PA Fly Fishing 2003 Fly Swap
Fly photos by Tim Bennett.
Bloody Surf Candy
Tied by Lou Teletski
Foxee Minnow
Tied by Tim Murphy
Matouka
Tied by Bill Brothers (Beeber)
Snowshoe Pheasant Tail Emerger
Tied by Tim Bennett
Light Hendrickson Dry
Tied by Judy Stegmueller
Foam Stimulator
Tied by J. Goldsmith
Big Spring Brassie
Tied By Dennis V
Flying Ant
Tied By Lance
Glass Bead Green Weenie
Tied By Rudy K.
Parachute Sulphur
Tied By Mike Wiethorn
Orange Crane Fly
Tied By Chaz
Marabou Flymph
Tied by Trevor Lanning
Hair Hackled Wet Fly
Tied By David Talley
Upwing Snowshoe Emerger
Tied by Hank Stegmueller
Slovnik Sulphur Special
Tied by Miro Slovnik
Robber Fly
Tied by Kevin Kresowaty
Adams Parachute
Tied By ASH
Red Quill Dun
Tied By Jack M.

 

 

Matouka
Tied by Bill Brothers (Beeber)
Hook: #6 streamer
Eyes: silver bead chain
Body: White chenille
Tail: Matched grizzly feathers
Back: Matched grizzly feathers, stripped on one side and lashed
to the body with copper wire.
Head: Grizzly soft hackle.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tying Instructions: (Illustrated instructions available at  http://www.flyanglersonline.com/flytying/fotw2/110402fotw.html )

1. With the hook in the vise, start the thread at the bend. Tie in about three inches of fine wire. Then, tie in about three inches of chenille. Wrap the thread forward about three-quarters of the way down the shank.
2. Thinly coat the thread wraps with cement and wrap the chenille forward to where the thread stops. Tie down, half-hitch, and trim excess.
3. Tie in about an inch of red chenille, wrap forward to about two and a half eye widths from the eye, tie down, half-hitch, and secure excess.
4. Match the feathers, trim them to length, trim the bottom fibers, and secure the Matuka "wing" at the bend with one or two wraps of wire.
5. Spiral wrap the wire forward, remembering that you want to cross the feathers at right angles to avoid trapping any fibers, and that you can "groom" the feathers forward to make it easier for the wire to pass through them. Wrap to the front of the "gills," secure with thread, half-hitch, and trim excess wire.
6. Tie in the hackle by the butt, curve toward you (we want the fibers to slant back), and make three to four wraps forward. Tie down, trim excess, and form a tapered head. Add the eyes of your choice and coat head with cement.

 

Caddis   -   Mayflies   -   Midges/Craneflies   -   Stoneflies   -   Terrestrials   -   Baitfish

Nymphs/Wets   -   Emergers   -   Duns/Dries   -   Streamers

2003 Index   -   2004 Index   -   2005 Index   -   2006 Index   -   2007 Index   -   2007 Summer Index   -   2007 Caddis Index   -   2008 Wooly Bugger Index

 

Foxee Minnow
Tied by Tim Murphy

Hook - Any wet fly hook.  I tied these on Mustad 3906B's size 8
Eyes - Small lead 1/50 oz
Body - Varying colors of fox tail.

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

Tying Instructions:
The light color is tied in on the top of the hook shank after securing  the lead eyes.  Rotate the hook 180 degrees and tie in your choice of Krystal Flash ( Clouser's original material ), or Flashabou which I used.  The overwing is the darkest color.  I like to leave a lot of underfur to make the profile larger.  Bob Clouser ties them much sparser.

 

Caddis   -   Mayflies   -   Midges/Craneflies   -   Stoneflies   -   Terrestrials   -   Baitfish

Nymphs/Wets   -   Emergers   -   Duns/Dries   -   Streamers

2003 Index   -   2004 Index   -   2005 Index   -   2006 Index   -   2007 Index   -   2007 Summer Index   -   2007 Caddis Index   -   2008 Wooly Bugger Index

 

Bloody Surf Candy
Tied by Lou Teletski

Recipe Pending (will update soon, or maybe it's a big secret.....Lou?)

