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Goss Family History

January 2014
Acknowledgments
Information here is based largely on that done by Andrew's granddaughter Ila Goss-BARRETT and her grandson Bill JENKINS. Cousin Ila was a major inspiration in starting my genealogical work.

Our Goss family starts with Andrew Goss1 (1840-1912) in Sweden. Andrew followed the 1849 California Gold Rush to the United States by way of Sardinia when he was about 12 years old, probably jumping ship in San Francisco around 1853-1854. Upon arrival he "Americanized" his name to "Andrew Goss" (the original name is unknown but suspected to be Anders Gustafsson).

Andrew Goss settled in Coulterville, Mariposa County, California, where he married Elizabeth Goodwin and had six sons. After his divorce from Elizabeth, he married Theresa Ferretti-Garbarino and moved to nearby Tuolumne, Tuolumne County, California, and ultimately Stockton, San Joaquin County, California. He died in 1912.

DNA Analysis
A National Geographic's "Genographic Project" study of my Y chromosome, which has passed from father to son since the beginning of our species, shows that the male Goss line carries the M170 marker (Haplogroup I), one of several minor genetic mutations used to track various migrating populations. This marker which is common to Europeans originated with the so-called "Eurasian Adam" who lived in the region of modern-day Sudan and Ethiopia as far back as 79,000 years ago and carried the M168 marker. This marker is carried by every non-African person alive today. From there the line moved north to the Arabian peninsula and fanned out across the rest of the world. The M89 marker (Haplogroup F) appeared in the Middle East some 45,000 years ago which spawned lines in Europe, Asia, and India. 90 to 95 percent of all non-African races (essentially all but Australian aborigines, some Asia-Pacific lines, and one line of Native Americans) carry the M89 marker. It is some 20,000 years ago (a good 800 generations back) that the M170 marker appears in Anatolia (modern-day Turkey) and the Balkans before spreading into southeastern and central Europe.

Andrew GOSS1 (1840-1912)

Andrew GOSS 1. Andrew Goss1 is the patriarch of the American Goss line who journeyed alone from Sweden to America and became a rifleman, saddler[Cen 1870], teamster[Cen 1880], gold miner, blacksmith[Cen 1910], and constable of Coulterville, Mariposa County, California. Andrew was born on April 8, 1840, and at about the age of 12 he followed the California Gold Rush to the United States, apparently by way of Sardinia. He is believed to have jumped ship to San Francisco around 1853-1854[Cen 1900]. After arriving in San Francisco, Andrew made his way to Coulterville, Mariposa County, California, and settled down as a saddler, farrier, and gold miner, and "Americanized" his name to Andrew Goss (the original name is unknown but suspected to be Anders Gustafsson).

After settling in Coulterville for ten years or so, Andrew married Elizabeth Goodwin on May 3, 1868, and fathered six sons:

