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VOLUME 14, NUMBER 6 -- May 19, 2008


-- Hurricane Journal --

We're gonna be just fine

It’s been awhile.
Earlier today, I heard from a nice woman in New Jersey that I met because of Katrina, and it made me think about The Tattoo and the things I’ve written. And so here’s another entry, and it’ll probably be my last.
It’s my last for a lot of reasons, but one of them is that I’m not going to be a teen for much longer. I turn 20 in April. It’s my golden birthday and everything. It’s special. Don’t get me wrong, though – I’m terrified. I hate getting older, and not being able to say –teen at the end of my age is going to kill me. Birthdays mean that time is moving, and it’s moving fast. I remember spending my 18th birthday in Ryan’s restaurant because we were still living in the FEMA trailer. We ate the birthday cake right there.
Mom always nags that I haven’t written much on the parish lately. I know I should, so that other people can understand what the people in St. Bernard are feeling, how they’re coping, how they’re getting through each day. But sooner or later, after ordeals like Katrina, the earth-shattering kind, you need to put it all behind you. You need to let go.

 – By Samantha Perez

 





Wreck-less driving

The parents of two teens killed in a high speed wreck last summer are using their own sorrowful experience to try to stop other young drivers from taking the same deadly risks.

David Roy and Dennis Gosselin, fathers of 16-year-old Alyssa Roy and 17-year-old Myles Gosselin – passengers who died in the August crash that claimed the lives of four teens – spoke to students at Bristol Eastern High School about the wrenching agony of losing a child.

As they spoke, their families stood near, wiping away tears.

Roy angrily asked the audience if they loved their parents.

“Do you want to see your parents cry like this? Make a poor choice.”

 By Rachel Glogowski

 

 

By Justin Skaradosky/ The Tattoo

 

 

Check out The Tattoo's many travel stories by clicking here

Don't miss the continuing story of a 17-year-old evacuee in Louisiana. Read Samantha Perez's heartbreaking, wonderful

Hurricane Journal


 

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