Lincoln County, Missouri Cemeteries

The purpose of this page is to present information about selected cemeteries in Lincoln County, Missouri that is supplemental to that which may be shown elsewhere, on the net or in print. These cemeteries are selected primarily because they are associated with my related or allied family. This page is a work in progress and is being continually updated and modified.

It's now January 2014. The internet has changed dramatically and new facilities have become available which did not exist in 2007 when I first created this page or in 2010 when I last touched it. This includes Google Maps and Findagrave.com, two very important and useful services. Availability of Google Maps and its features obsoletes the need for the images I posted that were obtained from a site called Satellite Views. Findagrave.com provides a website with a comprehensive database of all cemeteries in the country and a facility for the community to enter burials for all cemeteries. However, it has become controversial as a result of its 2013 acquisition by Ancestry.com, the Dark Force in the online genealogy world. At this point, updating this page to reflect these changes is not a priority. Possibly for the future.

For full-frame version: Missouri Cemetery Laws

The most complete, current information about all known Lincoln County, Missouri USGenWeb site. This includes

Listings

Various listings and location maps of cemeteries in Lincoln County have been prepared and are available in print and through internet searches. None of them are complete or necessarily accurate. The most authoritative, complete and accurate list is:
Lincoln County, Missouri USGenWeb: "Cemeteries in Lincoln County, Missouri"
although it is not in tabular form and has been broken into sections.

Tabular listings can be generated from various websites, and all appear to be based on the same data from the USGS-GNIS. However, GNIS does not list no more than about one-third of known cemeteries. In particular, it appears that lists using USGS/GNIS data and searching on "Cemetery" Feature Class systematically exclude (i.e. do not separately list) cemeteries associated with or attached to a church in Lincoln County. Those cemeteries are names the same as the church. This is from my casual perusal in Lincoln County. Specific examples include New Liberty, Corinth, Asbury, Star Hope, New Hope and New Salem but that situation appears to apply to all churches in Lincoln County. You will need to do a separate search on "Church" Feature Class. Almost all of the listed churches have attached cemeteries. Other, mostly smaller, cemeteries are just not included in GNIS, examples: Crenshaw, Elsberry Family, etc. although others are (Overall, Argent, etc.).

One such listing is generated from Topozone which displays geographic coordinates and links to the satellite overhead photos. Note that the list is, as described above, significantly incomplete, probably listing not more than one-third of known cemeteries since it does not include church cemeteries and various others. But it does show coordinates - which may or may not be correct - but based on my spot check do appear close at least. The coordinates are shown in a form called "DEC" (Decimal Degrees) to three decimal places, rounded. (Coordinates can go to seven decimal places.) A similar listing generated from GNIS shows them in a format called "DMS" (Degrees, Minutes, Seconds). If you check the GNIS Detail Report (by clicking on an individual Feature Name), it will show "DEC" coordinates to seven decimal places. (If entering DEC coordinates manually in Terraserver search box, need to include the minus sign in front of the longitude.) The names of cemeteries on the Topozone report match those on the GNIS report. Note that various Feature Names show coordinates as "Unknown" which are generally historical but I see some that I know are active (2007). I have added a list of churches and noted with an asterisk [*] those churches (virtually all) that have an attached cemetery. Click on name of Cemetery or Church to see Topozone map Comments in square brackets [] are mine.

Note 03 May 2007: The following list of churches needs to be refreshed. Certain churches were listed in GNIS as a feature type "Locale" and have been corrected by GNIS as of May 3. (I complained.) The churches I reported were: Mashek, Alexandria ("Old Alexandria") , Oak Ridge (Baptist), Ebenezer, Souls Chapel and Fairview. They also found 37 more mis-classified churches in Lincoln County. Also, the GNIS list of churches does NOT include ANY of the Catholic churches in Lincoln County. (Complaint emailed 28 June 2007.) (Listings also appear to be missing most Catholic Churches in St. Louis/St. Louis County.)

Following GNIS entries may overlap/duplicate: Alexandria Church (ID=742455) (Okete Map) (390235N/0905825W), Old Alexandria Christian Church (ID=735400) (Unknown Map), Old Alexandria Church (ID=723711) (Okete Map) (390248N/0905817W), Old Alexandria Methodist Episcopal Church (ID=723711) (Unknown Map).
Old Alexandria Cemetery: GBNF Vol. VII, pages 40-80.
NO apparent GBNF transcription for the Alexander Cemetery (family surname) off Ridge Road ...
Saint Marys Catholic Church (historical) (ID=754901) (Unknown Map), Mashek Church (historical) (ID=742430) (Silex Map) (390016N/0910430W).

The following lists from SatelliteViews.net display the same GNIS-derived names as above, but with links to SatelliteViews satellite aerial photos which apparently can only be linked to by feature name (technically the feature ID number) and not geographic coordinates.

Maps

If attempting to locate a Lincoln County Cemetery it is almost essential to have a map. Written and verbal directions can be unclear, confusing, misleading and even wrong. Further, the unique method of naming county roads along with their sometimes twisting routes compounds the difficulty. What appears to be the continuation of the same road can suddenly change its name at some point.

The Missouri Department of Transportation (MoDOT) used to sell large county maps for 50 cents, but that program appears to have been discontinued. Those maps were very detailed, accurate and easy to read. They marked cemeteries and churches with a symbol, but not name. As of February, 2007, I cannot find the order form on their website. They only show a State highway map.

For full-frame version: Aerial Photos and Maps


This page continues with additional information, transcriptions or links to transcriptions and corrections as needed about cemeteries where individuals linked to my various Missouri family lines are buried. "GBNF" refers to the Gone But Not Forgotten series transcriptions of gravestones in Lincoln County prepared by William L. Douglas Jr. and Merle M. Jackson ca. 1980.

I had posted aerial satellite photos here of a few cemeteries before I discovered SatelliteViews.net which is much better since it is precise, can be zoomed in/out and shows road names. I will leave what I already posted but will rely on Satelliteviews.net for these photos unless it does not list the cemetery (it only uses pre-defined GNIS Feature ID's) or if they start charging for the service.

The following sequence is based on relative importance to my own family history and extent of additional information I provide. So far,


Smith Cemetery I

aka: "Smith Cemetery (1)" or "Smith Cemetery I" or "Smith Cemetery B"

This Smith Cemetery is alternately recorded as "Smith Cemetery (1)", "Smith Cemetery I" or "Smith Cemetery 'B'" (Cemetery/township maps). It is located in Hurricane Township, Lincoln County, Missouri; Township 51N, Range 1E, Section 3 (Survey 1743).

The Smith Cemetery is located about 600 yards slightly southwest of the Smith Chapel in a grove of trees about 200 by 200 feet or about .91 acre. Smith Chapel was founded ca 1820's by James and Elizabeth (Ellis) Smith. Presumably the cemetery was associated with the church, but not sure why so far away and remote. Apparently the present (2006) Smith Chapel building is the one constructed in 1871 and is an active Methodist congregation.

From History of Lincoln County, Missouri; Goodspeed; Chicago; 1888; page 482-483; section "Methodist Episcopal Church South". Note that in 1844/1845 there was a split of the Methodist Episcopal churches into the breakaway "Methodist Episcopal Church South" and those who remained in the "old church."