11. James Albert Goss 7 May 1868 10 Jul 1956 (88)
12. Charles A. Goss 10 Mar 1871 23 Nov 1891 (20)
13. William A. Goss 8 Apr 1873 4 Apr 1890 (16)
14. Benjamin Roland Goss2 31 Jul 1876 17 Sep 1956 (80)
15. John Charles Goss 5 Jul 1879 19 Sep 1882 (3)
16. Jesse Norman Goss 29 Nov 1883 1 Feb 1946 (62)
Possible Parentage
An Anders Gustafsson, who was born on April 8, 1840 in Welande, Täby, Örebro, Sweden, appears in Swedish parish records as the son of Gustaf Anderson and Maja Cajsa Larsdotter. Aside from Andrew's birth date there is no other known evidence to tie Andrew to this family. Furthermore, the cited location appears to be in contradiction: Täby is essentially a suburb to the north of Stockholm in the province of Uppsala (Uppland); and Örebro is a province that lies to the west of Stockholm. I have yet to locate Welande.
Contemporary Events
  • 1818-1844: King Karl XIV & III Johan (Bernadotte)
  • 1844-1859: King Oscar I (Bernadotte)
  • 1849: California Gold Rush
  • 1851-1900: Apache Wars, Geronimo
  • 1853-1857: Pres. Franklin Pierce (Dem)
  • 1853-1856: Crimean War
  • 1857-1861: Pres. James Buchanan (Dem)
  • 1859: Charles Darwin's On the Origin of Species
  • 1861-1865: Pres. Abraham Lincoln (Rep)
  • 1861-1865: American Civil War
  • 1862: Homestead Act
  • 1865: Pres. Lincoln assassinated
  • 1865-1869: Pres. Andrew Johnson (Dem)
  • 1867-1878: Tchaikovsky
  • 1868: Susan B. Anthony's The Revolution
  • 1868: Burlingame-Seward Treaty with China grants Most Favored Nation status to China and encourages Chinese immigration
  • 1869-1877: Pres. Ulysses S. Grant (Rep)
  • 1869: Transcontinental Railroad
  • 1876: Bell's first telephone call
  • 1876: Custer's Battle of Little Big Horn
  • 1877-1881: Pres. Rutherford B. Hayes (Rep)
  • 1881: Pres. James A. Garfield (Rep)
  • 1881-1885: Pres. Chester A. Arthur (Rep)
  • 1882: Chinese Exclusion Act bans Chinese immigration
  • 1885-1889: Pres. Grover Cleveland1 (Dem)
  • 1889-1893: Pres. Benjamin Harrison (Rep)
  • 1885-1889: Pres. Grover Cleveland2 (Dem)
  • 1897-1901: Pres. William McKinley (Rep)
  • 1898: Spanish-American War
  • 1899-1901: Boxer Rebellion
  • 1901: McKinley assassination
  • 1901-1909: Pres. Theodore Roosevelt (Rep)
  • 1903: Wright Brothers' first flight
  • 1906: San Francisco earthquake
  • 1907-1909: Great White Fleet
  • 1908: Ford's Model T
  • 1909-1913: Pres. William H. Taft (Rep)
  • 1912: RMS Titanic disaster
Swedish Emigration
The population of Sweden doubled between 1750 and 1850 and lagged behind Western Europe in industrializing. This population pressure drove a mass emigration with a million Swedes emigrating to America between 1850 and 1910.

During the last three years of the War of the Rebellion (American Civil War), Andrew served in the Coulterville Rifleman Third Brigade. His marksmanship was a source of great personal pride which, at one time, won him a Coulterville area marksmanship award and a picture of President George Washington. Andrew is said to have treasured the picture.

It was also during this time, September 4, 1865, that Andrew was naturalized as a United States citizen. Interesting is a phrase on his naturalization papers in Mariposa that states he was "no longer a subject to the King of Sardinia." This appears to indicate that Andrew was at one time a citizen of Sardina but more probably represents a careless mistake on the part of the naturalization official.

Sardinia

One hypothesis about the Sardinia connection could be that Andrew had been a mercenary in the service of King Victor Emmanuel II of Piedmont, Savoy, and Sardinia who at the time was allied with the British and French in battle against Russia in the Crimean War (October 1853-February 1856). Sweden was neutral during the conflict. The biggest problem with his hypothesis is that Andrew would have been too young.

Another hypothesis is that Sardinia may refer to the ship Sardinian, which made runs from Glasgow and Liverpool to eastern Canada and New York from the late 1840s until 1920.


Andrew & Elizabeth

Following his service as a rifleman, Andrew married the daughter of Scottish immigrants named Elizabeth Goodwin from Bear Gap, Northumberland County, Pennsylvania. She was probably as young as 15 at the time; he, about 27. They soon had their first of six sons, Jim on May 7, 1868.

During the 1870's, four more sons were born to the Goss family: Charles A., William A., Benjamin Roland, and John Charles. On September 10, 1874, Andrew filed an application for a land claim for 133.29 acres in the southeast quarter of Coulterville. The homestead was finalized in 1883. Andrew also filed a land patent on February 15, 1876, for a tract in La Grange Township, Tuolumne County (Township 3 South, Range 14 East, Section 6), which is likely along State Highway 59 just north of the Stanislaus-Tuolumne County line.

