Troy's Genealogue

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Family Histories:

KESTER Family History, Part V

September 2012

Rebecca (KESTER) WELCH (1786-1849)

125111. Rebecca Kester was born on July 3, 1786, probably in Nelson County, Kentucky. She married William Welch in 1806 and had 10 children:[Hunt 310]

125111A. Patience Welch 2 Apr 1807 20 Sep 1869 (62)
125111B. Samuel Welch 24 Jun 1810 12 May 1873 (62)
125111C. Sarah Welch 20 Oct 1812 18 Aug 1876 (63)
125111D. Daniel Welch 22 Jan 1815 1859 (44)
125111E. John Welch 19 Jun 1817 1850 (32)
125111F. Jesse Welch 16 Jan 1820 12 Jun 1891 (71)
125111G. Mary Welch 30 Jan 1822 24 Jul 1849 (27)
125111H. Landen Welch 8 Mar 1823 (1848) (24)
125111I. Harvey Welch 24 Feb 1827 (1851) (23)
125111J. Ruhama Welch 19 Jun 1830 Mar 1858 (24)
Welch Family
William Welch was born on February 19, 1784, to John and Sarah (Sutton) Welch. He was the elder brother of John Welch who married Rebecca's younger sister, Mary A. (Kester) Welch, four years later.[Hunt 310,350]

The Welch family moved from Ohio to Vigo County, Indiana by 1817 and settled in Pierson Township.[Hunt 310]

William Welch died on November 29, 1846, at the age of 62.[Hunt 310]

Rebecca (Kester) Welch lived another three years and died, probably in Clay County, Indiana, on December 8, 1849. She is buried at Friendly Grove Cemetery, Clay County, Indiana. She was 63 years old.[Hunt 310]

Sources
  • Hunt, John Eddy. The Pound and Kester Families. Chicago: Regan Printing House, 1904.

Sarah (KESTER) EVANS (1788-1862)

125112. Sarah Kester was born on October 5, 1788, in Kentucky, likely in Nelson County south of Louisville. She married Moses Evans on March 26, 1806; she was 17 years old and he was 25. They had six children:[Hunt 326]

1251121. Felix Evans 4 Feb 1807 29 Apr 1848 (41)
1251122. Cynthia Ann Evans 4 Oct 1808 29 May 1813 (4)
1251123. Paul Evans 30 Jan 1811 15 Jun 1836 (25)
1251124. Joseph Evans 13 Jun 1813 1 Sep 1887 (74)
1251125. Milton Evans 23 Jan 1816 22 Oct 1844 (28)
1251126. Matilda Evans 3 Jul 1818 22 May 1897 (79)
Moses Evans
Moses Evans was born on September 24, 1780, in Warren County, Georgia, to Joseph and Hester Evans.[Hunt 326]

The Evans family probably started in Preble County and made their way northeast into Miami County by 1813. They then moved west into Indiana Territory in 1815, the year prior to Indiana's admission into the union as the 19th state. They settled in Vigo County, south of Terre Haute.[Hunt 326]

In 1842 the Evans moved to Houston County, Texas, for about two years before returning to Vigo County in 1844.[Hunt 326]

Moses Evans died on January 8, 1853, probably in Vigo County, Indiana. He was 72 years old.[Hunt 326]

Sarah (Kester) Evans died 9 years later at the age of 73 on September 19, 1862. She is buried at Union Cemetery, northwest of Farmersburg, Vigo County, Indiana.[Hunt 326]

Sources
  • Hunt, John Eddy. The Pound and Kester Families. Chicago: Regan Printing House, 1904.

John Bonham KESTER, Sr. (1791-1840)

125113. John Bonham Kester, Sr.6 was born on March 24, 1791, in Nelson County, Kentucky, south of Louisville. He was likely named for his maternal uncle, John Kester. He probably moved with his father north to Preble County, Ohio, as a young man around 1807. He is said to have served in the War of 1812[Hunt 337], as his father had, but does not appear to have served in the same unit. He later married Margaret Layson2 on April 13, 1815; he was 24 years old and she was 18. They raised 10 surviving children of 12:[Hunt 336-337]