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

Tying Instructions: (Pending, will update soon)

 

Caddis   -   Mayflies   -   Midges/Craneflies   -   Stoneflies   -   Terrestrials   -   Baitfish

Nymphs/Wets   -   Emergers   -   Duns/Dries   -   Streamers

2003 Index   -   2004 Index   -   2005 Index   -   2006 Index   -   2007 Index   -   2007 Summer Index   -   2007 Caddis Index   -   2008 Wooly Bugger Index

 

Snowshoe Pheasant Tail Emerger
Tied by Tim Bennett

Hook: TMC 2487 Curved caddis/emerger hook #14.
Thread: 8/0 Gray.
Tail: A few strands of copper antron as trailing shuck.
Body: 3-4 pheasant tail barbs wrapped from bend to thorax and coated with cement.
Thorax: Peacock herl.
Hackle: Dun dry fly hackle wound through thorax and trimmed on bottom.
Wing: Dun colored snowshoe hare fur.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:  This is a new creation that evolved from other pheasant tail emergers that have produced for me in the past. Inspiration for this fly came from other patterns like the Pheasant Tail nymph, Klinkammer Special and Harrop Hair Wing Dun. You can keep the hackle full for a high riding posture or trim as shown for a low profile. The trimmed hackle should help support the fly in an upright position and keep the curved body and shuck in, or just beneath, the surface film. Add a little floatant on the thorax and hackle as necessary.

 

Caddis   -   Mayflies   -   Midges/Craneflies   -   Stoneflies   -   Terrestrials   -   Baitfish

Nymphs/Wets   -   Emergers   -   Duns/Dries   -   Streamers

2003 Index   -   2004 Index   -   2005 Index   -   2006 Index   -   2007 Index   -   2007 Summer Index   -   2007 Caddis Index   -   2008 Wooly Bugger Index

 

Light Hendrickson Dry
Tied by Judy Stegmueller

Hook:  Mustad 94840 #12-14
Thread:  Cream
Wings:  Wood Duck
Tail:  Cream Hackle Fibers
Body:  Cream Fur Blend
Hackles:  2 Cream Hackles

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tying Instructions:
1. Wrap thread to mid point of shank, then wrap back up halfway to eye.
2. Tie in wings.  Pick up wings and wrap in front to make stand up.
Separate and wrap in between to make two wings (Fig. 8 method)
3. Tie in tail.
4. Dub fur towards wing.  Leave 1/16" space between body and wings.
5. Secure two hackles behind wings.
6. Wrap 1st hackle three times behind wings, two times in front.
Repeat with 2nd hackle.
7. Tie off, clip excess, whip finish and dress fly.

 

Caddis   -   Mayflies   -   Midges/Craneflies   -   Stoneflies   -   Terrestrials   -   Baitfish

Nymphs/Wets   -   Emergers   -   Duns/Dries   -   Streamers

2003 Index   -   2004 Index   -   2005 Index   -   2006 Index   -   2007 Index   -   2007 Summer Index   -   2007 Caddis Index   -   2008 Wooly Bugger Index

 

Foam Stimulator
Tied by J. Goldsmith
Hook: size 14, 9672 Mustad, 3x long
Thread: yellow 8/0
Tail: deer hair
Body: orange dry fly foam 
Wing: elk hair 
Hackle: grizzly
Thorax: caddis green superfine dubbing

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tying Instructions:
1.  Start the thread at mid-shank and tie in a sparse deer or elk hair tail.  The first wraps may be tight, but as you move toward the hook bend, too much pressure will flare the tail.  Try to keep it as straight as possible.  Tail should extend beyond the bend about 1/3 length of shank.
2.  Tie in, at the bend, a grizzly hackle with hackle about as long as the hook gap.
3.  Also near hook bend, tie in a strip of foam.  If the foam is thick, cut a thin strip to avoid bulkiness when wrapped.
4.  Wrap foam 2/3 way up shank.
5.  Palmer hackle forward over the entire length of foam.  The hackle can be tied down and the remainder cut away, or, if long enough, draped out of the way behind the hook bend/over the vise.
6.  Clean and stack a small clump of elk hair and tie in where foam ends.
7.  If you cut away remaining hackl, you will need to tie in a new one here.
8.  Dub over the tied down wing buts up to the eye.
9.  Wrap hackle forward over thorax and whip finish a small head.

