tombstones tombstones Stucco Tombstones

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OK, you've seen the cheap kickboard tombstones. You've seen the styrofoam home made kind with engraving, hot wire cutters, and all that. From the cheap and cheesy ....to the timeconsuming and more expensive.

The whole idea of home haunting props is to make the look good enough to scare the TOTs, make them cheap, make them reusable, and most of all....not spend a lot of time on them!

I choose to spend a little more money (not much more) to save me time putting together these tombstone props. I saw this new product at Menards (144-7235) that is a stucco foam board for using to insulate cinder block foundations on a house.

$13 for a 2x4 sheet. OK. You can get a huge 4x8 sheet of plain stryofoam for around $20. However, let's look a bit at this new product. It comes in gray stucco which is weather proof. It's just stucco stuck to one side of the sheet. But here's the good news...it looks EXACTLY like stone...because it IS stone. No painting, priming needed.

You can get three 16" wide by 24" tall headstones with one of these 2' by 4' sheets. I just used a jigsaw to cut out my headstone patterns.












Now, try cutting the stone part with your rotary cutter for the lettering. Nope, not good. Sparks will fly.

Just make a stencil of whatever graphics and text you want with your PC printer...and then tape it to the cut out headstone...and simply spray paint it! I drove in small nails to hold the stencil in place around the letters. Little holes left...but no one will see them in the dim light. I outlined the letters in white paint to give it more of a engraved look.

The TOTs will never know the difference in dim light.













I then used a cedar board glued to the back of the stryofoam board to keep it stable in the wind. A couple of lengths of 1/2" PVC pipes screwed to the back. This allows a place to slide in your rebar. This rebar is pounded into the ground...to hold the thing up.













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