holiday lights

Happy Holidays! Bon Hiver!

 

Unique gifts from the
CafePress Store!

 

 

A Northern Exposure
holiday primer:

Chris-in-the-Morning on the air


"Bon Hiver" is French, literally meaning Happy Winter. The denizens of Cicely traditionally call out this greeting to one another on the first snow (episode 5.10 First Snow)

The Christmas holiday episode is 3.10 Seoul Mates:

"It's an old legend, that on Christmas Eve at midnight, all the animals fall on their knees and speak -- praising the new born Jesus.

(pausing to reflect)

Back in the winter of '68, my Dad was doing a short term for D and D. Mom was -- I'm not sure where Mom was. Anyway, I was home alone on Christmas Eve and I stayed up late to see if my dog, Buddy, would talk. He did -- at least I think he did. I don't remember Buddy's exact words, but that's not important. What matters is that a seven-year-old boy experienced his own personal epiphany.

My point? It's that Christmas reveals itself to each of us in a personal way -- be it secular or sacred. Whatever Christmas is -- and it's many things to many people -- we all own a piece of it. Kinda like Santa's bag, inside there's gift for everyone.

My Christmas wish for you tonight -- may your dog talk."

- Chris-in-the-Morning (excerpt from "The Friendly Beasts")

"A long time ago, the raven looked down from the sky and saw that the people of the world were living in darkness.

The ball of light was kept hidden by a selfish old chief.

So the raven turned himself into a spruce needle and floated on the river where the chief's daughter came for water.

She drank the spruce needle.

She became pregnant and gave birth to a boy, who was the raven in disguise.

The baby cried and cried until the chief gave him the ball of light to play with.

As soon as he had the light, the raven turned back into himself.

The raven carried the light into the sky.

From then on, we no longer lived in darkness."

Marilyn tells the story of Christmas and the Raven story.

Cicely Christmas


Ravens are a big part of Cicely's holiday traditions.

The Raven story borrows from various Native American stories and Lore, such as the Origin of Light, an Inuit story; Raven Steals the Light; and other stories of the Raven.

Raven goodies:

Ornaments and cards (and more!) - Taku Graphics

Book: Raven, A Trickster Tale from the Pacific Northwest

Book: How the Raven Stole the Sun

Old world style glass ornaments in the shape of a Raven

Tsimshain First Nations artist - Raven on a ball

Hand-stiched calico Raven (NW Indian style) from Alaska

Gitksan Native glass ball with ravens

Shows a current listing of Raven ornaments on ebay

More NX holiday fun:

Cicely's Quirky Christmas List

Chris Stevens and the Meaning of Christmas

 

© Copyright, 2010 • Northern Exposure is Copyright Universal City Studios. All Rights Reserved. • Created 10/22/03 • Updated 12/24/10