The
Second part of
the good Hus-wiues
Iewell.

Where is to be found most apt and
readiest wayes to distill many whol
some and sweet waters.

In which likewise is shewed the best maner
in preseruing of diuers sorts of Fruits, & making of Sirrops.

With diuers conceits in Cookerie with the
Booke of Caruing.

AT LONDON
Printed by E. Allde for Edward
White, dwelling at the little North
doore of Paules Church at
the signe of the Gun,
1597.

A Booke of Cookerie

To boyle mary bones for dinner.
First put your mary bones into a faire pot of Water, and let them boyle till they bee halfe enough, then take out al your broath, sauing so much as will couer your mary bones, then put therto eight or nine carret rootes, and see they be wel scraped and washed, and cut inch long or little lesse and a handfull of Parselie and Isop chopped small, and season it with Salte, Pepper and Saffron. You may boyle Chynes and racks of Veale in al points as this is.

To boyle a Capon.
Let your capon be faire scalded and short trussed, and put into a fair pot of water with a marybone or two, & a racke of mutton cut together in three or fower peeces, and let them boyle togther tyll they be halfe boyled, then take out a ladle full or two of the best of the broth, and put it into a faire earthen pot, & put thereto a pinte of white wine or of claret, and cut a twelue or fourteene dates long wayes & a handfull of small raysons, a handfull of tyme, Rosemary and Isope bound together, and so let these persels boyle by thēselues, and when your capon is enough, lay it in a faire platter vpon sops of white bread, and your mutton by him also, then take out the mary from the bones whole, and lay it vpon the capon, then take your made broth & lay it vpō your capon & mutton, and so serue it forth, your latter broth must bee seasoned with cinamon cloues and mace, and salt and mace beaten also.

To boyle a capon with Orenges.
Take your Capon & set him on the fire as before with marybones & mutton, and whē you have skimmed the pot wel, put thereto the value of a farthing loafe, and let it boyle till it be halfe boyled, them take two or three ladleful of ye same broth and put it into an earthen pot, with a pint of the wine aforesaid, and pill six or eight Oringes and slice them thin, and put thē into the same broth with foure peniworth in sugar or more, and a handfull of parceley, tyme, and Rosemary together tyed, and season it with whole mace, Cloues & sticks of cinamon with two Nutmeg beaten small and so serue it.

To boile teales, Mallards, pigeons chines of porke, or Neates tunges, all after one sort.
Let them be halfe rosted, sticke a few cloues in their brestes, then two or three tostes of bread being burned black, then put them into a litle faire water immediately take them out again, and strain them with a litle wine and vineger to the quantitie of a pinte: put it into an earthen potte, and take eight or ten onions slyced small, being fryed in a frying pan with a dish of butter, and when they be fried, put thē into your broth, then take your meat from the spitte and put it into the same broth, and so let them boyle together for a time seasoning with salt and pepper.

Mutton boyled for supper.
First set your mutton on the fire, & skim it cleane, then take out all the broth sauing so much as will couer it, then take and put thereto ten or twelue onions pilled, cut them in quarters, with a handful of parseley chopped fine, putting it to the mutton, and so let them boile, seasoning it with pepper, salt and saffron, with two or or three spoonefull of vineger.

To boyle Mutton with Nauons.
First pill your Nauons, and wash them then cut fiue or sixe of them into peeces to the bignes of an inche, and when your mutton hath boiled a while take out al the licour sauing so much as may couer well the mutton, then put the Nauons into the pot of mutton with a handfull of parselye, chopped fine, and a branche of Rosemary, seasoning it with salt pepper and saffren.

To boyle a Lambes head with purtenaunces.
First skimme it well, then take of the broth leauing so much as will couer it, then put to it Parsely and Rosemarye, a branch of Isop and time, and a dish of butter, with Barberies or Gooseberies, then let them boile being seasoned with cloues Mace, salte, pepper, and saffron, and so serue it foorth vpon sops.

To stewe a Capon for Dinner.
Take a knuckle of Veale and boil it with your capon: putting to it proines Raysons great and small, whole Mace, and let it boile together, seasoning it with Salt and so serue it forth.

To boyle a capon in white broth.
Take a wel fleshed capon and a maribone, and a quart of faire water, put them together in an earthen pot, and let them boyle until the Capon be enough, but you must first take away the mary from ye bone, and when it hath boiled take the vppermost of the broth & put it into an earthen potte, and the mary with it. Put to it small raisons, proines, whole mace, dates, and halfe a quartern of suger, sixe spoonefull of verdiuice, three or fower yolkes of Egges, put these all together, and when your Capon is boyled, lay him in a fayre platter: powre your broth vpon him, and so serue him.

To boyle chickins.
Boyle them as the Lambs head & purtenance is boiled, and when you are to serue them, strain three or foure yolkes of Egges with vergious, and put it into the pot, and let it boyle no more: after the egs be put in, season it with salt, pepper, mace and cloues, and so serue them. Thus may you boyle a connye or Muggets of Veale, as the chickens are boyled.

To boyle chickens with Spinnage and Lettice.
Take a Platter of Spinnage and Lettice and wash them cleane, and when the pot is skimmed then put them in with a dish of butter, and a branch of rosemary with a little vergious, being seasoned with Salt and ginger beaten.

To make Pears to be boiled in meate.
Take a peece of a legge of Mutton or Veale raw, being mixed with a little Sheeps sewet, and halfe a manchet grated fine, taking foure raw egges yolkes and al. Then take a little Time, & parsely chopped smal, then take a few gooseberies or barberies, or greene grapes being whole. Put all these together, being seasoned with Salte, saffron and cloues, beaten and wrought altogther, then make Rowles or Balles like to a peare, and when you haue so done, take the stalke of the sage, and put it into the ends of your peares or balles, then take the freshe broth of beefe, Mutton or veale, being put into an earthen pot, putting the peares or balles in the same broth wyth Salt, cloues, mace and Saffren, and when you be ready to serve him, put two or three yolkes of egs into the broth. Let them boile no more after that but serue it forth vpon soppes. You make make balles after the same sorte.

To farce a cabbadge for a banquet dish.
Take litle rounde cabbage cutting off the stalkes, and by the cabbadge then make a round hole in your cabbadge, as much as will receive your farsing meat, take heede you breake not the brimmes, thereof with your knife, for the hole must be round and deepe, then take the Kidney of a mutton or more, and chop it not smal. Then boile sixe egges hard, taking the yolkes of them being smal chopped, & also take rawe egges and a manchet grated fine, then take a handfull of proynes, so many great raysons, seasoning al these with salte, pepper, cloues and Mace, working all these together, and so stuffe your Cabbedge. But if you haue Sawsedge you may put it among your meate at the putting in of your stuffe, but you must leaue out both the ends of your sawsage at the mouth of the cabbadge when you shall serue it out. In ye boyling it must be within the cabbadge, and the cabbadge must be stopped close with his couer in the time of his boyling, and bound fast round about for breaking: the cabbadge must bee sodde in a deepe pot with fresh beefe broth or mutton broth, and no more thē will lye vnto the top of the cabbadge, and when it is enough take away the thrid, and so set it in a platter, opening the heade & laying out the Sawsadge endes, and so serue it forth.

To boile a brest of Veale or mutton farced.
Take a breast of Veale or Mutton and farce it in like maner as your cabadg is, so that you leaue out the proines and great raysons, boyle your veale or mutton in the foresaide brothes, putting no more broath then will couer your meat, & when your meat is halfe boyled, then put two handfulls of Lettuce or Spinage, cutting it fower times asunder and no more, and when your meate and hearbes be boyleds, then put a little verdiuice in the broth, seasoning it with salt and pepper, then serue your meate vpon Soppes, casting your hearbes vpon it, and so serue it.

To boile a Mugget of a sheepe.
First wash and scour it clean, then per boyle it a litle, then choppe a piece of a Kidney of Mutton small, and put it into a platter, thē put the quantity of a farthing lofe grated, with prunes and raysons of eche a handful, Persely and time chopped smal, and three or foure hard rosted egges being chopped with bread and Suet, then a litle water put to and saffron, and coulour it with three or foure rawe egges, both yolkes and whites, Salt, Pepper, C[l]oues and Mace being minced together, putting it into the Mugget, and so boile it with a little Mutton broth and Wine, Lettice and spinnage whole in the same broth, and so serue it forth.

