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SIKORSKI Family History, Part I

December 2009
Surname
The surname "Sikorski" is a Polish and Jewish name for a small, dark person. It is derived from the Polish "sikora," a titmouse or coal mouse.

Our Sikorski family begins with Frank Sikorski1 and his wife Amelia "Emily" Skrocka1 in Poland, variously referred to as Russian- or Austria-Hungarian-occupied Poland (references that vary over time as Poland suffered successive occupations). Russia occupied the cental and eastern portions of Poland and Austria-Hungary occupied the southern region of Poland known as Galicia. The remaining western and northern regions were occupied by Prussia and its succeeding German Empire.

Saint Agnes
The Sikorskis were affiliated with the Saint Agnes Catholic and Holy Family parishes in Ashland. Saint Agnes dates back to 1874. Its first church building on Third Avenue East was built in 1877. Construction on the current church on Lakeshore Drive started in 1886 and continued for 10 years. In 1899, the Polish community formed the Holy Family parish that was widely attended by local Poles, Ukranians, Lithuanians, Czechs, Slovaks, and Bohemians. Several Sikorskis, including Zenon and his sister Bronislawa, are buried at Saint Agnes Cemetery. Holy Family parish later remerged with Saint Agnes parish in 1990 and eventually became today's Our Lady of the Lake Catholic Community.

Frank and Amelia's son Zenon F. Sikorski2 and at least four other children emigrated to America in 1890 or 1891 and later married Aleksandra Sikorska2, allegedly a relative of the same surname. After arrival in the early 1890s, the Sikorskis are first believed to have settled in northwestern Wisconsin at Ashland on the shore of Lake Superior before 1900. Not long after they continued northwest into Minnesota in the region of the Mesabi Iron Range, the chief deposit of iron ore in the United States. By 1920 they returned to Wisconsin and resettled in Milwaukee.

Family heritage states that the famed General Władysław Sikorski, who distinguished himself in repelling a Russian invasion of Warsaw in 1920, formed the Polish government-in-exile in Paris, served as its premier, and died in a mysterious plane crash in 1943, was an uncle. Kopaszyna Coat of ArmsThis would indicate that either Zenon or Aleksandra was his sibling; however, claim to such a direct relationship is highly doubtful. Władysław is only known to have one brother and two sisters. Both Władysław's father and grandfather died before Frank Sikorski was born. His elder brother had at least two sons who emigrated to Brazil. Through the general's ancestors, the Sikorski family claims the coat of arms of Kopaszyna, a clan of 15 szlachta (noble) families that trace back to the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth (1569-1795).

Surname Gender
Note that per Polish naming conventions, females frequently take the feminine "-ska" suffix rather than the masculine "-ski" suffix. As such, when in doubt, maiden names that were used back in Poland are here listed with the female suffix. Ladies born in the U.S. will follow the American practice of simply taking the father's surname without changing the suffix unless I see the female suffix used in records.

Polish Origins

So far we have not been able to pinpoint our origin in Poland to any area more specific than "Russian-occupied Poland" or "Austria-Hungary-occupied Poland." All but one reflection point to the Russian-controlled regions but the 1900 census records that John Sikorski and his sister Blanche (Sikorska) Kaminska were from "Austria-Hungary-occupied Poland." This leads me to focus on an area where Austrian-Hungarian rule may have changed hands to Russian during their lifetime. Furthermore, the family history that claimed familial ties to General Sikorski, who was born in Austria-Hungarian Galicia, further spurred interest in such a region. From that process a brief history of Polish territory is presented:

Other SIKORSKI Families of Minnesota & Wisconsin

Lines that may show promise are the Sikorskis of Ashland, Ashland County, Wisconsin. Although we still have not found any direct or suspected ties to these two families, both Zenon Sikorski and his sister Blanche (Sikorska) Kaminska were buried in Ashland in 1934 and 1940, respectively.

