"Best of the Best" Washington State

Boy Scout Camp Patches and Histories

Focusing on Camp Memorabilia from the Teens through the 1940's

 

Hello, thank you for checking out my website. I'm a collector of camp patches. Please note: I list camps according to the State they are located in, not by the location of their Council headquarters. Most of the images that you see below are items that I need. I'm also looking for duplicates. My e-mail is kevinrudesill@comcast.net

 

Why pay high on-line auction fees. Please contact me if you are looking to sell your collection

 

Camp 22 (1920-1921) was located at Lake 22 just southeast of Verlot and owned by the YMCA. This camp was used by the Scouts of Snohomish County after Camp Tyree. Sleeping in big tents on Army cots, Scouts spent two weeks hiking the trails of the area and putting their Scouting skills to use. Formal Scouting use of Camp 22 ended with the formation of a new camp on leased Forest Service property at Lake Kelcema. (Credit to Mike Heavener).

 

Camp Abee near Anacortes was listed in the 1929 Puget Sount Camping Book (PSCB). This would have been part of the Skagit Valley Council which existed from 1923 to 1929 and Mount Baker Council. No memorabilia is known to exist.

 

Camp Akela of the former Tumwater Area Council was the Cub Scouting side of the Cleland Scout Reservation (Camp Thunderbird) near Olympia.

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Mount Baker Council also has a Camp Akela program.

Camp Arrowhead of the former North Central Washington Council could have been just a Camporee or district camp. Need more information.

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Camp B located on the present day Cascade Scout Reservation was later renamed to T-H Ranch. Camp B was named after T. Byron Hunt, former executive of the Seattle Area Council.

 

Camp Baldrey was listed in the 1926 PSCB. This would have been part of the Bellingham Council which existed from 1918 to 1926.

 

Camp Baldy of the former Twin Harbors Area Council was located on the North side of Lake Quinault. The Camp goes back to at least the 1924 as there is a reference in The Chehalis Bee-Nugget newspaper August 19, 1924.

There is also a reference in The Chehalis Bee-Nugget newspaper May 20, 1932.

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After the Boy Scouts left the Camp it was used for many years by the Kiwanis. There is some controversy though surrounding this camp property. Former Olympic Park Superintendent, Maureen Finnerty, made a huge public relations mistake by ordering the burning to the ground of the former campsite because the Camp was located on Olympic National Park property, and in Ms. Finnerty's opinion, was "old, dilapidated and in deplorable shape" (Source: The Ellensburg Daily Record, November 30, 1991).

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Beehive Mountain Scout Camp: Beehive Mountain lies to the northeast of the reservoir and Mission Ridge Ski Area, South of Wenatchee. It is at 4,150 feet. It is a great area for using your snowmobile.

 

Bird Lake Camp of the Yakima Valley Area Council.

 

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Black Lake Scout Site: Although this site was never used by Tumwater Area Council for Boy Scout Camp, it was going to be. You see, in June 1941, this site was chosen to be the Boy Scout Camp for the 1941 camping season. Flyers and/or memorabilia may have been issued. In July 1941, there was a change from the Black Lake Site to a private boys camp named Olympus located on Summit Lake West of Olympia. Camp Olympus was rented from Otto C. Mauthe & purchased in 1945 from him for $5000.

 

Also, the Knights of Columbus opened the popular Columbus Park on Black Lake May 19, 1929. In the Chehalis Bee-Nugget May 31, 1929, it says that "The Knights of Columbus have tendered the free use of the park to the Boy Scout organization for meeting and camping purposes.." and "District Executive M. G. Stroup of Olympia while in Chehalis last week stated that the various scout troops have already begun to use the park for their outdoor training and recreation. The location and facilities of the park are especially convenient and suitable for the needs of the scout."

 

Black Mountain Scout Camp / Black Mountain Scout Reservation is located on Silver Lake, near Maple Falls and Sumas WA. One of two camps owned by the present day Mt. Baker Council, this camp has was opened in 1919.

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"Camp Black Mountain, located on the beautiful shores of Silver Lake an hour drive east of Bellingham, is the oldest existing camp in Washington State. Interviews with Hugh Eldridge Carr and General Floyd Hansen, Bellingham Eagle Scouts from the early 1920's, indicate the camp was active prior to 1919. The land was used by permission of owner H. P. Jukes (the council treasurer) prior to transferring ownership to the BSA in 1929. It was originally used by the Bellingham Council as Camp H. P. Jukes and has been in continuous use since that time with the exception of two seasons during WWII (1943 and 1944). Upon first use the camp was used for troop and district events, but became a fully organized resort in 1925. During the 1920's, the camp was supported by the Order of the Blue Knot, an honor camper's society that later became Quilshan Lodge, Order of the Arrow. Programs from the 1925 and 1926 seasons provide insight into early camp activities and vintage photographs of this cherished property." (Credit to: Wikipedia 9/2009)

 

The first mention of Silver Lake as a camping site was mentioned in the minutes of the Whatcom County Council in 1927, where it was reported that a "camp trip to Silver Lake was a success."

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The Black Mountain patch looks almost identical Spokane's Camp Sekani. "Enclosed is a scan of the 1931 issue. Black Mountain used this design through the late 1930's - I have this example and the 1939 issue. The "honor camper" patch came from a Bellingham estate and the recipient attended Washington State Normal College (now WWU) in 1930 - the sale included his college annual & other Bellingham material. One way to tell Black Mountain Issues from Sekani is the patch shape. Black Mountain used domes, Sekani used rounds." (Credit to F. Kern 1/2/2002).

Camp Blakely was listed in the 1926 PSCB and was on the San Juan Islands in Washington State. This would have been part of the Skagit County Council which existed from 1923 to 1929. "Today, one of the largest of Washington state’s San Juan Islands, Blakely is seven square miles of isolation and pristine beauty. Home to Seattle Pacific’s roughly 900-acre wilderness environmental research campus, approximately 80 percent of the island is preserved in trust." (Courtesy of SPU Website). No memorabilia is known to exist.

