, per head for adults and 5 cents for children.  So let every one come out and help this worthy young man, whi is striving in this way to get means to complete his course in the seminary, so that he may be prepared to take the gospel back and preach it acceptably to his people in his native country.

 

Geneva

GENEVA, Ky., July 10, 1905

Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Sandefur and master Herbert of Evansville were the pleasant guest of his parents, Dr. and Mrs. M. C. Sandefur.  They returned to their home on the Fourth.

 

Oscar Abbott, of Eddyville is here visiting his brother, R. H. Abbott.

 

Mrs. W. T. Averitt of Morganfield is here spending the week with her sister, Mrs. Henry dance.

 

Miss Kitty Owen Sandefur, of Henderson is spending a few days with dr. and Mrs. Sandefur.

 

B. B. Cobb has returned to Howell, Ind.

 

Mr. and Mrs. Grotley and family of Equality, Ill, are visiting Mr. and Mrs. Bonnetll at their pretty country home.

 

Mr. and Mrs. John Sandefur, of Howell, Ind., is spending a week with relatives here.

 

The Misses Amlets entertained a few of their friends Wednesday evening giving a dance in honor of Miss Kitty Sandefur, of Henderson.  The evening was enjoyed by all present.

 

Mrs. M. C. Sandefur has returned home from a visit to Howell, Ind., and Chicago.

 

Miss Eleanor Slaton of Evansville is the guest of the Misses Bonnell this week.

 

Mrs. M. A. Abbot, who has been suffering with neuralgia is slightly improved.

 

Mrs. Anna Morrison who recently returned home from Letchers hospital is no better.

 

Mrs. Martin Keeper who was painfully hurt by a vicious cow, is improving slowly.

 

There will be preaching at the M. E. church here Sunday by the Rev. E. E. Pate, Sunday school at 9:30 o’clock.

 

Robards

The Methodist church is about complete.

 

We understand that our coal company has let out the contract for building the tip, Mr. Gates being the lucky man.

 

Quite a number of our people attended services at Mc Mullen Chapel, July 4.

 

Miss Pearl Ebeln, has been visiting relatives in Henderson for a few days.

 

Mrs. T. W. Royster spent several days in Sturgis last week.

 

Miss Fannie Clark returned Wednesday from a visit to relatives in Henderson.

 

Dr. H. Poole went to Henderson Friday on business.

 

Mr. and Mrs. A. Brooks are at Dawson.  The intention of their going was to see if Mrs. Brook’s health would not be benefited by the water.

 

Mrs. John Otey and daughter, of Louisville are visiting friends and relatives here.

 

Mrs. Phil Bingomer and daughter, Miss Edna are visiting relatives in Evansville.

 

Owen Ligon, who has a position on a show boat above Louisville, is here among his relatives.

 

Miss Myrtle eblen is visiting relatives in Princeton, Ky.

 

The party at Charlie Robards Tuesday was a success.

 

Mrs. Robert Royster and son, Murl, returned from Birmingham, Ala., Friday where she has been visiting her husband.

 

Miss Winnie Funston is visiting relatives in Owensboro and Louisville.

 

Auit a crowd attended the funeral Monday of Mr. Enoch Eakins, who was 77 years old and a high respected citizen.  He leaves a wife and eight children and host of friends to morn his loss.

 

W. S. Wilson on last Sunday struck a rusty nail in his foot from which he has been suffering ever since.

 

PERSONAL

Master Alvin Wolfing, of Morganfieeld was in the city yesterday enroute home from a visit to reltives at Slaughtersville.

 

C. M Katterjohn, manager of the Cumberland Telephone Company, of Evansville, was in the city yesterday on business.

 

Rev. F. W. Wittenbraker, of Hopkinsville, was in the city yesterday enroute to Owensboro.

 

Mr. and Mrs. Stewart Starling and children, of Owwensboro, returned home yesterday after a visit to Col. And Mrs. E. L. Starling on North Main Street.

 

Morgan Mc Cormick went to Stanley yesterday to visit his uncle, Nat Stanley, for a few days.

 

W. G. Duncan and son, Roy, of Robards, were in the city yesterday.

Lon Richards went to Hawesville yesterday.

Robert Roll and little sons returned from basket yersterday.

B. H. Denton, of the county, left for Shelbyville yesterday.

 

Mrs. Ed Melton and children went to Owensboro yesterday to visit Mr. and Mrs. W. P. Crook.

 

L. Bailey, secretary and treasurer of the Reinecke Coal company., of Madisonville was in the city on business yesterday.

 

Miss Willie Archey, of Robards, returned home yesterday after a visit to Miss Little Ruth Orr, on Clay Street.

 

Mrs. Abe Mann and son, Clarence, left Sunday for Waukeesha, Wis. To be gone for three weeks or a month.