In researching early Sikorski families in Minnesota, the following families are found; however, these families generally refer to their homeland as the German- or Prussian-occupied Poland and likely are much more distant in relation:

• Two Harbors, northeast Minnesota on the shore of Lake Superior, northeast of Duluth: • Winona, southeastern border of Minnesota with Wisconsin:

Frank SIKORSKI1

1. Frank Sikorski1 and Amelia "Emily" SKROCKA were both born in Poland. It is not known whether they immigrated to America or not, but they had at least five children who did, perhaps more:

11. John Sikorski Oct 1858 --  -- 
1x. Wital Sikorski (1865) --  -- 
12. Ed Sikorski 20 Oct 1867 5 Apr 1903 (37)
1x. Joseph Sikorski/Secord 19 Mar 1869 7 Jul 1955 (86)
13. Bronisława "Blanche" Sikorska 21 Jul 1869 25 Jul 1940 (71)
1x. Adam Sikorski Nov 1869 --  -- 
1x. Adam Sikorski 1871 --  -- 
14. Benjamin Sikorski 4 Nov 1872 --  -- 
15. Zenon F. Sikorski2 1 Nov 1873 16 Mar 1934 (60)

16. Aleksandra Sikorska2 (1885) 10 Jan 1910 (24)

John SIKORSKI (1858-)

11. John Sikorski was born in October 1858, either in Austro-Hungarian-occupied[Cen 1900] or Russian-occupied[Cen 1905,1910] Poland. He immigrated to America in 1890[Cen 1900,1910] and is first recorded in the 1900 census living as a boarder with Michael and Bronislawa (Sikorska) Kaminski, his sister's family, in Hibbing, Saint Louis County, Minnesota. At the time, John was working as an iron miner.[Cen 1900]

John continued to live in Hibbing with the Kaminskis in 1905 and was joined sometime prior by brothers Ben and Zenon.[Cen 1905]

About 1910, he moved in with Zenon and Ben, and Zenon's infant daughter "Bessie" (Blanche) at 226 Hickory Street in Virginia, Saint Louis County, Minnesota, where he was recorded as a brother. John was working as a laborer at the time.[Cen 1910]

Sources
  • Cen 1900: 15 Jun 1900 Census, Second Avenue, Hibbing Village, Stuntz Township, Saint Louis County, Minnesota
  • Cen 1905: 5 Jun 1905 Census, 225 Pine Street, Hibbing Village, Stuntz Township, Saint Louis County, Minnesota
  • Cen 1910: 18 Apr 1910 Census, 226 Hickory Street, Virginia, Saint Louis County, Minnesota

Wital SIKORSKI

1x. Wital Sikorski, a possible brother of Zenon Sikorski, was born in the early 1860s in Poland. He immigrated in 1885 and married Frances Paskewich, also a Polish immigrant who arrived in 1900. She was several years his senior and had at least four children, of whom only one survived to 1910.[Cen 1910]

Discrepancies

There is a small discrepancy in the Sikorski's address between the 1920 census (1009 Front Street East) and Frances' death certificate (1019 East Front Street).

Spelling of Wital's name also varies. In 1905 and 1920 it is recorded as "Wital", in 1910 as "Vetal", and on Frances' death certificate as "Vitala". These variations suggest his name may have been rendered in Polish as "Witołd", which is pronounced more along the lines of "Vitowd".

The Sikorskis resided at 1315 Front Street East in Ashland, Ashland County, Wisconsin, by 1910[Cen 1910], and then moved three blocks west to 1009 Front Street East by 1920[Cen 1920].

Frances (Paskewich) Sikorski fell ill with carcinoma of the uterus in 1922 and underwent surgery on February 4. She died nine months later at her residence at 1019 East Front Street in Ashland on November 25, 1922. She was 67 years old. Frances was buried at Saint Agnes Cemetery in Ashland on November 27.[Dth 1922]

Sources
  • Cen 1905: 1 Jun 1905 Census, Ashland, Ashland County, Wisconsin
  • Cen 1910: 19 Apr 1910 Census, 1315 Front Street East, Ashland, Ashland County, Wisconsin
  • Cen 1920: 9 Jan 1920 Census, 1009 Front Street East, Ashland, Ashland County, Wisconsin
  • Dth 1922: Death Record 172, Ashland, Ashland County, Wisconsin, filed 28 Nov 1922

Ed SIKORSKI (1867-1903)

12. Ed Sikorski was born on October 20, 1867, in Poland. He likely immigrated around 1890 with his siblings and settled near Ashland, Ashland County, Wisconsin.

