Baptist Education Society

CONTENTS

Constitution

By-Laws

Beneficiaries

Trustees

54th Meeting

Report of the Board

Treasurer Report

The Alumni Association

Necrology for 1870-1

Madison University

Hamilton Theological Seminary

Courses of Study

General Remarks

Campus

Receipt

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MADISON UNIVERSITY.

THE GRAMMAR SCHOOL.

To Pastors and the Churches:

WE ask your prayerful consideration of the following statements:--

1. We are endeavoring to cooperate with you in building up the Church, and in evangelizing the world. Our first object is, to increase the number and the power of the ministry. It is your prerogative as a Church to "separate" those whom God has called. It is ours as an "Institution of Learning," to instruct in the ways of God more perfectly, "those whom you have separated." It is yours to foster in the convert the first kindlings of desire for usefulness. It is ours to provide such additional intellectual and moral training as will best give power for usefulness. In this way we shall multiply Pastors, Evangelists, Teachers, for perfecting the saints, for the work of the ministry.

2. Madison University under different forms has existed over fifty years. It was opened in 1820 as a "Seminary," enlarged in 1832 into "Hamilton Literary and Theological Institution," and chartered in 1846 as "Madison University." It emerged in 1850 from a three years' Removal agitation. It has had, since then, twenty-one years of earnest work in general and ministerial education. It has held steadily on its course, as an Institution which was founded by the Church, which belongs to the Church, which works primarily for the Church. In all that pertains to the interests of general education it is liberal––liberal in its charter, liberal in its plans and aims, liberal in opening its course to all. But to the Church that founded it, it owes the most solemn obligations. Distant be the day when this Church shall cease to own, to pray for, to foster, and to endow it with the best talents and gifts.

3. This Institution is the "mother stock" from which have issued, directly or indirectly, five similar Institutions. Nor has this lost vigor. It stands forth more hale and strong than ever. It sends out annually vigorous men, furnished with sound learning and sound doctrine. True, it almost stands alone in the uniqueness of its character, and in its devotion to the denomination that founded it. It began with a view to meet the wants of the Churches. Nor does it less well meet the wants of all young men who have for their object to acquire a thorough education.

4. It is twenty-one years since it emerged from the Removal strife. It was thought that it would expire from exhaustion. But new strength in time of need came from on high. Before, it had no endowment, but a heavy debt. It now has no debt. It has additional buildings, and $260,000 of invested funds. New Institutions have divided and subdivided the region of its patronage. But it still draws its students from nearly all States in the Union and from foreign lands.

The last twenty-one years have educated not less students than the twenty years that preceded, when the patronage was undivided, and all New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Michigan, and most of New England, looked to this School. For the last twenty-one years the record gives the following table:--

27

THE YEARLY AVERAGE SINCE 1850.

Theological Graduates........................
College Graduates............................
Grammar School Graduates.....................
Theological Students,.......................
College Students,...........................
Grammar School Students,...................
Whole Number Yearly,........................

WHOLE NUMBER FOR 21 YEARS.
Theological Graduates .......................
College Graduates............................
Grammar School Graduates.....................

10
16
28
22
92
53
167


 213
327
592

That is, the average number of students taught each year, in all the departments, since "the withdrawal" in 1850, is 167. The least number any one year was 69, (1850). The greatest number of any one year was 228. The Institution maintained about this number, till the first year of the war, after which the increase was checked. Present number of students, 180.

5. The preceding statements we wish to bear more directly on the Grammar School. This is initiatory. It is an immediate link to connect the Institution and the Churches. It takes young men of a good common school education, at once, when they are called to a life of study. This Department was eliminated as a distinct Academy, in 1832. It has furnished the drill course for preparatory Freshmen, and for business life. It has made no pretensions, but has done a great and thorough work. Its three lines of study-–English with Mathematics, Latin and Greek, have met the wants of all whose aim has been to give culture, symmetry and strength to all the mental faculties. This School in its denominational relations and claims, we think has no rival.