SMITH'S CHAPEL, METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH SOUTH, is situated on Survey 1743, in Hurricane Township, and it belongs to the Clarksville Circuit. It was organized, in 1869, by Rev. Thomas B. KING, with twenty-nine members. It now has about 160 members. The pastors have been Revs. Thomas B. KING, I. A. M. THOMPSON, J. M. O'BRIEN, Henry KAY, Jesse SUTTON [(1808-1882) See Sutton family], S. D. BARNETT, M. WILLIAMS, H. D. GROVES and J. W. RAMSEY, the latter being the present pastor [as of 1888]. W. W. JAMISON has been secretary of the church ever since its organization. The frame church building, in which this organization now worships, is 32x40 feet in size, and was erected in the year 1871, at a cost of $1,200. It was dedicated in the same year by Rev. William A. TARWATER. The church at this place had formerly been Methodist Episcopal, organized in a very early day, and lost its identity after the trouble in 1844 and 1845, and before the late war. When originally organized, services were held at the residences of the old pioneers, James SMITH and Judge PEPATORS, who, with their wives, were constituent members.

The Smith Chapel long predates the above-mentioned 1869; i.e. James Smith died in 1867.

According to gravestone transcriptions, the earliest identified burial was in 1831 and the last in 1905. Approximately 40 burials total. The first burial was Abraham Francis "Abram" Smith born January 1830, died 12 June 1831, son of James and Elizabeth Lee "Betsy" (Ellis) Smith. I had been a bit skeptical of the 1831 date (possible misreading), since the next listed burial did not occur until 1844 with active burials through the rest of the century. But Abram's birth date of 1830 fits with siblings and there may be confirming sources such as a family bible, although I haven't seen any. It is also possible there were burials from 1831 to 1844 with no gravestone or other record. The recorded dates are: 1831 1844 1847 1847 1850 1852 1852 1855 1855 1856 1857 1860 1863 1863 1867 1867 1870 1871 1872 1872 1872 1872 1874 1876 1876 1876 1877 1877? 1879 1879 1879 1883 1885 1889 1889 1894 (Levi Shuck, date not engraved on stone) 1897 1905 1905 .

The Smith Cemetery I is readily visible and relatively easy to find and access if you just know where to look. Its general location is about 425 yards directly South-East of the intersection of Hwy. CC/F and W in a copse of trees, surrounded by a fenced farm field. Note that Hwy. CC becomes Hwy. F going west at the intersection of CC and W. Hwy. CC is about 1.5 miles north of downtown Elsberry off Highway 79; the intersection of CC/F and W is about eight miles west of Highway 79, about a mile past the Smith Chapel. The cemetery is about 630 yards directly South-West of the Smith Chapel in a grove of trees about 200 by 200 feet or about .91 acre. Cemetery geographic coordinates are Latitude: 39.21361, Longitude: -90.88491 (east edge) (Satelliteviews.net). GNIS gives as 39.214ºN, 90.882ºW; Auburn map. Note that GNIS lists "Smith Cemetery" in its "Cemetery" Feature Type listing, separate from "Smith "Chapel" Church. Smith Chapel coordinates are Latitude: 39.21611ºN, Longitude: -90.87694ºW, (Satelliteviews.net). Auburn map.

The Smith cemetery can be accessed by one of the following means:

  1. On Highway W, about 600 yards South of the intersection of CC and W, there is an access road heading East. Open the wide metal gate by the road which is latched by a small chain (close it again after you drive past), follow the fence to the opening at the east end, turn left and continue to drive right up to the cemetery. The entrance, but not the entire road, shows on the aerial photo; however, it is clearly drawn on the topo map.
  2. drive up the private road from CC just past the farmhouse WITH PERMISSION, hop the fence and walk abt 100 yards directly West of the farmhouse.

Written and verbal directions can be confusing, so it is highly recommended to obtain maps, which are free in the internet from two sources. Smith Cemetery I TerraServer Topo map and Aerial Photo Be sure to check both "Aerial Photo" and "Topo Map" sections. Also at: Topozone. Enter "Smith Cemetery", Lincoln (County) and "MO" in the appropriate search boxes. Topozone is easier to use when looking up specific place-names. It can zoom in on the topo map. Note that while Topozone's topo maps are free, they require a paid subscription to access aerial photos which are probably the same as TerraServer.

After I prepared the above, I discovered the SatelliteViews.net website that shows similar aerial photos, but which appear sharper and can be zoomed in a little closer. And it's FREE! (At least for now in March 2007.) It also overlays the names on the roads. Can move image by "hand." See Smith Cemetery I @ SatelliteViews.net (GNIS Feature ID 726598) See also Smith Chapel @ SatelliteViews.net

Transcriptions

Original transcription, annotated transcription, corrections and additions of the burials and also including genealogies of the families follow.

For full-frame version: Smith Cemetery I - Transcriptions


Old Liberty Cemetery

The first listed (GBNF) burial was December 1830 of Molly (Chaney) Mabry (aka Polly), she b. 31 Oct 1765 d/o Ezekial Chaney; d. 12 Dec 1830; m. (reportedly) 20 Feb 1797 at Pittsylvania or Surry Co., VA to Cornelius Mabry (1755/1759-1829) who reportedly died at Logan Co., Ky. Second listed burial was 1838 of Naomia Salmons, age 2. Apparently many unmarked graves, so there could be earlier burials. The last listed burial: 1956 - Robert P. Sitton Feb. 5, 1956. This cemetery was most active from the 1860's to the 1920's. Virtually no burials after the mid 1920's. Most frequent surnames: Duff, Gililland, Hammett, Holcomb, Hudson, Humphreys, Lewallen, Mabry, Porter, Reddish, Robinson, Salmons, Shocklee, Sitton, Uptegrove, Wessler, Wilson. Approximately 237 listed burials.

I do not know why this location was chosen for this cemetery since the New Liberty Church (organized 1818) with its own cemetery (first recorded burial 1891) is located a couple miles away to the northwest, its building as constructed in 1874. Possibly began as a family burial ground. Possibly near an original (pre-1848) meeting place of a "Liberty Church." Possibly location near the original 1848 log New Liberty Church, pre-1874 since I have found no specific record or notation of that log building's location.

Condition - Sept 2005 front area recently mowed, back areas hadn't been mowed for a while, grass about 8" but not unruly overgrown. All stones upright, a small pile of about eight footstones stacked. Overall not too bad. Wire fence surrounding perimeter, latching gate entrance.

Additions, Corrections

Burials not in GBNF listing:

Further information pending.


New Liberty Cemetery and Methodist Episcopal Church

Adjacent to the New Liberty Church. aka "Liberty Church Cemetery" although the phrase "Liberty Cemetery" has also been used to refer to the Old Liberty Cemetery, down the road. As of September, 2008, the New Liberty Church was not being used for an active congregation, but the exterior was still very well maintained. The cemetery is also very well maintained.

From History of Lincoln County, Missouri; Goodspeed; Chicago; 1888; page 481; section "Methodist Episcopal Churches". Note that in 1844/1845 there was a split of the Methodist Episcopal churches into the breakaway "Methodist Episcopal Church South" and those who remained in the "old church."