Ed SIKORSKI (1867-1903) Ed Sikorski died on April 5, 1903, at the age of 37, and was buried at Saint Agnes Cemetery in Ashland.

Zenon's Brother?
Ed's relationship is based on the colocation of his grave with siblings Zenon and Bronislawa. He was buried on the north side of the potter's field at Saint Agnes in 1903 and joined two years later by Mary Kaminski, Bronislawa's daughter. In 1910, Zenon's wife Aleksandra was buried there as well, as was Zenon, Bronislawa, and her husband Michael Kaminski.

Bronsława (SIKORSKA) KAMINSKA (1869-1940)

13. Bronisława "Blanche" Sikorska was born on July 21, 1869,* in Austro-Hungarian-occupied[Cen 1900] or Russian-occupied Poland[Cen 1905,1910]. She immigrated to America in around 1890 to 1892* and married Michael "Matt" Kaminski/Kominski, either right before their departure or soon after arrival from Poland. They had at least three children, two of whom died in childhood[Cen 1900]:

13x. Kaminski (1894-1900) (<1900) (<6)
13x. Mary Kaminska 5 Apr 1896 4 Nov 1905 (9)
133. Rudolph W. Kominski 29 May 1902 4 Aug 1969 (67)
Name and Birth Year

Blanche's death certificate and headstone record her birth date as July 21, 1869, but censuses generally indicate that she was born a few years earlier in the range of 1863-1867. Closer inspection of the various recorded ages suggests she was born closer to 1866.

The variation in Blanche's names are interesting. In the 1910 census she is recorded as "Bernice," an Anglicized form of "Bronislawa," a name which reappears in 1936 on niece Blanche Sikorski's reentry documentation to the United States from Poland as well as the 1900 census spelled as "Bronaslava." The 1920 and 1930 censuses, her own death certificate[Dth], along with son Rudolph's death certificate all record her name as "Blanche."

Immigration, 1890
A "Frau Bronislawa Sikorska," age 24, from Łomża, Russia (now in northeastern Poland), departed Hamburg, Germany on September 29, 1890 aboard the British Queen bound for Hartlepool, England and onward to America. Two weeks later, a "Bronish Sikorska" arrived in New York City on October 13, 1890 aboard the City of Rome.


Michael and "Bronaslava" (sic) are first recorded in the 1900 census residing on Second Avenue in Hibbing, Saint Louis County, Minnesota, with their first daughter Mary and four Polish immigrant boarders who were working as iron miners. Among these boarders was John Sikorski, who immigrated in 1890 and is later identified as a brother[Cen 1910]. All were noted as having been born in "PolandAus," a likely reference to Galicia, a Polish region under occupation by the Austro-Hungarian Empire.[Cen 1900]

Hibbing
The mining town of Hibbing, later referred to as "North Hibbing," was laid down in 1893. The Oliver Mining Company negotiated a wholesale move of the town two miles south to make way for what would become the world's largest iron mine. The first large phase of moving about 200 buildings to the new site began in 1919 and was completed in 1921. For years after more of the structures were moved south, the last in 1968.

By 1905, Blanche's brothers Ben and Zenon joined the Kaminski family, along with brother John in Hibbing. Mike worked as a merchant.[Cen 1905]

Later in that year, tragedy struck with the death of their 9-year old daughter, Mary, on November 4, 1905 in Ashland County, Wisconsin. She was buried at Saint Agnes Cemetery in Ashland next to her likely uncle, Ed Sikorski.

Michael and Blanche were both naturalized in 1908[Cen 1920] and thereafter were enumerated in Bovey Village, Itasca County, Minnesota, in the 1910 census, where Michael was noted as a proprietor of a saloon.[Cen 1910]

By the 1920 census, the Kaminskis moved just up the road to 119 Wisconsin Avenue in Gilbert near Grand Rapids, where Michael worked at a school and Blanche's brother Zenon, a widower, was living with them as a boarder.[Cen 1920]

Come the 1930 census they had removed to 641 Fifth Avenue in Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin, where Michael worked as a grinder in an iron factory and brother Zenon worked as a flagman on the railroad.[Cen 1930]

Per niece Blanche Sikorski's reentry documentation to the United States from Poland in 1936, Blanche (noted as "Aunt Bronislawa Kaminska") lived at 1661 South 10 Street, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, that year.

Blanche and Michael KAMINSKI Bronislawa "Blanche" (Sikorska) Kaminski died four days after her birthday on July 25, 1940, in Milwaukee, having suffered from chronic myocarditis and heat prostration. She had been residing at 803 West Mitchell Street. Blanche was buried on July 27 at Saint Agnes Cemetery in Ashland, Ashland County, Wisconsin, as was Mike and her brother Zenon. She was at least 71 years old.

Michael Kaminski died two months later on October 9, 1940. He was in his early 70s and is buried with his wife and daughter at Saint Agnes Cemetery in Ashland.

Census Ages and Birth Years

Records on Michael and Blanche's birth, marriage, and immigration years:

  • 1900: both age 36 (1863); Michael immigrated in 1891, "Bronislava" in 1892; married 6 years (~1894)
  • 1905: Mike, age 45 (~1859/1860) and Mary, age 44, (~1860/1861)
  • 1910: both age 43 (~1866/1867), married for 18 years (~1891/1892), and both immigrated in 1892
  • 1920: Michael, age 50 (~1868/1869), and Blanche, age 48 (~1870/1871); Michael immigrated in 1890 and Blanche in 1894
  • 1930: Michael, age 68 (~1861/1862), and Blanche, age 65 (~1864/1865); Michael married at age 20 (Michael) and Blanche at age 17, i.e. ~1882; Michael immigrated in 1890 and Blanche in 1891
  • 1940: Blanche born on 21 Jul 1869 and Michael ("Matt&quot) age 72 (1867-1868) as surviving spouse; in U.S. for 46 years (1893-1894)
Sources
  • Cen 1900: 15 Jun 1900 Census, Second Avenue, Hibbing Village, Stuntz Township, Saint Louis County, Minnesota
  • Cen 1905: 5 Jun 1905 Census, 225 Pine Street, Hibbing Village, Stuntz Township, Saint Louis County, Minnesota
  • Cen 1910: 26 Apr 1910 Census, Bovey Village, Itasca County, Minnesota
  • Cen 1920: 12 Jan 1920 Census, (119 Wisconsin Avenue), Gilbert, St. Louis County, Minnesota
  • Cen 1930: 9 Apr 1930 Census, 641 Fifth AvenMilwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin
  • Dth: Death Record 3231, Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin, filed 26 Jul 1940

Joseph SIKORSKI (Secord) (1869-1955)

1x. Joseph Sikorski (Secord), a possible brother of Zenon Sikorski, was born on March 19, 1869, in Russian-occupied Poland, allegedly from Suwałki in the northeast province of Podlaskie. He immigrated to the United States in 1898 or 1899 and married Mary Sokołowska in the mid-1890s. They had at least 13 children, but four died before 1910:

1xA. Josephine Ruby Sikorski (1898) 3 Jan 1983 (84)
1xB. Benjamin Sikorski/Secord 27 Aug 1900 4 Mar 1960 (59)
1xx. John "Yosh" R. Sikorski/Secord 30 Aug 1902 20 Oct 1983 (81)
1xx. Stanley Sikorski (1904) --  -- 
1xK. Richard Anthony Sikorski 1906 1942 (36)
1xL. Leo Sikorski (1908) --  -- 
1xM. Lucy Sikorski (1909) --  -- 

The Sikorskis settled at 1310 St. Claire Street East in Ashland, Ashland County, Wisconsin by 1910 and remained there up through Joseph's death in 1955.[Cen 1910,1920,Dth] Three Sikorski men, two named Adam and one named Ben, lived at 1314 ten years prior, suggesting that they were close kin.

Joseph worked as a wood piler at a pulp mill[Cen 1910] and a laborer at a railroad roundhouse[Cen 1930,Dth].

Mary (Sokołowska) Sikorski died in 1948 at the age of about 84 years and is buried at Saint Agnes Cemetery in Ashland.

Joseph Sikorski died seven years later on July 7, 1955, at about the age of 86 years. Six months earlier he had entered the Lakeside Nursing Home in Washburn, Bayfield County, Wisconsin, across the Chequamegon Bay to the north. He suffered a cerebral thrombosis (blood clot in the brain) two days before his death. Joseph was buried at Saint Agnes Cemetery in Ashland on July 11.

Secord

At least two of Joseph and Mary's sons Anglecized their names to "Secord" by as early as 1930[Cen 1930] . In fact, Joseph's daughter-in-law "Mrs. Ben Secord" (Edna) gave her name as such as the informant on Joseph's death certificate while listing Joseph as a Sikorski.[Dth]

Descendants also confirm the change in spelling to the surname Secord and add that they believe Joseph to have come from Suwałki (pronounced "su-VAW-ki") in the northeast corner of modern-day Poland near the Lithuanian border. Joseph's wife Mary Sokołowska and half-brother Frank Kwiatowski both trace back to Wiatrołuża, about 8 miles northeast of the town of Suwałki.

Joseph is known to have at least two half-siblings: Stella (Kwiatowski) Milanowski (b. ~1887) and Frank KWIATKOWSKI (1888-1974), indicating that his father died and his mother remarried prior to 1887.

Sources
  • Cen 1910: 18 Apr 1910 Census, 1310 St. Claire Street East, Ashland, Ashland County, Wisconsin
  • Cen 1920: 8 Jan 1920 Census, 1310 St. Claire Street (East), Ashland, Ashland County, Wisconsin
  • Cen 1930: 21 Apr 1930 Census, 1310 St. Claire Street (East), Ashland, Ashland County, Wisconsin
  • Dth 1955: Death Record 724, Washburn, Bayfield County, Wisconsin, filed 11 Jul 1955

Adam SIKORSKI

1x. Two likely relatives, both named Adam Sikorski, were born respectively in November 1869 and 1871. The elder immigrated in 1890 and the younger in 1893, and both lived together as boarders with Frank ZAK, a German saloonkeeper, the ZAK family, and a likely brother Ben at 1314 Saint Claire Street in Ashland, Ashland County, Wisconsin, on the shore of Lake Superior's Chequamegon Bay, in 1900. All three worked as general laborers and were pending naturalization.[Cen 1900]

Sources
  • Cen 1900: 12 Jun 1900 Census, 1314 St. Claire Street, Ashland, Ashland County, Wisconsin

Benjamin SIKORSKI (1872-)

14. Benjamin "Ben" Sikorski was born in Poland on November 4, 1872,[WWI] and immigrated to the United States in 1890 or 1891. He is first found at 1314 Saint Claire Street in Ashland, Ashland County, Wisconsin, in 1900, along the shore of Lake Superior's Chequamegon Bay. There he lived as a boarder with Frank Zak, a German saloonkeeper, the Zak family, and two of Ben's likely relatives, both named Adam Sikorski, ages 30 and 29.[Cen 1900]

Saint Claire Street
By 1910, the residence at 1314 Saint Claire Street was occupied by the Bert and Stella (KWIATKOWSKI) MILANOWSKI family and Stella's brother Frank KWIATKOWSKI. The KWIATKOWSKIs are said to be half-siblings of Joseph Sikorski/Secord, who lived two doors over at 1310 Saint Claire Street.

