Oat Matzoth for Passover

Two different forms of matzoth are shown. The matzah on the left contains 80% oat flour and is quite like a crumbly Scottish oatcake in texture and flavor. The two matzoth on the right have about 63% oat flour, have higher tensile strength, are smoother in the mouth, and are easier to roll out. Both have a slightly bitter taste, very likely owing to the requirement to bake at a high temperature. Per an article in the Forward, Passover 2008, commercial oat matzoth also have a bitter flavor owing to the production method. The rip in the left matzah shows that you have to be very careful when you turn the matzoth during the baking process!

Passover is a bit problematic to celiacs, because to a certain extent, every day is Passover. Thus, there is a tendency for Passover to be rather non-special unless one is constantly eating cookies, cakes and leavened bread, because on Passover, Jews the world-over do not eat leavened products. Because of many factors, celiacs routinely tend to eat corn and rice tortillas, potatoes, rice, quinoa and rice pasta, all of which are fair game for liberal Jewish celiacs Passover or not. So the challenge is: How can Passover become special again?

On Passover, and particularly for the Seder celebration, Exodus 12:14-20 commands the eating of unleavened bread made traditionally from one of the "biblical grains" - wheat, oats, barley, rye, or spelt. So rather than celebrating the Seder with mock Matzoth or tortillas, this year I experimented with using oats. Of course, once can invest heavily in commercial oat Matzoth, but these are very expensive and have been carrying a reputation of inedibility. The home-made Matzoth, except for containing a mixture of oats, nuts and some potato starch, follow the rules for Matzoth preparation: dampen the flour, quickly knead it, roll it out and and bake, all within 18 minutes.

Is this Matzoth eatable? It's dry, but isn't all Matzoth? So far, this is the best gluten-free Matzoth yet, and it is made by hand with love and thoughtfulness - also a requirement for the ancients of the faith.

High % Oat Matzoth (Recipe can be multiplied)
Amount
Ingredient
1/4 cup Oat Flour (click here for sources)
1 Tablespoon Ground almond or other nut meal
2 Tablespoons Cool water (more or less to make a putty-like consistency)
 

Pre-heat oven to 450° F (230° C)

In a small bowl, mix oat flour, nut meal and cool water. Stir with a spoon util incorporated, knead a few times and roll dough into a ball. Flatten the ball by hand, turning it over several times on parchment paper. Use a wooden rolling pin to quickly make a flat cake, approximaely 1/16 inch (1.5 mm) thick. Dock with a fork and place the dough on a pan in the oven, without the parchment paper. Carfully turn the Matzah over once during the baking process when the bread is firm. Cook until the edges are very lightly browned. When cool, place the Matzah cake into a plastic bag.

 

Smooth Textured Oat Matzoth (Makes two cakes)
Amount
Ingredient
1/2 cup + 1 Tablespoon Oat Flour (click here for sources)
2 Tablespoons Ground almond or other nut meal
2 - 3 Tablespoons Potato starch
1/4 Cup Cool water (more or less to make a putty-like consistency)
 

Pre-heat oven to 450° F (230° C)

In a small bowl, mix oat flour, potato starch, and nut meal with half of the cool water. Add more water, stirring, until the texture of the dough is like putty. Knead a few times, divide in two, and roll each piece of dough into a ball. Flatten the ball by hand, turning it over several times on parchment paper. Use a wooden rolling pin to quickly make a flat cake, approximaely 1/16 inch (1.5 mm) thick. Dock with a fork and place the dough on a pan in the oven, without the parchment paper. Carfully turn the Matzoth over once during the baking process when the bread is firm. Cook until the edges are very lightly browned. When cool, place the Matzoth cakes into a plastic bag.