125113A. George W. Kester 9 Feb 1817 11 Feb 1818 (1)
125113B. Sarah Ann Kester7 18 Mar 1819 29 Jun 1902 (83)
125113C. Mary Kester 28 Oct 1820 23 Mar 1841 (20)
125113D. James Layson Kester 12 Apr 1822 23 Dec 1890 (68)
125113E. Cynthia Ann Kester 3 Oct 1823 10 Sep 1860 (36)
125113F. Elizabeth Ann Kester 20 Feb 1826 27 Mar 1854 (28)
125113G. Joseph KESTER 19 Jan 1828 13 Jul 1828 (5 mos.)
125113H. John Bonham Kester, Jr. 19 Sep 1829 17 Jul 1921 (91)
125113I. William Kester 19 Aug 1831 27 Dec 1894 (63)
125113J. Naomi Kester 7 Sep 1833 18 Mar 1885 (51)
125113K. Eliza Jane Kester 17 Feb 1836 20 Dec 1888 (52)
125113L. Francis Marion KesterBlue Star 1 Jul 1838 8 Mar 1920 (81)
Layson
Margaret Layson2 was the daughter of James Layson1 (~1771-UNK) and Sarah Scott1 (~1771-UNK) of Missouri and Georgia.

The Kesters were likely married in either Preble County, Ohio, after John's father died, or in Vigo County in western Indiana. It was probably in Pimento, south of Terre Haute in Vigo County, that the Kesters started their large family and stayed there into 1822. By 1823 they moved about 50 miles north to the area of Crawfordsville, Montgomery County.

Vermillion County, Illinois

Vermilion County, Illinois, is located due west from Montgomery County, Indiana, just across the Illinois line. As such I suspect this does not necessarily imply that the Kester family resided in Illinois during this time, rather that John likely crossed to Illinois to serve in the war leaving his family in Indiana.

The following notes on the Black Hawk War give a brief overview of the campaign as well as some background that notes figures associated with John Kester's company that predate the 1831-1832 hostilities, namely Moore and Hubbard. John's participation in this earlier activity is doubtful but until I find concrete details of the company's actions in the actual campaign these are the only insights I have to date on the Vermillion battalion's origin and actions.

During the Black Hawk War of 1831-1832, John enlisted in Vermilion County, Illinois, as a private in Captain E. Aston's Illinois Militia under (Colonel Isaac R.) Moores' regiment.

Black Hawk War, 1832

Excerpts from "History of Vermillion County Illinois" reveal that white settlers moved further up the Mississippi River encroaching on the Winnebagoes and Pottawattamies around Chicago.

In the run-up to the war, in July 1827 settlers at Fort Dearborn, near Chicago, were tipped by friendly Indians of a massacre brewing so the U.S. government ordered the formation of troops under Brevet Brigadier General Henry Atkinson. Illinois Governor Ninian Edwards called out the state militia to march to Galena, in the northwest corner of Illinois along the Mississippi River.

Colonel Gurdon Hubbard was quickly dispatched from Fort Dearborn to Danville, Vermilion County, to gather troops, forming the "Vermilion County Battalion" at Butler's Point (near Danville). The troops were released for the night to prepare five days of rations, and then set out on Sunday (July 15) for the Vermilion River and northward.

Upon reaching Joliet, southwest on the approach to Chicago, Colonel Moores began building a fortification only to be recalled down river to General Atkinson's headquarters at Ottawa to be relieved as the threat apparently had passed with only one white man killed in an ambush.

In 1829, the U.S. government ordered two tribes to vacate villages in Illinois and resettle west of the Mississippi River citing the Treaty of 1804.

In 1831, Black Hawk, a Sauk chief, protested and tried to return to Sauk lands at Rock Island on the east side of the Mississippi. He raised a force of 1,000 Indians and crossed the Mississippi on April 6, 1832. In response, five brigades were raised in Illinois and began pursuit of Black Hawk's force. This culminated in the first skirmish, the Battle of Stillman's Run, on May 14, when after a small ambush U.S. forces retreated in panic mistaking a band of 40 Indians for a much larger force. White blood having been spilled, this opened an all-out pursuit of Black Hawk which ended with Black Hawk's defeat at the Bad Axe River in Wisconsin, in August 1832.