Goss Ranch, 1878

A Coulterville map of 1878 shows the Goss Ranch (Block 1, Lot 4) to be 1.12 acres and located along the 1032X block of Stockton Street as you head northwest out of town.

The map also shows that Andrew owned a 7-acre plot (Block 5, Lot 3) along Water Street on the northeast side of town and spanning Maxwell Creek that loosely parallels Water Street.

The 1880's, however, were mixed with fortune and misfortune: John Charles died in 1882 at the age of 3, but Jesse Norman was born on November 29, 1883. Soon thereafter, about 1886, Andrew and Elizabeth's approximate 19-year marriage ended in divorce. After the divorce, Elizabeth and youngest son Jesse N. moved to Tuolumne, Tuolumne County where she was a hotel keeper.[Cen 1900]

The 1890's brought more misfortune to the Goss family: sons William and Charles died, and following this, four grandchildren were born, two of whom died soon after.

Andrew & Theresa (FERRETTI-GARBARINO) GOSS, abt. 1898 Andrew & Theresa (FERRETTI-GARBARINO) GOSS, bef. 1912
Photos courtesy of Theresa's great-grandson, Stevan Stroud

Andrew & Theresa

Andrew later married Theresa (Ferretti) Garbarino, an Italian immigrant who was nearly half his age, on November 19, 1898, in Sonora, Tuolumne County. She was the widow of Angelo Garbarino who died around 1890 leaving four daughters, Pauline, May, Louisa, and Rosa Garbarino. Within a year of their marriage they lived in Big Oak Flat, Tuolumne County, where Andrew worked as a farmer and Theresa's father, Frank Ferretti, boarded with them and helped as a farm hand.[Cen 1900]

Andrew's original homestead, the Goss Ranch, was 160 acres, although an unfenced mining claim runs through it leaving about 138 acres. After Andrew's and Elizabeth's divorce, they split the estate. Andrew's half eventually became his son Jim's, who later turned it over to his youngest daughter Bussie. When Bussie moved to Oakdale, she sold it to her niece Billy.

Elizabeth ended up defaulting on her taxes and the estate was bought out by a local cattle rancher, Tim Carlon. Later Carlon sold the property to the Merced Gold Mining Company from whom granddaughter, Ila Goss-Barrett bought it. Ila later sold the property to her daughter Billy so that now much of the original homestead remains in Billy's hands.

Andrew sold his home in Coulterville in 1904 after he let went delinquent on his taxes. It was at this time that he moved to the Fair Oak district of Stockton, San Joaquin County, where Andrew worked as a watchman for Union Oil.

Mariposa Gazette, December 21, 1912

"Andrew Goss, whose death occurred on Monday, Dec. 9th, at his home in Stockton, was at one time a prominent and much esteemed resident of Coulterville but removing some years ago to the valley city seemed to have become attached to the new surroundings and Coulterville scenes saw him no more. But Coulterville neighbors and friends did not forget and with genuine regret followed his remains last Thursday to the Coulterville cemetery where they were laid beside those of his three sons, Charles, William and John."

"Mr. Goss was a native of Sweden and 74 years of age. He was twice married and is survived by the widow, Mrs. Theresa Goss, and three sons by a former marriage, Jas. Goss of Coulterville and Benj. and Jesse Goss of Jamestown."

"The good that men do live after them and so many of us who knew him well can recall nothing but kind acts in the life of the deceased causing sorrow for his death to be deep and sincere. His family are receiving the sympathy of numerous friends in their bereavement."

On the evening of December 8, 1912, Andrew is recalled to have been sitting at the diner table in his home at 1701 E. Scotts Avenue in Stockton with his eldest son Jim. Andrew took out his pocket watch, placed it on the table and slumped over with a heart attack. He died the following morning at 8:00 a.m., December 9, 1912,[Dth 1912] survived by his wife, Theresa; ex-wife and mother of his sons, Elizabeth; three sons, James Sr., Benjamin2, and Jesse; and six grandchildren, Stella, William, Zelda, Ila, Eloise "Bussie", and Lloyd3. He was 72 years old. Andrew is buried at the Coulterville Cemetery.

