James Lee Weaver's Family Tree


Uel Lamkin.Uel married Sarah Hardin.

Sarah Hardin [Parents] was born in 1768. She died in 1817. She married Uel Lamkin.


Edwin Hardin [Parents] was born in 1815 in IlIllinois. He died in 1843.

1830 Hempstead census....2 females under five
yrs...male 20-30 and
female 20-30

1840 Sevier Co.,AR...1 male under 5, 1 male 5-10, 1
male 30-40, 2
females 10-15, 1 female 30-40.....Jackson Township in
Sev. Co., AR

1843 Hemp. Co. land pat. cancelled

Source: "Mary Turney"

He had the following children:

  M i Joel P Hardin was born on 30 May 1825 in Brecken Ridge, Tx. He died on 26 Nov 1904 in Greenbrair, Craford, Ks.
  F ii Martha Naphania Hardin was born on 8 Nov 1826 in Ar. She died on 7 Apr 1884 in , Tx. She was buried in Guiceland Cemetery.

Guiceland Cemetery Inscription

Born: 9 Nov 1826 - Died 7 Apr 1884 (Double Person flat style headstone shared with her husband Joseph T. Bowman.) Inscription: "Wife of Joseph Bowman". There is also a state historical marker about their family

From the Land Survey Abstract Indices of the Original Land Owners of Texas:

Person Bearing Land Certificate At Time of Survey
NEPHANIA BOWMAN

Person To Whom The Land Was Awarded
N. BOWMAN

Abstract Number On File, Texas General Land Office, Austin
236

I am Bob Bowman. Perhaps I can help in your search. Joseph Bowman was my great-great grandfather, who was the son of Jesse B. Bowman, who died at the Alamo in 1836. Joseph also fought in the Texas revolution in 1936. He is buried at Guiceland Cemetery on the border of Houston and Anderson counties in East Texas. Joseph was born May 1, 1811, in Illinois and Naphania Hardin, his wife, was born Nov. 8, 1826. They were married January 6, 1841. Their children and their birthdates were Edward, Nov. 9, 1842; William Henry, May 5, 1844; Mary Elizabeth (the one you referred to), March 5, 1846; Louisey Jane (Elma), March 25, 1848; Sarah Jane, Nov. 11, 1850; Irene Melviney, Nov. 31, 1853; Laura Josephine, Oct. 2, 1856; Samuel Linch, January 24, 1859; George Washington (George, however, used William as his middle name), May 24, 1860; and Joel Harrison, my great-grandfather, July 10, 1863.

Naphania Hardin was either an Indian herself or the child of an Indian parent. At the time they were married, she was 16 and Joseph was 31. Naphania's father was Edwin Hardin, whose great-uncle, Colonel Joseph Hardin, was also the great grandfather of John Wesley Hardin, a notorious killer and gunfighter who killed between 30 and 40 men. The Hardins were descendants of the "Knob Creek Hardins" of North Carolina and had ties with the Lumbee Indians, a tribe living around Robeson County, N.C.

Jesse B. Bowman, Joseph's father, fought in the War of 1812 in Illinois while he was living in Shawneetown, the oldest town in Illinois. He moved to Harmony (Posey County) Indiana between 1814 and 1816, left there between 1817 and 1820, then settled on the Ouchita River in Arkansas in the l820s, becoming the first white settler of what is now Camden, Arkansas, and then moved west to Hempstead County about 1824. He remained there until 1833, when lured by the promise of free land in Texas, he moved to Red River County, Texas. He left there in early 1835 for San Antonio as part of a company of volunteers commanded by Col. James Bowie (whose famous Bowie knife had been made in Hempstead County earlier). Bowman died during the fall of the Alamo on March 6, 1836, and his body was burned with the other Alamo defenders on orders of General Santa Anna.

You'll find Jesse B. Bowman's name as an Alamo hero inside the Alamo, on the Cenotaph outside the Alamo, on a "heroes walk" on Bowie Street in downtown San Antonio, on an Alamo monument at the Texas state capitol in Austin, and in various other places and books. A Texas state historical marker to Jesse B. Bowman stands near old Jonesville in Red River County, north of Clarksville, and a state historical marker to his son, Joseph, stands near his grave in Guiceland Cemetery.

I have not been able to find out who Jesse B. Bowman's mother and father were. I have an indication he came to Illinois from Rutherford County, Tennessee, but I am not positive. He was a hunter and trapper and could not write or read, so there are few personal records available.

If you would like to know more about the Jesse B. Bowman and Joseph Bowman lines, Doris and I wrote a hardback book, "Search for an Alamo Soldier," a number of years ago. The book can be purchased for $23.00 (the price includes taxes, postage and shipping) by contacting Bob Bowman & Associates Inc., 515 S. First Street, Lufkin, Texas 75902, or by calling 936-634-7444.

I hope this has been helpful. If you need to correspond with me, you might use my office e-mail at bobb@lcc.net. Doris and I work at the office and we don't check with our home e-mail as frequently as we should.

Good luck with your search, and if you have anything related to the Jesse B. Bowman lin
  F iii Sylvannia Hardin was born on 24 Dec 1829 in Hempstead, Ar. She died on 16 Aug 1905 in Houston, Tx. She was buried in Guiceland Cemetery, Houston, Tx.
  M iv Abraham K Hardin was born in Sep 1832. He died in At home of M D Solman. He was buried in Guiceland Cemetery, Houston, Tx.

Jonathan Hardin [Parents] was born on 15 Dec 1800 in , Tn. He died in 1869 in Conway, Ar. He married Elizabeth A Magness in 1837.

Elizabeth A Magness was born on 9 Oct 1808 in It. She died on 24 Oct 1873 in Ar. She married Jonathan Hardin in 1837.

They had the following children:

  M i Abraham Hardin
  M ii John Francis Hardin.
  M iii Edwin Hardin
  F iv Elizabeth Hardin was born in 1837.
  F v Louisa Hardin
  M vi Ambrose Hardin was born in 1843.
  M vii Missouri Arkansaw Hardin was born in 1846.

Abraham Hardin [Parents] was born in , Ga. He died in , Tx. He married Authura.

Authura

They had the following children:

  M i William Hardin
  M ii John Hardin
  M iii James Hardin
  F iv Mary Hardin
  F v Elizabeth Hardin
  F vi Martha Hardin
  F vii Emily Hardin

John Wesley Hardin [Parents] was born on 26 May 1853 in Bonham, Fannin, Tx. He died on 19 Aug 1895 in El Paso, Tx. He married Callie Lewis.

Other marriages:
Bowen, Jane

Old West outlaw and gunslinger John Wesley Hardin was born May 26, 1853, in Bonham, Texas. Rumored to be so mean he once shot a man for snoring, Hardin was shot to death in El Paso on August 19, 1895, by a man he had hired to kill someone else.
John's father, James G. Hardin, was a Methodist preacher, lawyer, schoolteacher and circuit rider. His mother was Elizabeth Hardin. At age fourteen, John stabbed a schoolmate. At age fifteen, he shot a black man to death in Polk County. While fleeing from the law following that murder, he killed at least one, and possibly four Union soldiers who were attempting to apprehend him.
As a cowboy on the Chisolm Trail in 1871, Hardin killed seven people. He killed three more upon arriving in Abilene, Kansas. Back in Texas, following a run-in with the State Police back in Gonzales County, Hardin got married, settled down and had three children. But he soon resumed his murder spree, killing 4 more times before surrendering to the Cherokee County sheriff in September 1872. He broke out of jail after a couple of weeks, however.
Hardin next killed Jack Helm, a former State Police captain, who led the fight against the anti-Reconstructionist forces of Jim Taylor in the Sutton-Taylor Feud. Hardin had become a supporter of Taylor's from 1873 to 1874.
In May 1874, Hardin killed a deputy sheriff in Brown County while visiting the town of Comanche. Fleeing to Florida with his family, Hardin was captured by Texas Rangers in Pensacola on July 23, 1877. During that flight, he killed at least one, and perhaps as many as five more victims.
On September 28, 1878, Hardin was sentenced to twenty-five years for the Brown County deputy's murder. He was pardoned on March 16, 1894. Having studied law while in prison, Hardin was admitted to the Texas bar soon after his release.
In 1895, Hardin went to El Paso to testify for the defense in a murder trial. Following the trial, he stayed and established a law practice. Just when he seemed to finally be going straight, Hardin began an affair with one of his married female clients. Her husband found out about the affair and Hardin hired some law officials to kill him. One of the hired gunmen, however, Constable John Selman, shot Hardin instead.
Legend has it that his last words were, "Four sixes to beat, Henry." When killed, Hardin was shooting dice with local furniture dealer Henry Brown at the Acme saloon in El Paso. Thus ended the life and career of one of Texas deadliest gunslingers. Despite his killing of over thirty people, Hardin had a reputation as a gentleman among those who knew him, and he always claimed he never killed anyone who didn't need killing.
Bibliography: Wendy Brabner, ed., Texas Monthly Texas Characters Datebook 1985 (Austin, Texas: Texas Monthly Press, 1984). Ron Tyler, ed., The New Handbook of Texas, Vol. 3 (Austin, Texas: Texas State Historical Association, 1996) pp. 454-55.


Wes was from a prominent Texas family who's ancestors included - A Texas Freedom Fighter who fought at San Jacinto. Another signed "The Texas Declaration of Independence". His Grandfather served in the Congress of the Republic of Texas. Judge William B. Hardin had a Texas County named after him, Hardin County. His father worked as a circuit preacher, taught school, and practiced law.
When two years old his family moved to southeastern Texas, where Wes learned to handle guns while hunting. During the Civil War he kept up his target practice by shooting at an effigy of President Lincoln.
His first serious fight came at eleven years old. During a fight with another boy he stabbed the boy in his chest and back. The boy lived, but Wes had tasted the thrill of the battle. It wasn't long until things became more serious.
At fifteen he shot a former slave to death, then he killed the three soldiers sent to arrest him. His father rushed him off to live with relatives in Navarro County. There, at sixteen, he taught school for a term.
With the taste for excitement in his every thought, and he went out on his own. Working as a cowhand in nearby Corsicana he met Bill Longley, a fugitive from a murder like himself.
Drifting on he came to the tiny town of Towash, Texas, where he killed another man. Fleeing to his uncle's farm he was in two more shoot outs on the way.
He farmed with his uncle for just a few months before he needed to go looking for excitement. In the east Texas town of Marshall, he was arrested by a deputy sheriff. The deputy was transporting some prisoners, including Wes, to central Texas to serve their time when Wes killed a guard and made his escape.
Living with relatives again, including the mean minded Mannen Clements and his brothers, he resumed the life of a cowboy. Gambling soon brought about another shooting scrape.
While a cowboy Wes rode with a herd up the Chisholm Trail to Ablilene, Kansas. While herding through Indian Territory Wes killed an Indian,"...just to keep in practice".
In Kansas, as a member of a posse, he helped hunt down a Mexican killer. Returning to Texas he went to Smiley. Where he had another shoot out with lawmen.
Returning home he married Jane Bowen. Married life didn't settle him down any and in a short time he had been in three more shootings, being wounded twice. He was captured and taken into custody.
In jail a very short time he is rescued by his cousins the Clements, lead by Mannen Clements. Wes joins in with his cousins to take part in a famous Texas Feud, The Sutto and Taylor's.
Laying low for the next year, Wes makes up for it the following year by killing Deputy Sheriff Charles Webb in 1874. Texas places a $4000.ºº dead or alive reward on his head. This meant that now "The Texas Ranger" were after Wes.
Posing as"J.H.Swain Jr." Wes moves his family by steam boat to Florida. In Florida his family now consist of two children, a boy and a girl. For three years he works anonymously as a livestock buyer, a saloon keeper and the logging business.
In 1877, Texas Ranger John Armstrong captures Wes on board a train near Pensacola, Florida. Taking him back for trail he is convicted and sent to Huntsville Penitentiary. Wes spends his time behind bars studying to take the Bar Exam.
Released in 1894, he hangs his lawyers shingle in Gonzales, Texas. His wife had died a year and a half earlier so he has his children by himself.
Moving his practice to Junction he meets a young women and they are married. She leaves him on their wedding day.
Moving again, this time to the wild border town El Paso. Running with a wild crowd he gets in one too many arguments and is shot and killed there at the age of forty-two.

Hardin was born on May 25, 1853 in Bonham, Texas. His father was a circuit-riding preacher and his mother was a gentile cultured woman. He grew up in Sumpter, where he attended school in an establishment set up by his father. One day, another student Charles Sloter, challenged him to a wrestling match. Hardin had him pinned down, when Sloter pulled a knife on him. A friend tossed him a knife and the fight turned bloody. Sloter's parents protested, but dropped it when witnesses proved it was self-defense.
In 1862, the family moved to Polk County, where his father practiced law. Three years later, they moved back to Sumpter. His father practiced law and taught school where Hardin attended. By that time, Hardin was an accomplished hunter and excellent shot.
In 1865, at twelve, Hardin killed his first man. He and cousin Barnett Jones were arm wrestling a black man named Mage at his father' plantation in Livingston, Texas. His ring scratched Mage's face and a fistfight broke out. The next morning, while walking back home, Mage accosted Hardin and tried to club him. Hardin shot him. Mage died soon after. His father worried that "union-dominated" courts would treat his son harshly, so he sent him to live with a friend at an isolated ranch. When a union patrol came after him to arrest him, he ambushed the party and killed three men.
Next he joined two cousins, Manning Clements and Tom Dixon, herding longhorns. They spent their free time in saloons and gambling halls, even though they were still teenagers. Wes became very skilled with his Colt .44 and an expert at poker, euchre, and seven-up. He also was a good judge of race horses.
He met up with his cousin Simp Dixon, whose mother, brother, and sister had been killed by union troops. He had sworn vengeance against the Yankees forever. Hardin and Dixon got cornered into a battle with union troops, in which Hardin killed two men. After that, he had out on uncle Barnett Hardin's plantation. In 1869, Governor Edmund J. Davis vowed to have Hardin killed, jailed, or hung. Hardin was only sixteen, but known to be a deadly gunfighter. But friends and family always warned him when the governor's troops were close.
He drifted for a few months, killing two more men. At the urging of his father, he enrolled at Professor Landrum's Academy in Round Rock. The state police caught up to him so he had to continue his studies in a hideout. He eventually took a test and got a diploma.
He next left for Shreveport, Louisiana. At the border he was mistakenly arrested for another man. But when the police found out who he was, they made arrangements to transport him back to Waco. Hardin brought a Colt .45 from another prisoner, so was able to shoot his guard and escape. Police caught up with him again. But one night the three troopers got drunk, and Hardin shot them all and escaped.
He reached Gonzales where he and Manning Clements signed up to drive a herd of steers to Abilene, Kansas. While at Gonzales he met Jane Bowen, who he would later marry.
He stayed on in Abilene for awhile hitting saloons and gambling halls. He confronted Marshall Wild Bill Hickok, but nothing came of it. A couple months later, he went back to Texas. He killed three men in a posse that was after him. This sent fresh waves of government troops after him. But he went back to Gonzales, confident everyone there would protect him. In March 1873, he married Jane.
In July 1873, he was wounded for the first time. In an argument over a bet, Phil Sublet shot him in the stomach with a shotgun. He got emergency surgery in a nearby hotel. A few days later a posse caught up with him, so Clements helped him escape. Troopers caught up with them and engaged them in a gun battle. Wes shot two men and was also wounded again in the thigh. But the two got away.
But his wounds were troubling him, so Hardin surrendered to the county sheriff at Smiley. When he heard the state police were coming to take over, he escaped to Gonzales. There he became involved in a family feud between the Sutton and Taylor families. This got the governor back on his trail. He fled to Comanche with his cousins, driving steer. Brown County Sheriff Charles Webb swore he'd kill Hardin.
Webb rode to Comanche to the rack where Hardin was betting on horses. Webb knew it would be foolhardy to go after Hardin among all his friends. So he waited until later when Hardin was celebrating his 21st birthday at Jack Wright's saloon. Several residents of Brown County backed him up. He had just about had Hardin convinced he wasn't there to make trouble, when he pulled his gun on him. Some instinct made Hardin turn around and he killed Webb first. A free-for-all broke out. Hardin and Clements got away, but brother Joe and the Dixon brothers were arrested. Brown County residents stormed the jail and lynched the three men. Joe had never been guilty of anything.
Hardin fled to Alabama, where he became a stockman and saloonkeeper. He took the name of James W. Swain. His wife and three kids joined him at Polland, Alabama. Meanwhile back in Comanche, a man named John Duncan, had hired on with Jane's father as a ranch hand. He was actually a Texas Ranger after Hardin. He saw a letter that led him to Alabama. The rangers captured Hardin on a train coming to Alabama from Pensacola, Florida. Hardin was quickly convicted and sentenced to 25 years hard labor at Huntsville Prison.
He served 19 years before being pardoned in 1894. During that time he wrote many letters to his wife and mother. Some 300 of them are preserved at the Southwest Texas State University at San Marcos. While there he led several escape attempts, but none succeeded. He also studied law and theology while in prison. In December 1878, his final appeal was denied. In 1883, he was ill for several months probably from infection from one of his gunshot wounds. He was troubled by illness again in 1890. His wife died on November 6, 1892.
When he left prison, he had had enough schooling to become a lawyer. He set up a law office in Gonzales in October 1894. He seems to have done well. He avoided saloons and gambling halls. He began writing his autobiography. He charmed Callie Lewis into marrying him, but they split soon afterwards. He grew depressed over the split and began hanging out at saloons again. He moved to El Paso and set up a new law practice. He was finally killed there by Sheriff John Selman on August 19, 1895, for Hardin's disparaging remarks against his son.

1860 United States Federal Census Name: John W Hardin
Age in 1860: 3
Birth Year: abt 1857
Birthplace: Bonham, Fannin, Texas
Home in 1860: Sumpter, Trinity, Texas
Gender: Male
Post Office: Sumpter

Callie Lewis.Callie married John Wesley Hardin.


John Wesley Hardin [Parents] was born on 26 May 1853 in Bonham, Fannin, Tx. He died on 19 Aug 1895 in El Paso, Tx. He married Jane Bowen on 29 Feb 1872 in Riddlesville, Tx.

Other marriages:
Lewis, Callie

Old West outlaw and gunslinger John Wesley Hardin was born May 26, 1853, in Bonham, Texas. Rumored to be so mean he once shot a man for snoring, Hardin was shot to death in El Paso on August 19, 1895, by a man he had hired to kill someone else.
John's father, James G. Hardin, was a Methodist preacher, lawyer, schoolteacher and circuit rider. His mother was Elizabeth Hardin. At age fourteen, John stabbed a schoolmate. At age fifteen, he shot a black man to death in Polk County. While fleeing from the law following that murder, he killed at least one, and possibly four Union soldiers who were attempting to apprehend him.
As a cowboy on the Chisolm Trail in 1871, Hardin killed seven people. He killed three more upon arriving in Abilene, Kansas. Back in Texas, following a run-in with the State Police back in Gonzales County, Hardin got married, settled down and had three children. But he soon resumed his murder spree, killing 4 more times before surrendering to the Cherokee County sheriff in September 1872. He broke out of jail after a couple of weeks, however.
Hardin next killed Jack Helm, a former State Police captain, who led the fight against the anti-Reconstructionist forces of Jim Taylor in the Sutton-Taylor Feud. Hardin had become a supporter of Taylor's from 1873 to 1874.
In May 1874, Hardin killed a deputy sheriff in Brown County while visiting the town of Comanche. Fleeing to Florida with his family, Hardin was captured by Texas Rangers in Pensacola on July 23, 1877. During that flight, he killed at least one, and perhaps as many as five more victims.
On September 28, 1878, Hardin was sentenced to twenty-five years for the Brown County deputy's murder. He was pardoned on March 16, 1894. Having studied law while in prison, Hardin was admitted to the Texas bar soon after his release.
In 1895, Hardin went to El Paso to testify for the defense in a murder trial. Following the trial, he stayed and established a law practice. Just when he seemed to finally be going straight, Hardin began an affair with one of his married female clients. Her husband found out about the affair and Hardin hired some law officials to kill him. One of the hired gunmen, however, Constable John Selman, shot Hardin instead.
Legend has it that his last words were, "Four sixes to beat, Henry." When killed, Hardin was shooting dice with local furniture dealer Henry Brown at the Acme saloon in El Paso. Thus ended the life and career of one of Texas deadliest gunslingers. Despite his killing of over thirty people, Hardin had a reputation as a gentleman among those who knew him, and he always claimed he never killed anyone who didn't need killing.
Bibliography: Wendy Brabner, ed., Texas Monthly Texas Characters Datebook 1985 (Austin, Texas: Texas Monthly Press, 1984). Ron Tyler, ed., The New Handbook of Texas, Vol. 3 (Austin, Texas: Texas State Historical Association, 1996) pp. 454-55.


Wes was from a prominent Texas family who's ancestors included - A Texas Freedom Fighter who fought at San Jacinto. Another signed "The Texas Declaration of Independence". His Grandfather served in the Congress of the Republic of Texas. Judge William B. Hardin had a Texas County named after him, Hardin County. His father worked as a circuit preacher, taught school, and practiced law.
When two years old his family moved to southeastern Texas, where Wes learned to handle guns while hunting. During the Civil War he kept up his target practice by shooting at an effigy of President Lincoln.
His first serious fight came at eleven years old. During a fight with another boy he stabbed the boy in his chest and back. The boy lived, but Wes had tasted the thrill of the battle. It wasn't long until things became more serious.
At fifteen he shot a former slave to death, then he killed the three soldiers sent to arrest him. His father rushed him off to live with relatives in Navarro County. There, at sixteen, he taught school for a term.
With the taste for excitement in his every thought, and he went out on his own. Working as a cowhand in nearby Corsicana he met Bill Longley, a fugitive from a murder like himself.
Drifting on he came to the tiny town of Towash, Texas, where he killed another man. Fleeing to his uncle's farm he was in two more shoot outs on the way.
He farmed with his uncle for just a few months before he needed to go looking for excitement. In the east Texas town of Marshall, he was arrested by a deputy sheriff. The deputy was transporting some prisoners, including Wes, to central Texas to serve their time when Wes killed a guard and made his escape.
Living with relatives again, including the mean minded Mannen Clements and his brothers, he resumed the life of a cowboy. Gambling soon brought about another shooting scrape.
While a cowboy Wes rode with a herd up the Chisholm Trail to Ablilene, Kansas. While herding through Indian Territory Wes killed an Indian,"...just to keep in practice".
In Kansas, as a member of a posse, he helped hunt down a Mexican killer. Returning to Texas he went to Smiley. Where he had another shoot out with lawmen.
Returning home he married Jane Bowen. Married life didn't settle him down any and in a short time he had been in three more shootings, being wounded twice. He was captured and taken into custody.
In jail a very short time he is rescued by his cousins the Clements, lead by Mannen Clements. Wes joins in with his cousins to take part in a famous Texas Feud, The Sutto and Taylor's.
Laying low for the next year, Wes makes up for it the following year by killing Deputy Sheriff Charles Webb in 1874. Texas places a $4000.ºº dead or alive reward on his head. This meant that now "The Texas Ranger" were after Wes.
Posing as"J.H.Swain Jr." Wes moves his family by steam boat to Florida. In Florida his family now consist of two children, a boy and a girl. For three years he works anonymously as a livestock buyer, a saloon keeper and the logging business.
In 1877, Texas Ranger John Armstrong captures Wes on board a train near Pensacola, Florida. Taking him back for trail he is convicted and sent to Huntsville Penitentiary. Wes spends his time behind bars studying to take the Bar Exam.
Released in 1894, he hangs his lawyers shingle in Gonzales, Texas. His wife had died a year and a half earlier so he has his children by himself.
Moving his practice to Junction he meets a young women and they are married. She leaves him on their wedding day.
Moving again, this time to the wild border town El Paso. Running with a wild crowd he gets in one too many arguments and is shot and killed there at the age of forty-two.