Sac and Fox Indians
The Sac and Fox Indians, Algonquin-speaking tribes, are believed to have originated near the Saint-Lawrence Seaway in Canda and later moved to Saginaw Bay, Michigan, and Green Bay, Wisconsin, under pressure of the White Man and the Iroquois in the mid-17th century. There the Sauk and Fox began to intermarry and the tribes joined. In the mid-18th century they moved again to Saukenuk (modern day Rock Island, Illinois) at the convergence of the Rock and Mississippi rivers. The U.S. government forced them out of Saukenuk into a 40-miles square reservation at the forks of the Iowa River--not far from Greene as described above. However in 1832 Black Hawk, Keokuk's war-prone rival, made an unsuccessful attempt to retake Saukenuk, his birth place. This marked the last Native American fight for homelands east of the Mississippi. The Sac & Fox Nation later moved to Kansas and is now based in Stroud, Oklahoma, some 2,000 miles from their homeland.

After the Black Hawk War, the Kesters stayed on another year in Montgomery County before relocating west to Mercer County, south of Davenport in western Illinois in 1834. They then crossed the Mississippi River into Iowa Territory in 1836, two years before Iowa had been officially declared a territory by the U.S. Congress. They settled in Cedar Bluff, Cedar County, just south of Cedar Rapids, by 1838.[Hunt 337]

Not long after the move to Cedar Bluff, John Bonham Kester, Sr. died there on January 1, 1840. He was only 48 years old. John is buried at the Gunsolus (Evergreen) Cemetery, in Cedar County. John is said to have been a doctor and a farmer.[Hunt 337]

Margaret was left with nine children at home between the ages of 1 and 20. She lived on in Cedar County through at least the 1850 census where she was enumerated with her five youngest children and next door to her next elder daughter, Elizabeth (Kester) Dennis.[Cen 1850]

About 1860, the Kester children, beginning with James, began migrating westward to California. First James, and later John Jr., moved to Napa County. Then they relocated south to San Luis Obispo County about 1867 (about the time of Margaret's death) where many of the remaining children settled.

Margaret (Layson) Kester died in Ivanhoe, (probably Linn County), Iowa, on July 17, 1867. She was 70 years old.

Sources
  • Hunt, John Eddy. The Pound and Kester Families. Chicago: Regan Printing House, 1904.
  • Cen 1820: 7 Aug 1820 Census, Vigo County, Indiana
  • Cen 1840: 1840 Census, Cedar County, Iowa Territory
  • Cen 1850: 17 Sep 1850 Census, Center Township, Cedar County, Iowa

Mary A. (KESTER) WELCH (1792-1857)

125114. Mary A. Kester was born on November 1, 1792, in Kentucky, probably in Nelson County south of Louisville. She married John Welch (Jr.) in 1810. They had 12 children:[Hunt 350]

125114A. Ruhama Welch 15 Nov 1811 14 Apr 1891 (79)
125114B. Daniel L. Welch 1813 1874 (61)
125114C. Sarah Ann Welch 10 Jan 1815 19 Oct 1894 (79)
125114D. John Welch (III) 9 Apr (1817) (Sep-Oct) 1886 (68)
125114E. Paul Kester Welch 9 Apr (1817) 12 Feb 1885 (66)
125114F. Nancy Welch 1822 1890 (68)
125114G. James Welch 10 Jan 1826 30 Jul 1883 (57)
125114H. Joseph Welch 15 Feb 1829 1858 (27)
125114I. Ruth Welch 13 Feb 1831 6 Apr 1863 (32)
125114J. Francis Marion Welch 7 Apr 1832 31 Oct 1882 (50)
125114K. Mary Ann Welch 25 Feb 1835 17 Sep 1898 (63)
125114L. Simeon Welch 4 Mar 1838 2 Jan 1892 (53)
Welch Family
John Welch was born on October 3, 1788, to John and Sarah (Sutton) Welch. He was the younger brother of William Welch who had married Mary's eldest sister, Rebecca (Kester) Welch, four years prior.[Hunt 310,350]

They started their family in Ohio and soon after their marriage John answered the call to war against the British in the War of 1812 (1812-1815).

The Welchs moved west from Ohio to near Pimento, Vigo County, Indiana, in 1818, after the twins were born.

Mary A. (Kester) Welch died near Pimento on July 8, 1857, at the age of 64. She is buried at the Second Prairie Creek Cemetery in Linton Township, Vigo County, as is her mother.

John Welch died four years later on July 12, 1861.