By 1905, Ben moved into Minnesota with his sister Blanche Kaminski, her family, and brothers John and Zenon at Hibbing, Saint Louis County. He was noted working as a laborer.[1905]

About 1910, Ben moved in with his younger brother Zenon, Zenon's infant daughter, and elder brother John at 226 Hickory Street in Virginia, Saint Louis County, Minnesota. At the time he worked as a bartender with brother Zenon at a saloon on 118 Chestnut Street.[Cen 1910, Dir 1910]

222 Third Street North By 1915, Ben's brother Zenon moved to Superior, Wisconsin, and Ben had resettled at 222 Oak Street in Virginia (now believed to be 3rd Street North, pictured right). Ben worked as a miner.[Dir 1915]

At the time World War I broke out, Ben worked at an ore mine in nearby Gilbert, Saint Louis County, Minnesota, according to his draft registration, and listed brother "Zeno Sikorski" of Gilbert as his nearest relative.[WWI]

Sources
  • Cen 1900: 12 Jun 1900 Census, 1314 Saint Claire Street, Ashland, Ashland County, Wisconsin
  • Cen 1905: 5 Jun 1905 Census, 225 Pine Street, Hibbing, Stuntz Township, Saint Louis County, Minnesota
  • Cen 1910: 18 Apr 1910 Census, 226 Hickory Street, Virginia, Saint Louis County, Minnesota
  • Dir 1910: 1910 City Directory, 118 Chestnut Street, Virginia, Saint Louis County, Minnesota
  • Dir 1915: 1915 City Directory, 222 Oak Street, Virginia, Saint Louis County, Minnesota
  • WWI: World War I Draft Registration, Saint Louis County, Minnesota

Zenon F. SIKORSKI2 (1873-1934)

Zenon F. SIKORSKI 15. Zenon F. Sikorski2 was born in Russian-occupied Poland on November 1, 1873. He married Aleksandra Sikorska2 about 1907. She died six months after giving birth to their only daughter:

151. Blanche M. Sikorski3 25 Jun 1909 25 Dec 1980 (71)

Zenon and Aleksandra SIKORSKI Per an interview with Zenon's son-in-law Casimer, Zenon grew up in Warsaw.

Census records show that he immigrated to the United States between 1888 and 1891 and was naturalized in 1906[Cen 1920]. He is first found in 1905 living with his sister Blanche Kaminski, her family, and brothers John and Ben in Hibbing, Saint Louis County, Minnesota. Zenon worked as a saloon keeper.[Cen 1905].

Hibbing
The mining town of Hibbing, later referred to as "North Hibbing," was laid down in 1893. The Oliver Mining Company negotiated a wholesale move of the town two miles south to make way for what would become the world's largest iron mine. The first large phase of moving about 200 buildings to the new site began in 1919 and was completed in 1921. For years after more of the structures were moved south, the last in 1968.

After Zenon and Aleksandra wed about 1907, they lived at 226 Hickory Street in Virginia, St. Louis County, Minnesota (now believed to be 8th Street South, pictured right), at the time of their daughter's birth in 1909. He is listed on Blanche's birth certificate as being a saloon keeper.

226 Eighth Street South Aleksandra died of typhoid fever in the new year on January 10, 1910, just six months after giving birth to their first and only child. Left as a widower with an infant daughter, family tradition says that Zenon left his daughter with either two maiden sisters or sisters-in-law.

Following Aleksandra's death, Zenon's elder brothers John and Ben moved in with him and his infant daughter at 226 Hickory Street. Zenon continued to work at a saloon at 118 Chestnut Avenue, as did his brother Ben.[Cen 1910, Dir 1910]

By 1915, Zenon moved to Superior, Douglas County, Wisconsin, across the bay from Duluth.[Dir 1915]

Zenon and Alexandra SIKORSKI By 1920, Zenon was living nearby at 119 Wisconsin Avenue, Gilbert in St. Louis County, as a widower boarder with sister and brother-in-law Blanche and Mike Kaminski. Zenon was recorded as a flagman for the railroad.

Later, in 1930, Zenon appears again on the census with Mike and Blanche Kaminski, this time at 641 Fifth Avenue in Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin, and listed as a "brother-in-law".

