THE LEADING CITIZENS OF MADISON COUNTY

CONTENTS
Preface
Names Index
Portrait Index


  KINSMAN D. BROGA, M.D., eclectic physician of Oneida, N.Y., was born in Becket, Berkshire County, Mass., April 29, 1830, son of Kinsman W. and Marion (Cole) Broga. The father was a carpenter and joiner by trade, and lived during his entire life in Berkshire County. The mother, though of a long-lived ancestry, died in middle life. Kinsman W. Broga and his wife had eleven children, six of whom still survive, namely: William, living in Syracuse; Waite, Elmina R., and Elizabeth, all of Otis, Mass.; Kinsman D.; and Charles, living at Dalton, Livingston County, N.Y.
  Kinsman D. Broga was brought up among the Berkshire hills, and in his youthful days worked at farm labor and also with his father at his trade. He was always thorough in whatever he undertook. Being always anxious for an education, he attended school and studied as he had opportunity. A certain lady boarding with his people was of material assistance, lending him various text-books, which he took great delight in studying, among them works on chemistry, physiology, and kindred subjects. He soon became most interested in works pertaining to medicine and surgery, and read them extensively, in preference to those upon other subjects, which was a proof in itself of his early leaning toward his profession. Remaining at home with his father until he was twenty-one years old, doing the work of a dutiful son of those days, he at that age started out in life for himself. The first work that presented itself to him was blacksmithing, and he worked at that trade for a time. His sister Harriet, now deceased, having married a doctor of the eclectic school, his attention was directed particularly to that system of medical practice; and he began his studies under the direction of his brother-in-law. Being, as has already been intimated, a natural physician, so to speak, and having confidence in himself, there is no wonder that he should, when he became a regular practitioner, be successful. His later preceptors were Dr. W. Soule and Dr. Soule, Sr., and Dr. Wood, of Durhamville, where he began practice about 1861, under a license. After the war the Legislature passed a law requiring all physicians to have a diploma or a certificate from an examining board, or to retire from practice. Considering himself qualified, he appeared before such a board, together with thirteen others, three of whom, including himself, passed the examination successfully, notwithstanding its thoroughness and rigidity. His practice, which has been attended with most gratifying success, is general, not special; and at Oneida as at Camden, where he has a branch office, he has plenty of work. He reads a great deal upon the science of medicine, thus keeping himself abreast of the times and prepared to meet any phase of disease. Dr. Kinsman D. Broga has been twice married. By his first marriage, to Miss Demaris Brown, of Lee, Mass., he had four children: Harriet Louisa, wife of Chauncey Kinney, who has four sons--Arthur, Frederick, Leon, and Charles; Franklin Dwight, who married Capitola Campbell, and has one son, George; Arthur Ellery, M.D., of Stockbridge, who married Nellie Beard, of Shelton, Conn., and has one child, Hazel; and Susan Ellen, of Stockbridge. By his second marriage, to Mrs. Ellen A. Dolbey, nee Crofutt, of Constantia, Oswego County, N.Y., a native of Stratford, Conn., Dr. Broga has one child, Dwight C., thirteen years old. Politically, Dr. Broga is a Democrat, and fraternally an Odd Fellow. He has attained his present position by his own close study and continued faithful striving after excellence in his profession.

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