NEW LIBERTY METHODIST EPISCOPAL was organized in 1818, at some private house (probably that of the father of Judge S. T. INGRAM), near Corso, in the northwestern part of the county. It is believed that it was organized by Rev. John SCRIPS. The Ingrams, Owings and Hudsons were some of its constituent members. No church building was constructed until 1848, when a log chapel was erected.
The present frame building was erected in 1874, at a cost of $850. It was dedicated in July, 1875, by Rev. N. SHUMATE. It is located on Section 1, Township 50, north, Range 3 west. Among the pastors have been Revs. HENDERSON, ALDERMAN, HYDE, ANDERSON, THOMPSON, McMASTER, SHUMATE and FERELL. This is the oldest Methodist Episcopal Church in Lincoln County, and probably the first one organized therein. It is also among the first Methodist Episcopal Churches organized in Missouri Territory. In the division of the Methodist Episcopal Church, which took place in 1844 and 1845, only about four members of New Liberty Church withdrew and went with their Southern brethren into the Methodist Episcopal Church South. The rest all remained true to the old church, but, after the division, owing to the many persecutions of the adherents of slavery, this church did not prosper well until after the Civil War closed, and slavery, the cause of the division, was abolished. At the close of the war she had about sixteen members--at the present time [1888] she has about fifty.

Note that the location given above as of 1888 (Section 1, Township 50, north, Range 3 west) is the same as the existant building (2009).

The above mentioned "father of Judge S. T. Ingram" would be Jarrett Ingram (1787-1851) who m. 30 June 1807 at Logan County, Kentucky to Nancy Hudson (1790-1871). These Ingram's were buried at the nearby Ingram Cemetery, which is just across the border in Pike County.

Oldest reported burial (from 2006 census): 1891 (Lela F. Ingram (1891-1891), d/o John Edward and Mollie Adelia (Thomas) Ingram). Next oldest (from 2006 census): 1895 (Clarence Grimmett) (GBNF gives burial '188(?)'). Then: 1897, Mrs. Sarah Ann Porter, d. 1 July 1897, born 15 Oct 1815, wife of William Porter (1809-1905). Cemetery most active 1900's through 1950's, burials continued into the 1970's, the latest (as of June 2008) being 1997, then June 2007, then May 2008.

The GBNF transcription was done in 1979. In about 2006, another census was done by Gary Davidson and posted online at: New Liberty Cemetery

The 2006 posted version is a bare-bones table and does not show full dates (year only), inscriptions or indicate shared stones. It does, however, report a section number which will give a rough idea of where the grave is located. I compared the two listings and found that the 2006 census 1) includes some pre-1979 burials not shown in the GBNF listing and 2) does not include some other burials shown in GBNF. The 2006 census shows about 30 new burials subsequent to 1979.

Errata

Additions-GBNF

The GBNF transcription of New Liberty Cemetery does not show certain burials. Additional ones are shown in the 2006 census (below) and from various other sources:

Additions - Shelton Infants:

Two burials are listed in Davidson as surname: Shelton, given name just "Infant" Look-up of Missouri Death Certificates revealed their names:

Additions - Misc.:

Corrections-GBNF

Additions - from Davidson census (about 2006):

Davidson transcription shows additional burials not listed in GBNF. Most, but not all, post-date GBNF.

Additions - post-Davidson census (about 2006):

Following are burials at New Liberty since Davidson census. Note that Gary passed away in 2008 and was buried at New Liberty.


Elsberry City Cemetery

Additional burials, not listed GBNF, unmarked?:

Misc. Corrections, Updates

Further info. pending. Earliest burial?


Oak Ridge Cemetery


aka Oak Ridge Church Cemetery
aka Oak Ridge Baptist Church Cemetery
aka Oak Ridge Baptist Cemetery

The Oak Ridge Cemetery adjoined what was the Oak Ridge Baptist Church. Now, only the concrete steps from the church remain. The earliest burials at Oak Ridge I found from my notes and from quick review of the transcription are November 1859, February 1862 and July 1863: three infant children of Christopher Columbus Eastin (1836-1919) and Elizabeth A. "Bettie" Barnes (1842-1907) (four infants on shared stone). Next are March 1873 (James L. Crank, b. 1823); August 1873 and July 1875: Archie Gordon and Mary Lou, children of Alfred M. & Jane E. Lilley (shared stone, no birth dates shown). Various burials in the 1880's and 1890's; cemetery is still active and well-maintained (2005). GBNF transcription date: October 3, 1982.

Cemetery entrance is at the apex of the horseshoe drive shown in the following series of aerial photos.

Oak Ridge Cemetery Photos at Lincoln County USGenWeb site.

Following are additional burials not listed in GBNF but reported in primary sources. May not have gravestones:

The following are individuals who are 1) related to those who are buried at Smith Cemetery 2) lived and died in the area of Smith Chapel (North Lincoln, South Pike Co.) 3) died mid to late 1800's 4) death dates and/or burials unknown and 5) some possibility they may have been buried at Smith Cemetery or Oak Ridge:

Corrections, additions and misc. notes:

Further info. pending.


Corinth Cemetery
aka Corinth Christian Church Cemetery
(Corinth Cemetery and Christian Church)

The church is a large white building, an active church of the Christian denomination which is very nicely maintained as of September, 2005. The cemetery is still active with recent burials, but it hadn't been mowed in a long time and the grass was over six inches high when I was there.

Note that there is also a Corinth Cemetery in Pike County. Clarksville Map, 391940N-0905844W

My family

My family buried there, From GBNF - Corinth Cemetery, Volume V, Page 15: Lilley Joan Park-May 1858 Mar. 1931 Notes: Given name usually spelled Joanne, Jo Ann; aka. Jo, Joda, Jodie ---------- GBNF - Corinth Cemetery, Volume V, Page 19 Park James S.-Mar. 19, 1848 Apr. 7, 1937 Fannie Alice-Feb. 19, 1858 Aug. 8, 1934-Same stone- Lena May-Daughter of J.S. & F.A. Park 188-?-1892 Aged-9 Years 3 Months & 17 days Roscoe Hobart-Son of J.S. & F.A. Park Died July 1899 Aged-1 Year 8 Months & 12 days Notes: Birth dates calculated from age at death from gravestone and date of death from Lincoln County, Missouri Deaths, 1866-1936: Lena May - DoB: 12 May 1883 Roscoe Hobart - DoB: 5 Nov 1897

Graves of Joanne Park Lilley and the Park's are located near the front of the cemetery (south face), east side. Joanne is next to the fence, the Park's a couple graves over and up toward the church building.

Unmarked Burials

Following burials NOT listed in GBNF transcription of burials at Corinth ca. 1980, presumably no grave marker, from other sources. Reportedly, there were also a number of pauper burials in this cemetery handled by the local funeral director O'Garlan Ricks. These probably included transients who died in the Winfield/Foley area near the train and river routes. Since these were charity burials, presumably, there are no grave markers; I do not know if other records were prepared and kept or if there are other ways of discerning them.

Other Notes and Comments


New Salem Cemetery

aka: New Salem Baptist Cemetery, New Salem Church Cemetery, New Salem Baptist Church Cemetery, Salem Cemetery.

Burials not included in GBNF transcription of New Salem Cemetery:


Crenshaw Cemetery

The earliest burial was 1860: Infant daughter of W.N. & E. Crenshaw (William Nelson and Mary Elizabeth (Vertees) Crenshaw). Last burial was 1938: Martha Ellen (Crenshaw) Chewning (divorced from Albert G. Chewning).