Camp Bonaparte of the present day Grand Columbia Council (formerly North Central Washington Council) has been North Central Washington's gateway to adventure since 1965. Bonaparte is located on pristine Bonaparte Lake in Okanogan County (Okanogan National Forest), just east of Tonasket, Washington. Bonaparte features outstanding aquatics and mountain biking programs.

 

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Camp Brinkley (now called Camp Edward as of 2013) was part of the Cascade Scout Reservation owned by the present day Chief Seattle Council. The camp opened in 1967 and closed for Boy Scout Camp at the close of the 1992 Summer Camp. Camp Edward is presently used for Cub Scouting. Click here for more history.

 

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Camp C: Later renamed to Camp Omache. Since 1955, the Cascade Scout Reservation has been home to Camp B, Camp C, Reservation X, Camp Omache, Rocking T-H Ranch, Camp Brinkley, and Camp Pigott.

 

Cascade Scout Reservation (see Camp Brinkley). Since 1955, this property has been home to Camp B, Camp C, Reservation X, Camp Omache, Rocking T-H Ranch, Camp Brinkley, and Camp Pigott.

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Central WA Council Summer Camp: See Camp Fife. Patches exist from 1947-1950.

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Chinook Camp of the former Inland Empire Council. Property on Diamond Lake, part of Cowles Scout Reservation. Always "Camp Chinook" -- the single word "Chinook" appears on District patches from Columbia Pacific Council.

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The patches pictured above, left, and below, left, all came in the same lot. The large H may be for H. Cowles.

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Camp Cleland, located on Lower Lena Lake in the Olympic Mountain's, was the original camp of the Tumwater Area Council based in Olympia WA. It operated from 1927 through the mid 1940's. Click here for more history.

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The present day Cleland Scout Reservation is located on Summit Lake, near Olympia. The reservation contains Camp Akela (Cub Scout Camp), Martin (Training Camp) and Thunderbird (Webelos Resident Camp, Training Camp).

 

Camp Cleveland (sp?): One of the earliest Tacoma Area Council Camps was Camp Cleveland (sp) located on American Lake. Camp was later moved to Lake Spanaway on Parks Land. They built a few buildings. Camp Cleveland and Spanaway Lake Camp were closed by the time Camp Kilworth opened in Federal Way.

 

Camp Corliss: "A building that used to be owned by the Corliss family allowing Boy Scouts and Pierce County Explorer Search and Rescue a place to enhance their training." This would be scouts in the old Mount Rainier Council. The Cub scouts used the camp for end of year ceremonies. In 2010 all the trees were logged, and the camp went away.

Hwy 410 East from Hwy. 167
Sumner-Tapps Hwy E
Up hill turn Right onto 166th Ave E (Ridgewest Drive E)
Keep left on Ridgewest Drive E
Turn Right on 168th Ave E
5115 168th Ave E. - Camp Corliss
Driveway is on left side of road near the end
Park in pasture
Walk to the Camp entry in the woods and follow signs to the Start / Finish area

 

Camp Couch: "I live on an old Boy Scout Camp called Camp Couch, which is located on Camano Island, Washington. I was wondering if you had any information about this camp. What I know is that this camp was started by Jim Couch in 1961 and was open until 1971." (Credit to Marie Isey via e-mail to Kevin Rudesill).

 

Camp Coweeman River was a District camp of the former Portland Area Council. Coweeman River is near Kelso/Longview.

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Camp Cowles / Cowles Scout Reservation of the Inland Northwest Council (formerly Inland Empire Council and Spokane Area Council).

 

Named for William H. Cowles, Sr., an early Spokane pioneer and supporter of Scouting, Cowles Scout Reservation began as Camp Cowles 1920 with a purchase of 80 acres of prime waterfront on Diamond Lake. It has grown to four camps: Camp Cowles, Camp Chinook (renamed Camp Fosseen in the 1980's), Camp Ponderosa, Camp Sunrise and Camp Japeechen, covering over 900 acres and more than a mile of waterfront. "Cowles and Fosseen (Chinook) were used for troop summer camp programs. Both have established buildings and dining halls along with other smaller structures for program and staff housing. Ponderosa and Sunrise have no buildings. They exist as descriptions of locations within the Cowles Reservation. The camps serve as sites for district or council outdoor events or short-term troop camping." (Quote courtesy of Dana Bonstrom).

 

The Spokane Council was registered in 1915 and was one of the earliest "First Class Councils" on the West Coast. Camp Cowles opened in 1920 (It is the 2nd oldest Boy Scout Camp west of the Mississippi.)  Finch Lodge was built in 1923. In 1922, W.H. Cowles was the Chairman of the Region 11 Committee, based in Spokane, with jurisdiction over all scouts in Oregon, Idaho, Montana and Washington.

>1923 reference to Camp Cowles

 

>1948 article talks about the Camp's first year, 1920.

 

Click here for more information on Camp Cowles including information about the Camp's namesake, William H. Cowles.

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Camp Crescent Lake in the Olympic National Park, near Port Angeles.

>Source: The New York Times 8/28/1921

 

Camp Curran is a small Boy Scouts of American camp in Puyallup, WA that is owned by Pacific Harbors Council. It is hosted by Troop 692 (They hold their weekly meetings there and take care of the grounds). This camp is mostly used for the troop's meetings and short overnight stays. Often for advancement training for the Scouts. It is open to any of the troops in the area.

 

Camp Cypress Island of the former Skagit County Council.

 

 

Camp Delezenne of the present day Pacific Harbors Council (formerly Twin Harbors Area Council) is located Southeast of Elma, Washington and was owned by Twin Harbors Council. The first camp opened on July 13, 1958. 40 acres owned, 33 leased. Today it is a primitive weekend camp with a Swimming Hole. I believe the Camp's name comes from Delezenne Creek. There is also a Delezenne Precinct of Grays Harbors County (circa 1920) which had several logging Camps where entire families lived Click here for Directions to Camp and more history.