To boile Mutton for Supper.
Take Carret rootes, and cut them an inch long, take a handfull of parselie and time halfe chopped, and put into the pot the Mutton, and so let them boyle, being seasoned with Salte and pepper, and so serue it foorth.

To boile a neats tung for Supper.
Take a little wine or faire water, putting vnchopped Lettuce faire washed into your Neates tongue, with a dishe of Butter or two, and season it with Salte, Pepper, cloues and Mace, and so serue it.

To boile Mallards, Teales, and chines of porke with Cabbadge.
First vnlose your Cabbage, & cut them in three or foure quarters vnlosing euery leafe for doubt of worms to be in there, then wash thē and put them into a pot of faire water, and let them boyle a quarter of an houre, then take them vp, and chop them somewhat great, then put them into a faire pot with the broath of the Mallard and whole Pepper, and pepper beaten, with Cloues, mace, and salte, and so let them boile together, &c.

For a Goose gibluts and pigges petitose.
Let them be soddē throughly, then cut them in peeces and fry thē with butter, and when they be half fried, then put to a little Vineger with Ginger, Sinamon and pepper and so serue it forth: thus may you vse Calues feete boyles in all pointes as this is.

For fricasies of a lambes head and purtenance.
Take a Lambs head and cleaue it, and cut his purtenaunces in peeces, and perboyle it till it bee almost enough, then take the yolkes of two rawe Egges, and baste your Lambes head and purtenance with it, and frye it in butter for sauce, put to the butter, pepper, Vineger, and Salt, frying them together a little on the fire and so serue it.

For fricasies of Neates feete for supper.
Take your Neates feete & cleane them and baste thē with butter and crums of bread, and lay them vpon a grediorne, till they be throughlie broyled, then take Vineger, pepper, salt and butter, and put thē altogeather in a dish, set on a chafingdish of coles boyling and so let them boyle there til you must serue it, you must put to sauce, barberies or grapes, &c.

A fricase of Tripes.
Let them be faire sodden, and sauce thē take the leanest and cut it in peeces, inch broad, frye them with butter or flats, and your sauce to bee vineger, pepper and mustard, being put a litle while in the friing panne with butter or flattes.

To rost a lambes head.
Take the head and purtenaunces being cleane washed, cut the purtenaunces in peeces, so that it may be broached, and rost thē, basting it with butter and when it is enough, take the yolkes of two rawe egs, with a little parsely chopped fine, beating them togther, and baste your Lambes head with it, euen so long till your egges be hardened on, then take it vp, and serue it with the sauce of pepper, vineger and butter boyled a little vpon a Chafingdish of coles.

To make a pie in a pot.
Take the leanest of a Legge of Mutton and mince it small, with a peece of the kidney of mutton, then put it into a earthen pot, putting therto a ladlefull or two of mutton broth, and a little wine, of proynes and raisons of ech a handfull, or barberies. Let them boyle together, putting to it half an orenge, if you haue any, seasoning it with salte, pepper, cloues, mace, and Saffron and so serue it.

To make allowes to roste or boile.
Take a Leg of mutton and slice it thin, and take out the kidneys of the mutton hauing it minced small, with Isope, time, parsely, & the yolkes of hard egges, then bind it with crumms of white bread and rawe eggs, and put to it proines and great raisons, and for want of them barberies or Goosberies, or grapes seasoning it with Cloues, mace, pepper Sinamon, ginger & salt. You may make a mugget of a Sheepe as these allowes bee, sauing you must put no mutton into it.

To make red deere.
Take a legge of beef, and cut out all the sinewes clean, then take a roling pin and all to beate it, then perboile it, and when you haue so doon lard it very thick, then lay it in wine or Vineger for two or three howers, or a whole night, thē take it out & season it with peper, salt cloues and mace, thē put it into your past, & so bake it.

To farse all things.
Take a good handfull of tyme, Isope, Parselye, and three or foure yolkes of Egges hard rosted, and choppe them with hearbs small, then take white bread grated and raw egs with sweet butter, a few small Raisons, or Barberies, seasoning it with Pepper, Cloues, Mace, Sinamon and Ginger, woorking it altogether as paste, and thē may you stuffe with it what you will.

A sop of Onions.
Take and slice your Onions, & put them in a frying panne with a dish or two of sweete butter, and frie them togther, then take a litle faire water and put into it salt and peper, and so frie them together a little more, then boile them in a lyttle Earthen pot, putting to it a lyttle water and sweet butter, &c. You may vse Spinnage in like maner.

To make gallantine for flesh or fish.
Take browne bread and burne it black in the tosting of it, thē take them and lay them in a litle wine and vineger, and when they haue soked a while, thē strain them, seasoning it with sinamon, ginger, Pepper and salte, then set it on a chafingdish with coales, and let it boyle till it be thick, and then serue it in saucers.

To stewe Oysters.
Take your oysters, and put them either in a little skellet ouer the fire, or else in a platter ouer a chaffingdishe of coles, and so let thē boile with their licour, sweet butter, vergious, vineger, and pepper, and of the tops of Time a little, till they be enough, and then serue them vpon soppes.

To bake aloes of Veale or Mutton.
Make your aloes ready to bake in all pointes as you boile them, laying vpon them in the paste barberies, Gooseberies or grapes greene, or small Raisons, and put in your Pie a dish af [sic] butter, and so set it in the ouen, and when it is baked, then put in a little vergious, and so seethe it in an Ouen again a while, and so serue it foorth.

To bake a Connie, Veale, or Mutton.
Take a Conny and perboile it almoste enough, then mince the flesh of it verie fine, and take with it three yolkes of hard egges, and mince with it, thē lay another Conny in your Pie being perboiled, and your minced meat with it, being seasoned with Cloues, Mace, Ginger, Saffron Pepper & Salt, with two dishes of sweete butter mixed with it, lay vpon your Connie Barberies Gooseberies, or grapes, or els smal raisons, and so bake it.

To make fine paste.
Take faire flower and wheat, & the yolkes of egges with sweet Butter, melted, mixing all these together with your hands, til it be brought dowe paste, & then make your coffins whether it be for pyes or tartes, then you may put Saffron and suger if you will have it a sweet paste, hauing respect to the true seasoning some vse to put to their paste Beefe or Mutton broth, and some Creame.

For small pies.
Take the Mary out of the marybones hole, and cut it in the bignes of a bean season your mary with Ginger, Suger, and Sinamon, then put them in fine paste and frie them in a frying panne with the skimming of fresh beefe broth, or else you may bake them in your ouen a litle while take heede they burne not and when you do serue them in a faire dish, cast blaunch pouder vpon them.

To make purses or cremitaries.
Take a little Marow, small raisons, & Dates, let the stones be taken away, these being beaten together in a Morter, season it with Ginger, Sinamon and suger, then pot it in fine paste, & bake them or frie them, so done in the seruing of them cast blaunch pouder vpon them.

To make a tart of Spinnage or of wheate leaues or of colewortes.
Take three handfull of Spinnage, boile it in faire water, when it is boyled, put away the water from it and put the spinnage in a stone morter, grind it smal with two dishes of butter melted, and foure rawe eggs all to beaten, then straine it and season it with sugar, Sinamon and ginger, and lay it in your Coffin, when it is hardened in the ouen, then bake it, and when it is enough, serve it vpon a faire dish, and cast vpon it Suger and Biskets.

For tartes of creame.
Take a pinte of creane with sixe rawe egges, and boile them together, and stirre it well that it burne not, then let it boile till it be thick, then take it out of the pot, and put to two dishes of Butter melted, and when it is some what colde, then straine it and season it with Suger, then put it into your paste, when your paste is hardened, and when it is enough, thē serue it with Suger cast vpon it. If you will haue a Tart of two colours, then take the halfe of it, when it is in Creame, and colour the other halfe with saffron or yolks of egges.