Additional Burials:

The following burials are not included in above GBNF/Lincoln County website but are confirmed by onsite visit by Neal Underwood on Monday, September 22, 2008. The gravestone is located on the west perimeter just inside the fence, about halfway between the north and south boundaries. It is a flat stone, rising about 4" above ground level, pink granite and in excellent condition.

Additional Presumed Burials:

Burials not included in above GBNF/Lincoln County website and presumed:

Corrections:

Corrections of above GBNF/Lincoln County website. These may have been subsequently corrected on the website.

Other Burial Notes:


Overall Cemetery

Additional Burials:

Additional burials, not listed in above, from other sources:


Asbury Cemetery and Methodist Church

aka: Asbury Chapel Cemetery
aka: "Ashbury" (misspelling)

Located at and associated with the Asbury United Methodist Church. This church is an active congregation (2006) and the building has been rebuilt and substantially enlarged over its old white clapboard building which was destroyed by fire in 1969. See: History of Asbury Methodist Church

There are two sections of this cemetery. One section, the original older part, is located behind the church building (north side?) and is not readily visible from the road. The newer section is across the road from the church and clearly visible. This land for this section was donated by Floyd Overall.

Transcription: GBNF Vol. II. The transcription does not differentiate burials between the two sections of the cemetery. Updates and corrections:


Winfield Cemetery
aka
Winfield City Cemetery


Mayes Cemeteries

Following Mayes Cemeteries:

      LC Website              GBNF*

    Mayes Cemetery I      Vol. I,  p. 54  Mayes Cemetery "B"   East jct (W) & (CC)
    Mayes Cemetery II     Vol. II, p. 73  Mayes Cemetery "A"   Hagar Farm (1981)
    Mayes Cemetery III    Vol. II, p. 74  Mayes Cemetery "C"   Lakeview subdivision

* Alpha letter designations are handwritten on Palmer (Elsberry) Library copy.

The "Mayes Cemetery" shown in USGS/GNIS listings is the Mayes Cemetery I; it is the only Mayes Cemetery shown in USGS/GNIS.

All Mayeses buried in these three Mayes Cemeteries are descendants of of Henry Mayes (abt1765-1850) and Nancy (Palmer) Mayes (abt1777-1847) who are buried in the Mayes Cemetery I.

The Lincoln County, Missouri USGenWeb site shows for Mayes Cemeteries (as of September, 2006; may be changing.

Mayes Cemetery I

The following are reported as buried at Mayes Farm/Mayes Cemetery but are not listed in GBNF inscriptions. Based on relationship, presumed Mayes I.


Mary Frances Kitson (15Sep1842-1868), reported burial "Mayes Farm"
  d/o William Henry Kitson (1820-1893) and Lucy Harrison Mayes (1824-1857)

Matilda Ann Kitson (abt1854-abt1856), reported burial "Mayes Cemetery"
  d/o William Henry Kitson (1820-1893) and Lucy Harrison Mayes (1824-1857)

Mary Kitson (1885-1885), reported burial "Mayes Farm"
  d/o John Franklin Kitson (1849-1921) and Eliza Hawkins (abt1885-aft1880)
  gd/o William Henry Kitson (1820-1893) and Lucy Harrison Mayes (1824-1857)

Ida May Kitson (13Mar1886-21Sep1889), burial unknown
  d/o John Franklin Kitson (1849-1921) and Eliza Hawkins (abt1885-aft1880)
  gd/o William Henry Kitson (1820-1893) and Lucy Harrison Mayes (1824-1857)

Myrtle Kitson (1888-1890), burial unknown, reported Oak Ridge.
  d/o John Franklin Kitson (1849-1921) and Eliza Hawkins (abt1885-aft1880)
  gd/o William Henry Kitson (1820-1893) and Lucy Harrison Mayes (1824-1857)
  Not listed in GBNF transcription of Oak Ridge Cemetery, no citation
    or support for reported burial at Oak RIdge.

Mayes Cemetery II

Only three graves listed: Raleigh Mayes (1802-1867), Emily Kemper Mayes (1806-1876) (wife of Raleigh Mayes) and Charlie Forrest Whiteside (1863-1865) (son of Edwin Ellis and Sarepta Anne (Mayes) Whiteside).

Mayes Cemetery III

The following burials reported in a "Mayes" cemetery are confirmed as listed in GBNF:


Martin Joseph Mayes (1800-1876), burial reported as "Family Cemetery"
  born 11 March 1800 at Fauquier County, Virginia; died 20 September 1876
  s/o Henry Mayes (abt1765-1850) and Mary Palmer (abt1777-1847)

Cordelia (Palmer) Mayes (1816-1900), burial reported as "Family Cemetery"
  born 15 December 1816 at Fauquier County, Virginia; died 16 June 1900
 d/o Joseph B. Palmer (abt1792-1839) and Louvisa Riddle (est1795-1855/1870).
 wife of Martin Joseph Mayes (1800-1876)

The following burials reported in a "Mayes" cemetery are NOT listed in GBNF, but are presumed buried Mayes Cemetery III based on relationship:


Lousetta Cordelia Mayes (1837-1843), burial reported as "Mayes Farm"
  born 19 April 1837 at Lincoln County; died 14 April 1843.
  d/o Martin Joseph Mayes (1800-1876) and Cordelia Palmer Mayes (1816-1900)

Louvisa Catherine Mayes (1838-1863), burial reported as "Martin Mayes Pro Family Cem"
  born 18 April 1838 at Lincoln County; died 3 January 1863.
  d/o Martin Joseph Mayes (1800-1876) and Cordelia Palmer Mayes (1816-1900)

Joseph Henry Mayes (1840-1900), burial reported as "Mayes Fam Cem."
  born 25 September 1840 at Lincoln County; died 16 May 1900.
  s/o Martin Joseph Mayes (1800-1876) and Cordelia Palmer Mayes (1816-1900)

Mary Frances Mayes (1842-1874), burial reported as "Mayes Farm"
 born 30 August 1842 at Lincoln County; died 26 Jan 1874.
  d/o Martin Joseph Mayes (1800-1876) and Cordelia Palmer Mayes (1816-1900)


Elsberry Family Cemetery
aka: Elsberry (R.T.)
aka: Wilkinson Cemetery or "Burying Ground"
aka: Wilkerson Cemetery

Location: T51N R2E. North-West of Elsberry. Browns Mill Road (which goes through Elsberry East-West) (west) to Long Blvd. Right (north) on Long Blvd. which ends at the Hunt-Guinness farm where cemetery is located. (Was Hunt-Guinness farm prob. abt 1980.) This cemetery is reportedly a good distance off the road, may not be visible and is likely overgrown. It has occasionally been referred to as the "Wilkinson" Cemetery or Burying Ground, Wilkinson being the surname (correct) of a few related family members that are buried there. One citation written as the "Wilkerson" Cemetery was close, but not precisely correct. One record misspelled it "Wilikson."

Burial place of Robert T. Elsberry (1818-1891), the founder of Elsberry, Missouri.

Distinguished from the Hammack-Elsberry Cemetery on Hwy (B).

Transcriptions

Original transcription, annotated transcription, corrections and additions of the burials. This includes transcription: GBNF Vol. VIII. Following sections are 1): Original GBNF transcription, 2) Comments and 3) Annotated GBNF transcription

For full-frame version: Elsberry Family Cemetery - Transcriptions


Hammack-Elsberry Cemetery

This cemetery is sometimes referred to as just "Elsberry Cemetery" but that term also has been imprecisely applied to other cemeteries in the Elsberry area. Citations should be "Hammack-Elsberry Cemetery."