 

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Diamond Lake Camp of the former Spokane Council. (see Camp Cowles)

 

District Camp of the former Tacoma Area Council.

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Camp Dover on American Lake (South Pierce County, WA - near Tacoma). Joe Leister mentioned that a scout camp on American Lake in South Pierce County may have been the original camp of the Tacoma Scout Council. Camp mentioned in Tacoma Scout Weekly December 20, 1920. The first record of a Tacoma Camp was in the first edition of the Tacoma Scout Weekly (December 20, 1920). There they spoke about "Camp Dover" on American Lake. This camp was named after Elmer Dover, the 1st President of the Tacoma Area Scout Council (Joe Leister 2/2007).

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Camp Edward of the Chief Seattle Council is the new name for the former Camp Brinkley.

 

Camp Elk was listed in the 1926 PSCB and was on Alta Lake (30 miles from Lake Chelan).

This would have been part of the North Central Washington Council which existed from 1924 to 1992. No memorabilia is known to exist.

 

Evergreen Area Council BSA Camps / E.A.C. Inc.

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Everett Council Boy Scout Camps was listed in the 1926 PSCB and was near Silverton.

 

Camp Fife of the present day Grand Columbia Council (formerly Central Washington Council & Fort Simcoe Area Council) has been providing a quality camping experience since 1923. It is located in the heart of the Cascade Mountain Range in Goose Prairie, Washington, just off of Chinook Pass. Click here for more history.

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Central Washington Council (1942-1954)

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Fort Simcoe Area Council

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Grand Columbia Council

The area lends itself to day hikes and extended backpack trips. Today it features a heated swimming pool, a premiere horsemanship program, and one of the largest COPE courses in the Western Region. (Courtesy of the Grand Columbia Council website) Click here for more history.

 

Council Patches (CP's) or Council Camporee patches from Central Washington Council

Council Patches (CP's) or Council Camporee patches from Central Washington Council

 

Camp Fire Mountain / Fire Mountain Scout Reservation: "The area now known as Fire Mountain Scout Reservation was settled and farmed by William Gaches from La Connor in the early 1900's. He built the farmhouse and farmed 300 acres, planting the orchard as well as hay in the field which is now Lake Challenge. In the early 1950's the land was sold to Lloyd Nelson who raised beef cattle on the property. In 1971, the 300 acres owned by the Nelson's, as well as an additional 140 acres of the neighboring Walking M Ranch, were acquired by the Evergreen Area Council. The 440 acres were named Fire Mountain Scout Reservation by Council Scouter Bob Overstreet who, as a young man, had fought one of several fires on Cultus Mountain. Hundreds of volunteers as well as the Army Reserve, Navy Seabees, and Marine Reserves worked frantically to turn the hay fields into the beautiful 37 acre Lake Challenge, build the Dining hall, Campfire Bowl and campsites so Fire Mountain would become a reality for hundreds of Snohomish County Scouts. Over the years generous donors have financed 3 additions to the Dining Hall, the building of Salishan Lodge, and many other projects. In 1988 the Council Executive Board made a commitment to undertake a capital campaign to make Fire Mountain into a premier camping and training facility. 1988 saw the completion of a new commissary and separate meeting room addition to the Dining Hall, construction of a new bunkhouse with a lounge for the summer camp staff, the completion of two new troop campsites and, finally, the acquisition of 225 additional acres, bringing the total reservation to 665 acres. From 1990 onwards the expansion has continued with new plumbing and toilet facilities in each campsite and the opening of Cub Adventure Land to host resident camping programs for Cubs and Webelos Scouts. It featured a teepee campsite, a complete BB gun/Archery range complex, aquatics area and, its focal point, the Wild West style Fort Boeing. Fire Mountain has continued to grow and has expanded its services and program support to thousands of Scouts and adult leaders each year. Such is the demand that the whole camp is used for Scout camp with the Cub and Webelos camping run in other weeks." (Credit to http://www.firemtn.org/history/)

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Fort Lewis Youth Camp near Steilacoom. (need more information)

 

Camp Fosseen of the former Inland Empire Council. Named after former Spokane Mayor, Neal Randolph Fosseen, the original Council camp was on the slopes of Mount Spokane. When sold, the Camp was relocated to the Cowles Scout Reservation. No memorabilia is known to exist. "One patch bearing the Fosseen name was for a 1960's high adventure backpacking trek that started from that camp. The trek followed trails around Mt. Spokane and the neighboring peaks." (Quote courtesy of Dana Bonstrom). Click here for more history.

 

Freeman - The Picnic Area known as Camp Freeman is located just to the left before Camp Brinkley (now called Camp Edward).

 

Camp Hahobas (1933-Present) of the Pacific Harbors Council (formerly Mount Rainier Council). Much of the camp property was donated by the widow of 1911 City of Tacoma Mayor W.W. (William Wolcott) Seymour. The Camp consists of 593 acres of Scouting paradise overlooking the beautiful Olympic Mountains and the Hood Canal. The camp boasts three fresh water lakes, a half-mile of saltwater beach, breathtaking views, and rustic serenity. Scouts bring and pitch their own tents in lush forested campsites and dine on the shore of Robbins Lake. Click here for more history.

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Camp Hicks Lake of the former Tumwater Area Council. No memorabilia known.

 

1918 - I had always heard that there was a Boy Scout Camp on Hicks Lake in Lacey, Washington and until a few years ago when three new houses were built the foundations and pilings were still evident. The first Tumwater Council President, Hance H. Cleland, owned Hicks Lake and at the time Tumwater Council didn't have a Scout Camp. It is obvious that he let the Scouts use his property for their Summer Camp.

 

Inland Empire Council Aquatic Camp

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Inland Empire Council Camp (1952-1958): See Camp Cowles

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Camp Jones 7.5 acres on Lake Quinault. Perhaps an earlier name for Camp Baldy or a section of the Baldy camp. This would have been in the former Twin Harbors Area Council.

Camp Kelcema of the Everett Area Council was located near Silverton on Lake Kelcema. The 23-acre lake at on a sub alpine setting (3320 feet above sea level), surrounded by trees and vegetation within the Boulder River Wilderness. At Deer Creek Pass, the views of Three Fingers, Mt. Bullon, Jumbo Mtn., and others are spectacular.

 

"In 1922, through the efforts of S.E. Bargreen, the Everett Area Council acquired a lease on 4 acres of Forest Service land on Lake Kelcema. Over the years a lodge, several Adirondacks were built and a swim beach developed. In the early 1940's  longtime Scout Executive Capt. R.G. Mathews retired. In his honor the camp was renamed Camp Mathews (1943 and 1944 Camp Mathews patches exist). 1945 Cam Mathews reference in August 30, 1945 edition of the The Arlington Times. Later the Camp was renamed back to Kelcema." (Courtesy of Venne Buechamp)

 

Click here for more history.

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Camp Kilworth located on Dash Point in Federal Way was an early camp of the Tacoma Area Council. The camp was opened in 1932 and is still used by Pacific Harbors Council. In 1932, Council and Rotary Eight Past-President William "Will" Kilworth and his wife August, donated 40 acres near Dash Point to the Scouts. The property was officially deeded to the Boy Scouts on February 28, 1934. Click here for more history.

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Camp Kilworth of the Pacific Harbors Council is located on Dash Point in Federal Way. Training programs and day camps are held here.                  

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Camp Kollonowski (Sp?): Joe Leister mentioned this camp to me November 2004. Camp Kollonowski was near “Home” (sp.) Washington on the Kitsap Penninsula and was owned by the former Mt. Rainier Council.

 

Lacey Scout Camp: Located on Hick's Lake this property was originally a Boy Scout and resort camp during the 1940's and 1950's. It was abandoned in the 1970's and up to the mid 2000's still had remnants of the old cabins. Today it has 3 large houses on it. Click here for more history.

 

Camp Lost Lake of the former North Central Washington Council.

 

Camp Lost Lake of the former Twin Harbors Area Council was a YMCA camp on Lost Lake in Shelton rented by the Scouts. It is located off of Coquallum Road.

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Camp Martin: Is the "Camp Akela" or cub-scouting side of the Cleland Scout Reservation. Camp Akela, Camp Martin and Camp Thunderbird make up the Cleland Scout Reservation.

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Camp Mathews of the former Everett Area Council. In 1922, through the efforts of S.E. Bargreen, the Everett Area Council acquired a lease on 4 acres of Forest Service land on Lake Kelcema. Over the years a lodge, several Adirondacks were built and a swim beach developed. In 1941 longtime Scout Executive Capt. R.G. Mathews retired. In his honor the camp was renamed Camp Mathews. Mr. Mathews was the Scout Executive of the Glacier Park Council before coming to Everett. There is a 1925 newspaper article that he wrote on the Montana Camps Page, Camp Whitefish.

 

Camp Mathews was later changed back to Kelcema. Click here for more history.

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Camp Mead was a property near Dayton, WA used by the Blue Mountain Council. It is in the Blue Mountains and close to Ski Bluewood. We believe it is in the same vicinity, perhaps the same property, as  Camp Touchet, which was once (leased) by (Blue Mountain) Council.

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Camp Meany was the Cub Scout Camp for the Seattle Area Council located on the same property as Camp Parsons. The camp was named for Edmond S. Meany (1862-1935), renown university professor, mountaineer, author and conservationist. Click here for more history.

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In June 2003 on EBAY there was a sale of 100 photos from pre WW2 Cub Scout Camp Meany. Large lake with passenger boat "Carlisle 2", "Sko-ko-mish". Trail, tepees, totem poles, crafts, dozens of young cub scouts having fun.

Camp Merrill was owned by the former Mount St. Helens Council which existed from 1925 to 1932.  Merrill Lake, 344 acres big, is located north of Cougar near Mount St. Helens. No memorabilia is known to exist.

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Camp Midas: A very early camp of the present day Inland Northwest Council (Spokane Area Council).   

1923 Tacoma Council "Mountain Camp" for inter-city boys (Joe Leister, 2/2007)

Mount Baker Scout Camps: See Camp Black Mountain

Mount Rainier Council Camp: See Camp Hahobas

 

 

North Central Washington Council Camps

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Camp Nuznupa of the Blue Mountain Council which was founded by the Walla Walla rotary in 1922. Also referred to as “Noosnoopa” in the Council’s 1972 History Book. No memorabilia is known to exist.

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Camp Olympus: The former Tumwater Area Council property on Summit Lake was originally named Camp Olympus after the Boys Camp that was originally located there. Later the camp was referred to as the Summit Lake Camp. The Summit Lake site was announced for the first time at the April 1941 Council Executive Board Meeting. In July 1941 the council rented the private boys camp Olympus at Summit Lake for Boy Scout summer camp. From 1942-August 1945  (World War II) the Summit Lake camp was used off and on as a base to train soldiers. Camp was held in 1942 starting July 12. Also, in 1943 starting July 12. The Centralia Daily Chronicle in a June 10, 1943 edition says the Camp program will be "geared towards the war" and that "marksmanship will be taught and supervised by a National Rifle Association officer and swimming will be under the supervision of an accredited Red Cross life saving instructor."

 

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It was decided to purchase Camp Olympus from Otto C. Mauthe in October 1944. The Council paid $5000 to Mr. Mauthe in 1945 and acquired the camp. At the July 17, 1949 Council Executive Board Meeting, a proposal to have a camp name contest was made. From 1950-1954 the camp was still being referred to as the "Summit Lake" site.

                                           

Most of the Camp Olympus patches show a large peak in the background with a small lake and tent. They are square white felt with a silk screened image. The 1942 Honor Camper is a smaller, rectangle shaped patch. There are also a smaller 1945 & 1946 patches.

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Camp Wilderness of the Tumwater Area Council. This was a senior camp, most likely held at Lower Lena Lake, Camp Cleland.

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Camp Omache: 1957-1977. Originally called Camp "C", Omache means Land of the Big Medicine.” Camp Omache was closed in the early 2000's to be converted into a new Boy Scout Camp, Camp Pigott, which opened in June 2003. The former Boy Scout Camp Brinkley (next to Omache) was also converted into a full-time Cub Scout camp.

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Camp Owhi: Seven miles NE of Nespelem. Used by the North Central Washington Council.

 

Pacific Harbors Council Camps

Pacific Harbors Outpost

Pacific Harbors Summer Camp

PHC Camps

 

Camp Parsons of the Chief Seattle Council (formerly called Seattle Area Council) opened in 1919. Click here for more history.

 

 

Circa 1924

 

Camp Parsons is the oldest Boy Scout camp west of the Mississippi River.

July 1962

 

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Camp Pigott: The newest Boy Scout camp of the Chief Seattle Council, Camp Pigott opened in 2003 on land once occupied by Camp Omache.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Camp Ponderosa: Named for William H. Cowles, Sr., an early Spokane pioneer and supporter of Scouting, Cowles Scout Reservation began as Camp Cowles in the early 1920's with a purchase of 80 acres of prime waterfront on Diamond Lake. It has grown to four camps: Camp Cowles, Camp Fosseen, Camp Ponderosa and Camp Sunrise, covering over 900 acres and more than a mile of waterfront. Ponderosa and Sunrise have no buildings. They exist as descriptions of locations within the Cowles Reservation. The camps serve as sites for district or council outdoor events or short-term troop camping.

 

Camp Potlatch: A camping area near Maple Falls used by the Mount Baker Area Council circa 1974.

 

Prince Creek Scout Camp of the former Wenatchee Area Council was located on Lake Chelan in Central Washington.

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Prince Creek was named after Henry Domke's pack horse which was killed after falling off the mountain above the creek in 1886. Stories abound regarding horses slipping on the rocky slopes of Lake Chelan, territory better suited to the mountain goat. Most of the cobbles and gravels you see here were deposited by the flood of 1948 which changed the course of the creek. A Forest Service guard station, barn and campground were obliterated and washed into the lake, as were all other Forest Service campgrounds on the lake except Graham Harbor. Sand and rocks buried the dock, and soon the stream was running over it and into the lake.

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1920's reference to Camp Prince Creek of the Wenatchee Area Council

 

Randall Martin Scout Reservation of the Blue Mountain Council. http://www.bmcbsa.org/martin/martin.htm

 

Reservation X: "By the early 1950's, the summer camp program at Camp Parsons was operating at capacity, and members of the Council Camping Committee felt that additional summer camp facilities would be needed as the Scouting program continued to grow. 

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In 1955, a piece of property north of Monroe was purchased. That property, 165 acres surrounding Lake Hughes, became the Cascade Scout Reservation. The Scouts who arrived at the Reservation for summer camp in 1956 found a camp that was in the process of taking shape.  For the time being it was even without an official name, and was simply "Res X"."  (Credit to: http://www.seattlescouting.org).

 

Rocking T-H Ranch or just T-H Ranch was originally known as Camp B after T. Byron Hunt, former executive of the Seattle Area Council.

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"More property to the north of Camp Omache was acquired, and In 1963 the Rocking T-H Ranch opened. The Ranch offered programs for older Scouts and Explorers, including trail rides and horsemanship programs." (Credit to: http://www.seattlescouting.org).

 

Rotary was one of the earlier camps of the Blue Mountain Council. It was operating August 1935. A camp aid book from this year references "hike to Fort Douglas-Blue Mountain work."

 

Paul Ash provided this information to me in February 2010. It is from the Council's 1972 history booklet:

 

Scout-a-Vista is a one of the Council camps of the present day Grand Columbia Council. Prior councils include Wenatchee Area Council and North Central Washington Council. "The February 14, 1930 edition of the Wenatchee Sun, notes the Wenatchee Scouts in 1929 purchased 168 acres at the head of Squilchuck for the sum of $3,000. Over the years adjacent lands were secured to total 204.8 acres. Finally on January 27, 1936, payment had been made in full and the deed was delivered to Scout-A-Vista." (courtesy of the Wenatchee World, January 5, 2010).

 

"Scout-A-Vista is located in the Cascade Mountains near Mission Ridge Ski Resort, about a 15-minute drive from Wenatchee, Washington. The camp has a full service dining hall, a handicapped accessible shower house, maintained campsites and a fully stocked fishing hole." (Courtesy of Council website 1/2009).

 

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The following information came from The Wenatchee World, 10/19/2009:

Location: About eight miles south of downtown Wenatchee, off Squilchuck Road

Size: 204 acres

History: Purchase agreement signed in 1929 to buy land for $3,000; sale completed in 1936. All funds raised through local donations.

Facilities: Lodge, caretakers home, bathroom/shower house, trading post, and storage building

Use: Hosted the regional summer camp until 1965, now the site of winter camps, day camps, Cub Scout outings, local troop activities and rented out to private organizations.

Value: $2.5 million to $4 million

 

Seattle Area Council District Camps

 

Camp Backus

 

1932 Seattle Area Council R-Book: "On Mercer Island; a 20-acre tract for small troop camp sites."

 

"Camp Backus was acquired from Manson and Elsie Backus in 1925. The camp was located on almost 19 acres on the west side of Mercer Island.  The camp was used mostly for troop weekend and summer camping.  In 1967 the property was sold and the proceeds were used to buy the land that Camp Brinkley is located on." Credit to: http://www.seattlescouting.org

 

Camporee or other scouting event was held here February 1944. Seattle Scout Melvin Marcus, 1939 Crescent Dr., Seattle, Wash. Troop 10 attended. His backpack was on auction November 2007.

 

Camp Ballinger

 

Listed in 1947 Seattle Area Council minutes as in constant use for week-end Troop Camps.

 

Blue Ox Camp

 

Was an early 1930's District Camp of the Seattle Area Council located on Mercer Island. No memorabilia is known to exist.

1932 Seattle Area Council R-Book: "On Mercer Island, Lake Washington, for Seattle troops."

 

"This was one of several District Camps used by the Seattle Area Council in the early 1930's.  Blue Ox Camp was located on Mercer Island.  It was used by Scouts and Cubs from Seattle for summer and overnight camping." Credit to: http://www.seattlescouting.org

  

Camp Carver

 

"Camp Carver was located on the Olympic Peninsula and used primarily by the Chief Kitsap District in the 1970's. It was used until 1976, shortly after the Olympic Area Council merged with the Chief Seattle Council." Credit to: http://www.seattlescouting.org

 

Central District Camp

 

In 1952 the Central District held their District Camp on a tract of land 3 miles East of North Bend used by various non profit groups from King County. Formerly the North Bend Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) camp (note from Kevin: built 1934, ran 1935-1941, transferred to Associated Boy's Club in 1945) now known as Camp Waskowitz, a 372-acre camp that was purchased in 1957 by the Highline School District (Highline has been holding nature classes there since 1946). The name is that if Fritz Waskowitz, a former member of the University of Washington football team, who lost is life as a pilot in World War II. Waskowitz is one of two remaining intact Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) camps in the nation. Formerly known as Camp North Bend, the buildings are of simple utilitarian wood-frame construction. (Seattle Area Council also shows a Snoqualmie District in 1947 Council Minutes. This could be their District's Camp).

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Central District Camp patches for 1951, 1952, 1953, 1956 and 1957:

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Camp Frederick

 

1932 Seattle Area Council R-Book: "Kent, Auburn, Enumclaw Districts. On the Greenwater near the Rainier National Park boundary."
 

"This was one of several District Camps used by the Seattle Area Council in the early 1930's. Camp Frederick was located on the Greenwater River near the Rainier National Park boundary. It was used by the Kent, Auburn, and Enumclaw Districts." Credit to: http://www.seattlescouting.org

 

Camp Freeman

 

"The property for Camp Freeman was donated to the Seattle Area Council in 1943 by Anna Freeman on the death of her husband Alva, who had received the property as a land grant for his service in the Spanish-American War. The 53.25 acre camp was located on the Cedar River and was used primarily for training and weekend camping, although was used for Wood Badge training and other week long trainings on several occasions. Only one patch was ever designed.

 

One of five Chief Seattle Council camps developed or remodeled during the Golden Jubilee Campaign, Camp Freeman was a developed Chief Seattle Council camp from 1964 until 1987, when the property was sold to Henderson Homes.

 

Listed in 1947 Seattle Area Council minutes as in constant use for week-end Troop Camps.

 

Information provided 2/17/2010 by Lindsey Johnstone, son of the Camp Ranger, Matt Johnstone."

 

Listed in 1947 Seattle Area Council minutes as in constant use for week-end Troop Camps.

 

 

Camp Hopkins

 

"Located on Bainbridge Island, Camp Hopkins was dedicated on April 23, 1938. The property measured just 294' from east to west and 412' from north to south. It had one frame building used as a warehouse, and one log building on a concrete foundation that was used as a troop meeting place." Credit to: http://www.seattlescouting.org  Used in 1967.

 

Camp Kuppler

 

"Camp Kuppler was named after George A. Kuppler, a well-respected businessman in Port Angeles. The camp was located south of Port Angeles near Heart O' The Hills and the Olympic National Park. Land for the camp was acquired with the purchase of a 10 acre parcel from Marie Kearns, for $5 on July 17, 1939. The property was enlarged to the east on October 20, 1947, when 5 acres were bought from Claude J. Spencer and his wife Georgia Alice Spencer, for $10. Camp Kuppler was used mostly for troop camping, but the Mt. Olympus District held Klondike Derbys there, as well as a few camporees. Camp Kuppler was undeveloped; it had no parking lot, no established firepits, and no potable water.  However, some benches and one wooden latrine were built. Because of the camp's location and limited use, in 1995 the decision was made to sell the property." Credit to: http://www.seattlescouting.org   Camp Kuppler (not Cupler) in Clallam County is mentioned as a camping area for Scouts from the Olympic Area Council, circa 1976.

 

Camp Wm. Long.

 

City of Seattle park used frequently by Scouts in early 1900's. Camporee was held here June 1944. Seattle Scout Melvin Marcus, 1939 Crescent Dr., Seattle, Wash. Troop 10 attended. His backpack was on auction November 2007.

 

Camp Mackenzie

 

1932 Seattle Area Council R-Book: "Kitsap District on Hood Canal near Holly; summer and overnight."

 

"This was one of several District Camps used by the Seattle Area Council in the early 1930's. Camp Mackenzie was located on Hood Canal near Holly.  It was used for summer and overnight camping." Credit to: http://www.seattlescouting.org

 

Camp Rotary

 

1932 Seattle Area Council R-Book: "On Mercer Island in Lake Washington the Seattle Rotary Club has provided a camp for the use of al scouts on one-day or over-night hikes, with particularly good opportunities to pass first class tests. Single patrols or whole troops may use this camp any Friday night or Saturday. A council staff officer is in charge. Substantial lean-tos for shelter, pure drinking water, and interesting trails to explore are some of the features that make Camp Rotary attractive. There is a fine lodge with a big fireplace for use on rainy nights."

 

"Camp Rotary was located on Mercer Island and used by Scouts in the 1920s-1930s. It was just over 13 acres in size and was used mainly for weekend troop camping, although some districts held encampments there.  A number of lean-tos were built for shelter, and some trails branched out from the camp." Credit to: http://www.seattlescouting.org  Camp Rotary was sold in 1955 to help raise funds for the purchase of the Cascade Scout Reservation, home to camps Brinkley, Omache and Pigott.
 

Silver Peak Camp

 

1932 Seattle Area Council R-Book: "Way up in the heart of the Cascade range, two miles southwest of Snoqualmie Pass, Mr. T. N. Haller has provided scouts of the Seattle Area with a splendidly equipped mountain camp; a comfortable base for mountain climbing in summer and snow sports in winter. It is at the foot of Silver Peak, besides a roaring creek that forms the outlet of Annette Lake. The log cabin accommodates thirty, with spring bunks and mattresses, a completely equipped kitchen, and great stone fireplace. Troops sign up at Headquarters for week-end outings."
 

"T.N. Haller owned a log cabin two miles southwest of Snoqualmie Pass that he let Scouts use from the 1920's through the 1940's. Troop reservations for Silver Peak Camp were made through the Seattle Area Council Headquarters, and the camp could be used on weekends at any time of the year, although it was especially popular during the winter. The cabin had bunks and mattresses for up to 30 people, a fully equipped kitchen, and a great stone fireplace." Credit to: http://www.seattlescouting.org

 

Camp Vinnedge

 

1932 Seattle Area Council R-Book: Same information as below.

 

"This was one of several District Camps used by the Seattle Area Council in the early 1930's. Camp Vinnedge was located at Twin Cabins on the North Fork of the Snoqualmie River. It was used by the Renton, Issaquah, and Snoqualmie Valley Districts." Credit to: http://www.seattlescouting.org

 

Wildcat Lake Camp

 

"This was one of several District Camps used by the Seattle Area Council in the early 1930's. Wildcat Lake Camp was located on Wildcat Lake in Kitsap County. It was used by the Navy Yard District for summer and overnight camping." Credit to: http://www.seattlescouting.org

 

Camp Sekani of the former Inland Empire Council of Spokane. Sekani means "Children of the Rocks" in Salish. During the 1920s and 1930s, Sekani was used for summer camp activities.

 

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1930's flyer: "The camp sits on 56.48 acres located 1.75 miles outside the City limits beyond Minnehaha Park above the dam at the Upriver City Water Plant on the Spokane River. It has sleeping cabins, a splendid Lodge, swimming pool and a baseball diamond. Campers bring their own food and gear. The Camp Director was Paul K Walton out of Troop 77."

 

1933 flyer:

 

 

   

 

It appears patches were issued every year from 1925 until it was closed. The last camping season is recorded on a rocker patch segment that reads "Sekani 45." For the 1964 Jamboree, and probably the 1957 and 1960 Jamborees as well, Sekani was the council's site for the jamboree shake-down camp. It is interesting to note that exists a 1941 orange felt Sekani rectangle similar to the pre-1045 Portland camp issues." (quote courtesy of Dana Bonstrom).

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Camp Sekani is used today for Cub Scout day camp. Click here for more history.

 

 

Camp Sevenich 193?-1971. Camp Sevenich was located at Lake Conner a few miles east of Lake Stevens, Washington. Originally designed as a lowland camp for younger Scouts, Camp Sevenich slowly became the main council camp as increased vandalism eventually closed Camp Mathews. Click here for more history.

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Camp Sheppard of the Chief Seattle Council is located near the entrance to Mount Rainier National Park off SR 410 Camp. Camp Sheppard is named for Harry James Sheppard. The son of an Irish immigrant, Mr. Sheppard devoted much of his life to the BSA. Mr. Sheppard rented this property for the Boy Scouts, and he, his family, and other volunteers built many of its original buildings.  Ultimately Mr. Sheppard was instrumental in getting this property donated to the Boy Scouts. The Scouts have used this property from about 1947 on. It was originally called Camp Snoquera. In 1952 the lease was transferred to the Seattle Area Council, and in 1954 it was renamed in honor of Mr. Sheppard. Finally in 1956, the original “Camp Sheppard,” sign was erected in Mr. Sheppard's honor. (Credit to Kathy Dough, Great Granddaughter of Harry James Sheppard). Click here for more history.

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Silver Lake Camp. Camp Black Mountain may have been known by this in the 1920s.

 

 

Snoquera:1946-1953. In pre-Scout days, the property Camp Sheppard is located on was known as Camp Snoquera. Work camps occupied the site and in the 1890s a trail led from one of the old camps to the Starbo Mine on Mount Rainier. Camp Sheppard is situated off state Route 410 in the Mather Memorial Strip. The scenic 53-mile strip is named for Stephen Mather, the first director of the National Park Service. Name change to Camp Sheppard in 1954. (Credit to Seattle PI 5/2001).

 

Camp Sheppard started its life in the 1930s as a CCC camp under the name of Camp Snoquera, a combination of Snoqualmie from Snoqualmie Pass and era for the Economic Recover Administration. The name was given by the men who served at the camp. (Camp Sheppard website, 11/2010).

 

Spanaway Lake Camp: Originally used by Scouts of the Pierce County Council (C. 1924-1927) and then merged into the Tacoma Council in 1927. This Camp was used from 1923 to 1932.  In 1923, Rotary Eight assisted in constructing the Scout Camp at Spanaway Lake. When the Scouts were forced to move in 1932, Council and Rotary Eight Past-President Will Kilworth donated 40 acres near Dash Point to the Scouts. This became Camp Kilworth.

 

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Spirit Lake Camp of the former Mount St. Helens Council out of Vancouver started in the teens. Later used for 25 years by the Portland Area Council/Columbia Pacific Council until it was destroyed in the 1980 eruption of Mount Saint Helens.

 

Click here for more history and some great color images.

 

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The Tumwater Area Council property on Summit Lake was originally named Camp Olympus after the Boys Camp that was originally located there. Later the camp was referred to as the Summit Lake Camp.

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The Summit Lake site was announced for the first time at the April 1941 Council Executive Board Meeting. In July 1941 the council rented the private boys camp Olympus at Summit Lake for Boy Scout summer camp. It was decided to purchase Camp Olympus from Otto C. Mauthe in October 1944. The Council paid $5000 to Mr. Mauthe in 1945 and acquired the camp. In 1943 the Weyerhaeuser Company offered Tumwater Area Council all of Summit Lake up to the peak/crests of the hills for $5000. From 1942-August 1945  (World War II) the Summit Lake camp was used off and on as a base to train soldiers, including those for the Normandy Invasion. At the July 17, 1949 Council Executive Board Meeting, a proposal to have a camp name contest was made.

 

From 1950-1954 the camp was still being referred to as the "Summit Lake" site.

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The result of the camp name contest was to call the property "Camp Thunderbird" of which it is still known today.

 

Camp Summit Lake of the Grand Columbia Council. "Summit Lake is one of the best kept secrets in the Grand Columbia Council. It is located on the Colville Indian Reservation at the summit of Disautel pass on Hyw 155 between Omak and Nespelem. The Okanogan Valley District holds its Polar Bear Camporee there the last weekend of January each year. It is not a staffed camp but may be reserved and used by Scout Troops, Posts and Crews." (Courtesy of Council website 1/2009).

 

"Summit Lake Camp, located at Disautel Pass on State Highway 155 between Nespelum and Omak. Originally acquired from the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation in 1967, the rustic camp has been a favorite of scout troops in Ferry, Okanogan and Chelan counties, hosting a variety of camping events such as the annual Polar Bear Camp." (Grand Columbia Council website 9/2013)

 

The following information came from The Wenatchee World, 10/19/2009:

Location: 18 miles east of Okanogan, within the Colville Confederated Tribes reservation

Size: 100 acres

History: Purchased from Colville Confederated Tribes in 1967 for $10,250.

Facilities: Lodge

Use: Winter camps, local troop activities.

Value: $100,000 to $200,000

 

Camp Sunrise: Named for William H. Cowles, Sr., an early Spokane pioneer and supporter of Scouting, Cowles Scout Reservation began as Camp Cowles in the early 1920's with a purchase of 80 acres of prime waterfront on Diamond Lake. It has grown to four camps: Camp Cowles, Camp Fosseen, Camp Ponderosa and Camp Sunrise, covering over 900 acres and more than a mile of waterfront.
 

"Ponderosa and Sunrise have no buildings. They exist as descriptions of locations within the Cowles Reservation. The camps serve as sites for district or council outdoor events or short-term troop camping." (Quote courtesy of Dana Bonstrom).

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Camp Tahoma of the former Mount Rainier Council. See Camp Hahobas...

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T-H Ranch (see Rocking T-H Ranch)

 

Camp Thunderbird, located 16 miles west of Olympia on the western shore of Summit Lake, is one of two camps that make up the Cleland Scout Reservation. Together with Camp Martin, they occupy over 150 acres of dense picturesque forest surrounded by the scenic Black Hills. Click here for more history and images.

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Camp Touchet of the Blue Mountain Council. The Camp goes back to the early 1920s.

 

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>1927. Raleigh is mentioned in the newspaper article. (F. Kern collection, 2003)

 

 

Today, Camp Touchet is a beautiful camping facility owned by the Columbia Basin Baptist Association called Touchet Valley Baptist Camp. It is located half way between Dayton and Ski Bluewood. It has a rustic atmosphere which offers, a play field, hiking and water play. The Touchet River winds it's way through the property.

 

Camp Tyree: One of the earliest camps used by Scouts in Snohomish County. 1916-1920.

 

"We went up to Tyree on the Monte Cristo Lone which was on the Buchanan Farm. We had a very nice camp there; good swimming, a nice cookhouse and a good sized tent. Mr. Kelly lined it up and put Mr. I.P. Hewett in charge. Mr. Kelly was there part of the time because he was our Executive. Later I.P. became out Executive. There was a big tent for medical and a tent for each patrol. We built our frames and bunks. It worked out real well. Every morning we'd have reveille, do a little exercise, have a talk and then have breakfast. We'd do whatever they had lined up for us, hiking or scouting skills but mainly swimming. Seems to me there were about 80 boys in camp. One of the highlights was the bus, which came every day on the railroad tracks bringing mail and supplies. Camp Tyree the fire camp, was used for three or four years." (Credit to Howard Bargreen, Troop 10)

 

"Later called Camp 22, used from 1920-1921. Camp 22 located at Lake 22 just southeast of Verlot was owned by the YMCA. This camp was used by the Scouts of Snohomish County after Camp Tyree. Sleeping in big tents on Army cots, Scouts spent two weeks hiking the trails of the area and putting their Scouting skills to use. Formal Scouting use of Camp 22 ended with the formation of a new camp on leased Forest Service property at Lake Kelcema." 

 

Cub Camp Vorehead Nahcotta, WA (near Ocean Park, WA). The camp has been donated to the Scouts through the courtesy of J.A. Vorehead of Nahcota, 1931. This would have been in the former Twin Harbors A.C.

 

Camp Welsh listed in 1942 Region XI Camp Directory eight miles from Anacortes mentioned as a camping area for Scouts from the Mount Baker Area Council, in the early 1940's.

 

Camp Werner of the Olympic Area Council was located on Lake Gibbs. It was a land parcel of 270 acres, which included 45 acre Lake Gibbs. Click here for more history.

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Camp Wilderness of the Blue Mountain Council (same design as Camp Mead patch). Located in the Blue Mountains and close to Ski Bluewood. Possibly an older name for Camp Touchet. 

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Troop Camp Zanika-Lache of the former North Central Washington Council is located on Lake Wenatchee.

 

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