A tart of proines.
Make your Coffine two inches deepe round about, thē take ten or twelue good apples, pare them and slice them and put them into the Paste with two dishes if butter among the apples, then couer your tarte close with the Paste, and breake a dishe of butter into peeces, and lay it vpō the couer because of burning in the Panne. And when the apples be tender, take it forth and cut of the couer, & beate the apples together till they be softe, and they be dry put the more butter into them and so season them with Sinamon, Ginger and Suger, then must you cut your couer after the fashion, leauing it vpon your Tarts, serue it with blaunch pouder.

a tart of egges.
Take twelue Egges and butter them together, then straine them with rosewater, season it with Suger, then out it into your paste, and so bake it and serue it with suger vppon it.

a white leach.
Take a quart of newe milke, and three ounces weight of Isinglasse, halfe a pounde of beaten suger, and stirre them together, and let it boile half a quarter of an hower till it be thicke, stirring them all the while: then straine it with three spoonfull of Rosewater, thē put it into a platter and let it coole, and cut it in squares. Lay it fair in dishes, and lay golde vpon it.

To keep lard in season.
Cut your lard in faire peeces, and salt it well with white salte, euery peece with your hand, and lay it in a close vessel then take faire running water, and much white salt in it, to make it brine, thē boile it vntill it beare an Egge, then put it into your Lard and keepe it close.

To make Iombils a hundred.
Take twenty Egges and put them into a pot both the yolkes & the white, beat them wel, then take a pound of beaten suger and put to them, and stirre them wel together, then put to it a quarter of a peck of flower, and make a hard paste thereof, and then with Anniseede moulde it well, and make it in little rowles beeing long, and tye them in knots, and wet the ends in Rosewater, then put them into a pan of seething water, but euen in one waum, then take them out with a Skimmer and lay them in a cloth to drie, this being doon lay them in a tart panne, the bottome beeing oyled, then put them into a temperat Ouen for one howre, turning then often in the Ouen.

To make buttered Egges.
Take eight yolkes of egges, and put them into a pint of creame, beat them together and straine them into a possenet all, setting vpon the fire and stirring it, & let it seeth vntil it quaile, then take it and put it into a clean cloth, and let it hang so that the Waye may auoide from it, and when it is gone beate it into a dishe of rosewater and suger, with a spoon, and so shall you haue fine butter. This doon, you may take the white of the same eggs putting it into another pint of Cream, vsing it as the yolkes were vsed and thus you may haue as fine white butter as you haue yellow butter.

To boyle Neats feete.
Take your Neats feete out of the sauce and wash thē in faire water, then put them into your mutton broth, and take fiue or sixe onions chopped not small, then take a quantitie of tyme, Parsely and Isope chopped fine : boyle altogether, and when it is half boyled and more, thē a dish or two of butter, and put to it, then season it with pepper, salt and saffron, with fiue or sixe spoonefulls of vineger, and so serue it vpon soppes.

To boyle a Carpe.
Take out the gall, cast it away, and so scalde not your Carpe nor yet washe him, & when you doo kill him let his blood fall into a Platter, & splet your carpe into the same blood, and cast thereon a ladleful of vinegar, then toste three or fower tosts of browne bread and burne it blacke, and dip them into a little faire water, and thē immediatly straine them into the liquour where your carp shalbe sodden with three or fower Onions chopped some what big, with parsely chopped small, then set your broth vpon the fire, and when it begins to boyle, put to your Carpe two or three dishes of butter, and a branch of rosemarie slipped, and slippes of time, and if it be too thick, put to it a little Wine, and so let it boyle faire and softlye, seasoning it with whole mace, cloues and salt, and pepper, cloues and mace beaten, and so serue it.

To boile a pike with orenges a banquet dish.
Take your pike, split him, and seeth him alone with water, butter, & salt, then take an earthen pot and put into it a pint of water, and another of Wine, with two Orenges or two Lemmons if you haue them: if not, then take foure or fiue Oringes, the rines being cut away, and slyced, and so put to the licour, with sixe Dates cut long wayes, and season your broth with Ginger, pepper and salte, and two dishes of sweete butter, boyling these together, and when you will serue him, lay your pike vpon soppes, casting your broth vpon it, you must remember that you cut of your pikes head hardby the body & thē his body to be spletted, cutting euery side in two or three partes, and when he is enough, setting the body of the fish in order: then take his heade & set it at the foremost part of the dish, standing vpright with an Orenge in his mouth, and so serue him.

To boile a pike another way.
Take your Pike and pull out all hys guttes, and so not splette your Pyke, but cut of his head whole, and cut his body in three or foure peeces, and so let him be boiled in wine, Water, and Salte, to the quantities of a pottell then take a pinte of wine, and a Ladlefull or two of the Pikes broth and put these together into an earthen pot, with two dishes of butter, and three or foure Orenges sliced, small Raisons and suger, Time and rosemary, slipped, and then put in the [r]effect of the Pike in the same broth, and so let them boile togther and when you be ready to serue, lay your Pike vpon soppes, and put your broth vpon it, seasoning it with whole sinamon and mace, and a Nutmeg beaten and so serue it foorth.

To boile Roche, Perche, and Dase, with other small fish.
Take faire water & put to it parsely Time & Rosemary slipped, and so let it boyle a good while together, then take a dish or two of butter, putting to the same broth and your fish, and so let it boyle together, seasoning it with cloues mace pepper and salte, and so serue them vpon soppes.

To boile a Pike another way.
Take and splet your Pike through the back and take out the refect, so done, put your Pike into a pan of water with Rosemary, let it seeth till it be boiled, thē take your refecte with a little wine & verdiuice with two dishes of butter, put these in a platter, setting in on a chafingdishe of Coles, and there let it boile, seasoning it with whole mace, this done, take vp your Pike, laying him vpon sops in a platter, then take your refecte and his broth and cast vpon it, and so serue it forth with salt.

To boile a Tench.
Seeth your Tench with a little water & a good deale of vineger, whē it is sodden lay it in a faire dish, take out all the bones and put a litle Saffron in your broth with a little salt, and put the same broth vpon your tench, and cast a little fine pepper vpon it while it is hot, and so let your tench stand til it be on a gelly, and when you do serue it, take an Onion & Persely chopped fine, and cast it vpon your Tench, and so serue it.

For Turbet and Cunger.
Seeth them in faire water and salt, and let them boile till they be enough, then take them from the fire and let them coole then vse them in the seasoning as the salmon hearafter following.

For fresh Salmon.
Take your Salmon and boile him in faire water, rosemary and time, and in the seething put a quart of strong Ale to it, and so let it boile till it be enough, then take it from the fire, and let it coole, then take your Salmon out of the pan, and put it into an earthen pan or wooden boule, and there put so much broth as will couer him, put into the same broth a good deale of vinegar, so that it be tart with it.

For White pease pottage.
Take a quart of white Pease or more & seeth them in faire water close,vntill they doe cast their huskes, the white cast away, as long as any wil come vp to the topp, and when they be gon, then put into the peaze two dishes of butter, and a little vergious, with pepper and salt, and a little fine powder of March, and so let it stand till you will occupy it, and thē serue it vpon sops. You may soe the Porpose and Seale in your Pease, seruing it forth two peeces in a dish.

To bake porpose or Seale.
Take your porpose or Seale, and perboile it, seasoning it with Pepper and Salt, and so bake it, you must take of the Skinne when you doe bake it, and then serue it forth with Gallentine in sawcers.

To make a cawdle of Ote meale.
Take two handful or more of great otemeale, and beat it in a Stone Morter wel, then put it into a quart of ale, and set it on the fire, and stirre it, season it with Cloues, mace, and Suger beaten and let it boile til it be enough, then serue it forth vpon Soppes.

To dresse a carpe.
Take your carpe and scale it and splet it, and cut off his heade, & take out all the bones from him cleane, then take the fish and mince it fine, being raw, with the yolkes of foure or fiue hard egges minced with it, so doone put it into an earthen pot, with two dishes of butter & a pint of whit wine, a handfull of proynes, two yolks of hard egges cut in foure quarters, and season it with one nutmeg not small beaten, Salt, Sinamon and Ginger, and in the boyling of it you must stirre it that it burne not to the pot bottome, and when it is enough then take your minced meat, & lay it in the dish, making the proportion of the body, setting his head at the vpper end and his taile at the lower end, which head and taile must be sodden by themselues in a vessell with water and salt.