Wilkinson / Wilkerson / Wilkison Cemetery

The name "Wilkinson Burying Ground," "Wilkerson Cemetery" and "Wilikson [sic] Cem" appears in a few death certificates and obituaries. This has been confirmed from matching certain records to be the cemetery more commonly and correctly known as the Elsberry Family Cemetery (distinguished from the Hammack-Elsberry Cemetery on Hwy (B)).

Examples:


"Elsberry Cemetery"

"Elsberry Cemetery" is used loosely in various places including obit's, death certificates, publications, lists, etc. to refer to cemeteries that should be more correctly and precisely identified. These include: "Hammack-Elsberry Cemetery" OR the "Elsberry City Cemetery" (large municipal cemetery on Hwy. (B) just at edge of city limits of Elsberry) OR the "Elsberry Family Cemetery" (T51N R2E Sur 1706; Outside of Elsberry, at dead end of Long Blvd., north of Browns Mill Rd.) OR possibly other cemeteries in/near Elsberry that have more precise names.

GBNF (Vol 1, p 25-26) uses "Elsberry Cemetery" to refer the Hammack-Elsberry Cemetery.

GNIS shows two entries for "Elsberry Cemetery":

Any use of just "Elsberry Cemetery" needs to be clarified and a more precise name must be used in citations.


Mill Creek Cemetery and Baptist Church

Burials NOT listed in GBNF:

Misc. Additions and Corrections:


Argent Cemetery

TBA


Louisville Cemetery and Church


Olney Cemetery


Whiteside Family Cemetery

Location: William G. White and Erma Parke White Memorial Wildlife Area (810) acres 15 mi. north of Troy. West of Hwy (61) near Whiteside, Mo., 1/4 mi. south of Whiteside.
Census: Gone But Not Forgotten, Vol. VIII

That was the old Whiteside Farm once owned by William "Uncle Billy" Whiteside (1804-1894), who is buried there. In 1967 that farm was owned by Erma Parke White (Mrs. W. G.).

Erma Lee Parke was born 15 Feb 1880 at Lincoln County, Missouri, d/o Perry Thomas "Dick" Parke (1843-1887) and Mary Ann Holcumbrink (1850-1942); Gd/o William Perry "Uncle Billy" Parke (1822-1905) and Cynthia Stephens (1822-1893); GGd/o Perry Parke (1792-1866) and Nancy Wilson (1793-1858). She died in 1969 and is buried at the Auburn Cemetery in Lincoln County.

William Givens "Bunk" White was born in 1878 in Lincoln County, died 28 Feb 1957 and buried at Auburn Cemetery.


Auburn Cemetery
aka Auburn Presbyterian Church Cemetery

At the Auburn Presbyterian Church. The Auburn Cemetery is listed in GNIS under the "cemetery" Feature Type, but that church not listed in GNIS. (This is contrary to GNIS usual protocol of listing the church but not the cemetery.) As of about 2007, the church is still active: Auburn Presbyterian Church, 59 Auburn Church Road, Silex MO 63377, 573-384-6302.


Watts Cemetery
aka:
Hamilton Cemetery

This cemetery seems to be usually known as the "Watts Cemetery" (Watts Cemetery (2), Census GBNF Vol. II)) but, according to The Kemper Book (Clarence Cannon, 1957, page 20), was called the "Hamilton Cemetery," on Seneca Watts' old farm, which in 1957 was known as the "Taylor Place." Location described as "south of New Hope." GNIS shows a Hamilton Cemetery on the Okete map at 390723N, 0905420W, no "Watts" cemetery. The Okete map apparently covers the area that includes the Whiteside Cemetery ((390658N, 0905246W DMS) or (39.1231032, -90.9056889 DEC)). The Lincoln County, Missouri USGenWeb site gives specific directions to the Watts Cemetery, but they appear to be missing a key piece of information. The "gravel road" going north past the Damron Quarry appears to be one mile east of the intersection of V/JJ and W. That intersection is about two miles south of New Hope. Note that the "Damron Quarry" is nowhere near the now vacant town of Dameron. See Watts Cemetery

Seneca Watts enjoyed the respect and affection of all who knew him, and was a man of wide influence. He was a favorite with his father-in-law Martin Kemper, who made him executor of his will, and when another son-in-law Raleigh Mayes, in wittingly displeased the old gentleman by selling a slave woman given his wife Emily by her father, he made Seneca trustee for the share of Emily in his estate. This Estate amounting to a little over one hundred dollars for each child of Emily was paid each of the children in gold by Uncle Senece on the day of their marriage. He lived to an advanced age, a fine type of the old Virginia gentleman. He and his wife are buried in the Hamilton Cemetery, on his old farm, now known as the Taylor Place. (The Kemper Book; Cannon, Clarence; 1957; page 20)


Palmer Cemetery II
aka:
Palmer Cemetery "B"

Location: Eversmeyer Farm, Township T50N R1W, Sec. 17, Survey 1745.

Transcription: GBNF, Volume VII.

The transcription includes the following:

Palmer

Rebecca-Wife of Barton-Broken Stone rest missing-

Broken Stone-Born Mar. 12, 1788 Died Mar. 9, 1858 69 Yrs. 28 Dys.
This May Be Barton Palmer-

Other records confirm the above are Burton Palmer (1788-1858) and his wife Rebecca (Rebekah) Bruce (1792-1846). Burton Palmer born 12 March 1788 at Garrard County, Kentucky; died 9 March 1858 at Lincoln County; buried March 1858 at Palmer Cemetery II; married 10 February 1814 at Garrard County, Kentucky to Rebecca Bruce (1792-1846). She born 6 October 1792 at Augusta County, Virginia; died 2 March 1846 at Lincoln County; buried March 1846 at Palmer Cemetery II.



Unknown Lincoln County, Missouri Cemeteries

Following are references I have come across about cemeteries that are mentioned somewhere, but information as to location is unknown or incomplete.

"John Moore Farm (1868)"

Not listed in GBNF or on the Lincoln County, Missouri USGenWeb page.

Only known (by me) burials:

Polly and Thomas must be buried on the land they owned, southwest of Silex, Mo. Their cabin stood not far from where the present road crosses Null's creek 1« miles SE of Millwood. The farm is now [1967] owned by Justin Miller. In 1964, Lilburn Mudd, #71, one of their descendants who now lives at Silex, and I hunted for their graves. Some of the people in the community, the Nagles, remembered that at one time there were tomb- stones in what is now a corn field, just back of the house, on that farm. From the courthouse records, it is proved that that is the land owned by Thomas and Polly. Apparently the stones were removed by a later owner and perhaps dumped in a ditch. Lilburn continues his search for the stones.
From: Kinfolks of William Parke and Synah Perry & Josiah Wilson and Margaret Crow ; Howell, Margie Ellis; 1967; self-published.


Jamison / Jamieson Cemetery

Alternately spelled Jamison Cemetery, Jamieson Cemetery or Jameson Cemetery. Lincoln County, Missouri USGenWeb site identifies as "Jamieson Cemetery (Jamison or Jameson?)", Location: Louisville, no further information.