6. Some Suggestions.––In order better to secure the objects which the Churches aim at, by the cooperation of this Institution, we suggest the following outline;

1. That lads of promise in the Sunday School be looked after with special care––that Pastors and Deacons fix the eye upon such as seem by nature to be endowed with special gifts, upon such as with a good physical organization, occupied with a ready mind and good heart, are "grown in favor,"-that these be encouraged to read, and meditate upon simple passages of Scripture, and in their own way to explain them. This will serve to develop those who have "gifts " for preaching, teaching and "edifying," and to show the workings of the Holy Spirit in them.

2. That young men in the Church and out of it, be directed in a course of mental and moral culture, not with a necessary reference to the Gospel Ministry, but to some sphere of life which would give more than ordinary scope for the play of the mental faculties, and more than the ordinary field for usefulness. How many young men pass on to obscurity, because some slight attention to them has not opened a way for their aspirations. How many who might tell this short experience: "I was twenty, a member of the Church, and had a common school education. I could in some way gather means for two, four or six years of study. I was anxious to rise to a higher plane of usefulness. I felt the "fire shut up." But I was spending my best years with no distinct aim, because I could see no distinct way. One day Bro. S. said to me: "Do you not think you ought to give yourself to study, and make the most of your life by preparing for some one of the professions? Many farmers, merchants and mechanics are members of our Churches, but few professional men. We want more ministers, teachers, physicians, lawyers, to carry a Christian influence into the higher walks of life. Besides, there is a school at Hamilton, well adapted to your case.' These few words opened a new life to me, and but for them I should have been plodding my way in a narrow circle, useful, doubtless, but ignorant of those higher forces that can be plied for elevating our race." This young man is now a teacher in one of our Higher Institutions.

3. If you find the young man deficient in the common English branches, direct him, and if possible, let him, first of all, become master of Spelling, Penmanship, Arithmetic, Geography and English Grammar. These are fundamental to good scholarship. Only those young men who have attempted a higher education without the knowledge of these branches, know the embarrassment. Those who have been drilled into good scholarship in these common branches, are found thorough in all the branches of a higher education. But "looseness and shallowness" in most cases result from being superficial in the common school.

4. It is in this way that the Holy Spirit will designate those who are "apt to teach," and have other gifts for the Holy Ministry. If Pastors and Deacons, and other Church Members shall have done their duty towards young men, will not our Colleges and Seminaries be filled with students for the ministry, and our Churches better supplied with Pastors?

MADISON UNIVERSITY.

THEOLOGICAL FACULTY. 

Rev. EBENEZER DODGE, D. D.,. LL. D., 
Professor
of Biblical Theology.
Rev. GEORGE W. EATON, D. D., LL. D., 
Emeritus Professor of Practical Theo
logy.
Rev. ALEXANDER M. BEEBEE, D. D., 
Professor of Homiletics.
Rev. HEZEKIAH HARVEY, D. D.,
Professor of Biblical Criticism and Pastoral Theology.
*____________________
Professor
of Ecclesiastical History.

COLLEGE FACULTY.

EBENEZER DODGE, D. D., LL. D., 
President and Professor of Betaphysics and Evidences of Revealed Religion. 

PHILETUS B. SPEAR, D. D., 
Professor of Hebrew.
ALEXANDER M. BEEBEE, D. D., 
Professor of Logic.
LUCIEN M. OSBORN, A. M.,
 
Professor
of Natural Sciences
 N. LLOYD ANDREWS, A. M., 
Professor of Greek Language and Literature. 
JOHN J. LEWIS, A. M.,
Professor of English Literature and Civil History. 
EDWARD JUDSON, A. M., 
Professor of
the Latin and Modern Languages. 
ALBERT S. BICHMORE, A. M., MD., 
Professor of Natural History.
HEZEKIAH

HARVEY, D. D., 
Bleecker Professor of Moral Philosophy. 
JAMES M. TAYLOR, A.M., 
Professor
of Mathematics.

GRAMMAR SCHOOL.

JAMES M. TAYLOR, A. M., Principal.
GEORGE F. ARNOLD, A. B., Tutor.

OTHER OFFICERS.

N. L. ANDREWS, Librarian. 
P. B. SPEAR, Treasurer of Madison University.

*For the Current year, instruction in this department is given by the Professor of Homiletics.

MADISON UNIVERSITY.