Jamestown Magnet, December 1912

"Word was received in Jamestown Monday morning that Andrew Goss, a pioneer of Coulterville, Mariposa Co., had died in Stockton, where he, with his wife, had made a home for a number of years. It appears that he died quite suddenly Monday morning after returning from his work. He leaves, besides his widow, three sons. James, residing in Coulterville, B. R. and Jesse Goss of Jamestown. The remains were taken to Coulterville, the funeral being held there Thursday."


Andrew GOSS, 1840-1912 Andrew is remembered to have loved music. His sons played a wide range of musical instruments which attracted the attention of many townsfolk who came to hear the Goss boys play. In addition to being a saddler, gold miner, and rifleman, Andrew was also a teamster, constable of Coulterville, an apprentice Mason, and is said to have been a director of the construction of the Yosemite-Coulterville pike, the first major road into Yosemite.

Theresa & Thomas

Theresa went on to remarry to Thomas R. Lee, a native of Alabama, on March 19, 1919, in San Francisco. They continued to live Stockton and rented a house at 520 North American Street. Thomas worked as a paper hanger.[Cen 1920] By 1930 they moved about seven blocks south and bought a house at 214 South American Street. Thomas worked as a painter.[Cen 1930]

Theresa Mary (Ferretti Garbarino Goss) Lee died on April 24, 1941, in Stockton, San Joaquin County, California. She was 78 years old.

Thomas R. Lee died six months later on Octoberl 24, 1941, in Stockton. He was 76 years old.

Sources
  • Cen 1870: 15 Jul 1870 Census, Twp. 4 (Maxwell Creek/Coulterville), Mariposa County, California
  • Cen 1880: 14 Jun 1880 Census, Coulterville Twp. 4, Mariposa County, California
  • Cen 1900: 28 Jun 1900 Census, Twp. 3, Tuolumne County, California
  • Cen 1910: 27 Apr 1910 Census, 1701 Scott Ave., O'Neal Pct., San Joaquin County, California
  • Dth: California State Index #452-6, Local Registration #459, #12-037568
  • Cen 1920: 9 Jan 1920 Census, 520 North American Street, Stockton, San Joaquin County, California
  • Cen 1930: 9 Apr 1930 Census, 214 South American Street, Stockton, San Joaquin County, California

James Albert GOSS (1868-1956)

Jim GOSS 11. James Albert Goss, (Sr.) was the first-born son of a Swedish immigrant father. He was born at the home of his maternal grandmother, Jane (McNeil Goodwin) Johnson on May 7, 1868, in Coulterville, Mariposa County, California, and was likely named for his maternal grandfather James Goodwin, who had died three years prior. He married Louise Rose Canova, a daughter of Italian immigrant merchants from Genoa, Italy, on October 7, 1890, and had six children, two of whom died in childhood:

111. Lillian Pearl Goss 29 Oct 1891 13 Feb 1892 (3 mos.)
112. Estella Evangeline Goss 30 Nov 1892 21 Mar 1978 (85)
113. James Albert Goss, Jr. 1 Jun 1897 20 Apr 1899 (1)
114. Zelda Kathryn Goss 10 Nov 1903 20 Oct 1984 (80)
115. Ila Anna Goss 14 May 1905 (29) Jul 2006 (101)
116. Eloise "Bussie" Irene Goss 31 May 1908 20 Oct 2002 (94)

James Albert Goss was a teamster by trade. He lived his entire life in Coulterville.

Louise Rose (Canova) Goss died on February 26, 1939, in Coulterville, a week before her 67th birthday.

James Albert Goss died 17 years later at the age of 88 on July 10, 1956. Both James and Louise are buried at the Coulterville Cemetery.