GNIS shows "Jamieson Cemetery" in Lincoln County, Missouri. Louisville map; DMS: 391122N - 0910756W / DEC: 39.189deg.N - 91.132deg.W

UPDATE: I have figured out that this is apparently the same as the "Brown-Jameson Cemetery," transcribed in GBNF Vol. VIII, T51N, R2W, Sec. 16. This location corresponds to the GNIS map coordinates for the Jamieson Cemetery which I traced from the satellite map. The Uncited "Locations of Cemeteries Lincoln County, Missouri" List also shows the "Jamieson" Cemetery at T51N R2W Sect 16 on farms which were owned by Joe Wooten (1926 Atlas) and Bufford ("Current"). The GBNF transcript is online: Brown-Jameson Cemetery (Volume 8, page 8) but only shows six burials.

There is still a slight possibility these are two different cemeteries. I have found a number of Lincoln County additional burials at a Jamison Cemetery or Graveyard for whom no apparent gravestone was found. However, GBNF reports that several gravestones from this cemetery "had been hauled to the ditch, for fill." Other burials I have found:

There is one Rootsweb World Connect database for Samuel Jamison (1810-1880) who GBNF shows as buried at this cemetery. From that database:

Although not an ancestor, I've included his family because Perry Jenks contacted me regarding his ancestor, the subject Samuel Jameson, while looking into a possible connection to the other Jamesons in Lincoln Co., MO, many of whom are in my database. Perry is the gg-grandson of Samuel's daughter, Mary Jameson, and her husband, Asbury Swan.
Note:
According to their marriage record, Samuel Jameson and Sarah Newchurch, both of Waverly Twp., were married on 2 June 1840 in Lincoln Co. by Justice of the Peace, William Jameson who is possibly related since Samuel & Sarah had a son William who died in infancy. Perry Jenks reports that in April 1843 Samuel Jamison and wife Sarah sold 6 acres in the SE 1/4 part of Section 16, T51N, R2W to John C. Jamison to fill out 40 acres bought by John C. Jamison at a Troy land sale. Perry hasn't yet established a relationship between Samuel and John C. Jamison but one is suggested by the sale. Perry believes that John C. Jamison was John Cowden Jamison who died in 1844 Lincoln Co.
Note:
Samuel Jameson, age 40 b. NC, has a household on 23 Sep 1850 in Lincoln Co. Sam'l Jameson, age 49 b. NC, has his 17 Aug 1860 household there in Waverly Twp. Samuel Jameson, age 59 b. NC, has his 19 Aug 1870 household again in Waverly Twp. I did not find Samuel with a household in 1840 Waverly Twp. or in any other Lincoln Co. township. However, the Waverly households of George Jamison or Jameson (age 50-59) and David Jameson (age 50-59) each have one age 20-29 male counted who MIGHT be Samuel. Since Samuel has an age 17 George Jameson in his 1850 household, I thought the 1840 George might be Samuel's father. Neither George nor David has an age 20-29 female and but each has 2 age 5-9 males (is young George counted?) which may indicate that the census was taken before Samuel married 2nd wife Sarah. The tombstone for Samuel Jamison is found in the Waverly Twp. Brown-Jameson Cemetery with that of wife Sarah and infant son William.
Note:
Howard R. Watts speculates that the subject Samuel Jamison (b. ABT 1810 in NC) is likely a brother of Watt's ancestor, William Jamison (b. 6 Feb 1799 Cabarrus Co., NC). Watts bases his belief on Lincoln Co., MO records which show them living near one another and a document written by a Samuel L. Jamison, a nephew of William Jamison, who lived with his uncle after his father (allegedly the subject Samuel) died. There is a possible conflict here in that the subject Samuel and alleged brother William both died in 1880 Lincoln Co., MO, several years after Samuel L. Jamison/Jameson had already married in 1870.
Note:
Shirley Massie Simms has the subject Samuel as Samuel B. Jamison, b. 3 Oct 1801 (sic) in NC, married to Sarah Unknown, with the same children that Perry Jenks gave me. She has him as the s/o Samuel Jamison b. 1774 and the brother of John H. Jamison & William Jamison of Pike Co. & Lincoln Co., MO - based on Howard R. Watts' above speculation. My correspondent, Jax Zumwalt, has the subject Samuel as Samuel S. Jamison, b. 3 Oct 1810.


Brinegar Cemetery
Kimler Cemetery
McDonald Cemetery

Cemeteries in Waverly Township, Louisville area with no further information in GBNF; Lincoln County, Missouri USGenWeb site or apparently elsewhere. All three listed in GNIS, Louisville Map with geographic coordinates. Brinegar and McDonald are shown on the
  • Lincoln County, Missouri USGenWeb: "Lincoln, County, Missouri 1989 (Plat) Cemetery Maps" page 01, T51N-R2W; Brinegar Section 16 and McDonald Section 32.


    Tickridge Homestead (near Elsberry)

    Aka: Tick Ridge. Not listed in GBNF or Lincoln County, Missouri USGenWeb site. No further information. No idea as to location. Have not found mention of "Tick Ridge" other than a general comment that is located in northern Lincoln County, possibly in the vicinity of Smith Chapel. (See section below about Sledd Cemetery, which is about 2.5 miles directly west of Smith Chapel.) This appears to be consistent with various data about Drury Damron. Burials reported (no further information):


    Lindsay Cemetery ("Field on old Blackwell property")

    This cemetery name comes from a Rootsweb WorldConnect file for the family of Mumford Blackwell (1803-1873) and Mary A. Waters (1813-1888). They married 13 Sep 1834 at the M.E. Church, Culpeper Co., Virginia. Both reported buried "Lindsay Cemetery (Field on old Blackwell property)." He was son of Benjamin F. Blackwell and Diana Hoffman. She was daughter of Landy P. Waters and Betsy (Margaret) Farr. Mary was sister of Mortimer Waters (1808-?), father of John William Waters (1835-1910) who lived and died in Lincoln County. The "Lindsay" may be connected with the family of Maglane Dawson "Maydee" Lindsay (1871-1960) who married 18 June 1891 at Lincoln County to Landy Philip Waters (1866-1906), he grandnephew of Mary A. Waters Blackwell (1813-1888). Both buried Elsberry City Cemetery.

    The WC file reports:
    1) A receipt for gravestone of Mumford Blackwell dated Aug. 28, 1873 for cost of $32.00
    2) Administrator of estate James Blackwell, son
    3) "Online Cemetery Index has date of birth as Jan 20, 1803" but doesn't cite source.
    I can't find this "index" online as of July 2006.

    In the 1870 census, Mumford Blackwell was living in Lincoln County, Waverly Township, Louisville Post Office (Page 13), so the cemetery may be that vicinity. Search of land records might yield a more precise location.

    Burials reported:



    Other Lincoln County, Missouri Cemetery Notes

    Following are random notes about various Lincoln County cemeteries.

    Misc. Various

    Following cemeteries are listed in Gone But Not Forgotten (GBNF) Listing of Contents (I have not seen), but as of August, 2006 are not included in the listings in the Lincoln County website Cemetery Enumerations page:

     Beard .................. Vol. VIII    (May be "Baird"?)
     Foulconer .............. Vol. VIII
     Perkins ................ Vol. X       (diff. from Perkins in Vol. III)
     Richards ............... Vol. X       (has name, no GBNF ref.)
     Troy (col) ............. Vol. IX
    


    Pioneer Uptegrove Cemetery

    Transcription and location description online at Pioneer Uptegrove Cemetery.

    "These records from a member of the Uptegrove family in 1996. The cemetery is located on a farm between Louisville and Corso, about 5 miles from the "Old Liberty Cemetery" where many Uptegroves are buried. The Atlas of Lincoln Co., Mo., locates the farm in Twp 51N, Range 2 W, Section 28."

    The transcription reports:
    " 7. Elizabeth, wife of J.W. Brown Died May 17, 1858 26 years, 1 month, 1 day"
    Calculates to birth date 16 April 1832.

    Elizabeth Uptegrove married 5 Oct 1854 at Lincoln County to James W. Brown; one son: William Edward Brown, b. 3 Feb 1856, died 18 November 1923; parents confirmed by his death certificate. However, there is an issue. The 1860 census of household of James W. Brown (Louisville P.O.) shows a son, William E., age 4, and wife Elizabeth C., age 24 (clear handwriting) (born 1835/1836). James W. Brown married 17 April 1862 at Lincoln County to Lucinda Dull. No marriage record could be found in Missouri (FS-IGI) for a James W. Brown to an Elizabeth ________ between 1858 and 1862. Further, in the 1910 census, James W. Brown reports that he was married twice. Consequently, the reported death year of 1858 of Elizabeth Uptegrove may be incorrect, but that would mean two independent errors: 1) misrecording her death year and 2) misrecording her age by a material amount in the 1860 census (she would have been about age 28). An unsolved mystery.


    New Hope Cemetery and Baptist Church

    aka: New Hope Church Cemetery, New Hope Baptist Cemetery, New Hope Baptist Church Cemetery.

    There are also two other cemeteries at New Hope. The "town" of New Hope is designated on maps at intersection of Hwy (W) and Old New Hope Road (CR-614)), but I do not recall there is any land features remaining to actually indicate a "town." 1) Sanders-Cox Cemetery (aka Sanders-Baskett (1989Plat) - On south side of Old New Hope Rd (CR-614) about 1/2 mile east of its intersection with Hwy (W) (1989 farm of James Mayes) (marked on MODOT map) and 2) Seaton Cemetery (aka Seaton-Foley Cemetery (1989Plat)) - On east side of Hwy (W), about 1/2 mile north of its intersection with Hwy (B) (1989 farm of Robert Howard) (NOT marked on MODOT map).

    Additional Burials:

    Additional burials, not listed in GBNF, from other sources:


    Grimes-Howard Cemetery

    T51N, R2E, Sec 33. aka: Grimes. Lincoln County, Missouri USGenWeb site shows a "Grimes-Howard" Cemetery, location "Southwest of Elsberry, Mo, Hwy (JJ) on the old Howard Farm, owned in 1981 by Mr. & Mrs. Carr Edwards Jr.", Looks like fairly far in from Hwy (JJ), almost to boundary of Forrest Keeling Nursery property. Census: Gone But Not Forgotten, Vol. II


    Star Hope Cemetery and Baptist Church

    aka: Star Hope Church Cemetery, Star Hope Baptist Cemetery, Star Hope Baptist Church Cemetery.

    Additional Burials

    Following burials NOT listed in GBNF, from other sources:


    Howdeshell Cemetery


    Bryant Creek Cemetery

    aka: Bryant Creek Pioneer Cemetery.


    Sled Cemetery

    Location: On Hwy. (F), 1.4 miles west of the junction of Hwy. (F) and Hwy. (W). (Note that Hwy. (CC) becomes (F) west of junction with (W).) Cemetery is (apparently) on the north side of (F), in a field about 1/4 mile in, across home of A.E. Doelling. This is probably about 2.5 miles directly west of Smith Chapel.

    http://extension.missouri.edu/centuryfarm/Brochures/2002BrochureWeb.pdf

    2002 Missouri Century Farms

    ("Missouri Century Farms is a joint effort by University Extension and the College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources")

    William S. Halley: In 1860, William’s great-grandparents, James C. Sled and Sarah Wills Sled, were married Bedford County, Virginia. At ages 33 and 23, respectively, James and Sarah, along with her father, Winston Wills traveled to Missouri to settle. In December 1861 they purchased their property in the rolling hills of Northern Lincoln County, which was often referred to as “Tick Ridge”. The property lay approximately 15 miles west of the Mississippi River and the town of Elsberry. Elsberry soon became a thriving river and rail location. William's great-grandparents made their living on the property until their deaths and were buried in the Sled Cemetery, which is a private cemetery located on the farm. Their only living child, a daughter, Harriet Linn Sled married William Lee Halley in 1890, and as Harriet’s parents, they made their living on the acreage until their death. A two storied home was constructed on the highest part of the property, which was breezy at all times – proved to be cool in the summer but severely cold in the winter, but the view to the west was awesome. William’s father, Norman Sled Halley was their only child. He was born on the farm in 1891, married, raised two children, and made his living raising cattle and various crops until his death in 1973. His only absence from his home was to serve in World War I. He did not marry until he was 40 years old. William was born in 1938 and raised on the farm. His mother was born and raised within a few miles of this property and was one of 11 siblings, she had many relatives living in this same area, and William has many childhood memories of all sorts of occasions. The community revolved around “Smith Chapel United Methodist Church”, which is located a few miles away from the family farm. It is still a very active church. During the time William was growing up, State Highway F was constructed to replace the old gravel county road. The new highway cut through the Halley farm leaving parcels on both sides of the highway. William left for college and then employment in St. Louis in the late 50’s but returned frequently to the farm, and after his mother’s death in 1978, he started raising a few cattle and crops while still living and working full time in St. Louis County. In 1994, along with his wife and son, William made a decision to build a home and move permanently to the farm, which they now call Breezy Point Farm. William continues to raise cattle and once again enjoy the life he knew many years ago on the same spot of ground. No matter what William’s son’s future includes, his wish is that he too will embrace and reap the benefits of the land which has been so lovingly cared for by their forefathers for 141 years. Arthur and Pamela Muensterman: John H. Muensterman was born on March 27, 1867 in Skye, Germany. He came to the United States in 1881 at the age of fourteen. He moved to the Troy area to live with his aunt and help on her farm. He also worked for Richard S. Young who owned the neighboring dairy farm. He met his future wife, Rosa Schiedegger from Caton Bern, Switzerland in 1898 and they were William S. Halley: In 1860, William’s great-grandparents, James C. Sled and Sarah Wills Sled, were married Bedford County, Virginia. At ages 33 and 23, respectively, James and Sarah, along with her father, Winston Wills traveled to Missouri to settle. In December 1861 they purchased their property in the rolling hills of Northern Lincoln County, which was often referred to as “Tick Ridge”. The property lay approximately 15 miles west of the Mississippi River and the town of Elsberry. Elsberry soon became a thriving river and rail location. William’s great-grandparents made their living on the property until their deaths and were buried in the Sled Cemetery, which is a private cemetery located on the farm. Their only living child, a daughter, Harriet Linn Sled married William Lee Halley in 1890, and as Harriet’s parents, they made their living on the acreage until their death. A two storied home was constructed on the highest part of the property, which was breezy at all times – proved to be cool in the summer but severely cold in the winter, but the view to the west was awesome. William's father, Norman Sled Halley was their only child. He was born on the farm in 1891, married, raised two children, and made his living raising cattle and various crops until his death in 1973. His only absence from his home was to serve in World War I. He did not marry until he was 40 years old. William was born in 1938 and raised on the farm. His mother was born and raised within a few miles of this property and was one of 11 siblings, she had many relatives living in this same area, and William has many childhood memories of all sorts of occasions. The community revolved around “Smith Chapel United Methodist Church”, which is located a few miles away from the family farm. It is still a very active church. During the time William was growing up, State Highway F was constructed to replace the old gravel county road. The new highway cut through the Halley farm leaving parcels on both sides of the highway. William left for college and then employment in St. Louis in the late 50’s but returned frequently to the farm, and after his mother’s death in 1978, he started raising a few cattle and crops while still living and working full time in St. Louis County. In 1994, along with his wife and son, William made a decision to build a home and move permanently to the farm, which they now call Breezy Point Farm. William continues to raise cattle and once again enjoy the life he knew many years ago on the same spot of ground. No matter what William’s son’s future includes, his wish is that he too will embrace and reap the benefits of the land which has been so lovingly cared for by their forefathers for 141 years. Arthur and Pamela Muensterman: John H. Muensterman was born on March 27, 1867 in Skye, Germany. He came to the United States in 1881 at the age of fourteen. He moved to the Troy area to live with his aunt and help on her farm. He also worked for Richard S. Young who owned the neighboring dairy farm. He met his future wife, Rosa Schiedegger from Caton Bern, Switzerland in 1898 and they were