 

R. P. Farnsworth and Walter O. Hall went to Owensboro yesterday on business.

 

Miss Bettie Mills, of Uniontown, was in the city yesterday en route to Louisville.

 

Miss Kate Newman and little brother, Robert Newman, Jr., returned yesterday from a visit to friends at Uniontown.  They were accompanied by Miss Arlette Pike and brother, Master Cronin Pike, who will visit them for a few days.

 

Mr. and Mrs. S. Tilden Sinne and son, Master Earl returned yesterday from an extended visit to Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.

 

J. T. Dillehay, of Owensboro, spent Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. R. D. Lightfoot on Green Street.

 

Mrs. Andrew Fuller and children, of St. Louis are visiting Mr. and Mrs. Jake Bonenberger, on the Corydon road.

 

Mrs. Thomas Melton, of Sebree, returned home yesterday from a visit to her mother, Mrs. Mary Calloway.

 

Mrs. S. K. Feland of Hopkinsville, was in the city yesterday en route home from Annapolis, Md., where she had been visiting her son, Capt. Logan Feland.

 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Garrett  and little daughter, Miss Florence Mabel, returned Sunday from a visit to Mr. Garrett’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Garrett, of Owensboro.

 

F. A. Gonne, of Detroit, Michigan left yesterday for a trip through the South after a visit to his brother in law Rev. and Mrs. E. Mc Collom on the Corydon Road.

 

Miss Elizabeth Schuette, of the county, returned from Indianapolis Sunday.

 

Elder H. C. Ford, of Nebo, Ky., was in the city yesterday from Owensboro.

 

Mrs. M. A. aRnold and daughter, Jiss Addie of Madisonville, were in the city yesterday en route home from a visit to her mother, Mrs. Belle of Louisville.

 

W. G. Collins, of Sebree, was in the city yesterday en route from Owensboro.

 

Epton Bivins left yesterday for Lexington to be gone for a week or ten days.

 

Miss Pearl Jones of Grandberry, Tex, returned home yesterday after spending several weeks with her sister, Mrs. Pearcy Utley, of Smith Mills.

 

Mr. and Mrs. Augustus Brooks, of Robards, were in the city yesterday en route home from Dawson Springs.

 

Mrs. M. A. Drury, of Morganfield is visiting her daughter, Mrs. Herbert L. Denton on North Green Street.

 

E. A. Broadley, of Baskett, ws in the city yesterday en route to Sebree Springs to spend a few days.

 

W. H. Ryan went down the L & N yesterday.

Rev. B. A. Geiger, of Sebree, was in the city yesterday.

Herman Palis returned from Dawson Springs Sunday.

John Triplett, of Robards, was in the city yesterday on business.

R. L. Bell, of Slaughtersville, was in the city yesterday.

Mrr. And Mrs. R. M. Herndon returned from Corydon yesterday.

Henry Baldauaf returned from Louisville yesterday.

Archdeacon M. M. Benton, of Louisville, was in the city yesterday.

Johnnie Muncaster went to Sebree yesterday.

Mesdames J. B. Herron and J. R. Thompson and Miss Lillian Thompson and Charles Willett, of Flournoy, were in the city yesterday.

 

Miss Amelia Miles, of Stanley,w as in the city yesterday en route to Morganfield to visit Miss Margaret Larnie.

 

Mr. and Mrs. W. G. Turpin and little son, and Mrs. Turpin’s mother, Mrs. A. Hall of St. Louis, returned from a visit to relatives at Sebree yesterday.

 

S. Vance King, of Owensboro, was in the city Sunday.

James H. Rowland went down the I.C. Yesterday.

Ellis Owen of Owensboro, spent Sunday with friends in the city.

 

Mr. and Mrs. R. E. Epley and children of Sebree, returned home yesterday after a visit to Mr. and Mrs. M. J. Epley.

 

R. P. Henry, of Madisonville, returned home Sunday after a visit to Mr. and Mrs. W. M. Farless, on South Main Street.

 

Narrow Escape from Drowning

On the West Side of Main Street

Rescued One Gives Good Advice

Help!  Help!  Help!

Were the shrill cries of distress that rang out upon the listening ear of night at the time when graveyards and policemen yawn.  Someone had evidently fallen by the wayside or perhaps was about to shuffle off this mortal coil with only a wooden overcoat for a covering.

 

Night hawks policemen hack drivers and others who were pursuing nocturnal avocations heard the reverberating wails of woe and hastened to catch the location at the foghorn appeals for assistance.

 

They were not mistaken.  The human distress whistle was blown on the west side of Main Street between First and Second and thither they hurried in their automobiles.  The cry was evidently that of a drowning person.