James A. GOSS, 1868-1956
Mariposa Gazette, 13 July (1958)

"Funeral Saturday for James Goss, North Side Pioneer"

"James A. Goss 88 of Coulterville died Tuesday in Mercy Hospital after a long illness. He was born May 7, 1868 at Coulterville, where he lived all his life. He was a member of IOOF lodge for 52 years. His wife Louise Goss died in 1939.

Jim Goss remained until lately in the home of his parents, the late Andrew Goss, who came to California in 1857. Until 1924 he operated the family blacksmith shop and livery stable and during that time he also hauled freight from valley towns into Coulterville and Yosemite. With the advent of the automobiles, he converted the shop into a garage and station, still in operation in Coulterville.

Funeral services will be conducted Saturday at 2 P.M. in the IOOF hall, Coulterville, by the lodge. Burial will be under the direction of Tiscornia and Ivers in Coulterville cemetery.

He is survived by four daughters, Mrs. Stella Tiscornia of Merced, Mrs. Ila Barrett of Coulterville, Mrs. Zelda Hudson of Snelling, Mrs. Eloise Lemmons of Oakdale, a brother, Ben Goss of Santa Rosa; 10 grandchildren; 12 great grandchildren."


Sources
  • Cen 1870: 15 Jul 1870 Census, Twp. 4 (Maxwell Creek/Coulterville), Mariposa County, California
  • Cen 1880: 14 Jun 1880 Census, Coulterville Twp. 4, Mariposa County, California

Charles A. Goss (1871-1891)

Charles A. GOSS, 1871-1891 12. Charles A. Goss was born in Coulterville, Mariposa County, California, on March 10, 1871. He died at the age of 20 on November 23,1891. He is buried at the Coulterville Cemetery.


Sources
  • Cen 1880: 14 Jun 1880 Census, Coulterville Twp. 4, Mariposa County, California

William A. Goss (1873-1890)

William A. GOSS, 1873-1890 13. William "Willie" A. Goss was born April 8, 1873, in Coulterville, Mariposa County, California.

He died on April 4, 1890, four days before his 17th birthday, in Snelling, Merced County, California, following complications from a broken leg that would not heal. William is buried at the Coulterville Cemetery.


Sources
  • Cen 1880: 14 Jun 1880 Census, Coulterville Twp. 4, Mariposa County, California

Benjamin Roland Goss2 (1876-1956)

Ben GOSS 14. Benjamin Roland Goss2 was a first-generation American born to Swedish and Scottish parents. He was born on July 31, 1876, in Coulterville, Mariposa County, California. Benjamin married Alice Lucretia Converse on July 21, 1898, in Coulterville, a year and a half after Ben's maternal uncle, Pete Johnson, married Alice's elder sister Ida. They had two sons:

141. William Albert Goss 3 Aug 1899 13 Mar 1966 (67)
142. Lloyd Andrew Goss3 19 Sep 1912 1 Aug 1981 (68)

Contemporary Events
  • 1869-1877: Pres. Ulysses S. Grant (Rep, [DC])
  • 1873-1879: Panic of 1873 and Great Depression
  • 1876: Bell's first telephone call
  • 1876: Custer's Battle of Little Big Horn
  • 1877-1881: Pres. Rutherford B. Hayes (Rep)
  • 1881: Pres. James A. Garfield (Rep)
  • 1881-1885: Pres. Chester A. Arthur (Rep)
  • 1885-1889: Pres. Grover Cleveland1 (Dem)
  • 1882: Chinese Exclusion Act bans Chinese immigration
  • 1889-1893: Pres. Benjamin Harrison (Rep)
  • 1885-1889: Pres. Grover Cleveland2 (Dem)
  • 1897-1901: Pres. William McKinley (Rep)
  • 1898: Spanish-American War
  • 1901: McKinley assassination
  • 1901-1909: Pres. Theodore Roosevelt (Rep)
  • 1903: Wright Brothers' first flight
  • 1906: San Francisco earthquake
  • 1907-1909: Great White Fleet
  • 1908: Ford's Model T
  • 1909-1913: Pres. William H. Taft (Rep)
  • 1912: RMS Titanic disaster
  • 1913-1921: Pres. Woodrow Wilson (Dem)
  • 1914-1918: World War I
  • 1914: Panama Canal
  • 1917-1920: Spanish flu pandemic of 1918
  • 1919-1933: Prohibition, 18th Amendment
  • 1919-1920: Red Scare
  • 1920: 19th Amendment prohibits denying of voting based on gender
  • 1921-1923: Pres. Warren Harding (Rep)
  • 1923-1929: Pres. Calvin Coolidge (Rep)
  • 1927: Lindbergh's transatlantic flight
  • 1929-1933: Pres. Herbert Hoover (Rep)
  • 1929: Black Tuesday, Great Depression
  • 1933-1945: Pres. Franklin Roosevelt (Dem)
  • 1941-1945: Pearl Harbor, World War II
  • 1945-1953: Pres. Harry Truman (Dem)
  • 1950-1953: Korean War
  • 1947-1957: Second Red Scare, McCarthy
  • 1947/1948: Cold War, Berlin Airlift
  • 1953-1961: Pres. Dwight Eisenhower (Rep)

Benjamin was the fourth of six sons born to his Swedish immigrant father, Andrew, and Pennsylvania-born mother, Elizabeth Goodwin. He may have been named after a Coulterville resident boy, Roland Benjamin Dexter[Cen 1880], who was 14 years his senior.

In his teens, two of his older brothers, William and Charles died leaving him the second oldest surviving son.

Benjamin married Alice Lucretia Converse, daughter of a mid-West pioneer and a part Indian mother, in Coulterville, on July 21, 1898. The following August, their first son, William Albert, apparently named in memory of Benjamin's older brother, was born in Coulterville. At the time, Benjamin was working as a gold miner in the area.

Sometime later, the Goss family moved to Jamestown in neighboring Tuolumne County, where, on September 19, 1912, their second son, Lloyd Andrew3, was born. About this time, Benjamin was working as an iceman according to the Great Register of Voters, 1910-1912. Soon after Lloyd's birth, Benjamin's father, Andrew, died in Stockton, San Joaquin County, and was buried in Coulterville.

By 1917 the family left Jamestown for Colusa, Colusa County. The family resided at 222 Market Street and Benjamin worked as an auto mechanic[Cen 1920].

In the early 1920's, the family temporarily settled for a year in Myrtle Point, Coos County, Oregon, where they lived in a tent prior to returning to California and settling down in Santa Rosa, Sonoma County. While in Oregon, son William worked in a theater in Coos Bay.

The Goss family moved to the eastern section of Roseland in Santa Rosa by 1924 and opened and operated the first Shell gas station in Santa Rosa on Roberts Avenue. There both Benjamin and William registered as Republicans, Benjamin a mechanic and William a clerk.

After son Lloyd married in 1937, he and his bride rented the the lower level of a home on Roberts Avenue owned by Alice's sister, Carrie (Converse) Sullivan, until they found their own house around 1938.

The Roberts Avenue home was sold when construction of Highway 101 cut through the area. Ben and Alice bought another home at 425 Florence Street, about six blocks northwest of Roberts Avenue, and paid on this place from June 1939 until October 1943. Midway, in 1940, they spent a short while in temporary lodgings at the Riverside Auto Court, 2312 Sonoma Highway.[Cen 1940] Later the Goss family moved to Aston Avenue, near the Fairgrounds, for a time.

Mother, Elizabeth (Goodwin) Goss died on June 2, 1942, of congestive heart disease in Coulterville, and was buried at the Coulterville Cemetery.

In 1946 the Gosss moved to a new house at 1200 Brush Creek Road which was only partially built because the original owner had died. Benjamin and his two sons finished the house and put on the porch.

Ben and Alice celebrated their 50th anniversary in 1948. On that occasion, Ben's cousin, artist Jack Hopkins, gave them a painting that hung at Brush Creek Road until the house was sold in 1988. It continues to hang at their grandson Gary's house.