Notes:  This is a common fly and instructions abound on the net and in the pattern books.  It is more attractive when tied on a curved shank, straight-eyed terrestrial hook, but I like the hook gap of the standard nymph hook.   The deer/elk hair plus the foam boddy mean that this fly is a real floater.  I rarely fish alone; usually I have a dropper following (either dry midge or a submerged fly).  The fly is usually tied in larger sizes.

 

Caddis   -   Mayflies   -   Midges/Craneflies   -   Stoneflies   -   Terrestrials   -   Baitfish

Nymphs/Wets   -   Emergers   -   Duns/Dries   -   Streamers

2003 Index   -   2004 Index   -   2005 Index   -   2006 Index   -   2007 Index   -   2007 Summer Index   -   2007 Caddis Index   -   2008 Wooly Bugger Index

 

Big Spring Brassie
Tied By Dennis V

Hook: TMC 2488 #20
Thread: 14/0 Red
Bead: Small Red Glass Bead
Body: Red Ultra Wire (Small)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tying Instructions:
1.Put the bead on the hook.
2.Tie in the thread just behind the bead.
3.Tie in the wire and lash it down back to the bend of the hook.
4.Bring the thread back up to the bead, half hitch to keep in place.
5.Wrap the wire back up to the thread and end off.
6.Cover the end and finish off the thread with a whip finish.
7.Put a drop of head cement if you like to stabilize the bead and protect
the knot.

 

Caddis   -   Mayflies   -   Midges/Craneflies   -   Stoneflies   -   Terrestrials   -   Baitfish

Nymphs/Wets   -   Emergers   -   Duns/Dries   -   Streamers

2003 Index   -   2004 Index   -   2005 Index   -   2006 Index   -   2007 Index   -   2007 Summer Index   -   2007 Caddis Index   -   2008 Wooly Bugger Index

 

Flying Ant
Tied By Lance
Hook: Standard dry
Size: # 16
Thread: 8/0
Body: Black micro dubbing
Wing: White zelon
Hackle: 2 wraps of black or extremely dark dun

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tying Instructions: (Pending, will update soon)

 

Caddis   -   Mayflies   -   Midges/Craneflies   -   Stoneflies   -   Terrestrials   -   Baitfish

Nymphs/Wets   -   Emergers   -   Duns/Dries   -   Streamers

2003 Index   -   2004 Index   -   2005 Index   -   2006 Index   -   2007 Index   -   2007 Summer Index   -   2007 Caddis Index   -   2008 Wooly Bugger Index

 

Glass Bead Green Weenie
Tied By Rudy K.

6 or 7 small green glass beads
medium copper wire
black thread

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tying Instructions:
Take the copper wire and loop 1 bead through it.  Fold the wire in half and
add 5 or 6 more beads.  Put some thread wraps on the hook, then lash
the wire and beads to the hook.

 

Caddis   -   Mayflies   -   Midges/Craneflies   -   Stoneflies   -   Terrestrials   -   Baitfish

Nymphs/Wets   -   Emergers   -   Duns/Dries   -   Streamers

2003 Index   -   2004 Index   -   2005 Index   -   2006 Index   -   2007 Index   -   2007 Summer Index   -   2007 Caddis Index   -   2008 Wooly Bugger Index

 

Parachute Sulphur
Tied By Mike Wiethorn

Hook: Tiemco 200R Size 16
Body: Sulphur Orange synthetic dubbing made by Kettle Creek Fly Shop
Post: Chartreuse Para Post
Tail:  White Parapost
Hackle: Barred Ginger

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tying Instructions:
The fly is simple to tie and does not differ from tying any other parachute pattern.
The tips I can offer are once the tail is tied in is to take a wrap or two under
the thread under the tail so the thread is between the bend of the hook and the
tail material.  By making these wraps the para post material stays together better,
looking more like a shuck than splaying apart.  I like to use the Tiemco 200R hook
because I can get a traditional size 14 fly on a size 16 hook thus providing less
metal for the fish to look at.  Finally, I like to oversize my hackle a size or two.
By using the bigger hackle the fly floats better in the riffles and I have not found
that the fly us rejected in slower water because of the larger hackle.

 Notes:
This fly is used to imitate an emerging sulphur with a trailing shuck.
The choice for the chartreuse post material is so I can see it at dusk.
I have fished the Kettle Creek and its tributaries for the last 6 years and
have found that the dubbing sold by the Kettle Creek Fly Shop has been effective.

 

Caddis   -   Mayflies   -   Midges/Craneflies   -   Stoneflies   -   Terrestrials   -   Baitfish

Nymphs/Wets   -   Emergers   -   Duns/Dries   -   Streamers

2003 Index   -   2004 Index   -   2005 Index   -   2006 Index   -   2007 Index   -   2007 Summer Index   -   2007 Caddis Index   -   2008 Wooly Bugger Index

 

Orange Crane Fly
Tied By Chaz
Hook: #18 tiemco dry fly hook
Thread: Rusty Orange
Body: Sulphur Rabbit Fur
Wings: Dun Hackle Tips Tied over the body (not used on pictured fly)
Hackle: Brown Hackle Feathers

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tying Instructions:
Use a rusty orange thread and start by wrapping it back to the bend of the hook.
Dub either sulphur or medium gray fur dubbing and wrap around the hook until
it is 2/3 of the distance up toward the eye. Tie 2 dun hackle tips down over the body
as you would on a Henryville Special. The last step is to tie on a brown hackle and wrap
it around the hook 3 or 4 times and tie all of this off.

Notes:
April is often a month that confounds anglers. It can be very warm one day and freezing
cold the next. Area streams are usually high and may be muddy from frequent April rains
or from snow melt. However it is also a month when heavy hatches start to appear on the
regions trout streams.  One hatch that can be depended on during this contrary month is the
Orange Crane Fly. Hatching in huge numbers they coat the rocks and debris along the
streams so heavily that the rocks appear to move.  They don't hatch from the water but
crawl out on rocks to shed their nymphal shuck. When the hatch is on you will see the
crane flies flying over the waters surface laying eggs or doing their mating thing. It is at
this time they become so important to trout. Trout are seen frequently taking the flies with
slashing rises and it doesn't take much for an angler to fool the hungry trout when they rise
so freely.  This hatch is often a sporadic hatch for much of the year. But during April and
May this hatch can dominate all the other hatches that might occur on southeastern Pa. streams.
Don't go to area streams without a good imitation.
    This pattern will work anywhere you find a hatch of the crane flies.  Because this hatch is
so common it can be counted on to bring large trout to the surface to feed. I personally
catch more trout every year on this fly than any other fly. It is a very important hatch in the
Perkiomen and Lehigh Valleys. Many anglers believe it is the most important hatch in the valley.
    During the spring months until it gets fairly warm the crane flies hatch during the day.
Later in the summer they hatch in the evenings and when the cool weather returns in the fall
they will again hatch during the day usually in the morning. The pattern will entice trout to rise
even when there seem to be no crane flies present. I believe this is because there are so many
of the flies present when they are hatching that the trout will take them regardless of whether or
not there is a hatch. For this reason it is good to have plenty of the imitations on hand. Try them
at times when there is no surface activity and you may be surprised by a large hungry trout.

 

Caddis   -   Mayflies   -   Midges/Craneflies   -   Stoneflies   -   Terrestrials   -   Baitfish

Nymphs/Wets   -   Emergers   -   Duns/Dries   -   Streamers

2003 Index   -   2004 Index   -   2005 Index   -   2006 Index   -   2007 Index   -   2007 Summer Index   -   2007 Caddis Index   -   2008 Wooly Bugger Index

 

Marabou Flymph
Tied by Trevor Lanning

Hook: Mustad 3906 or 3906b, size 12
Thread: rusty orange or black
Body: black angora rabbit
Tail: black marabou
Hackle: brown

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes: Thanks to Dave Baker of Main Line fly Tiers for showing me this fly.
Fish it like you would normally fish any streamer but don't use any weight.
It's important to keep it moving. This fly works great during winter or early spring.
It's incredibly simple, but it works!

