Troy's Genealogue

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Family Histories:

WARGIN Family History,Part II

August 2012

Melania "Millie" (WARGIN) KRAWIECKI (1888-1964)

11A. Melania "Millie" L(ouise) Wargin was born in December 1888 in German-occupied Poland. She immigrated through Ellis Island, New York with her parents as a toddler in 1890. They settled in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. She married Edward Frank Krawiecki (Sr.) about 1918[Cen 1930] and had two children:

11A1. Bernardine Dorothy Krawiecki 2 Jun 1924 1 Aug 1987 (63)
11A2. Edward Krawiecki, Jr.    
Marriage Ages
The 1930 census shows that Millie was married at age 35 and Ed at age 36, but Ed was about 7 years older than Millie. Because they were married before 1920[Cen 1920], I estimate that they were married about 1918, when Ed was age 36 and Millie was about 29.[Cen 1930]

After their marriage, the Krawieckis lived just up the street from Millie's parents at 903 First Avenue in Milwaukee (now numbered and named as 2179 South 6th Street). There Ed worked as a grocer. By 1930 they moved to 599 Fourth Avenue (now believed to be the corner of South 9th Street and West Lapham Boulevard, a block north of St. Anthony Church) where Ed continued to work as a grocer.

Millie and Edward KRAWIECKI Edward Frank Krawiecki died on November 10, 1953, at the age of 72. He is buried at Saint Adalbert's Cemetery in Milwaukee.

Melania "Millie" (Wargin) Krawiecki died 11 years later on October 5, 1964. She was 75 years old and is buried with Edward at Saint Adalbert's Cemetery.

Sources
  • Cen 1900: 5 Jun 1900 Census, 819 First Avenue, Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin
  • Cen 1905: 1 Jun 1905 Wisconsin State Census, Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin
  • Cen 1910: 27 Apr 1910 Census, 911 First Avenue, Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin
  • Cen 1920: 13 Jan 1920 Census, 903 First Avenue, Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin
  • Cen 1930: 10 Apr 1930 Census, 599 Fourth Avenue, Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin

Helena (WARGIN) KEMPINSKI (1890-1941)

11B. Helena Wargin was born December 31, 1890, in Milwaukee County, Wisconsin, soon after her parents immigration from Poland. She married Franciszek "Frank" Kempiński, a widower and native of Wielkopolskie (Posen), German-occupied Poland, about 1923 and had one daughter. Frank had previously been married to Martha (Pepluiska) and had three children before her death in 1922.

- Henry Kempinski 23 Jul 1907 1 May 1970 (62)
- Helen Kempinski (Mar-Apr) 1910 --  -- 
- Harry Sylvester Kempinski 23 Oct 1912 1 Jun 1951 (38)

11B1. Eugenia Kempinski 9 Nov 1923 29 Mar 1987 (63)

KEMPINSKI residence Frank and Martha lived at 1062 5th Avenue by 1910[Cen 1910B] and later at 1336 8th Avenue by as early as 1917 where Frank established himself as a contract house carpenter.[Cen 1920B]

Helen was 32 years old when she married Frank, who was about 40 years old, in 1923. They lived at the corner of South 13th Street and Dakota Street (then likely numbered 606 Dakota Street). Frank's widowed mother, Franciszka "Frances" (Czerniachowska) Kempińska, immigrated from Poland in October 1929 to live with them. At about the same time, eldest son Henry married and lived nearby at 612 Dakota Street. Henry was also a carpenter.[Cen 1930]

KEMPINSKI PlotHelen (Wargin) Kempinski died on August 1, 1941, at the age of 50 years old. She and Frank had been married about 18 years. Helen was buried along side Frank's first wife Martha at Saint Adalbert's Cemetery in Milwaukee.

Frank Kempinski died 15 years later in 1956 at about the age of 73. He is also buried with Helen, Martha, two sons, and his mother at Saint Adalbert's Cemetery.


Sources
  • Cen 1900: 5 Jun 1900 Census, 819 First Avenue, Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin
  • Cen 1905: 1 Jun 1905 Wisconsin State Census, Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin
  • Cen 1910: 27 Apr 1910 Census, 911 First Avenue, Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin
  • Cen 1910B: 19-20 Apr 1910 Census, 1062 Fifth Avenue, Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin
  • Cen 1920: 15 Jan 1920 Census, 911 First Avenue, Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin
  • Cen 1920B: 12 Jan 1920 Census, 1336 Eighth Avenue, Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin
  • Cen 1930: 5 Apr 1930 Census, 606 Dakota Street, Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin

Anastasia "Nettie" (WARGIN) CZERNIAK (1892-1935)

11C. Anastasia "Nettie" Wargin was born in December 1892 in Wisconsin. She married Stephen Czerniak, a Polish immigrant, about 1924.