Zenon F. Sikorski died of cancer of the larynx at 3:15 AM on March 16, 1934, at his home at 1661 South 10th Street in Milwaukee. He was 60 years old. He was reunited with his wife at Saint Agnes Cemetery in Ashland, Ashland County, Wisconsin, on March 18. He is listed on his death certificate as a laborer for the C. & N.W. (Chicago & Northwestern/C&NW) Railway Company.[Dth 1934]

Aleksandra's Parents
Curiously (or disturbingly), the names of Zenon's parents listed on his death certificate by his daughter Blanche are none other than Frank and Emily Sikorski, the same parents that Zenon listed on his wife Aleksandra's death certificate 24 years earlier.[Dth] Zenon's known sister Blanche was also recorded with parents Frank Sikorski and Emily SKROCKA on her death certificate. Either Zenon incorrectly recorded his own parents on his young wife's death certificate, or, taken at face value, Zenon and Aleksandra were brother and sister. The Sikorski family continues to throw us curve balls in our research!

Zenon's son-in-law Casimer says that Zenon owned a meat packing plant, presumably in Chicago.

Sources
  • Cen 1905: 5 Jun 1905 Census, 225 Pine Street, Hibbing, Stuntz Township, Saint Louis County, Minnesota
  • Cen 1910: 18 Apr 1910 Census, 226 Hickory Street, Virginia, Saint Louis County, Minnesota
  • Dir 1910: 1910 City Directory, 118 Chestnut Street, Virginia, Saint Louis County, Minnesota
  • Dir 1915: 1915 City Directory, Virginia, Saint Louis County, Minnesota
  • Cen 1920: 12 Jan 1920 Census, (119 Wisconsin Avenue), Gilbert, St. Louis County, Minnesota
  • Cen 1930: 9 Apr 1930 Census, 641 Fifth Avenue, Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin
  • Dth 1934: Death Record 1101, Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin, filed 17 Mar 1934

Aleksandra SIKORSKA2 (~1885-1910)

Aleksandra SIKORSKA 16. Aleksandra (Alexandra) ("Alice") Sikorska2 was born in Poland in about 1885. It is not known when she immigrated to America. She wed Zenon Sikorski2 (15), a likely family relation, about 1907 and started a family in Virginia, St. Louis County, Minnesota. They had one daughter before her untimely death:

151/161. Blanche M. Sikorski3 25 Jun 1909 25 Dec 1980 (71)

Zenon and Aleksandra SIKORSKI Sadly, Aleksandra fell ill with typhoid fever in December of 1909 and died two weeks later at 10:00 AM on January 10, 1910, just six months after giving birth to their daughter. The family had been living at 226 Hickory Street in Virginia at the time.

Aleksandra was buried at the Calvary Cemetery in Virginia, in a ceremony presided over by Rev. M. Sengir and four months later moved and reburied at Saint Agnes Cemetery in Ashland, Ashland County, Wisconsin, on April 8. She and her husband share a headstone.

Zenon and Alexandra SIKORSKI

After Aleksandra's death, Zenon moved in with his sister Blanche. Their daughter Blanche was said to have been raised by two maiden aunts.


Virginia Calvary Cemetery
The Virginia Calvary Cemetery records hold that "Flaksandra" was buried in Lot 23, Block 4, which is now occupied by the Kostal family beginning in 1920. There is no record of removal but the Saint Agnes Cemetery in Ashland shows that "Alex" was buried there on April 8.

Aleksandra's Parents
Curiously (or disturbingly), the names of Zenon's parents listed on his death certificate by his daughter Blanche are none other than Frank and Emily Sikorski, the same parents that Zenon listed on his wife Aleksandra's death certificate 24 years earlier.[Dth] Zenon's known sister Blanche was also recorded with parents Frank Sikorski and Emily Skrocka on her death certificate. Either Zenon incorrectly recorded his own parents on his young wife's death certificate, or, taken at face value, Zenon and Aleksandra were brother and sister. The Sikorski family continues to throw us curve balls in our research!