 

Caddis   -   Mayflies   -   Midges/Craneflies   -   Stoneflies   -   Terrestrials   -   Baitfish

Nymphs/Wets   -   Emergers   -   Duns/Dries   -   Streamers

2003 Index   -   2004 Index   -   2005 Index   -   2006 Index   -   2007 Index   -   2007 Summer Index   -   2007 Caddis Index   -   2008 Wooly Bugger Index

 

Hair Hackled Wet Fly
Tied By David Talley

Tail: Wood Duck fibers
Body: Hare's ear dubbing
Hackle: Mink, spun in a dubbing loop and wound like a hackle

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tying Instructions: (Pending, will update soon)

 

Caddis   -   Mayflies   -   Midges/Craneflies   -   Stoneflies   -   Terrestrials   -   Baitfish

Nymphs/Wets   -   Emergers   -   Duns/Dries   -   Streamers

2003 Index   -   2004 Index   -   2005 Index   -   2006 Index   -   2007 Index   -   2007 Summer Index   -   2007 Caddis Index   -   2008 Wooly Bugger Index

 

Upwing Snowshoe Emerger (from Richard Ross, Fly Fisherman, September 2002)
Tied by Hank Stegmueller

Hook: #12-20 Partridge K14ST Oliver Edwards Nymph/Emerger (I used TMC 2487 #14)
Thread: Olive Dun, 8/0
Tail: 6-8 fibers from nicely barred partridge back feather
Abdomen: Goose biot
Thorax: 1-2 strands peacock herl
Wing: Snowshoe hare

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

Tying Instructions:
1. Cover hook shank with thread, then tie on 6-8 partridge fibers deep into bend of hook for tail.
Wrap forward over the butt ends of the fibers to build a case for the body.  The wrap back to tail.
2. Tie in goose biot and wrap it forward two-thirds of the hook shank.
3. Tie off biot, leaving a stable base for the wing.
4. Tie in a clump of snowshoe hare by the tips.  Wrap over the tips slightly to form a base
for the thorax, then trim the excess.
5. Tie in peacock herl and wrap it forward.
6. Tie off peacock herl leaving room to secure the wing and whip finish.
7. Pull the wing forward over the thorax to form the wing case and secure with two firm wraps.
8. Raise the wing, make several wraps between the wing and eye, and whip finish.

 

Caddis   -   Mayflies   -   Midges/Craneflies   -   Stoneflies   -   Terrestrials   -   Baitfish

Nymphs/Wets   -   Emergers   -   Duns/Dries   -   Streamers

2003 Index   -   2004 Index   -   2005 Index   -   2006 Index   -   2007 Index   -   2007 Summer Index   -   2007 Caddis Index   -   2008 Wooly Bugger Index

 

Slovnik Sulphur Special
Tied by Miro Slovnik

Hook: Mustad 94840
Size: 14
Thread: Yellow 8/0
Wing: White/Light Dun Hen (burnt)
Tail: Light Ginger Coq de Leon (hook length)
Body: Yellow Spanflex
Thorax: Sulphur Orange w/ flash
Hackle: Whiting Light Ginger saddle feather
Other: All flies were treated with Hydostop

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:
This is my recipe for the Sulphur Dun (Ephemerella Rotunda) that usually hatches around May 10th of each year.  It is a standard Catskill tie. I have been tinkering with this recipe over the past three years.  Someone once asked me, after seeing my pattern, "Have you ever seen a sulphur?"  Yes, I have as it is one of my favorite hatches to fish over and this pattern catches alot of fish even on heavily fished over water!  Tie it in smaller sizes as the hatch progresses and/or more pale yellow if your stream so dictates.  If you like to do a lot of 'false casting' you may not enjoy the twisting of tippet that may occur.... think 'roll cast' or go to bigger tippets.  I hope everyone catches as many, if not more, fish with this fly than I do!

 

Caddis   -   Mayflies   -   Midges/Craneflies   -   Stoneflies   -   Terrestrials   -   Baitfish

Nymphs/Wets   -   Emergers   -   Duns/Dries   -   Streamers

2003 Index   -   2004 Index   -   2005 Index   -   2006 Index   -   2007 Index   -   2007 Summer Index   -   2007 Caddis Index   -   2008 Wooly Bugger Index

 

Robber Fly
Tied by Kevin Kresowaty
Body: Tan foam formed by tying on a needle then sliding it off, (use deer hair as a base, it will help the body slide off easier)
Mid section: peacock herl
Wing: Deer, elk or buck tail. ( I used deer hair on the ones in swap)
hackle: brown and grizzly

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tying Instructions: None provided.