Anastasia (WARGIN) CZERNIAK Anastasia "Nettie" (Wargin) Czerniak died on August 10, 1935, at the young age of 42. They apparently did not have any children.

Stephen Czerniak died 42 years later on December 9, 1977, in Wisconsin.

Sources
  • Cen 1900: 5 Jun 1900 Census, 819 First Avenue, Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin
  • Cen 1905: 1 Jun 1905 Wisconsin State Census, Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin
  • Cen 1910: 27 Apr 1910 Census, 911 First Avenue, Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin
  • Cen 1920: 15 Jan 1920 Census, 911 First Avenue, Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin
  • Cen 1930: 4 Apr 1930 Census, 1000 American Avenue, Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin

Mary WARGIN (1897-1971)

11E. Mary "Marie" Wargin was born on June 10, 1897, in Milwaukee County, Wisconsin. She was a registered psychiatric nurse who never married. She lived with her parents through at least the 1930 census at 911 First Avenue (now numbered as 2201 South 6th Street) where she worked as a tailoress.

Mary WARGIN residence After her father died in 1931, Mary's mother lived with her off West Lincoln Avenue at 2228 South 18th Street. She continued to work as a tailoress, earning $400 in 1939.[Cen 1940]

Later, presumably after her mother died in 1943, Mary and a roommate lived at 711 West Lincoln Avenue (pictured to the left), across the street from Kościuzsko Park and a block west of the Basilica of St. Josaphat.

Mary WARGIN Mary Wargin died on August 16, 1971, in Milwaukee County. She was 74 years old.

Mary left a sizable inheritance to her nephew John and niece Nancy.

Sources
  • Cen 1900: 5 Jun 1900 Census, 819 First Avenue, Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin
  • Cen 1905: 1 Jun 1905 Wisconsin State Census, Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin
  • Cen 1910: 27 Apr 1910 Census, 911 First Avenue, Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin
  • Cen 1920: 15 Jan 1920 Census, 911 First Avenue, Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin
  • Cen 1930: 8 Apr 1930 Census, 911 First Avenue, Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin
  • Cen 1940: 18 Apr 1940 Census, 2228 South 18th Street, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin

Roman A. WARGIN (1899-1929)

11F. Roman A. Wargin was born on August 4, 1899, in Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin. He is believed to have served as a sergeant in the Army during World War I. Roman later married Lena "Lee" M. Pauley (Paveletz), a native of St. Louis, Missouri and of Bohemian extraction, about 1920. They had one son:

11F1. Lawrence "Lars" R(oman) WarginBlue Star 12 Jan 1922 Jul 1967 (45)

The Wargins moved to Washington, D.C. by 1922, where their son was born[Cen 1930]. They later returned to Milwaukee by 1926.

The Wargins traveled to Europe at least twice in the late 1920s, once returning via Le Havre, France, in 1926, and again the following year, returning via Copenhagen, Denmark, in 1927. They listed their residences as 763 Illinois Avenue in Milwaukee (1926) and 535 Mitchell Street, about four blocks north of Roman's parents (1927).[Imm 1926, 1927] Later they again resided at 763 Illinois Avenue (1929).[Dth]

In 1929, Roman and his steamship ticket agency became embroiled in a scandal under allegations of assisting aliens to enter the United States illegally and thereafter not following through on numerous incomplete travel arrangements that left immigrants stranded back home and even part way en route. Reporting from The Sheboygan Press and other greater Milwaukee newspapers covered the story of Roman A. Wargin, a former editor of the Milwaukee Polish language newspaper, Nowiny-Polskie, who was part owner in the "Wargin and Wargin Steamship Agency" (the other Wargin partner has not been identified yet). In April 1929, Roman pleaded not guilty to the charge of assisting aliens to enter the United States illegally. The case went to trial in December and on the eve of the trial, December 11, Roman committed suicide by gassing himself to death, citing betrayal by his friends.[Press]