Obituary

"Benjamin R. Goss, 80, died today [17 Sep 1956] in his home at 1200 Brush Creek Rd.

"Mr. Goss was born in California's Mother Lode country. He came to Santa Rosa in 1921, and worked as a mechanic. He was a member of the Santa Rosa Moose Lodge."

"He is survived by his sons, Lloyd Goss and William Goss, Santa Rosa. Five grandchildren and two great-grandchildren also survive. Funeral services will be held at 3 p.m. Saturday [22 Sep 1956] from the chapel of the Eggen & Lance Mortuary. Inurnment will follow at the Chapel of the Chimes."

Alice Lucretia (Converse) Goss, died on February 10, 1951, at the 1200 Brush Creek residence. They had been married for 52 years.

Five years later, Benjamin Roland Goss died at the same residence. Both are buried at the Chapel of the Chimes in Santa Rosa.

After Ben's death, the Brush Creek residence and a half acre of property was left to his 10-year old grandson, Gary4. The original house on Brush Creek was a two story building with living quarters upstairs and a garage downstairs.


Sources
  • Cen 1880: 14 Jun 1880 Census, Coulterville Twp. 4, Mariposa County, California
  • Cen 1900: 15 Jun 1900 Census, Coulterville North, Mariposa County, California
  • Cen 1910: 18 May 1910 Census, Township 4 (Jamestown), Tuolumne County, California
  • Cen 1920: 2 Jan 1920 Census, 222 Market Street, Colusa, Colusa County, California
  • Cen 1930: 3 Apr 1930 Census, Roberts Avenue, Santa Rosa, Sonoma County, California
  • Cen 1940: 8 April 1940 Census, Riverside Auto Court, 2312 Sonoma Highway, Santa Rosa, California

John Charles Goss (1879-1882)

Johnnie C. GOSS, 1879-1882 15. John "Johnnie" Charles Goss was born on July 5, 1879, in Coulterville, Mariposa County, California. He was likely named for his maternal uncle, John Charles Goodwin, who, at the young age of 19, died three years prior to his birth.

Johnnie died at the age of 3 on September 19, 1882, and is buried at the Coulterville Cemetery.

Sources
  • Cen 1880: 14 Jun 1880 Census, Coulterville Twp. 4, Mariposa County, California

Jesse Norman Goss (1883-1946)

Jesse N. GOSS 16. Jesse "Jess" Norman Goss was born in November 29, 1883, in Jamestown, Tuolumne County. He lived there most of his life and married Hazel (G/I). O'Neill, also of Jamestown, about 1915.

161. Charles Donald Goss 3 Oct 1916 28 Nov 1955 (39)
162. Gertrude Phyllis Goss      

Jess lived with his mother following the breakup of his parents when he was about 3 years old. In his teen years, he lived for a while as a boarder with his cousins Marguerite Wagner and Carrie (Wagner) Dexter in Red Cloud (present day Greeley Hill), Mariposa County.[Cen 1900]

According to the 1910-1912 Great Register of Voters, Jess was a printer. Come 1918 he worked as a lime kiln engineer at a mine in the nearby town of Quartz.

Jess was also a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows (I.O.O.F) at the Table Mountain Lodge 405 near Jamestown. In January 1942 he was installed as an officer at the lodge.

Jesse Norman Goss died on February 1, 1946, at the age of 62.

Hazel (O'Neill) Goss died six months later on August 21, 1946. She was 55 years old.

Sources
  • Cen 1900: 15 Jun 1900 Census, Township 1, Red Cloud Precinct, Mariposa County, California
  • Cen 1910: 21 Apr 1910 Census, Township 4, Tuolumne County, California
  • Cen 1920: 14 Jan 1920 Census, Jamestown Precinct, Township 4, Tuolumne County, California
  • Cen 1930: 21 Apr 1930 Census, Jamestown, Township 4, Tuolumne County, California