 

Caddis   -   Mayflies   -   Midges/Craneflies   -   Stoneflies   -   Terrestrials   -   Baitfish

Nymphs/Wets   -   Emergers   -   Duns/Dries   -   Streamers

2003 Index   -   2004 Index   -   2005 Index   -   2006 Index   -   2007 Index   -   2007 Summer Index   -   2007 Caddis Index   -   2008 Wooly Bugger Index

 

Adams Parachute
Tied By ASH

#14 Dry Hook
white poly wing
muskrat dubbing
grizzly hackle and brown hackle
brown hackle barbules for tail 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tying Instructions:
    Tie in section of poly wing (leave long for something  to hold on to
while winding hackles) about 2/3 of the way from hook bend. Force
upright with thread in front of wing. Cut excess wing behind thread
wrap (to rear). Cement wraps (I use Hard As Nails). While cement is
still wet, tie in one each grizzly hackle and brown hackle, tips
forward, shiny side up, on your side of wing post. Tie at base of
wing post.
    Take thread to rear of hook, tie in clump of brown hackle fibers for
tail. Wax thread and twist muskrat dubbing onto thread. Form neat
tapered body to wing post and one or two turns ahead of wing post
(these last two turns keep the hackle from tipping too far forward).
    Wind hackles (for me counter clockwise allows better view when tying
in hackle after wraps, which can be problematic with parachutes, ie,
binding down hackle fibers). I prefer a couple half hitches to a
whip finish for the same reason. Form head and cement.

 

Caddis   -   Mayflies   -   Midges/Craneflies   -   Stoneflies   -   Terrestrials   -   Baitfish

Nymphs/Wets   -   Emergers   -   Duns/Dries   -   Streamers

2003 Index   -   2004 Index   -   2005 Index   -   2006 Index   -   2007 Index   -   2007 Summer Index   -   2007 Caddis Index   -   2008 Wooly Bugger Index

 

Red Quill Dun
Tied By Jack M.

Hook: Size 14 or 16 Standard Dry
Thread: Olive, Brown or Tan
Tail: Medium Dun Barbs
Body: Cream or light brown dubbing over-wrapped with red or brown quill
Wings:  Wood Duck dyed brown
Hackle: Medium Dun

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tying Instructions:
Mash barb on hook; start thread just behind eye and wrap to
just above barb; tie in small bunch of medium dun colored hackle barbs
measured by hook shank, clip butts and wrap forward to secure; advance
thread to about one-third back from eye; select wood duck feather with even
tips (not pointed), then clip off top inch or so; pinch barbs together and
place feather along shank, top side down with tips overhanging eye (distance
from tie in point to tips should be about double the hook gap height); tie
down then clip and secure butts; push wing upright from eye and build thread
dam to hold; divide barbs left and right evenly, then wrap figure 8 style to
separate wing (the wings should be perpendicular to hook shank or slightly
forward-leaning); return thread to tail area and tie in quill segment and
then dub thread; wind dubbing to back of wing; now wind the quill segment
forward, allowing dubbing to show through in a thin line; tie down quill at
rear of wing, then clip end and tie down; select appropriate medium dun
hackle and tie in just behind wing, advance thread to front of wing; make
one wrap of hackle behind wing and two wraps in front, tie off and secure
butt; build head and whip finish, then apply cement.

Notes:
The artificial described is a decent imitation of the Hendricksons and Quill Gordons
and is also an excellent attractor pattern.  I tied this so you can use it on the early season
grey/blue winged mayfly hatches, but it has worked for me throughout the year.
 I hope you catch something before it gets lost in a tree.

 

Caddis   -   Mayflies   -   Midges/Craneflies   -   Stoneflies   -   Terrestrials   -   Baitfish

Nymphs/Wets   -   Emergers   -   Duns/Dries   -   Streamers

2003 Index   -   2004 Index   -   2005 Index   -   2006 Index   -   2007 Index   -   2007 Summer Index   -   2007 Caddis Index   -   2008 Wooly Bugger Index

 

[c] Alan J. Manderino 2008