Support teen journalism.

Tattoo Writer's Index

     

Home page

All issues

Who we are

Movies

High School Guide

Twitter: @yjinternational

Help us by

Shopping at amazon.com

Making a permanent impression since 1994
Follow Youth Journalism International on Facebook
X Trials | Katrina journals |Teen suicideTeen pregnancy |  School violence | Travel | Journals | Daily Sketch | Awards | Contact us

 

April 26, 2010

 

New contest to honor world's best teen journalists

 

Youth Journalism International officials Steve Collins, Katie Jordan and Jackie Majerus at the Scholastic Press Forum in Massachusetts. March 2010.

Youth Journalism International gains nonprofit status

WEST HARTFORD, Connecticut, U.S.A. – Youth Journalism International is poised to expand its charitable mission in the wake of receiving formal recognition recently from American tax authorities as a designated nonprofit.

Recognition as a 501(c)(3) public educational charity by the U.S. Internal Revenue Service allows donors to take tax deductions for their contributions to the organization. It also opens the doors for potential grants that could support the mission of Youth Journalism International.

“This is a big step to help our growing organization do much more to advance our effort to bring young people together across international borders, train aspiring journalists and fight for a free youth press,” said Steve Collins, president of YJI’s board of directors.

Youth Journalism International is the educational outgrowth of a 16-year volunteer effort to give young people a much-needed voice – and the skills to do it well.

As a non-governmental organization (or NGO), YJI has a worldwide reach, attracting scores of young writers from dozens of countries to tackle a wide range of stories, as well as photography and cartoons, much of it published online in The Tattoo international teen newspaper.

Details of Youth Journalism International’s organization are available online at youthjournalism.org. YJI is committed to transparency in its operations.

It welcomes donations from anyone who supports its efforts to provide the skills for young writers to make a difference in the world, Collins said.

For more information, please see YJI’s website or contact it at youthjournalisminternational@gmail.com. Its phone numbers are on YJI’s website.

 

Want to help? You can donate online right here:

 

 

This spring, Youth Journalism International, a Connecticut-based educational nonprofit, celebrates its Sweet 16th with a gift to talented young writers, photographers, and cartoonists around the globe:  The world’s first international journalism contest for teens.

Contest categories

STUDENT JOURNALIST OF THE YEAR

JOURNALISM EDUCATOR OF THE YEAR

NEWS – Team (more than one byline)

FEATURES – Individual

FEATURES – Team (more than one byline)

REVIEWS (single or double byline)

SPORTS (single or double byline)

CARTOONS

PHOTOGRAPHY

and

JACINTA MARIE BUNNELL AWARD FOR COMMENTARY to honor an individual who gave voice to an important issue in a single opinion piece or a series of opinion pieces devoted to the same topic.

Bunnell, who was severely disabled, died in 2009 at the age of 26. Among her legacies is a commitment by those whose lives she touched to focus on that most crucial question: “What do you think?”

It is a fitting tribute to Jacinta to honor one of the many young people who have tried to answer that question during the past year.

FRANK KEEGAN “TAKE NO PRISONERS” AWARD FOR NEWS (Individual) to honor an individual who showed the nose for news exemplified by longtime newsman Frank Keegan, whose love of journalism and determination that it has a future helped give birth to Youth Journalism International.

In the 16 years since it formed in 1994 to teach local teens about journalism, Youth Journalism International has blossomed into an international organization with students around the world. Now the group is sponsoring an annual contest to further its mission of promoting a free youth press.

The contest is accepting entries from now until May 7.  Young journalists in any country may enter, provided that they are 19 years old or younger, are writing in English and are not paid professionals.

“The contest is just another way for YJI to support young journalists,” said Katie Jordan of Bristol, Conn., an editor for the organization.  “There are a lot of great young writers out there who deserve to be recognized.”

The contest accepts entries in the categories of news, features, reviews, sports, cartoons and photography.

Students may also enter samples of work to be considered for the title of Student Journalist of the Year, or submit an essay nominating a journalism teacher or advisor for Journalism Educator of the Year.

The contest also features two special awards:  The Jacinta Marie Bunnell Award for Commentary and The Frank Keegan “Take No Prisoners” Award for News.