    Ellis Cemetery / Duncan Ellis Cemetery

    Ellis Cemetery aka Duncan Ellis Cemetery. Location also described as on the "Old Trail Place."


    Smith Cemetery II

    I have no idea who these Smith's were and nothing at all about other persons buried there. Patriarch appears to be a Benjamin P. Smith, b. July 14, 1816; died August 25, 1868; m. Catherine A., she b. December 14, 1815; died October 28, 1879. Nothing on Rootsweb WorldConnect about them.


    Green Cemetery

    The Missouri death certificate of John Q. Hudson (1869-1925) gives his burial at the "Green Cemetery near Silex Mo." However, he is listed in the enumeration of the Thomas Hudson Cemetery in Pike County. (Transcription of Thomas Hudson Cemetery; Pike Co. Mo. DAR Vol. 3 1983; FHL fiche 6104195.) This is the only instance of "Green Cemetery" I have seen, but it might appear in other places. It may be an aka for Thomas Hudson Cemetery. I don't have the complete transcription with me, so can't see if there are Green family buried there.

    Thornhill Cemetery I or "A"

    GBNF Volume I, pages 98-116. Online transcription: Thornhill Cemetery

    Additional burials, not shown in GBNF:


    Saint Alphonsus Cemetery
    aka
    "Millwood" or "Millwood Cemetery"

    Cemetery associated with St. Alphonsus-Millwood Catholic Church which was founded in 1850. From the maps, it appears the cemetery is slightly north of, and on the opposite side of the road of the church (I have not visited it).

    So far, most death certificates I have examined identified the burial place as "Millwood" or "Millwood Cemetery" but so far all trace back to the GBNF transcription of the St. Alphonsus Cemetery with some exceptions listed later. I do not see any other cemetery at or near Millwood. Millwood is shown in MODOT map as a town at Hwy (E) and (275) about two miles west of Silex. PO apparently now given as Silex which is nearby. Also, it appears from certain records such as obituaries that one did not have to be Catholic to be buried in this cemetery.

    Burials NOT listed in GBNF for St. Alphonsus Cemetery, from other sources (need to re-check). (I do not see any other cemeteries in the Millwood area.)


    Cox Cemetery - Silex
    aka Cox "B"

    One of apparently four cemeteries known as "Cox": 1) Cox-Silex aka Cox "B", 2) Cox-Elsberry, 3) Sanders-Cox (aka Sanders-Baskett (1989Plat)) and 4) Cox on Hwy (Y) aka Cox "A" aka Cox-Pries. This section pertains to Cox-Silex, aka Cox "B".

    Burials NOT listed in GBNF (any "Cox" Cemetery), from other sources. Presumed Cox-Silex ("B") based onproximity od death in Union Township.


    Miscellaneous Cemetery Notes

    St. Mary's and Mashek Cemeteries
    These are two separate, different cemeteries that may be confused because 1) they are located near each other (T49, R2W, Sec 24), 2) they are transcribed in GBNF Volume III (apparently separately, though I have not seen to verify), 3) Missouri Death Certificates are inconsistent in cemetery names used 4) GNIS lists both as "Saint Marys Cemetery" 5) a circulating, typewritten list of Lincoln County cemeteries refers to both as St. Mary's but differentiates them as Hawk Point and Mashek and 6) Mashek is sometimes otherwise referred to as "St. Mary's Mashek" or just "St. Mary's" because it was originally associated with the St. Mary's Catholic Church which has long since been torn down. Both are shown on the Lincoln County, Missouri Cemetery Plat Maps (T49, R2W) Any reference to "St. Mary's Cemetery" consequently needs to be verified and clarified.

    St. Mary's Cemetery - Hawk Point is located (T49, R2W, Sec 24) on the west side Hwy. D at the bend, just where it starts to curve to the east, about 1/2 mile north of Hawk Point. Latitude 38.98556, Longitude -91.13, Hawk Point Reporting Area. It is indicated on St. Marys Cemetery (Hawk Point Reporting Area) @ SatelliteViews.net Transcription in GBNF Volume III. It is associated with St. Mary's Catholic Church at Hawk Point which is active 2007. See: St. Mary Parish - Hawk Point - founded in 1919 Archdiocese of St. Louis website

    The Mashek Cemetery is sometimes referred to as St. Mary's Mashek, Mashek or Bohemia Cemetery. Some records (e.g. Missouri Death Certificates) MAY refer to it only as St. Mary's, so any such references need to be clarified. It is located (T49, R2W, Sec 24), at the junction of County Roads 597 (aka Bohemian Church Road) and 591 (aka Mashek Road)/Hwy. AA, just east inside the elbow. Latitude 39.00444, Longitude -91.07611 (SatelliteViews.net) The MODOT map also designates a cemetery on its map in this place, but also marks another cemetery in the northwest elbow of this junction that I do not know its name. It is indicated on "St. Marys Cemetery" (Silex Reporting Area) @ SatelliteViews.net ("Silex" is puzzling, but that's what it says; it's no where near the town of Silex, but the map display is correct.)

    A Catholic Church named St. Mary's and the cemetery was at one time part of the town of Mashek, Missouri which was an early settlement in 1848 by six Bohemian families. (Bohemia was an historic region in Central Europe and formed the core of Czechoslovakia after World War I ended in 1918. As of 2007 that region constitutes about half of the land mass of the Czech Republic, the former Czechoslovakia having split in two in 1993. Bohemia is no longer a legal jurisdiction.) One of those families was Peroutka which was translated to Wing. The original St. Mary's church was a small frame structure built in 1864 in the Mashek area. The town of Mashek and original St. Mary's Catholic church are no longer in existence, only the cemetery remains to mark the existence of this Bohemian Parish. I do not know when the town of church ceased. For some history of the town and parish, see: History of Catholic Churches at Troy, Missouri Transcription in GBNF Volume III.

    Immaculate Conception Cemetery
    Cemetery is adjacent to Immaculate Conception Catholic Church and a portion is pictured with the church at at: Immaculate Conception Parish - Old Monroe founded in 1867



    Missouri Cemeteries - Pike County

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