Hardin was born on May 25, 1853 in Bonham, Texas. His father was a circuit-riding preacher and his mother was a gentile cultured woman. He grew up in Sumpter, where he attended school in an establishment set up by his father. One day, another student Charles Sloter, challenged him to a wrestling match. Hardin had him pinned down, when Sloter pulled a knife on him. A friend tossed him a knife and the fight turned bloody. Sloter's parents protested, but dropped it when witnesses proved it was self-defense.
In 1862, the family moved to Polk County, where his father practiced law. Three years later, they moved back to Sumpter. His father practiced law and taught school where Hardin attended. By that time, Hardin was an accomplished hunter and excellent shot.
In 1865, at twelve, Hardin killed his first man. He and cousin Barnett Jones were arm wrestling a black man named Mage at his father' plantation in Livingston, Texas. His ring scratched Mage's face and a fistfight broke out. The next morning, while walking back home, Mage accosted Hardin and tried to club him. Hardin shot him. Mage died soon after. His father worried that "union-dominated" courts would treat his son harshly, so he sent him to live with a friend at an isolated ranch. When a union patrol came after him to arrest him, he ambushed the party and killed three men.
Next he joined two cousins, Manning Clements and Tom Dixon, herding longhorns. They spent their free time in saloons and gambling halls, even though they were still teenagers. Wes became very skilled with his Colt .44 and an expert at poker, euchre, and seven-up. He also was a good judge of race horses.
He met up with his cousin Simp Dixon, whose mother, brother, and sister had been killed by union troops. He had sworn vengeance against the Yankees forever. Hardin and Dixon got cornered into a battle with union troops, in which Hardin killed two men. After that, he had out on uncle Barnett Hardin's plantation. In 1869, Governor Edmund J. Davis vowed to have Hardin killed, jailed, or hung. Hardin was only sixteen, but known to be a deadly gunfighter. But friends and family always warned him when the governor's troops were close.
He drifted for a few months, killing two more men. At the urging of his father, he enrolled at Professor Landrum's Academy in Round Rock. The state police caught up to him so he had to continue his studies in a hideout. He eventually took a test and got a diploma.
He next left for Shreveport, Louisiana. At the border he was mistakenly arrested for another man. But when the police found out who he was, they made arrangements to transport him back to Waco. Hardin brought a Colt .45 from another prisoner, so was able to shoot his guard and escape. Police caught up with him again. But one night the three troopers got drunk, and Hardin shot them all and escaped.
He reached Gonzales where he and Manning Clements signed up to drive a herd of steers to Abilene, Kansas. While at Gonzales he met Jane Bowen, who he would later marry.
He stayed on in Abilene for awhile hitting saloons and gambling halls. He confronted Marshall Wild Bill Hickok, but nothing came of it. A couple months later, he went back to Texas. He killed three men in a posse that was after him. This sent fresh waves of government troops after him. But he went back to Gonzales, confident everyone there would protect him. In March 1873, he married Jane.
In July 1873, he was wounded for the first time. In an argument over a bet, Phil Sublet shot him in the stomach with a shotgun. He got emergency surgery in a nearby hotel. A few days later a posse caught up with him, so Clements helped him escape. Troopers caught up with them and engaged them in a gun battle. Wes shot two men and was also wounded again in the thigh. But the two got away.
But his wounds were troubling him, so Hardin surrendered to the county sheriff at Smiley. When he heard the state police were coming to take over, he escaped to Gonzales. There he became involved in a family feud between the Sutton and Taylor families. This got the governor back on his trail. He fled to Comanche with his cousins, driving steer. Brown County Sheriff Charles Webb swore he'd kill Hardin.
Webb rode to Comanche to the rack where Hardin was betting on horses. Webb knew it would be foolhardy to go after Hardin among all his friends. So he waited until later when Hardin was celebrating his 21st birthday at Jack Wright's saloon. Several residents of Brown County backed him up. He had just about had Hardin convinced he wasn't there to make trouble, when he pulled his gun on him. Some instinct made Hardin turn around and he killed Webb first. A free-for-all broke out. Hardin and Clements got away, but brother Joe and the Dixon brothers were arrested. Brown County residents stormed the jail and lynched the three men. Joe had never been guilty of anything.
Hardin fled to Alabama, where he became a stockman and saloonkeeper. He took the name of James W. Swain. His wife and three kids joined him at Polland, Alabama. Meanwhile back in Comanche, a man named John Duncan, had hired on with Jane's father as a ranch hand. He was actually a Texas Ranger after Hardin. He saw a letter that led him to Alabama. The rangers captured Hardin on a train coming to Alabama from Pensacola, Florida. Hardin was quickly convicted and sentenced to 25 years hard labor at Huntsville Prison.
He served 19 years before being pardoned in 1894. During that time he wrote many letters to his wife and mother. Some 300 of them are preserved at the Southwest Texas State University at San Marcos. While there he led several escape attempts, but none succeeded. He also studied law and theology while in prison. In December 1878, his final appeal was denied. In 1883, he was ill for several months probably from infection from one of his gunshot wounds. He was troubled by illness again in 1890. His wife died on November 6, 1892.
When he left prison, he had had enough schooling to become a lawyer. He set up a law office in Gonzales in October 1894. He seems to have done well. He avoided saloons and gambling halls. He began writing his autobiography. He charmed Callie Lewis into marrying him, but they split soon afterwards. He grew depressed over the split and began hanging out at saloons again. He moved to El Paso and set up a new law practice. He was finally killed there by Sheriff John Selman on August 19, 1895, for Hardin's disparaging remarks against his son.

