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VOLUME 15, NUMBER 12 -- January 19, 2009

 Youth Journalism International students who worked on this  project:
 
The writers:
 

 

Rachel Glogowski, 17, is a senior at Bristol Eastern High School in Bristol, Connecticut, U.S.A. She joined YJI in 2005 and is now an associate editor with the organization.



 

Alexandra Patrikios, 17, is a senior at Ballarat & Clarendon College in Ballarat, Victoria, Australia. She joined YJI in 2008 and is a senior reporter with the organization.


 

Katie Grosser, 18, is a senior at Gymnasium der Benediktiner school in Meschede, Calle, Germany. She joined YJI in 2008 and is a senior reporter with the organization.


The reporters from Youth Journalism International who interviewed young people around the world for this project:

Sana Ali, 17, is a senior at the Universal American School in Kuwait. She joined YJI in 2008 and is a reporter with the organization.

 

Brice Birdsall, 13, is in eighth grade at Alder Creek Middle School in Milwaukie, Oregon, U.S.A. She joined YJI in 2008 and is a junior reporter with the organization.

 


Shekinah-Glory Dhanie-Beepat, 15, lives in Carteret, New Jersey, U.S.A. She is homeschooled. She joined YJI in 2008 and is a reporter with the organization.

Eugenia Durante, 17, is in her fourth year at Liceo Classico G. Mazzini school in Genoa, Italy. She joined YJI in 2008 and is a reporter with the organization.

 

Katie Grosser, 18, is a senior at Gymnasium der Benediktiner school in Meschede, Calle, Germany. She joined YJI in 2008 and is a senior reporter with the organization.

 

 

Sarah Heath, 18, is a senior at Rhea County High School and lives in Spring City, Tennessee, U.S.A. She joined YJI in 2008 and is a junior reporter with the organization.


Edrees Kakar, 20, completed Afghan schools in Peshawar, Pakistan, and now works in Kabul, Afghanistan. He joined YJI in 2005 and is a senior reporter with the organization.

Kiernan Majerus-Collins, 13, is in eighth grade at Bristow Middle School in West Hartford, Connecticut, U.S.A. He joined YJI in 2007 and is a reporter with the organization.

Jacqueline Mejia, 16, is a junior at Francis Lewis High School and lives in Woodside, New York, U.S.A. She joined YJI in 2008 and is a junior reporter with the organization.

 

Harsha Mishra, 17, is in 11th grade at the Air Force School, Air Force Station, Bareilly, Uttar Pradesh, India. She joined YJI in 2008 and is a reporter with the organization.


Alexandra Patrikios, 17, is a senior at Ballarat & Clarendon College in Ballarat, Victoria, Australia. She joined YJI in 2008 and is a senior reporter with the organization. 

Mariechen Puchert, 18, is a new graduate of Clarendon High School for Girls in East London, Province of the Eastern Cape, South Africa. She joined YJI in 2008 and is a reporter with the organization.
 

Mariah Pulver, 16, of Oro Valley, Arizona, is a junior at Ironwood Ridge High School in Tucson, Arizona, U.S.A. She joined YJI in 2008 and is a junior reporter with the organization.

Special assistance in copy editing:

Wesley Saxena, 15, of West Hartford, Connecticut, is a sophomore at Hall High School. He joined YJI in 2006 and is a senior reporter with the organization.


 

 

 
 

Teens look for hope in Obama

Alexandra Patrikios (Australia) and Katie Grosser (Germany):

For Cyrilla Mulindi, a 19-year-old Kenyan living in South Africa, the election of Barack Obama as the next president of the United States means that “anything is possible!”

Click Here

Youth Journalism International

That feeling of hope – embodied in Obama’s campaign mantra of “Yes We Can” – resonated with many young people around the world interviewed by a team of Youth Journalism International reporters in eight countries on five continents.

They found this year’s highly anticipated presidential election not only entranced Americans, but also captured the attention of the world, with many rooting for reform on a variety of issues.

Obama’s election means “a change in our country, economy, and ourselves,” said Maria Fernanda Manzano, a 14-year-old student at Alder Creek Middle School in Milwaukie, Oregon.

“It’s history and I’m very happy. I hope he can make his promises come true,” said Kenneth Holder, an eighth grade student at King Philip Middle School in West Hartford, Connecticut.