You may vse a Pike thus in al points, so that you do not take the proines, but for them take Dates and small raisons, and when you haue seasoned it as your Carpe is and when you do serue it put the refect into the pikes mouth gaping, and so serue it foorth.

To farse Egges.
Take eight or ten egges and boyle them hard, pill of the shelles, and cutte euery egg in the middle then take out the yolkes and make your farcing stuffe as you do for flesh, sauing only you must put butter into it insteede of suet, and that a little so doon fill your Egges where the yolkes were, and then binde them and seeth them a little, and so serue them to the table.

Sallets for fish daies.
First a sallet of green fine hearbs, putting Perriwincles among them with oyle and vinegar.

an other.
Olives and Capers in one dish, with vinegar and oyle.

an other.
White Endive in a dish with periwincles vpon it, and oyle and vineger.

an other.
Carret rootes being minced, and then made in the dish, after the proportion of a Flowerdeluce, then picke Shrimps and lay vpon it with oyle and vinegar.

Another.
Onions in flakes laid round about the dishe, with minced carrets laid in the middle of the dish, with boyled Hippes in fiue partes like an Oken leafe, made and garnished with tawney long cut with oile and vineger.

another.
Alexander buds cut long waies, garnished with welkes.

another.
Skirret rootes cut long waies in a dish with tawney long cutte, vineger and Oyle.

another.
Salmon cut long waies, with slices of onions laid upon it, and vpon that to cast violets, oyle and vinegar.

another.
Take pickeeld herring cut long waies and lay them in rundles with onions and parsely chopped, and other herringes the bones being taken out to bee chopped together and laide in the roundles with a long piece laide betwixt the rundles like the proportion of a snake, garnished with Tawney long cut, with vinegar and oile.

another.
Take pickelde Herrings and cut them long waies, and so lay them in a dish, and serue them with oyle and vineger.

To make tartes or balde meates for fishe daies.
Take your dish and annoint the bottom well with butter, thē make a fine past to the bredth of the dish, and lay it on the same dish vpon the butter, then take Beetes, Spinage, and Cabbadges, or white Lettice, cutting them fine in long peeces, then take the yolkes of viii. rawe egges, and six yolkes of hard Egges, with small Raisons and a little Cheese fine scraped, and grated bread, and three or four dishes of Butter melted and clarified, and when you have wrought it togeather, season it with Sugar, Sinamon, Ginger and salt, then lay it vpon your fine past spreading it abroad, then the couer of fine paste being cut with prettie work, then set it in your ouen, bake it with your dish vnder it and when it is enough, thē at the seruing of it you must newe paste the couer with Butter, and so scrape suger vppon it, and then serue it foorth.

To make alloes of freshe Salmon to boyle or to bake.
Take your Salmon and cut him small in peeces of th[r]ee fingers breadth, and when you have cut so many slices as you will haue, let them be of the length of a womans hand, then take more of the salmon, as much as you thinke good, & mince it rawe with sixe yolkes of hard Egges very fine, and then two or three dishes of Butter with small raisons, and so worke them together with cloues, Mace, Pepper, and Salt, then lay your minced meat in your sliced Aloes, every one being rolled and pricked with a feather, fall closed, and then put your aloes, into an Earthern pot, and put to it a pinte of water, and another pint of Claret wine, and so let them boile til they be enough, & afterwarde take the yolkes of three rawe egges with a litle vergious, being strained together, and so put into the pot, then let your aloes seeth no more afterwarde, but serue them vpon Soppes of bread.

A Troute baked or minced.
Take a Troute and seeth him, thē take out all the bones, then mince it verie fine with three or foure dates minced with it, seasoning it with Ginger, and Sinamon, and a quantitie of Suger and Butter, put all these together, working them fast, thē take your fine paste, and cut it in three corner waies in a small bignesse, or four or fiue coffins in a dish, thē lay your stuffe in them, close them, and so bake thē and in the seruing of thē baste the couers with a little butter, and then cast a little blaunch pouder on them, and so sarue it foorth.

How to make a sprede Eagle of a Pullet.
Take a good pullet and cut his throate hard by the head, and make it but a little hole, then scalde him cleane, and take out of the small hole his crop, so done, take a quill and blowe into the same hole, for to make the skinne to rise for the fleshe, then break the wing bones, and the bones hard by the knee, then cut the necke hard by the body within the skinne, then cut off the romp within the skinne, leauing the bones at the legges, and also ye head on, so drawing the whole body out within the skinne of the hole, the bones to be laid beneath towardes the clawes, and the feete being left also on, you must cut of his bill: when you haue taken out all these bones, and brought it to the purpose, then take the fleshe of the same pullet, & perboile it a little, and mince it fine with Sheepes Suet, grated bread, three yolkes of harde Egges, then binde it with foure rawe Egges, and a fewe Barberies, working these together, season it with Cloues, Mace, Ginger, Pepper and salt and saffron, then stuffe your pullets skinne with it, putting it in at the hole at the head, and when you haue stuffed him, take him and lay him flat in a platter, and make it after the proportion of an Eagle in euery part, hauing his head to be cleft a sunder, and laide in two partes like an Eagles head thus done, then must you put him into the Ouen, leaving in the platter a dish of butter vnderneath him, an other vpon him, because of burning, and whē it is enough then set it foorth, casting vpon him in the seruice blaunch pouder, Sinamon Ginger, and Suger.

To make Mortirs of a Capon, Hen, or pullet.
Take a well fleshed Capon, Henne, or pullet, scalde and dresse him, then put him into a pot of faire water, and ther let it seeth til it be tender, then take it and pul all the flesh from his bones, and beat it in a stone morter, and when you thinke it halfe beaten, put some of the same licour into it, and then beate it til it be fine, then take it out and straine it with a litle rosewater out of a strainer into a dishe, then take it and set it on a chafingdish of coles, with a little Suger put to it, and so stirre it with your knife, & lay it in a faire dishe in three long [r]owes, thē take blanch pouder made of Sinamon and Suger, and cast vpon it, and so serue it forth.

To make a colluce.
Take all the bones and legges of the aforesaid Capon, Henne or pullet, and beat them fine in a stone Morter, putting to it halfe a pinte or more of the same licour that it was sodden in, then straine it, and put to it a litle Suger, then put it into a stone Crewes, and so drinke it warm first and last.

A made dish of the proportion of an Egge for flesh daies.
Make in all your things, your farcing stuffe as you do for your Cabbadge, even so much as will fill a Bladder. First take a drie bladder & wash it cleane, that is of a Calfe or of a Stere, and cut a little hole in the toppe, and then put in all your farcing stuffe, and when you haue filled it then close the bladder toppe, binding it with a threede, and then put it into freshe Beefe broth, or Mutton broth, and there let it seeth till it be enough, then take it out, and let it stand still til it be somewhat stiffe, then cut away the bladder from it, and take another drie bladder, and washe it clean: let it be bigger somewhat thē the other one was before, and cut it broad at the toppe, wherby your farcing stuffe may in the hole goe, and when it is in then so many whites of Egges being rawe as may run about him both aboue and beneath, within the bladder cleane couered with it, then bind vp your bladder mouth and put into your broth againe the Bladder, and there let it seeth till the white be hardened about the farsing, then take it out and cut away the bladder, then set it in a faire dish, laying the parselie vpon it, and so serue it forth.

Thus may you make small Egges to the number of sixe or eight in a dish in like maner, hauing a bladder for the same purpose.