 

The rains of Monday afternoon had filled the wide and deep holes in the sidewalk with the same sort of load carried by the “water wagon.”, and it was apparent that someone had mistaken this watery waste for a sidewalk in the city of Henderson, a city of the third classs with 14,375 in habitants.

 

It was too late the man had tumbled and what he needed was assistance.  The end of a rope was attached to a telephone pole and a lasso quickly arranged.  This was dexterously manipulated and the drowning man was dragged out by the left hind leg.  A stomach pump and other restoratives were applied.  He then sat up and took notice of his surroundings, and as he vanished into the plutonian darkness of the night, “his voice fell like the falling star.”  “Why don’t you bridge your municipal waterways or hang out a danger signal?”

 

Shot Negro In Leg

James Waller, a negro living at Spottsville was shot and badly wounded in one of his legs at a dance in Spottsville Saturday night.  He had a row with an unknown negro while attending a dance.  The shooting broke up the festivities.

 

Funeral of Henry Lyne

The funeral services over the remains of Henry Lyne were held Monday morning at the Episcopal church.  The services were conducted by Rev. L. W. Rose and attended by a number of relatives and friends of the family. 

 

The pallbearers were:  R. D. vance, Edwin Hodge, W. J. Marshall, Ingram Crockett, J. H. Hart, James S. Taylor.

 

Has Broken Leg

William Notter, a bridge carpenter for the L & N was caught under a heavy piece of timber Monday afternoon at Vaughn’s Station and his left leg broken.  He was brought across the bridge and taken to Letcher’s sanitarium for treatment.  The injury was severe.

 

Death of Sister of Mrs. Lyne Herndon

MAYSVILLE, Ky., July 10

Mrs. Susan Bennett of Tucson, Ariz. Who was visiting her parents, Mr. and Mrs. S. P. Bradford, of Aberdeee, O., died after a brief illness.  She was a sister of Mrs. Lyne Herndon of Louisville.  About the same time of her death the twin daughters of her uncle, Silas Bradford, died of cholera infantum.  Mrs. Bennett leaves a husband and one child.

 

Was Drowned in Green River

OWENSBORO, Ky., July 19

John Rader, who drowned at Calhoon Saturday night about 11 o’clock.  His body was recovered at 3 o’clock Sunday afternoon and brought here for shipment to his former home at Newcastle, Ind.

 

Girl Rock Tosser Is Bound Over

Threw Rock Into Crowd of Young Folk on Hay Ride and Will Spend Summer in Coundy Jail

Sadie Vaughn, a black girl of fifteen years, was presented in police court Monday afternoon on the charge of throwing rocks with a malicious intent.  She was bound over to the September grand jury in the sum of $200 dollars and will sojourn during the summer months at the county bastile with numerous others of her kind who have done things with malicious intent.

 

The girls offense consisted of flinging a rock at a crowd of young white people who were enjoying a hay ride through the streets of the city last Thursday night.  The rock struck Miss Carrie Brink, a member of the party on the lip, inflicting a serious wound.

 

Deputy jailer, Fred Eblen, who was a member of the party, saw the girl when she ran into the Street and tossed the stone.  He tumbled off the wagon and hustled into the girl’s home on Holloway Street and after catching her telephoned for the patrol wagon.  He worked up the case against the girl and was the chief witness for the state yesterday.

 

The girl denied throwing the rock and claimed that Adelaide Johnson had been the pebble tosser.  She had about fourteen witnesses in court, nearly all of them had seen the girl in the Street when the wagon passed but none of them saw her throw the rock.  Sadie confidentially expected to clear herself when Adelaid Johnson was introduced.  When it came her time to ask the witness questions Sadie bristled up and asked with confidence.

 

“Adelaide do you not remembah throwing that rock yourself?”

“You is sutinly foolish.  I ain’t had no rock in my hand,” replied the big eyed Adelaid.

 

Saide’s confidence floated away in the misty air of the court room as Judge Walker shouted for order and pronounced sentence as follows:

 

“The defendant is bound over to the September grand jury in the sume of $200.

 

Since Sadie is an educated black girl she will have ample time to write essays on the advantages of county jail as a summer resort while awaiting for the grand jury to meet.

 

-----

George Able, an aged resident, who became involved in a difficulty with George Mullins, a farmer, several days ago was the prosecuting witness against Mullins in a breach of the peace case.  The difficulty between the two men came up over a cow trade and Mr. Abel was struck by Mullins.

 

Mullins was represented by B. S. Morris and the case was tried before a jury of six men.  The taking of the testimony required a greater part of the afternoon.  The jury brought in a majority verdict that Mullins was guilty of a breach of the peace and fixed his fine at $5.

 

Several other cases were on the docket but were postponed on account of the lack of time.

 


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