My Daisy collection

My first Daisy was a Model 99 Target Special that I earned in grade school by selling greeting cards door-to-door for the American Youth Sales Club of White Plains NY. In the last few years, I've been casually collecting old Daisys as I've found them on our travels. I have six old Daisys so far and a current one.

One of these days (years) I'll get some better pictures taken of the collection.

Dating Daisys by Materials Changes
Late 1940 - cocking lever changed from malleable iron to die cast aluminum
Late 1951 - first molded plastic stocks (on Red Ryder)
Fall 1953 - heat blued barrels changed to electrostatic paint



1940s 102
[ NO. 102 Model 36
[ PLYMOUTH, MICH. U. S. A.
[ 500 SHOT

iron cocking lever - pressed steel trigger
wooden stock
nickle plated - aged to grey and rusted
3 bolts & square nuts in receiver area - most pictures show hex nuts but I've seen a few pics with square nuts on Google Images.
loading hole on top behind front site - cap-twist door
length 32"


1961 99 Target Special
[ MODEL NO. 99
[ DAISY MFG. CO. ROGERS, ARK., U.S.A.




Purchased new in 1961 - my original gun
Plain wooden stock and forearm - dark brown stain
Oval cross-section forearm
Leather sling - front mount on metal tab ahead of forearm
Oil hole - top of barrel behind letter stamping
Oil arrow on under side ahead of cocking lever
Die cast aluminum trigger and cocking lever
No safety
Removable shot tube - 50 shot
Rear peep site on 2 " arm with screw adjust ahead of peep
Length 37"





1970s Model 99 Shooting Education special
[ MODEL 99 B-B GUN
[ Daisy ROGERS, ARKANSAS U.S.A.

In gold on sides of breech:

[ 99 Champion

wooden stock and forearm - clear varnish
5 sided cross-section forearm
"Official Shooting Education" medallion on right side of stock
canvas sling - front mount on metal tab ahead of forearm
Oil hole - left side of barrel behind letter stamping
Oil arrow on under side ahead of cocking lever
Die cast aluminum trigger and cocking lever
"Quality Products" sticker on right side of cocking lever pivot
No safety
Removable shot tube
Rear peep site on 1" arm with screw adjust behind peep
Length 36+"



1980s Model 99 Shooting Education special
[ MODEL 99B ROGERS, AR. U.S.A.
[ Daisy B-B CAL [4.5MM] STEEL AIR GUN SHOT

In gold on sides of breech:

[ 99 Champion

wooden stock and forearm - clear varnish
5 sided cross-section forearm
"Official Shooting Education" medallion on right side of stock
canvas sling - front mount on screw eye at front end of forearm
Oil hole - left side of barrel near middle of forearm
Oil arrow on under side ahead of cocking lever
Die cast aluminum cocking lever
Plastic trigger and cross-bolt safety
non-removable shot tube - loading door on left behind front site
Rear peep site on 1" arm with screw adjust behind peep
Length 36"


1980s Model 840 - Remington look-alike
This is not the model 26 Spittin' Image Fieldmaster - I could only wish
[ MODEL 840
[ Daisy BB CAL (4.5mm) (s) .177 CAL (4.5mm) [pellet graphic]




about 300 fps for pellets
about 350 fps for BBs
Plastic stock and forearm
Adjustable rear site
BB loading door - left side above rear of forearm
Pellet loaded in breech on right side
Smooth bore
Length 37"


1980s Red Ryder
[ MODEL 1938B . . . . ROGERS, AR USA
[ Daisy B-B CAL [4.5mm] STEEL AIR GUN SHOT

Usage instructions on top of barrel, forward of rear site
Oil hole left side of barrel at front end of rear site
Wooden stock and forearm
Red Ryder "brand" on right side of stock
No forearm band nor any evidence of ever having one
Plastic trigger and cocking lever
Loading door on left side just behind front site
Length 36"

2014 Model 499B
This is the high-precision, match competition gun that Daisy designed expressly for the Daisy/Jacees Shooting Education Program and the National BB Gun Championship Matches back in 1976. The Model 99 was it's grandfather, the Model 299 it's father. They all share the same, hooded front sight with changeable inserts. The 99, the 299 and the original 499 had the same rear sight, a rather primitive, friction adjust peep. The 499B's "micrometer" adjust sight is a vast improvement, worthy of the gun's inherant accuracy which is a result of a far more precision shot tube than the older models.

In case you want to service your 499 yourself, here's a PowerPoint that takes you through disassembly and reassembly.


The standard Daisys that fired only BBs averaged between 250 and 300 fps when new. Age would bring them down well under 250 fps. The 499 is purposely at the low end of that range as its design intent was target shooting only and Daisy wanted to keep the cocking effort low for young, small users.


The BB itself is an interesting study. It began as the standard size BB lead shot or pellet for shotguns. Size BB is considered Bird Shot and is specified to be 0.180" or 4.57 mm. The early makers of BB guns in the 1880s made them to use size BB lead shot but over the decades they converted to steel and made the BBs smaller such that today's BBs are called 177 caliber or 4.5 mm.

In reality they are even smaller so as to move freely through a 177 caliber barrel. I have four different types of BBs in my collection, dating from the 1960s to the present. I measured them with a micrometer to see how they differed in size and consistancy.
Interesting results.
The Daisy Avanti precision BBs are larger than the regular Daisy PrecisionMax BBs, thus they fit the shot tube of the 499 more closely, the gun for which they were developed. This contributes to a muzzle velocity close to the other Daisy's but using a softer main spring, giving lower cocking effort. It also results in greater stability of the BB in flight because of less wander or wobble going down the shot tube.

The older Quick Silver BBs were probably the first Daisy BBs that could be called relatively precision. I believe the ones I have are from the 1980s. The oldest, Golden Bullseye, BBs are, I'm guessing, from the 1960s or early '70s. They are far from precision - very out of round, many flat spots, very rough finish. They work fine for plinking with any of the standard Daisys. Useless in the 499.

A short history of the BB and guns on Pyramyd Air

Making BBs
A test of BB quality and accuracy on Pyramyd Air.

And here are several useful entries from the Pyramyd Air blog:

How to hold a spring-air gun. This entry is from 2005, I just discovered it.
Did you know that you have to hold a spring-piston, air gun in a completely different way from most other guns and rifles? This advice improved my 5 meter accuracy by an amazing amount.

Some general info on shooting positions:
Shootng Postions Part 1
Shootng Postions Part 2
Shooting offhand


Here's a chronological history of Daisy BB guns, assembled from Boys' Life magazine ads.


A quick history of the Red Ryder:
model 111 - April 1940 to April 1954
model 94 - May 1954 to February 1958
model 1938 - 1972 to present

And more history:

History on Daisy's web site

History on The Daisy Museum web site

A great site for Daisy history

Some Collectors' sites:

Daisy Collectors
The Texas Collector

A good Daisy parts & service source
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