To still a Capon for a sicke person.
Take a well fleshed capon faire scalded and drest, and put him into an earthen pot, put to it Burrage and Buglas, three handfull of mints, one handfull of Hartes tung, and Langdebeefe, a handfull of Isope, put thereto a pinte of Clarret wine, and a pinte of cleane water, and twelue Proynes, and when you haue so doon couer the pot with a dish or saucer, and vpon that all to couer course paste that no aire come out, then take the pot and hang in a Brasse pot vp to ye brimmes of your paste, and so let it boile for twelve houres at the least, & alwaies as your water that is in the brasse pot doth cōsume, be sure to haue in readines another pot of hotte water at the fire to fill it as long as it doth seeth for the twelue howers, and when the howers be past take it from the fire, and let it coole for one hower, then vnlose and [illeg] the licour from the capon into a faire pot, taking euery morning warme foure or fiue spoonefuls next to your hart, which shall comfort and restore nature to you beeyng sicke, vsing this aforesaide capon.

To preserue Quinces in sirrop all the yeere.
Take three pound of quinces being pared and cored, two pounde of Suger and three quarts of faire running water, put all these togeather in an earthen pan, and let them boyle with a soft fire, & when they be skimmed, couer them close that no ayre maye come out from them, you must put cloues and Sinamon to it after it is skimmed, of quantitie as you will haue them to taste, if you wil know when they be boyled enough, hang a linnen cloth between the couer and the pan so that a good deale of it may hang in the licour, & when the cloth is very red they be boiled enough let them stand till they be colde, then put them in Galley pots sirroppe, and so wil they keepe a yeere.

To conserue wardens all the yeere in sirrop.
Take your wardens and put them into a great Earthen pot, and couer them close, set them in an Ouen when you haue set in your white bread, & when you haue drawne your white bread, and your pot, & that they be so colde that you may handle them, then pill the thin skinne from them ouer a pewter dish, that you may saue all the sirroppe that falleth from them: put to them a quarte of the same sirropp, and a pinte of Rosewater, and boile them together with a fewe Cloues and Sinnamon, and when it is reasonable thick and cold, put your wardens and Sirroppe into a Galley pot, and doe alwaies that the Syrrop bee aboue the Wardens, or any other thing that you conserue.

To conserue cherries, Damesins, or wheat plummes al the yeere in the sirrop.
First take faire water, so much as you shall think meete and one pound of suger, and put them both into a faire bason, and set the same ouer a soft fire, till the suger be melted, then put thereto one pound and a halfe of chirries, or Damans, and let them boile till they breake, then couer them close til they be colde, then put them in your gally pottes, and so keep them: this wise keeping proportion in weight of Suger and fruite, you may conserue as much as you list putting therto Sinamon and cloues, as is aforesaid.

To make a paste of Suger, whereof a man may make al manner of fruites, and other fine thinges with their forme, as Plates, Dishes, Cuppes, and such like thinges wherewith you may furnish a Table.
Take Gumme and dragant as much as you wil, and steep it in Rosewater til it be mollified, and for foure ounces of suger take of it the bigness of a beane, the iuyce of Lemons, a walnut shel ful, and a little of the white of an eg. But you must first take the gumme, and beat it so much with a pestell in a brasen morter, till it be come like water, then put to it the iuyce with the white of an egge, incorporating al these wel together, this don take foure ounces of fine white suger wel beaten to powder, and cast it into ye morter by a litle and little, vntil they be turned into ye form of paste, thē take it out of the said morter, and bray it vpon the powder of suger, as it were meale or flower, vntill it be like soft paste, to the end you may turn it, and fashion it which way you wil.  When you haue brought your paste to this fourme spread it abroad vpō great or smal leaves as you shall thinke it good, and so shal you form or make what things you wil, as is aforesaid, with such fine knackes as may serve a Table taking heede there stand no hotte thing nigh it. At the ende of the Banket they may eat all, and breake the Platters Dishes, Glasses Cuppes, and all other things, for this paste is very delicate and sauerous.  If you will make a Tarte of Almondes stamped with suger and Rosewater of like sorte that Marchpaines be made of, this shal you laye between two pastes of such vessels or fruits or some other things as you thinke good.

To confite walnuts.
Take them greene and small in huske, and make in them foure litle holes, or more, then steepe them in water eleuen daies, make them clene and boile them as ye Orenges heerafter written, but they must seeth foure time as much Dresse them likewise with Spices, sauing you must put in very fewe Cloues, least they taste bitter. In like sorte you may dresse Goords, cutting them in long peeces, and paring away the inner partes.

To make Mellons and Pomons sweet.
Take fine Suger and dissolue it in water, then take seeds of Mellons and cleaue thē a litle on the side that sticketh to the Mellon and put them in the sugred water, added to them a little rosewater. Leaue the saide seeds so by the space of three or foure houres, then take them out, and you shall see that as soone as the saide seedes be dry, it wil close vp again. Plant it and there will come of it such Mellons, as the like hath not been seen. If you wil haue them to giue the fauour of Muske : put in the said water a little muske, and fine Sinamon, and thus you may doo the seedes of Pompones, and Cowcumbers.

To confite Orenge peeles which may be doone at all times in the yeere, and cheefly in May, because then the saide peeles be greatest and thickest.
Take thicke Orrenge peeles, and them cut in foure or fiue peeces and steepe them in water the space of ten or twelue daies. You may know when they be steeped enough, if you holde them vp in the sunne and see through them, then they be steeped enough, & you cannot see through them, let them steepe vntil you may. Then lay them to drye vpon a table, and put them to dry between two linnen clothes, then put them in a Kettell or vessell leaded, and adde to it as much Honny as will halfe couer the saide peeles, more or less as you think good, boyle them a little and stire them alwaies, then take them from the fire, least the Honny should seeth ouermuch. For if it should boyle a little more than it ought to boyle, it would be thick. Let it thē stand and rest foure daies in the said Honny, stirring and mingling the Orrenge and Honny euery day together. Because there is not honny enough to couer all the saide Orrenge peeles, you must stir them well and oftentimes, thus doo three times, giuing them one bubling at ech time, then let thē stand three dayes then strain them from the honny, and after you haue let them boile a small space, take them from the fire, and bestow them in vessels, putting to them Ginger, cloues and Sinamon, mixe all togther, and the rest of the Sirrope will serue to dresse others withall.

How to purifie and prepare Honnye and Sugar for to confite citrons and all other fruites.
Take euery time ten pound of hony, the white of twelue new laid egges, and take away the froth of them, beate them wel together with a stick, and six glasses of fair fresh water, then put them into the honny, and boyle them in a pot with moderate fire the space of a quarter of an hower or lesse, then take them from the fire skimming them well.

To confite Peaches after the Spanish fashion.
Take great and faire Peaches and pill them clean, cut them in peeces and so lay them vpon a table abroad in the Sun the space of two daies, turning them euerye morning and night, & put thē hot into a Iulep of Sugar wel sodden and prepared as is aforesaid, and after you haue taken them out set them againe in the Sun turning them often vntill they bee wel dried, this doon, put them againe into the Iulep, then set them in the sun vntill they haue gotten a faire bark or crust, and thē you may keepe them in boxes for winter.

a goodlye secret for to condite or confite Orenges, citrons, and all other fruites in sirrop.
Take Cytrons and cut them in peeces, taking out of them the iuce or substaunce, then boyle them in freshe water halfe an hower vntill they be tender, and when you take them out, caste thē in colde water, leaue them there a good while, thē set them on the fire againe in other freshe water, doo but heat it a little with a smal fire, for it must not seeth, but let it simper a litle contnue thus eight daies together beating thē euery day in hot water: some heat ye water but one day, to the end that the citrons be not too tender, but change the freshe water at night to take out the bitterness of the pilles, the which being take away, you must take suger or Hony clarified, wherin you must the citrons put, hauing first wel dried them from the water, & in wīter you must keep thē from the frost, & in Sommer you shal leaue thē there all night, and a daye and a night in Honie, then boile the Honie or Suger by it selfe without the orenges or Citrons by the space of halfe an hower or lesse with a little fire, and beeing colde set it again to the fire with the Citrons, continuing so two morninges: if you wil put Honnie in water and not suger, you must clarifie it two times, and draine it through a strayner: hauing thus warmed and clarified it you shall straine and sette it againe to the fire, with Citrons onely, making them to boyle with a soft fire the space of a quarter of an houre, thē take it from the fire & let it rest at euery time you do it, a day & a night: the next morning you shall boyle it again together the space of half an hower, and doo so two morninges, to the end that the Honie or suger may be well incorporated with the Citrons. All the cunning consisteth in the boyling of this sirrope together with the Citrons, and also the Sirrope by it selfe, and herein heede must be taken that it take not ye smoke, so that it sauour not of the fire: In this manner may be drest the Peaches, or Lemmons Orrenges, Apples, greene Walnuts, and other liste being boiled more or lesse, according to the nature of the fruits.