The Jacinta Marie Bunnell Award will honor an individual who gave voice to an important issue through opinion writing.  The award is a tribute to Bunnell, who was severely disabled and died at the age of 26 in 2009.  Her legacy included a commitment by those whose lives she touched to focus on that most crucial question: “What do you think?”

The Frank Keegan Award will honor an individual who showed the nose for news exemplified by longtime newsman Frank Keegan, whose love of journalism and determination that it has a future helped give birth to Youth Journalism International.

“Frank was with us from day one,” said Steve Collins, president of Youth Journalism International. “We’re glad to have a way to honor him by showcasing some of the best work that young reporters are doing around the globe.”

To enter, students should submit copies of excellent work published online or in print between Jan. 1, 2009 and March 31, 2010.  Entries must be postmarked or emailed by 5 p.m. Eastern Standard Time, Friday, May 7, 2010. 

Entry fees for the contest are $10 for Student Journalist of the Year and Journalism Educator of the Year and $5 for both the Jacinta Marie Bunnell Award for Commentary and the Frank Keegan “Take No Prisoners” Award for News. Fees are $6 for each team entry in the news and features categories, and $3 for each individual entry in news, features, reviews, sports, cartoons and photography categories. 

Students who can’t afford these fees may send a note of explanation with their contest entry, and YJI will waive the entry fee.

The contest entry form and detailed instructions on how to enter can be found online at www.youthjournalism.org.

Youth Journalism International is a recognized 501(c)(3) public charity by the U.S. Internal Revenue Service. A non-governmental organization, YJI depends on donations from supporters to continue its important work training the next generation of journalists.

Key Facts about YJI's contest

DEADLINE: Entries must be postmarked or emailed by 5 p.m. Eastern Standard Time, Friday, May 7, 2010.

Entry fees for the contest are $10 each for Student Journalist of the Year and Journalism Educator of the Year (see details below) and $5 each for both the Jacinta Marie Bunnell Award for Commentary and the Frank Keegan “Take No Prisoners” Award for News. Fees are $6 for Team entries in News or Features. Other categories are $3 each. There is no limit to the number of entries one person or publication can submit.

The work has to have been published, in print or online, between Jan. 1, 2009 and March 31, 2010.

To submit an entry for Journalism Educator of the Year, please send an essay about why the teacher or adviser is the best in the world (300 to 800 words is best). It should be heartfelt. Think of it as writing a letter to us about the educator, so an informal tone is fine. Since your goal should be to persuade us, it is best to provide specific examples. Supporting materials, such as a copy of a newspaper, articles written about the educator or photos, are also fine. Multiple letters are also fine. We will give the most weight to what students have to say, but are more than willing to look at any items that bolster the case for someone.

To submit an entry for Student Journalist of the Year, please send a half dozen or so clips that show the student's work. A letter or letters explaining the impact of the work or the circumstances surrounding a student's journalism are encouraged. Tell us why this student journalist is the world's best. Other supporting material is fine, too, if it will bolster your case.

Any young journalist age 19 or under in any country who is not working professionally is eligible. Although entries must have been published online or in print, they do not have to have appeared in a school publication. Underground papers, blogs, online papers and other venues for journalism are all acceptable.


Help Youth Journalism International continue to offer free educations to talented teens! Your donation can help us continue to provide the world's premier teen journalism.

Add us to your online bookmark site:
Add http://www.readthetattoo.com to your blinklist account Add http://www.readthetattoo.com to your delicious account Add http://www.readthetattoo.com to your digg account Add http://www.readthetattoo.com to your fark account Add http://www.readthetattoo.com to your furl account Add http://www.readthetattoo.com to your magnolia account Add http://www.readthetattoo.com to your newsvine account Add http://www.readthetattoo.com to your reddit account Add http://www.readthetattoo.com to your simpy account Add http://www.readthetattoo.com to your spurl account Add http://www.readthetattoo.com to your myyahoo account Add http://www.readthetattoo.com to your shadows account Add http://www.readthetattoo.com to your sync2it account Monitor http://www.readthetattoo.com with Blogarithm Meneame

 

© 2010 by The Tattoo. All rights reserved.

Who we are  |  Join us  |  Contact Us  |  Privacy Policy

WebSTAT - Free Web Statistics