This Institution has THREE DEPARTMENTS, each complete in itself, yet all harmonizing in a connected course of eight years.

 1.-The THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY has a course of two years, designed for Graduates of Colleges and others, whose callings and attainments prepare them for Theological Studies. Thorough instruction by Lectures and other Exercises is given in Biblical Theology, Systematic Theology, Pastoral Duties, Church History, Biblical criticism and Interpretation. Provision is also made for instruction in the Hebrew to those who come from Colleges or elsewhere without such a knowledge of this language as the Course requires.

  2.-The College has a course of four years, in which instruction is given by Lectures and Recitations, three daily, to each class in Philosophy, Philology, History, Revealed Religion, Natural Science, Mathematics, Logic, Classical and English Literature.

3.-The GRAMMAR SCHOOL, or Academic Department, has a well balanced Classical and English coarse of two years designed to fit young men for College, or for the active pursuits of life. It is under the general supervision of the President and Faculty of the University, and special direction of the Principal. No pains will be spared to make it meet its design.

  The changes just made will affect favorably all Departments.--About $8,000 have been expended in reconstructing and repairing the two Buildings which contain the Students' Rooms. A President's House and ten acres of ground have been added to the Premises. A Prize Exhibition has been established. A President and three new Professors have been inaugurated. More room has been given for the Natural Sciences, with minor improvements.

The forty "Trevor Scholarships," for soldiers, or their sons or brothers, are working most beneficently.

CALENDAR.

1871.
Sept. 28.-First Term commences, Thursday Morning. 
Dec. 21-23.-Examination on the Studies of the Term. 
Dec. 23. Junior Exhibition. First Term closes. 

1872.
Jan. 3.--Second Term opens, Wednesday Morning. 
March 25-27.-Examination on the Studies of the Term. March 27.-Senior Prize Exhibition, Wednesday evening. Second Term closes. 
April 1.-Third Term opens, Monday Morning.
May 20-22.-Examination of Senior Class.
June 12-14.-Examinations on the Studies of the Term.
June 14.-Exhibition of University Grammar School, Friday Evening. 
June 17.-Meetings oĢ the University and Education Boards, Monday. 
June 17-18.-Examination for admission into the University, Monday and Tuesday.
June 18.-Anniversary of the Theological Seminary. Meeting of the Education Society, Tuesday.
June 19.-University Commencement, Wednesday. Third Term closes.

VACATION OF TWELVE WEEKS.

Sept. 11 and 12.-Examination for admission into the University. 
Sept. 12.-First Term commences, Thursday Morning.

EXPENSES.

Board per week, $3.00, payable each Term in advance . . .. $120.00

Incidental Expenses and Sacred Music, per Term, $3.00, in advance . . 9.00

TUITION PER ANNUM.
Payable each Term in advance.

Grammar School . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . $20.00

College . . . . . . . . . . . . .  . . . . . . . . 30.00

Theological Seminary, gratuitous.
To Students for the Ministry, rooms free.
To Students not having the Ministry in view, $3.00 per term is also charged for room rent.

CERTIFICATE.

At the meeting of the Board, January 1, 1840, the following resolution was adopted:

Resolved, To extend the privileges of Beneficiaries to indigent young men, in strict accordance with the first article of the Constitution; so that instead of a full license to preach the Gospel, it shall be deemed sufficient that the applicant for aid bring from the Church to which he belongs, a certificate of his having given to them the evidence of personal piety, and of his being called of God to preach the Gospel, and give the same evidence to the Faculty of the Institution.

The following is a proper form of a certificate to be presented by any young man who is to be received as a student preparing for the Christian Ministry:

"The bearer, ________ ___________, is a member of this Church, in good standing and, in our judgment, has suitable gifts for the Christian Ministry. We therefore fellowship him in taking a course of preparatory studies for the work, and recommend him for that purpose to the Faculty of Madison University.

"By order and in behalf of the Church,
"___________ ____________ , Church Clerk."

PARTIAL COURSE.

Candidates for the Ministry, whose circumstances render it expedient, are permitted, under the direction of the Faculty, to make a selection from the studies of the course, reciting with the regular classes.

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