1860 United States Federal Census Name: John W Hardin
Age in 1860: 3
Birth Year: abt 1857
Birthplace: Bonham, Fannin, Texas
Home in 1860: Sumpter, Trinity, Texas
Gender: Male
Post Office: Sumpter

Jane Bowen [Parents] was born in 1858. She died on 6 Nov 1892 in Gonzolez, Tx. She married John Wesley Hardin on 29 Feb 1872 in Riddlesville, Tx.

They had the following children:

  F i Mary Ellizabeth (Mollie) Hardin was born on 6 Feb 1873 in Gonzolez, Tx.
  M ii John Wesley Hardin , Jr. was born on 3 Aug 1875 in Gonzolez, Tx.
  F iii Callie Hardin was born on 15 Jul 1877 in Gonzolez, Tx.

James Gibson Hardin Sr. [Parents] was born on 2 Mar 1823 in Wayne, Giles, Tn. He died in Aug 1876 in Paris Lamar, Tx. He married Mary Elizabeth Cartright Dixon on 19 May 1847.

Mary Elizabeth Cartright Dixon [Parents] was born on 7 Dec 1826 in Sullivan, Tn. She died on 28 May 1866 in Ellis, Tx. She married James Gibson Hardin Sr. on 19 May 1847.

They had the following children:

  M i Joseph Gibson Hardin Jr. was born on 5 Jan 1850 in Bonham, Fannin, Tx. He died on 5 Jun 1874 in Dallas, Dallas, Tx.
  M ii John Wesley Hardin
  F iii Elizabeth Hardin
  F iv Martha Ann Hardin was born on 19 Apr 1857 in Moscow, Polk, Tx. She died on 4 Jan 1949 in Fort Worth, Tarrant, Tx.
  M v Benjamin Hardin was born in 1859. He died in 1869.
  M vi Jefferson Davis Hardin was born on 7 Sep 1861. He died in 1901.
  F vii Nannie Dixon Hardin was born on 31 Mar 1866. She died on 22 Jun 1953 in Fort Worth, Tarrant, Tx.
  M viii James Gibson Hardin was born on 15 Aug 1874 in Mount Calm, Hill, Tx. He died in 1918 in , Fl.

Benjamin Watson Hardin [Parents] was born on 28 Feb 1780 in Washington, Nc. He died on 25 Nov 1845 in Polk, Hill, Tx. He married Martha Ann Barnett on 7 Dec 1801 in Knox, Tn.

Martha Ann Barnett [Parents] was born in 1783 in , Sc. She died on 12 Jan 1863 in Polk, Hill, Tx. She married Benjamin Watson Hardin on 7 Dec 1801 in Knox, Tn.

They had the following children:

  F i Jane Hardin
  F ii Baby Hardin.
  M iii Gibson Hardin.
  M iv George Washington Hardin was born in 1802 in , Tn. He died in 1839 in , Tx.
  M v Joseph B Hardin
  M vi William Barnett Hardin
  M vii Robert Echison Hardin
  M viii Benjamin P Hardin
  F ix Martha Balch Hardin
  F x Elizabeth Ann Hardin was born in 1818 in Wayne, Tn.
  M xi James Gibson Hardin Sr.

William Dixon [Parents] was born about 1790. He died in Sullivan, In. He married Melinda McArthur.

Melinda McArthur [Parents] was born on 17 May 1790 in Ky. She died on 3 Jun 1838 in Ky. She married William Dixon.

They had the following children:

  F i Mary Elizabeth Cartright Dixon

Emmanuel Clements.Emmanuel married Martha Balch Hardin on 19 May 1847.

Martha Balch Hardin [Parents] was born on 4 Jan 1816 in , Tn. She died on 26 Mar 1867 in , Tx. She married Emmanuel Clements on 19 May 1847.

They had the following children:

  F i Mary Jane Clements.
  M ii Benjamin Hardin Clements.
  M iii William Clements.

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