Sources
  • Hunt, John Eddy. The Pound and Kester Families. Chicago: Regan Printing House, 1904.

Jesse KESTER (1800-1856)

125115. Jesse Kester was born in January or May 1800 in Kentucky, likely in Elk Creek, Shelby County, which was later redrawn into Spencer County. When he was about seven years old his family moved northeast to Preble County, in southwest Ohio, west of Dayton. Jesse's father died when he was 13 years old. Jesse married Sarah "Sally" Johnson (or Johnston) in Preble County and soon after they moved west across Indiana to Vigo County and started their family. They had six children before Sarah's death in 1833. Jesse later remarried to Ruth Eveline Conley and had three more children:[Hunt 366-367]

1251151. Nancy Kester 13 Nov 1818 19 Aug 1871 (52)
1251152. Harmon Kester 10 Sep 1819 7 Jan 1892 (72)
1251153. James Johnson Kester 15 Apr 1823 27 Mar 1887 (63)
1251154. Charles M. Kester 1825 Jun 1894 (69)
1251155. Margaret Ann Kester 20 Jun 1828 14 Dec 1897 (69)
1251156. Emeline Kester 10 May 1831 --  -- 

1251157. Henderson Warner Kester 9 Oct 1837 11 Mar 1885 (47)
1251158. Sarah Elenor Kester 23 May 1839 --  -- 
1251159. Maria Louisa Kester 10 Mar 1842 --  -- 

A couple years after Jesse's father's death in 1814, when Jesse was about 16, he became a baptist in Ohio.[Webb]

After Jesse's and Sally's marriage, the Kester family started in Prairie Creek Township (Township 10 North, Range 10 West), Vigo County, in western Indiana. Jesse sold his homestead, the west half of the northwest quarter of Section 34, about 1 mile west of Prairie Creek town, to William Lane on June 3, 1824.[Hunt 366]

The family followed the Wabash River north to Fountain County where they resettled in Hillsboro and Jesse and Charles McLaughlin built a "corn cracker" mill for grinding corn that fall. Jesse laid out the town of Hillsboro in 1830 and 1832.[Hunt 366-367]

Sarah (Johnson) Kester died in Hillsboro, Fountain County, Indiana, in 1833.[Hunt 367]

After Sarah's death, Jesse sold the Hillsboro homestead to Mr. Zuwalt and continued west into north-central Illinois where he started a second family with Ruth Eveline Conley in Magnolia Township, Putnam County.[Hunt 367] Only a couple a years prior Jesse's brother John had fought in the Black Hawk War of 1832 and repulsed Black Hawk and the "British Band" of Sauks, Meskwakis, and Kickapoos after they reoccupied lands west of the Illinois River that traverses Putnam County. There the family was enumerated in Lyons Precinct (likely modern-day Roberts Township), Marshall County, to the south of Magnolia.[Cen 1840]

"Old School Baptists"
"Old School Baptists" refers to Regular Baptists, and later Primitive Baptists, who believe in the Calvinist concept that salvation was predestined and therefore evangelical mission activity was both unnecessary and unbiblical. Elder Daniel Parker (1781-1844) started an "anti-mission" movement in Vincennes, Indiana, in 1820, expanded the church into Illinois in 1833, and in 1834 ultimately moved to Texas, which was then still a part of Mexico. He died there in 1844.

Jesse and his younger brother Bonham joined the Sandy Creek Church, a Regular Baptist or Primitive Baptist congregation[Webb], which had been founded in 1836 at Ox-Bow (Caledonia), just west of Magnolia in Magnolia Township. Ruth is recorded as having joined the congregation in 1841.[Webb] Jesse and Bonham served as elders and held services at pioneer homes, schools, or perhaps even at the fort at Caledonia. It wasn't until 1856, the year of Jesse's death that the church built a meeting house in Caledonia.

In 1847, the Kesters, except for the eldest two children who stayed behind in Magnolia, moved to Oregon Territory over the Oregon Trail. Two years later, Jesse followed the 1849 California Gold Rush south to California, but by 1850 returned to Putnam County, Illinois, where they lived at Ox Bow Prairie near Magnolia.[Hunt 367, Cen 1850] At about the same time, brother Bonham left Putnam County for Polk County, Iowa.

Jesse Kester died on July 27, 1856, at his home in Putnam County. He was 56 years old.[Webb, Hunt 366, ] Jesse's descendants have heard that he was not buried at Magnolia Cemetery and suspect that he is most likely buried in an unmarked grave at Caledonia Cemetery.

"History of Sandy Creek Church of Predestinarian Baptists
at Caledonia, Putnam County, Illinois," by Elder Robert L. Webb
Elder Jesse Kester "...was born in the state of Kentucky, in the year 1800. When a child his parents removed to Ohio, where, at the age of about sixteen, he experienced a hope in the Redeemer and joined the Regular Baptists, and ever remained an orderly member, though deeply sensible of the infirmities of the flesh; and for his love of the truth has suffered his full share of bitterness and persecution. He loved and contended for good order and discipline in God's house, and his seat was very seldom vacant. In his death, Sandy Creek Church has lost a substantial and faithful member. He died in the triumphs of faith, at his residence in Putnam Co., Ill., July 27, 1856."

Ruth Eveline (Conley) Kester died 34 years later in 1890 at about the age of 79.[Hunt 367]

Sources
  • Hunt, John Eddy. The Pound and Kester Families. Chicago: Regan Printing House, 1904.
  • Cen 1820: 7 Aug 1820 Census, Vigo County, Indiana
  • Cen 1840: 1840 Census, Lyons Precinct, Marshall County, Illinois
  • Cen 1850: 19 Nov 1850 Census, Putnam County, Illinois
  • Webb, Robert L. History of Sandy Creek Church of Predestinarian Baptists at Caledonia, Putnam County, Illinois. The Primitive Baptist Library, Carthage, Illinois: 1990.

Ruth (KESTER) MCCOSKEY (1802-1869)

125116. Ruth Kester was born August 14, 1802, in Middletown, Butler County, Ohio. When she was about 5 years old her family moved north into the adjacent Preble County. Her father died when she was 11 years old and a few years later they moved west to west Indiana, settling in Vigo County. She married Thomas Campbell McCoskey on August 24, 1820, in Vigo County, Indiana, and had 10 children:[Hunt 375]

125116A. Mary Jane McCoskey 15 Jun 1821 4 Jan 1884 (62)
125116B. James H. McCoskey 14 Aug 1823 15 Mar 1863 (39)
125116C. John Bowman McCoskey 25 Sep 1825 11 Apr 1891 (65)
125116D. Paul Kester McCoskey 27 Feb 1828 8 Jan 1895 (66)
125116E. Jacob Milton McCoskey 2 Jul 1830 8 Jul 1878 (48)
125116F. Nancy Elizabeth McCoskey 4 Feb 1833 >1904 (>70)
125116G. William T. McCoskey 14 Sep 1836 22 Aug 1888 (51)
125116H. Rebecca R. McCoskey 2 Feb 1838 28 Feb 1857 (19)
125116I. Thomas O. McCoskey 8 Feb 1841 20 Nov 1862 (21)
125116J. Joseph L. McCoskey 8 Mar 1846 8 Apr 1875 (29)

The McCoskey family settled in Youngstown, north of where Ruth's older siblings settled in Prairie Creek and Pimento.

Ruth (Kester) McCoskey died on March 3, 1869, probably in Youngstown, at the age of 66. She is buried at Smith Cemetery (Mount Zion Cemetery), east of Youngstown in Vigo County.

Thomas Campbell McCoskey died six years later on March 8, 1875, at the age of 73. He is buried with Ruth at Smith Cemetery.

Sources
  • Hunt, John Eddy. The Pound and Kester Families. Chicago: Regan Printing House, 1904.
  • Marr 1820: 24 Aug 1820, Vigo County, Indiana

Jacob KESTER (~1805-~1845)

125117. Jacob Kester was probably born in Preble County, Ohio, about 1805, a twin brother with Bonham. He was likely named for his maternal grandfather, Jacob Bonham. After his father died when he was about 9 years old, his family moved west to Vigo County, Indiana. There he married Margaret Pierson on January 11, 1827[Marr 1827], and had four children:[Hunt 384]

1251171. Squire Kester (1827-1830) (<1850) (12)
1251172. Sylvania Kester (1831-1833) 25 Mar 1857 (24)
1251173. Jane Emerine Kester --  --  -- 
1251174. Jacob Calvin Kester (1836-1837) (>1850) (12)

The KESTERs moved northeast to Crawfordsville, Montgomery County, by 1830.[Cen 1830]

They apprently returned to Vigo County where Jacob platted "Urbana" in Township 10 North, Range 10 West, Section 17 (Prairie Creek Township), on October 9, 1838,[Hunt 384] about 3 miles northwest of Prairie Creek, Vigo County. They then moved to Pierson Township, about 14 miles east, by 1840. Jacob's younger brother William and cousin Joseph LISTON were enumerated nearby.[Cen 1840]

Margeret (Pierson) Kester died sometime before Jacob, perhaps in the early 1840s.