To bray golde.
Take Golde leaues, fower drops of hony mixe it wel together, and put it into a glasse, and when you will occupie it, steep and temper it in gumme water and it will be good.

To make a condonack.
Take Quinces and pare thē, take out the cores, and seeth them in fair water vntil they break, thē strain them through a fine strainer, and for eight pound of the said strained quinces, you must put in 3 pound of Suger, and mingle it togther in a vessel, and boile them on the fire alwaies stirring it vntil it be sodden which you may perceiue, for that it will no longer cleaue to the vessel, but you may stāp muske in powder, you may also ad spice to it, as Ginger, Sinamon, Cloues, and Nutmegges, as much as you think meet, boyling the muske with a litle Vineger, then with a broad slice of wood spread of this confection vpon a table, which must be first strewed with Suger, and there make what proportion you wil, and set it in the sunne vntil it be drye, and when it hath stood a while turn it vpsidown, making alwaies a bed of Suger, both vnder and aboue, and turne them still, and drye them in the sunne vntill they haue gotten a crust. In like maner you may dresse Peares, Peaches, Damsins, and other fruites.

To make confection of Mellons or Pompones.
Take what quantity of Mellons you think best, and take them before they be ripe, but let thē be good, and make as many cuts in thē as they be marked with quarters on euery side, and hauing mandified them and take out the cores and curnels, and peeled the vtter rinde, steepe them in good Vineger, and leauing them so the space of ten daies, & when you haue taken them out, take other vineger and steepe them a new againe other ten daies remouing and stirring them euery daye, then when time shal be take them out, and put them in a course linnen cloth, drying and wiping them, and set thē in the ayre, the space of a day and a night, then boyle them in Hony, and by the space of x. daies giue them euery day a little boyling, leauing them alwaies in the Hony, and they must boile at euery boiling but one walm then take the peeces and put thē in a pot with pouder of cloues, Ginger and Nutmegges, and peeces of Sinnamon, thus doone, make one bed of the peeces of Mellons, and another of the spices, and then powre white Honnie vpon all in the said pots or vessels.

The stilling of a capon a great restoritie.
Take a yong Capon that is well fleshed and not fat, & a knuckle of yong Veale that is sucking, and let not fat be vpon it, and all to hack it bones and all, and flea the capon cleane the skin from the fleshe, and quarter it in foure quarters, and all to burst it bones and al, and put the Veale and it altogether in an earthen pot, and put to it a pinte of Red wine, and eight spoonfulles of rosewater, and halfe a pound of small raisons and Currants, and foure Dates quartered, and a handfull of Rosemary flowers and a handful of Burrage flowers, and twenty or thirtie whole maces, and take and couer the pot close with a couer, and take paste and put about the pots mouth that no ayre come forth, and set it within in a brasse pot full of water on the fire, and let it boile there eight houres and then take the ladle and bruse it altogether within the pot, and put it in a faire strainer, and straine it through with the Ladle, and let no fat be vpon the broth, but that it may be blowne or else taken with a feather, and euery daye next your hart drinke halfe a dozen spoonefulles thereof, with a Cake of Manus christi, and againe at foure of the clocke in the afternoone.

To make good sope.
First you must take halfe a strike of asshen Ashes, and a quarte of Lime, then you must mingle both these together, and then you must fil a pan full of water and seeth them well, so done, you must take foure pound of beastes tallow, and put it into the Lye, and seeth them together vntil it be hard.

To make Quinces in Sirrope.
Take thirty Quinces to the quantity of this sirrop, take a pottel of water and put it in a pan, and then take the whites of six egges and beat them with an other pottle of water, & then put it altogether, and put therto twelue or foureteen pound of Suger, as you shal see cause, and seeth it and skim it very cleane, and then put to it two ounces of cloues and bruse thē a very little, and let them seeth vntill the same do rise very black, and them skimme of the cloues again & wash them in faire water and dry them and put them in again and your quinces also. Put to them half a pint of rosewater, and then put the Sirrope in a faire earthern pot or panne, and lay a sheet foure time double vpon them to keep in ye heat, and so let it stand a day or two, and then put them & the sirop in a vessell that was neuer occupied, & couer them close, but in the beginning pare your quinces and core them, & seeth them in faire water, vntill they be tender, and then take them vp and lay them that the water may runne from them cleane, and when they be cold, then put thē into your sirrope as it is aboue said.

To make conserue of Barberies.
Take your Barberies and picke them cleane, and set thē ouer a soft fire, and put to them Rosewater as much as you thinke good, then when you thinke it be sodde enough, straine that, and then seeth it againe, and to euery pound of Barberies, one pound of suger, and meat your conserue.

To make a Pudding of a Calues chaldron.
First take ye chaldron & let it be washed scalded & perboyled, and let it be chopped & stamped fine in a morter, and while it is hotte straine it through a cullender, and halfe a dozen of Egges both whites and yolkes, with all maner of hearbs to them a handful or two, let the hearbes be shred small, and put them to the chaldron and a good hanful of grated bread then take a handful of flower, and put it to it all, then take an Orenge pil out of the sirope and mingle with it, them season it with Sinamon and Ginger, and a fewe Cloues and mace, and a little Rosewater and Marrow or Suet, Butter a good quantity thereof close it vp, so it be not dry baked, then take the thinnest of ye sheepes kel and wrapt the meat in, then raise the coffin of fine paste and put it in.

To boile calues feet.
Take a pinte of white wine and a smal quantity of water, and small raisons and whole mace, and boile them together in a little Vergious and yolkes of egges, mingled with them, and a peece of sweete butter, so serue them vppon bread sliced.

To stew Veale.
Take a knockle of Veale & al to bruse it, thē set it on the fire in a litle fresh water, let it seeth a good while, then take good plenty of onions and chop them into your broth, and when it hath well sodden, put in Vergious, Butter, Salt and Saffron and when it is enough, put to it a little suger, and then it will be good.

To boile chickins and mutton after the Dutch manner.
First take Chickens and mutton, and boyle them in water a good while, and let a good deale of the water be boyled away, then take out the Mutton and chickens and the broth, make whit broth, put in thereto Sinnamon and Ginger, Suger and a little Pepper, and a little Vergious, and a little flower to thicken it, and a little Saffron, take Rosemary, Time, Margerum and penirial, and Hisope, and halfe a dish of butter, with a litle salt, the liquor must be cold before the chickins be put in.

To make a caudle.
Take a pinte of Malmesie and fiue or sixe egges, and seeth them strained to gether, so sodden, stirre it till it be thicke, and ley it in a dish as you doe please, and so serue it.

To make a Haggas pudding.
Take a peece of a Calues Chaldron and perboile it, shred it so small as you can, then take as much Beefe Sewet as your meat, shred likewise, and a good deale more of grated bread, put this together, and to them seuen or eight yolkes of egs, and two or three whites, & a little creame, three or fower spoonefull of rosewater, a little Pepper, Mace and nutmegs, and a good deale of suger, fill them and let them be sodden with a very soft fire, and shred also with a little Winter Sauery, parsely and Time, and a little Peniriall with your meat.

To make Hagges Puddings.
Take th[e] liuer of a hog and perboyle it, then stampe in water and strain it with thicke creame, and put thereo eight or nine yolkes of egges, and three or foure whites, and Hogges suet, small raisons, Cloues and Mace, pepper, salte, and a litle suger, and a good deale of grated bread to make it thick, and let them seeth.

To make Ising puddings.
Take great Otemeale and pick it and let it soake in thick cream 3. howere, then put therto yolkes of Egs, and some whites, pepper salt cloues and mace, and a litle suger, and fil them not too full, and seeth them a good while.