Complaints lodged against Roman's company claimed that "hundreds of" (later revised to about 250) laborers and immigrants, mostly Polish, were out $100 to $500 each, to an initially reported aggregate amount of over $100,000, that had been entrusted to Roman to purchase tickets for relatives who wished to immigrate to American and reunite their families. Others had given him money to arrange for care packages to be sent home. One notable complaint reported a 13-year old girl had been stranded in Montevideo, Uruguay, because Roman had failed to purchase the ticket for the final leg of the journey. Prospective immigrants faced years of delay as their immigration permits expired.[Press]

Following Roman A. Wargin's untimely death on December 11, 1929, he was buried at the Valhalla Cemetery in Saint Louis County, Missouri, on December 15.[Dth]

Lee and Lawrence moved in with Lee's sister's family, Oscar and May Winter, in Maplewood, St. Louis County, Missouri.[Cen 1930] The following January, Lee received $17,000 in insurance money that claimants called to be seized and used to repay their claims, but the assistant district attorney noted that Roman's widow had no legal obligation to pay. Later in March, the Appleton Post Crescent reported that the aggregate amount of the claims was a little over $10,000 (not $100,000) and that a $10,000 bond on the company would cover all claims in full.[Press]

Lee went on to remarry to George Herbert Goetting before 1942, when they lived at 109 Beverly Road in Rockville, Montgomery County, Maryland[Draft]. After the war, they lived a few miles to the southeat at 8720 Colesville Road in Silver Spring by 1947. They eventually moved to Sarasota County, Florida.

Both Lena "Lee" (Pauley Wargin) Goetting and George Herbert Goetting died in Sarasota County in May 1966. They were both 79 years old.

Sources
  • Cen 1900: 5 Jun 1900 Census, 819 First Avenue, Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin
  • Cen 1905: 1 Jun 1905 Wisconsin State Census, Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin
  • Cen 1910: 27 Apr 1910 Census, 911 First Avenue, Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin
  • Imm 1926: 5 Jul 1926, arriving New York, New York aboard the De Grasse from Le Havre, France
  • Imm 1927: 17 Oct 1927, arriving New York, New York aboard the Frederik VIII from Copenhagen, Denmark
  • Dth 1929: Death Record 6074, Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin, filed 13 Dec 1929
  • Press: Apr 1929 to Jan 1930, The Sheboygan Press, Sheboygan, Sheboygan County, Wisconsin
  • Cen 1930: 9 Apr 1930 Census, 7355 Big Bend, Maple Wood, Saint Louis County, Missouri
  • Draft: 26 Apr 1942, World War II Draft Registration, Rockville, Montgomery County, Maryland

Bernard "Bernie" A. WARGIN (1901-1973)

11G. Bernard "Bernie" A. Wargin was born in Wisconsin on August 13, 1901. He was expected by his family to enter the priesthood but married Helen A. Rademacher on July 4th, 1936, and raised one son:

11G1. John R. Wargin 7 Aug 1937 11 Jun 2006 (68)

Bernard and Helen WARGIN Bernie owned the Badger Paint hardware store chain in Milwaukee.

Bernard A. Wargin died November 25, 1973, at the age of 72 and was interred at Saint Adalbert's Cemetery in Milwaukee. His residence at the time was at 3329 South Lenox, Milwaukee.

Bernard's widow, Helen A. (Rademacher) Wargin died 26 years later on February 29, 2000. She was interred with Bernie at Saint Adalbert's Cemetery.

Sources
  • Cen 1905: 1 Jun 1905 Wisconsin State Census, Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin
  • Cen 1910: 27 Apr 1910 Census, 911 First Avenue, Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin
  • Cen 1920: 15 Jan 1920 Census, 911 First Avenue, Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin
  • Cen 1930: 8 Apr 1930 Census, 911 First Ave., Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin

Sylvester Thomas WARGIN (1903-1966)

Sylvester Thomas WARGIN 11H. Sylvester Thomas Wargin was born December 29, 1903, in Wisconsin. Like his brother Bernie before him, his family expected him to enter the priesthood but he married Cecilia "Ritz" Dorothy Plewa about 1926 and had one daughter:

11H1. Nancy A. Wargin      

Sylvester WARGIN residence Sylvester and Ritz first lived a block north of Sylvester's boyhood home at 851 First Avenue (now likely numbered as the 2100 block of South 6th Street), by 1930. They later moved to 2822 South 12th Street.

Sylvester also taught at Boys Technology and Trade School ("Boy's Tech"), which was later renamed Milwaukee Trade and Technical High School (1976) when girls were admitted, and more recently as the Lynde and Harry Bradley School of Technology & Trade (2002).