Jacob Kester died about 1845 on his way to Crawfordsville, Montgomery County, Indiana, about 70 miles to the northeast.

After Jacob's an Margaret's deaths, children Sylvania and Jacob appear to have been taken in by Jacob's twin brother, Bonham and his wife Priscilla. They moved west to Polk County, Iowa, by 1850.[Cen 1850]

Sources
  • Hunt, John Eddy. The Pound and Kester Families. Chicago: Regan Printing House, 1904.
  • Cen 1820: 7 Aug 1820 Census, Vigo County, Indiana
  • Marr 1827: 11 Jan 1827, Vigo County, Indiana
  • Cen 1830: 1830 Census, Montgomery County, Indiana
  • Cen 1840: 1840 Census, Pierson Township, Vigo County, Indiana
  • Cen 1850: 19 Aug 1850 Census, Polk County, Iowa

Bonham KESTER (~1805-1869)

125118. Bonham Kester was probably born in Preble County, Ohio, about 1805, a twin brother with Jacob. He was apprently named for his mother's family name. After his father died when he was about 9 years old, his family moved west to Vigo County, Indiana. He married Priscilla Steapleton on August 17, 1827, in Montgomery County,[Marr 1827] where they settled in Crawfordsville. They had no children of their own.[Hunt 384]

"Old School Baptists"
"Old School Baptists" refers to Regular Baptists, and later Primitive Baptists, who believe in the Calvinist concept that salvation was predestined and therefore evangelical mission activity was both unnecessary and unbiblical. Elder Daniel Parker (1781-1844) started an "anti-mission" movement in Vincennes, Indiana, in 1820, expanded the church into Illinois in 1833, and in 1834 ultimately moved to Texas, which was then still a part of Mexico. He died there in 1844.

Bonham is said to have "run a carding machine propelled by overshot-water power" and was "an 'old school' Baptist minister."[Hunt 384]

Bonham moved to Putnam County, Illinois, probably when his elder brother Jesse did in the late 1830s. There Bonham and Jesse joined the Sandy Creek Church, a Regular Baptist or Primitive Baptist congregation[Webb], which had been founded in 1836 at Ox-Bow (Caledonia), just west of Magnolia in Magnolia Township, Putnam County, Illinois. They served as elders and held services at pioneer homes, schools, or perhaps even at the fort at Caledonia. It wasn't until 1856, several years after Bonham left Putnam County, that the Sandy Creek Church built a meeting house in Caledonia.

The Kesters later moved west to Polk County, in central Iowa near Des Moines, by 1850 and appear to have taken in the orphaned, teenaged children of Bonham's deceased brother Jacob, Sylvania and Jacob. Bonham worked as a carpenter.[Cen 1850] In 1854 they were noted in Camp Township, in the southeast corner of Polk County, and enumerated as one male and two females.[Cen 1854]

A few laters they shifted southwest into neighboring Madison County, Iowa, where they settled near Saint Charles in South Township. There Bonham worked as a mechanic.[Cen 1860]

After about 10 years, Bonham and Priscilla moved south to Washington County in the northwest corner of Arkansas. There they joined the Vine Grove church of "Old School Baptists."

Bonham Kester died on January 31, 1869, at the age of 63 years.

Obituary, April 5, 1869. Provided by Elder Robert L. Webb
"Beloved Brother Beebe: By request of sister Kester and other I send you the obituary of Eld. Bonham Kester, who departed this life January 31, 1869, aged 63 years. Brother Kester united with the Baptist church at the age of thirteen years; passed through the struggle of division from the Arminian Missionite Baptists, contending earnestly for the faith once delivered to the saints. Of the time of his call to the ministry and ordination I am not informed. He moved from Indiana and settled in Madison county, Iowa; he traveled quite extensively among his brethren and preached the word; he was faithful in his calling and esteemed his brethren. Brother Kester was remarkable for industry; when not laboring for an in behalf of his brethren, his hand were always busy for the comfort and support of his family. Punctual to all his obligations, he was an ornament to society and without wavering, an Old School Baptist. He moved from Iowa to Washington county, Arkansas, about a year before his decease, and united with the Vine Grove church. He was resigned to the will of his God and Savior, bore his sufferings with resignation, desiring to depart and be with Christ, which is far better. May God in mercy sustain and comfort his bereaved widow and the many sorrowing friends. Yours in love, Elmore G. Terry. Winterset, Madison Co., April 5, 1869."
Sources
  • Hunt, John Eddy. The Pound and Kester Families. Chicago: Regan Printing House, 1904.
  • Cen 1820: 7 Aug 1820 Census, Vigo County, Indiana
  • Marr 1827: 17 Aug 1827, Montgomery County, Indiana
  • Cen 1830: 1830 Census, Montgomery County, Indiana
  • Cen 1850: 19 Aug 1850 Census, Polk County, Iowa
  • Cen 1852: 1852 Iowa Census, Camp Township, Polk County, Iowa
  • Cen 1854: 1854 Iowa Census, Camp Township, Polk County, Iowa
  • Cen 1860: 30 Aug 1860 Census, Saint Charles Post Office, South Township, Madison County, Iowa

William KESTER (1811-1860)

125119. William (B.) Kester was born on April 6, 1811, probably in Preble County, Ohio. He was apparently named for his paternal grandfather. After his father died right about when he turned 3 years old, his family moved west to Vigo County, Indiana. He married Sarah Ann Mosier in Fountain County, Indiana, north of Vigo County, on July 1, 1830.[Hunt 384-385]

125119A. Emeline Kester 22 Nov 1832 --  -- 
125119B. Amanda Kester 14 Sep 1834 --  -- 
125119C. Francis Marion Kester (Sr.) 14 Nov 1836 19 Jun 1894 (57)
125119D. Ephraim B. Kester 20 Mar 1838 17 Aug 1931 (93)
125119E. Martha A. Kester 9 Mar 1840 --  -- 
125119F. Andrew M. Kester 20 Feb 1842 15 Mar 1843 (1)
125119G. Eliza Jane Kester 11 Nov 1845 --  -- 
125119H. Mary Ellen Kester 4 Jul 1849 --  -- 
125119I. Jesse F. Kester 19 Oct 1852 Sep 1901 (48)
125119J. John Kester 4 Jul 1854 --  -- 

The Kesters likely started their family in Rainsville, Warren County, Indiana, north of Fountain County, by 1832. They then moved southeast to Crawfordsville, Montgomery County, Indiana, by 1834 where the next three children were born. Afterward they returned south to Vigo County where they are variously reported in Terre Haute and Prairie Creek throughout the 1840s.[Hunt 385-392]

The Kesters moved across the Illinois border into neighboring Edgar County, settling near the town of Kansas in the early 1850s.[Hunt 393-394]

William Kester died on February 27, 1860, in Moultrie County, Illinois, following 4 days of hemorrhaging of the lungs.[Cen 1860] He was 48 years old and is buried at Lynn Creek Cemetery, in Moultrie County, west of Mattoon.[Hunt 384-385] He had been living in Township 14 North, Range 4 East (believed to be in Bethany Township).[Cen 1860]

Four months after William's death, Sarah lived southeast in Township 12 North, Range 6 East (believed to be in Whitley Township), Moultrie County.[Cen 1860]

Sarah Ann (Mosier) Kester died 6 years later on January 10, 1866, in Mattoon, Coles County, Illinois. She was 55 years old.

Sources
  • Hunt, John Eddy. The Pound and Kester Families. Chicago: Regan Printing House, 1904.
  • Cen 1820: 7 Aug 1820 Census, Vigo County, Indiana
  • Cen 1860: 1860 Census Mortality Schedules, Township 14, Range 4 East (Bethany Township), Moultrie County, Illinois
  • Cen 1860: 25 Jul 1860 Census, Sullivan Post Office, Township 12, Range 6 East (Whitley Township), Moultrie County, Illinois