Tyler Steinhorse, a 16-year-old from Tucson, Arizona called the Democrat’s win “just amazing.”

“I hope that he’ll actually bring about the change he promises,” said Anne Stolpe, 18, of Städtisches Gymnasium Meschede school in Meschede, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany.

Anna Lee, an 18-year-old senior at Ironwood Ridge High School in Tucson, Arizona, called Obama’s win “really historical” and declared a desire for “great change.”   Full Article

 

 

America's image may rebound, teens say

 

Katie Grosser (Germany): Once revered around the globe, the United States is facing image problems.

But Americans may have improved their nation’s image simply by electing Barack Obama as their next president, according to young people interviewed in the U.S. and abroad.

One Italian teen, 18-year-old Alessia Ubaldini, said Americans will have a “fresher image” and seem less cartoonish now.

Those outside the U.S. “won’t picture the Americans as the Simpson’s family,” said Ubaldini, who attends Liceo Classico Mazzini in Genoa, Italy.

Paul Harris, 17, of Victoria, Australia, said Obama’s election will help America “gain more international standing and maybe help them get back into the game as a world leader.”

In interviews with Youth Journalism International, more than 30 youth in eight countries, including the U.S., said they thought Obama’s election will have a positive impact on America’s reputation.  Full Article

 

Economy a crucial issue for worried teens

Rachel Glogowski (Connecticut, USA): Teens across the world may not be buying houses and saving for retirement just yet, but many said the current economic crisis is a more pressing issue than the war in Iraq for incoming President-elect Barack Obama.

Click Here

Youth Journalism International

When asked what the most important issue of the recent election was, 15-year-old Ray Ma of Columbia, South Carolina said, “Definitely the economy. Obama basically won over Americans on that issue. Now, having won the election, expectations are extremely high.”

“It seems like the issue on the war of Iraq has taken a back seat,” Ma said, “for now.” 

But the war has damaged the economy, and Obama will have to deal with that, said Cyrilla Mulindi, a 19-year-old Kenyan living in South Africa who attends Clarendon High School for Girls in East London.

Jessi Humberd, a senior at Rhea County High School in Spring City, Tennessee, said Obama’s policy on the war may help the economy.

“I think it will help our financial crisis, because we won’t be spending money in Iraq,” said Humberd.

More than 30 young people interviewed in eight states in the United States and seven other countries across the world by reporters for Youth Journalism International agreed that the global economic crisis was a significant factor in the recent presidential election and that it needs to be addressed as soon as possible.

“I think the economic crisis is the most important and immediate issue to be faced. If the crisis won’t be solved soon, the world economy will crack with catastrophic consequences for everybody,” said 18-year old Luca Capizzi, a student at Liceo Classico Mazzini in Genoa, Italy.  Full Article

 

 

'Get out!' vs. 'Finish the job!'

Rachel Glogowski (Connecticut, USA): The war in Iraq and Afghanistan is a hot topic for teens across the world.

Whatever their feelings are, most young people interviewed by Youth Journalism International agree that it is one of the most important issues facing future President Barack Obama.

“I want him to understand that the situation in Iraq and Afghanistan is unbearable,” said 18-year-old Alessia Ubaldini of Genoa, Italy. “He is a world citizen. He was born in Honolulu and he has lived in so many different places. I think he’s open minded enough to understand different nations.”

Many teens said Obama should withdraw troops from Iraq.

“Get us out,” said Rocco DiTaranto, an eighth grader at Bristow Middle School in West Hartford, Connecticut.

Alice Cordara, a 17-year-old high school student at Liceo Classico Mazzini in Genoa, Italy, said she wants the new American president to stay in contact with the leaders of both Iraq and Afghanistan.

“I hope Obama will retire the troops from both the countries, even if I’ve heard he only wants to move them from Iraq to Afghanistan,” she said.

But many students recognize that pulling troops out is not a simple matter.

“It’s a tricky issue, and any withdrawal would be a gradual process,” said 17-year-old Paul Harris, of Ballarat, Victoria, Australia.. Full Article

 

Obama's ability to influence uncertain

Alexandra Patrikios (Australia): President-elect Barack Obama may have appeared in newspapers across the world, but it is difficult to say just how much international influence his new Democratic administration will have once he takes office.

According to youth interviewed around the globe, Obama’s attention will be in considerable demand, as pressing international issues such as war, climate change, disease and foreign policy continue to pose threats to a greater communal environment.

Obama’s policy on AIDS is important to Cyrilla Mulindi, a 19-year-old resident of East London, South Africa. She said she hopes it will have a positive impact everywhere in Africa.

In Kuwait, Zeinab Matkour, who is Pakistani, said the perception is that Obama has a better understanding than previous presidents of the challenges faced by other nations.

Because of this, the new American president “would be able to really influence the Pakistani government,” Matkour said.

Alice Cordara, 17, of Genoa, Italy, said she hopes Obama’s military policy “will influence us not to join wars we cannot afford or approve.”

Nolitha Namatovu Luzuka, 18, a Ugandan who is a South African citizen living in East London, South Africa, said elections there are coming soon.

South Africa paid close attention to the American election, Luzuka said, which she said could positively impact the election there. Full Article

 

Young people welcome a new era

 

Katie Grosser (Germany): The extensive media coverage of the 2008 American elections reflected how many people were following the polls, eager to find out who would be the next president of the United States of America – Barack Obama or John McCain.

Click Here

Youth Journalism International

After Obama’s victory, the reaction reverberated not only in America, but around the world.

“Everybody was worried about the elections and we were happy to see that Obama had won,” said Alice Cordara, 17, of Genoa, Italy. “We like America’s new president very much.”

“Everyone reacted positively and was excited, especially my black peers,” said Anne Stolpe, 18, of Meschede, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany.

“Lots of kids were happy. Everyone was happy,” said Kenneth Holder, 13, of West Hartford, Connecticut.

In Carteret, New Jersey, students gushed over the victory, said 11-year-old Divya Singh. “Oh my gosh! Obama won!” Singh said, echoing the reaction. “We have a black president! YES!”

Luca Capizzi, 18, of Genoa, said fellow Italian teens were happy with Obama’s victory.

“Even the ones who have Republican ideals were on Obama’s side,” said Capizzi.   Full Article

 

 

 

See The Tattoo's pre-election package of stories here:

 

 

 

 See our coverage from the presidential campaign:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Teens at a Hartford rally for Barack Obama: (left to right) Abigail Oliveras, Devin Smith, Theresa Govert, Amanda Smith, all from East Haddam, Conn.

Tattoo photo

 

Check out Tattoo political stories from campaigns of the past

 

4 years ago:

Election 2004

 

 

 

 

 

12 years ago:

 

 

Election 1996

 

When Hurricane Katrina smashed ashore in 2005, Louisiana teen Samantha Perez started writing about the storm that washed away much of her old life. Her journal, chronicled in the pages of The Tattoo, is all online at Hurricane Journal. Read it for an eye-opening and intensely personal look into the eye of the worst storm in recent history.

 

 

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Don't miss this stellar story:

Roaring along on my uncle’s red motorbike past coconut and banana trees, I blinked away the dry, red dust and headed straight for a little, wooden hut perched on the thick stilts that keep it safe when the monsoons come.

This is so cool, I thought.

Sometimes I caught glimpses of curious faces looking at me flying along on my Uncle Sahk’s imported Honda Wave 110.

The thought of stopping was very far from my mind.

Back home in America, I never could have done this.

But I’d gone halfway around the world to Cambodia, where almost everything that is illegal back in the States is just fine.

On the fast lane toward an incredible adventure, I wasn’t about to stop for anything or anyone … unless something happened to get in my way.

And, wow, did something get in my way.

Let’s just say one shouldn’t be speeding down a dirt road in Klong Pursat at 75 miles an hour without a keen understanding that brakes were placed on motorbikes for a good reason.

America was about to make its mark in Cambodia and I was the one who was going to make it.  Full Article

 

Youth Journalism International reporters in eight countries talked to more than 30 young people on five continents to find out what the election of Barack Obama might mean for them, their nation, the world and the future. Read this special issue -- the largest we've ever undertaken -- to find out what they had to say on the eve of Obama's Inauguration as president of the United States.

Interviewed for this project were:

Fatema Al-Bader, 16, of Hawally, Kuwait. Fatema is in 11th grade at the Universal American School in Hawally.

 



Rabbia Ashraf, 16, of Hawally, Kuwait, is in 11th grade The American School of Kuwait in Hawally.

 


Rebecca Au, 14, of Highland Park, New Jersey, U.S.A. Rebecca is a sophomore at Owl Academy in Highland Park.


 

Luca Capizzi, 18, of Genoa, Italy. Luca is a student at Liceo Classico Mazzini in Genoa.


 

Alice Cordara, 17, of Genoa, Italy. Alice is a student at Liceo Classico Mazzini in Genoa.


Tyler Cruver, 16, of Dayton, Tennessee, U.S.A. Tyler is a junior at Rhea County High School.


 

Rocco DiTaranto, 14, of West Hartford, Connecticut, U.S.A. Rocco is an eighth grade student at Bristow Middle School in West Hartford.


Elan Green, 13, of Milwaukie, Oregon, U.S.A. Elan is an eighth grade student at Alder Creek Middle School in Milwaukie.


Saeed Haris 24, of Kabul, Afghanistan. Saeed, who has also lived in Pakistan, is an undergraduate student at the American University of Afghanistan in Kabul.


Paul Harris, 17, of Ballarat, Victoria, Australia.


Cheyenne Hill, 16, of Tucson, Arizona, U.S.A. Cheyenne is a junior at Ironwood Ridge High School in Tucson.

 


 

Kenneth Holder, 13, of West Hartford, Connecticut, U.S.A. Kenneth is an eighth grade student at King Philip Middle School in West Hartford.


Jessi Humberd, 17, of Spring City, Tennessee, U.S.A. Jessi is a senior at Rhea County High School.


 

Puneet Kapoor, 16, of Uttar Pradesh, India. Puneet is a student at the Sunbeam English School in Varanasi, Uttar Pradesh.


 

Philipp Küchler, 19, of North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany. Philipp is a student at St. Elisabeth Akademie in Düsseldorf, North Rhine-Westphalia.

 

Anna Lee, 18, of Tucson, Arizona, U.S.A. Anna is a senior at Ironwood Ridge High School in Tucson.

 

 

Nolitha Namatovu Luzuka, 18, of East London, South Africa. Nolithia, who is Ugandan, is a South African citizen and a senior at the Clarendon High School for Girls in East London.

 

Timothy Lyons, 17, of Ballarat, Victoria, Australia.

 

Ray Ma, 15, of Columbia, South Carolina, U.S.A. Ray is a homeschooler.

 

Sarah Malloy, 16, of Ballarat, Victoria, Australia.


Maria Fernanda Manzano, 14, of Milwaukie, Oregon, U.S.A. Maria is an eighth grade student at Alder Creek Middle School in Milwaukie.

 


 

Zeinab Matkour, 17, of Hawally, Kuwait. Zeinab, who is Pakistani, is in 11th grade at the Universal American School in Hawally.

 

Nicole Matthews, 18, of Queens, New York, U.S.A. Nicole, who voted for the first time on November 4, is a graduate of Beth Jacob High School in Brooklyn, New York.

 

Sarah Molloy, 16, of Ballarat, Victoria, Australia.

 

 

Cyrilla Mulindi, 19, of East London, South Africa. Cyrilla, a Kenyan, attends the Clarendon High School for Girls in East London.

 

Christian Reinhard Müller, 19, of East London, South Africa. Christian, a South African of German and South African descent, is a part-time student and works in East London.

 

Katie Mullaney, 16, of Hopkinton, Massachusetts, U.S.A. Katie is a student at Agape Academy in Hopkinton.

 

Divya Singh, 11, of Carteret, New Jersey, U.S.A. Divya is a seventh grade student at Carteret Middle School in Carteret.

 

Tyler Steinhorse, 16, of Tucson, Arizona, U.S.A. Tyler is a junior at Ironwood Ridge High School in Tucson.


 

Anne Stolpe, 18, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany. Anne attends Städtisches Gymnasium Meschede school in Meschede, North Rhine-Westphalia.

 

Muhammad Waqar, 28, of Kabul, Afghanistan. Muhammad, originally a Pakistani citizen from the northwestern region of Pakistan, works at a bank in Kabul.

 

Alessia Ubaldini, 18, of Genoa, Italy. Alessia is a high school senior at Liceo Classico Mazzini in Genoa.

 

 

See The Tattoo's pre-election package of stories here:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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