Sylvester Thomas Wargin died on July 2, 1966, in Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin. Sylvester and Cecilia WARGIN He was 62 years old and is buried at Saint Adalbert's Cemetery in Milwaukee.

Cecilia Dorothy (Plewa) Wargin died 29 years later on July 25, 1995, in Milwaukee, at the age of 91 years. She is buried with Sylvester at Saint Adalbert's Cemetery.

Sources
  • Cen 1905: 1 Jun 1905 Wisconsin State Census, Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin
  • Cen 1910: 27 Apr 1910 Census, 911 First Avenue, Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin
  • Cen 1920: 15 Jan 1920 Census, 911 First Avenue, Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin
  • Cen 1930: 7 Apr 1930 Census, 851 First Avenue, Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin

Casimer Stanley WARGIN3 (1907-1984)

Casimer WARGIN 11J. Casimer Stanley Wargin3 (Kazimierz Stanisław) was born in Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin, on July 21, 1907. His family expected him to enter the Catholic priesthood but he later married Blanche M. Sikorski on June 6, 1936[Mar]. They had three children:

11J1. Robert Wayne Wargin 8 Mar 1938 9 Dec 2006 (68)
11J2. Richard Wargin      
11J3. Joan Wargin4      
Casimer
The name Kazimierz (Latin: Casimir) honors great rulers of Poland of the Piast Dynasty, notably Duke Kazimierz I "the Restorer" (1016-1058) and King Kazimierz III "the Great" (1310-1370).

Casimer, and most, if not all, of his Wisconsin-born siblings were baptized in the Basilica of St. Josaphat, a Polish Roman Catholic church about half a block away from his childhood home and his father's tailor shop.

Casimer was a tailor most of his life, as was his father, and moved around quite often working for companies such as Universal Studios or on his own. He even tailored clothes for Mr. Foley of the Foley & Burk Shows circus and uniforms for World War II. Casimer also apparently worked other jobs on occasion, such as a drill press operator for the Heil Company in Milwaukee.

Casimer was nearly bald with bright white hair around the sides and a jolly attitude. He always had the same old jokes ready for any mundane situation, but his outlook was refreshing compared to that of his serious, fastidious wife, Blanche.

Prior to their wedding, Casimer had nearly joined the Catholic priesthood.

Casimer married Blanche M. Sikorski, the only daughter of Polish immigrants, on June 6, 1936. They were married by Rev. Henry Niefer in Milwaukee. Interestingly, according to their marriage certificate, Blanche resided at 2203 South 6th Street, next door to Cas' parents' home at the time of his father's death five years earlier. Based on this it would appear that Cas basically married the girl next door -- next door to his mother that is. At the time, Casimer himself was living to the east at 515 E. Lincoln Avenue. Casimer had been working as a park employee and Blanche as a social worker.[Mar 1936]

After marrying Blanche, the Wargin family bounced around the country and lived at at least 17 different addresses over the course of their 44-year marriage. First they moved to the Burbank-Glendale area of Los Angeles County, California, where Casimer got a job tailoring costumes for Universal Studios, most notably hundreds of uniforms for the railroad station scene of mass Confederate casualties in "Gone with the Wind." The Wargins lived there through at least 1938 when their first son, Bob, arrived.

Around 1940, Cas was recalled to have bounced between Corpus Christi, Texas, and Pensacola, Florida, selling uniforms to the military. He liked New Orleans, Louisiana, as a mid-way point and by April 1940 Cas, Blanche, and young Bob lived there at 1629G Bordeaux Street in Uptown. Blanche reported that Cas had only worked 20 weeks as a tailor in 1939 and earned $500 that year, which was only a fraction of what his neighbors earned. On the other hand, she also recorded that in 1940 Cas was working 60 hours a week, which was a good deal more than his neighbors.[Cen 1940]

Over the course of the following year, the family moved to that outskirts of Pensacola to 221 Corry Drive (perhaps now Old Corry Field Road) in Warrington, Escambia County, where their second son, Richard was born. There Casimer worked for Abbott Military Tailors in Pensacola.

Once again, the family moved, this time back to Milwaukee. By 1944, they lived at 4320 West Cleveland Avenue in Milwaukee where Casimer worked as a drill press operator for the Heil Company and where daughter Joan was born. Not long after this, the family pulled up stakes again and moved back to California, this time to Vallejo, in Solano County, where Casimer got a job making uniforms for the war effort at Mare Island Naval Shipyard.