To seeth Muscles.
Take butter and vinegar a good deale, parseley chopt small and pepper, then set it on the fire, and let it boile a while, then see the Muscles be cleane washed, and put them in the broth shelles and all, and when they be boyled a while, serue them shelles and all.

To make a Pudding.
Take Parseley and Time, and chop it small, then take the kidney of Veale, and perboile it, and when it is perboyled, take all the fat of it, and lay it that it may coole, and when it is colde shred it like as you doo sewet for puddings, then take marrow and mince it by it self, then take grated bread and smal raisons the quantity of your stuffe, & dates minced small, then take the egges and roste them hard, and take the yolks of them and chop thē small, and then take your stuffe aforerehearsed and mingle altogether, and then take pepper, Cloues and Mace, Saffron, and salt, and put it together with the said stuffe, as much as you thinke by casting shal suffice, then take six Egs and breake them into a vessel whites and all, and put your dry stuffe into the same egges, and temper them all wel together, and so fill your haggesse or gut, and seeth it wel and it will be good.

To stew Steakes.
Take a necke of Mutton and cut it in peeces and then frye them with butter vntill they be more than halfe enough fry them with a good many of Onions sliced, then put them in a little pot, & put thereto a little parsely chopt, as muche broath of Mutton or beefe as couer them, with a little Pepper, Salt, and Vergious: then let it seeth together very softly the space of an hower, and serue them vpon soppes.

To boyle the lightes of a calfe.
First boile the lightes in water, then take Persely, Time, Onyons, Penyriall, and a litle Rosemary, and when the Lightes be boiled, chop all these together Lights and all very smal, and then boile then in a litle pot, and put into them vergious, Butter, and some of the own broth then season it with Pepper, Sinamon, and Ginger: let them boile a little and serue them with sops.

To make a lenthen Haggesse with poched egges.
Take a Skillet of a pinte, and fill it half with vergious, and halfe with water, and then take Margerome, Wintersauerie, Peniroyall, mince, Time, of eche sixe crops, wash them, and take foure Egges, hard rosted, and shred them as fine as you can, & put the hearbes thus into the broth, then put a great handfull of currents, and the crummes of a quarter of a Manchet, and so let it seeth til it be thicke, then season it with Suger, Sinamon, Salt, and a good peece of Butter, and three or foure spoonefulles of Rosewater, then poch seauen Egges and lay them on sippets, and poure the Haggesse on them, with Sinamon and Sugar strewed on them.

To boile Onions.
Take a good many onions and cut thē in foure quarters, set them on the fire in asmuch water as you think will boyle them tender, and whē they be clean skimmed, put in a good many of small raisons, halfe a spooneful of grose pepper, a good peece of Suger, and a little Salte, and when the Onions be through boiled, beat the yolke of an Egge with Vergious, and put into your pot and so serve it vpon soppes. If you will poch, Egges and lay vpon them.

To boyle Citrons.
Whē your Citrons be boiled, pared and sliced, seeth them with water and wine, and put to them butter, small Raysons, and Barberies, suger, sinamon and Ginger, and let then seeth till your citrons be tender.

To bake Lampernes.
First make your coffin long waies, and season your lampernes with Pepper, Cloyes, and mace, and put them in the Pye, and put thereto a good handfull of small Raysons, two or three onions sliced a good peece of Butter, a litle suger, and a few Barberies & whē it is enough put in a little Vergious.

To make fried toste of Spinage.
Take Spinnage and seethe it in water and salt, and when it is tender, wring out the water betweene two Trenchers, then chop it smal and set it on a Chafingdish of coles, and put thereto butter, small Raisons, Sinamon, Ginger, and Sugar, and a little of the iuyce of an Orenge and two yolks of rawe Egges, and let it boile til it be somewhat thicke, then toste your toste, soake them in a little Butter, and Sugar, and spread thinne your spinnage vpon them, and set them on a dish before the fire a little while, & so serve them forth with a little sugar vpon them.

To bake a Citron pie.
Take your citron, pare it and slice it in peeces, and boile it with grose pepper and Ginger, and so lay it in your Paste with butter, and when it is almost baked put thereto Vinegar, Butter, and Suger, and let it stande in the Ouen a while and soke.

An other way to bake Citrons.
When your Citrons be pared & slyced laye it in your Paste with small Rayson, and season them with Pepper, ginger, and fine suger.

To bake Aloes.
Take a Legge of mutton or Veale, and cut it in thinne slices : take parseley, Time, Margerom, Sauerie, & chop them small, with ii. or iii. yolkes of hard Egges and put thereto a good many Currants, then put these hearbs in the slices, with a peece of Butter in each of them, and wrap them together and lay them close in your paste, season them with Cloues, Mace, Sinamon, Suger, and a lyttle whole pepper, Currans and Barberies cast vpon them, and put a dish of butter to them & whē they be almost baked put in a little Vergious.

To bray Golde.
Take Golde leaues, fower drops of hony, mix it wel together, and put it into a Glasse, and when you will occupy it, steep and temper it in gumme water and it will be good.

To make conserue of Roses, and of other flowers.
Take your Roses before they be fullye sprung out, and chop off the white of them, and let the Roses be dried one daye or two before they be stamped, and to one vnce of these flowers take one vnce and a halfe of fine beaten Suger, and let your roses be beatē as you can, and after beat your roses and Suger together againe, then put the Conserue into a faire glasse: And likewise make all Conserue of Flowers.

To make conserue of cherries, and other fruites.
Take halfe a pound of Cherries, & boile them dry in their own licour, and thē straine them through a Hearne rale, and when you haue strained them, put in two pounde of fine beaten Suger, and boyle them together a prety while, and then put your Conserue in a pot.

To seeth a carpe.
First take a Carpe and boile it in water and salt, then take of the broth and put in a litle pot, then put therto as much Wine as there is broth, with Rosemary, Parselie, Time, and margerum bounde together, and put them into the pot, & put thereto a good manie of sliced Onyons, small raisons, whole maces, a dish of butter, and a little suger, so that it be not too sharp nor too sweet, and let all these seeth together: if the wine be not sharpe enough then put thereto a little Vineger, and so serue it vpon soppes with broth.

To seeth a pike.
First seeth the Pike in water and salte, with Rosemarie, Parsely and Tyme, then take the best of the broth and put into a litle pot, ther put therto the ruffilt of the pyke, small Raisons, whole Mace, whole pepper, twelue or thirteen Dates: a good peece of Butter, a goblet of white wine, and a litle yeast, and whē they haue boyle a good while, put in a little vineger, suger and Ginger, so serue the pyke with the Ruffilt, and broth vpon soppes.

To boyle cockles.
Take water, vineger, pepper, and beere, and put the cockles in it, then let them seeth a good while, & serue thē broth and all. You may seeth then in nothing but water and salt if you wil.

To boyle a carpe in greene broth, with a pudding in his bellie.
Take the spawn of a carpe, and boile and crumble it as fine as you can, thē take grated bread, smal raisons dates minced, cinamon, suger, cloues, and Mace, and Pepper, and a little salte mingled altogeather, and take a good handful of sage, and boile it tender, and straine it with three or foure yolks of Egges, and one white, and put to the spawne, with a little creame and Rosewater, then take the carpe and put the pudding in the bellie, and seeth him in water and salt, and whē he is almost boyled, take some of the spawne and of the best of the broth, and put it into a little pot with a little white wine, and a good peece of butter, and three or foure Onyons, whole Mace, whole Pepper, and small Raisons, and three or fower Dates, and when it is a good deale sodden, put in a good deale of seeded spinnage, & straine it with three or fower yolks of Egges, and the Onyons that you put into the Broth with a little Vergious, and put it to your Broth : and if it be too sharpe put in a little Suger, and so laye your Carpe vpon soppes, and poure the Broth vpon it.

To make an Almond Custard.
Take a good sort of almonds blanched, and stampe them with Water, and straine them with water and a litle rosewater, and twelue Egges, then season it with a little synamon, suger, and a good deale of Ginger, then set it vpon a pot of seething water, & when it is enough stick Dates in it.

To make a blanch marger on the fish day.
Take the whites of egges and creme, and boile them on a chafing dish on coles, till they Curd, then will their whay goe from them, then put away the whay, then put to the Curd a little Rosewater, then straine it and season it with suger.

To bake chickins.
First season them with cloves & mace, pepper and salt and put to them currans & Barberies and slitte an apple and cast synamon and sugar vpon the apple & lay it in the bottome, and to it put a dish of butter and when it is almost enough baked, put a little sugar, vergious & orenges.

To make a Pudding in a pot.
Take a peece of a Legge of Mutton or Veale, and perboyle it well, then shred it very fine, with as much suet as there is mutton, and season it with a little pepper and salte, Cloues and Mace, with a good deal of synamon and Ginger, then put it in a little pot, and put thereto a good quantity of Currans and Prunes, and two or three Dates cut the long wayes, and let it seethe softly with a little vergious vpon sops, and so serve it with suger.

To stew steakes.
Take the great Ribbes of an Necke of mutton and choppe them asunder, and wash them wel, thē put them in a platter one by another, and set them on a chafindish of coales, couer them and turne them now and then, so let them stew til they be halfe enough, then take Parseley, Time, Margerome and Onyons, and chop them very small, and cast vpon the steakes, put therto one spoonfull of vergious, and two or three spooonfulls of Wine, a little butter and Marrowe, let them boyle till the mutton be tender, and cast theron a little pepper, if your broth be too sharp put in a little suger.

To roste a Pigge.
Take your pig and draw it, and wash it cleane, and take the liuer, perboile it and straine it with a little creame, and yolkes of Egges, and put thereto grated bread, marrow, smal Raisons, nutmegs in powder, mace, suger and salte, and stirre all these together, and put into the Pigges bellye, and sowe the Pigge, then spit it with the haire on, & when it is halfe enough pull of the skinne, and take heede you take not of the fatte, then baste it, and when it is enough, thē crum it with white bread, suger, sinamon and ginger, and let it be somewhat browne.

To roste an Hare.
Take the Hare and fley her, then take Parseley, Time Sauery, Creame, a good peece of Butter Pepper, small raisons, and barberies work all these together in the Hares bellye : when she is almost enough, baste her with Butter, and one yolke of an Egge, and make veneson sauce to her.

To make Tostes.
Take the Kidney of Veale and chop it small, then set it on a chafingdishe of Coales, and take two yolkes of egges, Currans, Synamon, Ginger, Cloues and mace, and suger, let them boyle together a good while, and a little Butter with the Kidnie.

To make conserue of Mellons or Pompons.
Take what quantity of Mellons you think best, and take thē before they be ripe, but let them be good, and make as many cuts in thē as they be marked with quarters on euery side, & hauing mundified thē and taken out the cores and curnelles, and peeled the vtter rinde, steepe them in good Vineger, and leauing them so the space of ten daies, & when you haue taken them out, take other vineger and steep them ten daies more, remouing and stirring them euery day, then when time shalbe take thē and put them in a course linnen cloth, drying & wiping them, then set them in the ayre the space of one daye and a night, then boile them in hony, and by the space of ten daies & giue them euery day a little boyling, leauing thē alwaies in the Hony, and they must boile at euery boiling but one walm, then take the peeces and put them in a pot, with pouder of Cloues, Ginger and Nutmegges, and a peece of synamon, this doone, make one bed of the peeces of Mellons, and another of the spice, and then poure white honye vpon all in the said pots or vessels.

To make sirrope of Violets.
First gather a great quantity of violet flowers, and pick thē cleane from the stalkes and set thē on the fire, and put to them so much Rosewater as you thinke good, then let them boile altogether vntill the colour be forth of them thē take them of the fire and strain them through a fine cloth, then put so much suger to them as you thinke good, then set it againe to the fire vntil it be somewhat thick, and put it into a violl glasse.

To make sope.
First you must take halfe a strike of Asshen ashes, and a quarte of Lime, then you must mingle both these together, and then must fil a panne ful of water and seeth them well, so doone, you must take foure pound of beastes tallow, and put it into the lye, and seeth them together vntill it be hard.

To preserue orrenges.
Take your Pills and water them two nights & one day, and drie them clean againe and boile them with a soft fire the space of one hower, then take them out to coole, and make your sirroppe halfe with Rosewater and half with that licour, and put double Suger to your Orenges, and when your Sirroppe is halfe sodden, then let your orenges seeth one quarter of an hower more, then take out your orrenges and let the sirroppe seeth vntil it rope, and when all is colde, then put your Orenges into the Sirrop : The white of an Egge and suger beaten together will make it to candie.

The stilling of a capon, a great restoritie.
Take a yong Capon that is wel fleshed and not fat, & a knuckle of yong Veale that is sucking, and let not fat be vpon it, and all to hack it bones and all, and flea the capon cleane the skinne from the flesh, and quarter it in foure quarters, and all to bruse it bones and al, and put the veale and it altogether in an Earthen pot, and put to it a pinte of Red wine, and eight spoonfuls of Rosewater, and half a pound of small Raisins or Currans, or foure Dates quartered, and a handfull of Rosemary flowers, and a handful of Burrage flowers, and twenty or thirty whole Maces, and take and couer the pot close with a couer, and take paste and put about the pots mouth that no ayre come forth, and set it within in a brasse pot full of water on the fire, & let it boile there eight howers, and then take the ladle and bruse it altogether within the pot, and put it in a faire strainer, and straine it through with the ladle, and let no fat be vpon the broth, but that it may be blowne or else taken with a feather, and euery daye next your hart drinke halfe a dozen spoonefulles therof, with a cake of Manus Christi, and againe at foure of the clock in the afternoone.

To make dry Marmelet of Peches.
Take your Peaches and pare thē and cut them from the stones, and mince them very finely and steepe them in rosewater, then straine them with rosewater through a coarse cloth or Strainer into your Pan that you will seethe it in, you must have to every pound of peches halfe a pound of suger finely beaten, and put it into your pan ye you do boile it in, you must reserue out a good quātity to mould your cakes or prints withall, of that Suger, then set your pan on the fire, and stir it til it be thick or stiffe that your stick wil stand vpright in it of it self, thē take it vp and lay it in a platter or charger in prety lumps as big as you wil haue ye mould or printes, and when it is colde print it on a faire boord with suger, and print thē on a mould or what knot or fashion you will, & bake in an earthen pot or pan vpon ye embers or in a seate couer, and keep thē continually by the fire to keep them dry.

To make the same of Quinces, or any other thing.
Take the Quinces and quarter them, and cut out the coares and pare them cleane, and seeth them in faire water till they be very tender, then take them with rosewater, and straine them, and do as is aforesaid in euery thing.

To preserue Orrenges, Lemmons, and Pomesitrons.
First shaue your Orrenges finely, & put them into water two dayes and two nights, changing your water three times a day, then perboyle them in three seueral waters, then take so much water as you think conuenient for the quantity of your Orrenges, then put in for euery pound of Orrenges one pound and a halfe of suger into the water, and put in two whites of egges and beat them altogether, then set them on the fire in a brasse vessel, & when they boyle skimme them very clean, and clense them through a Jellybagge, then set it on the fire and put in the Orrenges. Use walnuts in like maner, and vse lemmons and Pomecitrons in like sorte, but they must lye in water but one night.

To preserue Quinces al the yere through, whole and soft.
Take as is aforesaide one pound of water, and three pound of Suger, & break it into very smal pieces, and in all things as you did before, then take twelue Quinces and core them very clean, & pare them and wash them, and put into your sirrup, when the skim is taken off let them seeth very soft vntill they be tender, then take them vp very softly for breaking, and lay them in a faire thing one by another, thē straine your sirrupe, and set it on the fire againe, then put in your Quinces & haue a quick fire, let them seeth apace and turne them with your sticke, and when they be almost ready put in some Rosewater and let them seeth, and when you thinke they be ready take vp some of the sirrope in a spoone, and if it be thick like a Jelly whē it is colde then take of your Pan, and put your Quinces into pots and your sirrope to thē, and put into your pots litle stickes of Sinamon and a fewe cloues, and when they be colde couer them with paper pricked full of small holes.

FINIS.