Around 1948, Casimer and Blanche became Jehovah's Witnesses.

About 1955, the Wargins briefly moved to Fort Bragg, Mendocino County, California, and soon thereafter down to 729 Wright Street, Santa Rosa, Sonoma County, California, until about 1958. The Wargins then moved inland to Lodi, San Joaquin County, California, for the school year when Blanche had to undergo an hysterectomy and sought a doctor who was also a Jehovah's Witness.

At the end of the 1959 school year, the family briefly moved back to Santa Rosa, on King Street, and then off to Sebastopol (1960) and Sonoma, Sonoma County (1961). Again they returned to Santa Rosa about 1962 where daughter Joni graduated high school.

After all the children had left the house, Cas and Blanche followed Richard out to Virginia when he wed in July 1966. There they lived in first a one-bedroom apartment in Falls Church, Fairfax County, Virginia, and second in a two-bedroom apartment. Soon thereafter they moved across the Potomac River to Bethesda, Montgomery County, Maryland (1969/1970).

In March 1971, Cas and Blanche returned to Milwaukee for several years before returning once again to Santa Rosa in the mid-1970s where they lived at 948 West 9th Street.

Blanche M. (Sikorski) Wargin died on December 25, 1980, in Santa Rosa, Sonoma County, California, at the age of 71. She and Casimer had been married 44 years.

Soon after Blanche's death, Casimer sold his home in Santa Rosa and briefly returned to Virginia where he lived in a seniors' apartment in Reston, Vienna County. He then returned to Milwaukee and settled in at 3446 South Chase Avenue, near the intersection at East/West Morgan Avenue. There he remarried to La Verne B. (Gehle) Rife on May 1, 1982, a friend he had known since his youth. He left the Jehovah's Witnesses and attended Baptist services with his new bride.

Casimer WARGIN, 1907-1984 A year and a half later, again on Christmas Day, 1983, Casimer suffered a heart attack while sitting in his car in a store parking lot. He fell into a coma and died a few weeks later on January 8, 1984. He was 76 years old. Services were held at Prasser-Kleczka Funeral home at 3275 S. Howell Avenue and he was buried at the Forest Home Cemetery at 2405 W. Forest Home Avenue in Milwaukee two days later.

La Verne (Gehle Rife) Wargin succumbed to colon cancer 16 years later and died in April 1999 in Milwaukee at the age of 89. She is buried with her mother, three rows behind Casimer, at the Forest Home Cemetery in Milwaukee. Her family apparently reverted the name on her headstone to "La Verne Rife."

Sources
  • Cen 1910: 27 Apr 1910 Census, 911 First Avenue, Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin
  • Cen 1920: 15 Jan 1920 Census, 911 First Avenue, Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin
  • Cen 1930: 8 Apr 1930 Census, 911 First Avenue, Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin
  • Mar 1936: Marriage Certificate, 6 Jun 1936, Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin
  • Cen 1940: 15 Apr 1940 Census, 1629G Bordeaux Street, New Orleans, Orleans Parish, Louisiana

Jadwiga WARGIN (1911-1926)

Jadwiga WARGIN 11K. Jadwiga "Hedwig" Wargin was born with Down syndrome in 1911. She died 15 years later in 1926 and is buried at Saint Adalbert's Cemetery in Milwaukee.

Jadwiga
The name Jadwiga (German: Hedwig) likely honors Jadwiga of Hungary (1373/4-1399), who was crowned as "King" of Poland in 1384, after the deaths of her father, King Louis I of Hungary and Poland (1326-1384). She was later canonized by the Polish-born Pope John Paul II as Saint Hedwig.

Sources
  • Cen 1920: 15 Jan 1920 Census, 911 First Avenue, Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin

Anna (WARGIN) KOZLOWSKI (~1900-)

121. Anna Wargin was born about 1900 in Wisconsin, likely in Milwaukee, Milwaukee County. She married a Kozlowski and had at least two daughters:[Cen 1930]

1211. Rose Mary Kozlowski      
1212. Beatrice Kozlowski      

Anna divorced in the late 1920s.[Cen 1930]

Sources
  • Cen 1910: 15 Apr 1910 Census, 712 Lincoln Avenue, Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin
  • Cen 1920: 16 Jan 1920 Census, 712 Lincoln Avenue, Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin
  • Cen 1930: 14 Apr 1930 Census, 710 Lincoln Avenue, Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin