BRITISH AFFIDAVITS

Alldred
Astill
Aylott
Bartholomew
Carston
Castle
Chalkley
Chilton
Davis
Dawson

Alldred, Henry

When COMPLETED this document must be classified as SECRET.

AUSTRALIAN WAR CRIMES COMMISSION.

QUESTIONNAIRE.

NOTES:--

(a) This questionnaire should be completed by:--
(i) All repatriated Australian prisoners of war (A.I.F., R.A.A.F. and R.A.N.).
(ii) All repatriated Australian civil internees.
(iii) All repatriated British civil internees in the Pacific Area (excluding Malaya and China).
(iv) All members and ex-members of the Allied forces who have actual knowledge of war crimes committed by the enemy.

(b) It will be completed in the presence of an officer who will countersign the signature of the person making the statement.

(c) It is important that a full statement on page 3 (carried on to page 4 if necessary) be furnished as well as the answer to 8(f).

1. Army number:

1590263

2. Rank:

BOMBARDIER

3. Full name (in BLOCK letters):

ALLDRED, HENRY

4. Unit at time of capture and/or place of capture (State here unit in which soldier was serving at time of capture, e.g. 2/1 Fd. Regt. or H.Q. 6 Aust. Div., etc.):

GHROET JAVA. 69TH BTY. 21ST L.A.A. REGT. R.A.

5. Home address:

4 MAY AVENUE, LEIGH, LANES, ENGLAND

6. At what enemy camps and hospitals were you confined and when were you at each?

20.3.42 - 20.9.42 GHODOCK JAIL, JAVA
NOV. 1942 - NOV. 1943 KUMAMOTO, JAPAN
NOV. 1943 - MAR. 1944 KASHII
MAR. 1944 - 3.12.44 (NO. 1 CAMP) FUKUOKA
3.12.44 - 17.9.45 (NO. 3 CAMP) FUKUOKA

7. Do you have any information about any atrocities against, or mistreatment of, Allied soldiers, prisoners of war, civilian internees or the civilian population for which you think the perpetrators should be punished? (Answer by stating YES or NO in the spaces provided below)--

(a) Killings or executions:

NO.

(b) Rape, torture, beatings or other cruelties:

YES.

(c) Imprisonment under improper conditions:

NO.

(d) Massacres, wholesale looting, pillage, or burning of towns or villages:

NO.

(e) Use of prisoners of war or civilians on enemy military works or operations:

YES.

(f) Exposure of prisoners of war to danger of gunfire, bombing, torpedoing, or other hazards of war:

YES.

(g) Transportation of prisoners of war under improper conditions or deportation of civilians:

NO.

(h) Public exhibition or exposure to ridicule of prisoners of war:

NO.

(i) Failure to provide prisoners of war or internees with proper medical care, food or quarters:

YES.

(j) Collective punishment of a group for offence of others:

NO.

(k) Breaches of rules relating to the Red Cross:

YES.

(l) Cannibalism:

NO.

(m) Mutilation of the dead:

NO.

*(n) Any other war crimes not specifically mentioned above for which you think the guilty persons should be punished:

NO.

If any question is answered YES then state the facts in 8 (f) and on pages 3 and 4.

8. Details of Atrocities.--

(a) Kind of crime

(b) When and where it happened

(c) Who was the victim? (Give complete description including name and whether military or civilian personnel)

(d) Who was the perpetrator? (Give complete description and as much information as possible)

(e) State if you saw it yourself. If you did not see it, who told you about it? (Give names and addresses of other witnesses)

(f) Give brief story of crime. Full statement required on pages 3 and 4.

To the best of my belief the above particulars are correct.

HENRY ALLDRED
(Signature.)

R. E. ATKINS
(Signature of Interrogating Officer.)

23/9/45
(Date.)

MANILA
(Place and/or Unit at which interrogation was made.)

Comment by Interrogating Officer:

* Other war crimes not specifically mentioned include:--

(i) Usurpation of sovereignty during military occupation.
(ii) Compulsory enlistment of soldiers among the inhabitants of occupied territory.
(iii) Attempts to denationalize the inhabitants of occupied territory.
(iv} Confiscation of property.
(v) Exaction of illegitimate or of exorbitant contributions and requisitions.
(vi) Debasement of the currency and issue of spurious currency.
(vii) Deliberate bombardment of undefended places.
(viii) Wanton destruction of religious, charitable, educational and historical buildings and monuments.
(ix) Use of explosive or expanding bullets and other inhuman appliances.
(x) Directions to give no quarter and refusal of quarter.
(xi) Misuse of flags of truce.

FULL STATEMENT OF ATROCITY OR CRIME

This MUST be signed by the person making the statement and countersigned by the interrogating officer at the end of the statement.

(7B) NOV. 1942 - 3 DEC 1944 -- BEATINGS WERE AN EVERYDAY OCCURANCE MOSTLY GIVEN BY THE JAPANESE INTERPRETER, KATSURA..

(7E) FORCED TO WORK ON AIRFIELDS FROM NOV. 1942 TO NOV. 1943, ALSO FROM MARCH 1944 TO 3.12.44.

(7F) NOT ALLOWED TO USE AIR-RAID SHELTERS DURING AIR-RAIDS, FORCED TO CARRY ON WORKING.

(7I) MEDICAL CARE AND FOOD HAVE BEEN VERY BAD AT ALL TIMES IN JAPAN.

(7K) RED CROSS FOOD WAS HELD BY THE JAPS AND ISSUED TO US IN SMALL ISSUES OCCASIONALLY. THE JAPS TOOK A LARGE PERCENTAGE OUT OF EACH ISSUE FOR THEIR OWN USE.

R. E. ATKINS (signed)

HENRY ALLDRED (signed)


Astill, James

When COMPLETED this document must be classified as SECRET.

AUSTRALIAN WAR CRIMES COMMISSION.

QUESTIONNAIRE.

NOTES:--

(a) This questionnaire should be completed by:--
(i) All repatriated Australian prisoners of war (A.I.F., R.A.A.F. and R.A.N.).
(ii) All repatriated Australian civil internees.
(iii) All repatriated British civil internees in the Pacific Area (excluding Malaya and China).
(iv) All members and ex-members of the Allied forces who have actual knowledge of war crimes committed by the enemy.

(b) It will be completed in the presence of an officer who will countersign the signature of the person making the statement.

(c) It is important that a full statement on page 3 (carried on to page 4 if necessary) be furnished as well as the answer to 8(f).

1. Army number:

1699573

2. Rank:

SGT.

3. Full name (in BLOCK letters):

ASTILL, JAMES

4. Unit at time of capture and/or place of capture (State here unit in which soldier was serving at time of capture, e.g. 2/1 Fd. Regt. or H.Q. 6 Aust. Div., etc.):

69TH BTY., 21ST RGT., R.A.; GAROET, JAVA

5. Home address:

28 HIGH ST., BIDDULPH, STOKE ON TRENT, STAFFORDSHIRE

6. At what enemy camps and hospitals were you confined and when were you at each?

12 MAR 42 TO 20 OCT 42 BATAVIA
26 NOV 42 TO 19 NOV 43 KUMAMOTO
20 NOV 43 TO 3 DEC 44 FUKUOKA
3 DEC 44 TO 15 AUG 45 ORIO

7. Do you have any information about any atrocities against, or mistreatment of, Allied soldiers, prisoners of war, civilian internees or the civilian population for which you think the perpetrators should be punished? (Answer by stating YES or NO in the spaces provided below)--

(a) Killings or executions:

NO.

(b) Rape, torture, beatings or other cruelties:

YES.

(c) Imprisonment under improper conditions:

YES.

(d) Massacres, wholesale looting, pillage, or burning of towns or villages:

NO.

(e) Use of prisoners of war or civilians on enemy military works or operations:

YES.

(f) Exposure of prisoners of war to danger of gunfire, bombing, torpedoing, or other hazards of war:

NO.

(g) Transportation of prisoners of war under improper conditions or deportation of civilians:

YES.

(h) Public exhibition or exposure to ridicule of prisoners of war:

NO.

(i) Failure to provide prisoners of war or internees with proper medical care, food or quarters:

YES.

(j) Collective punishment of a group for offence of others:

YES.

(k) Breaches of rules relating to the Red Cross:

YES.

(l) Cannibalism:

NO.

(m) Mutilation of the dead:

NO.

*(n) Any other war crimes not specifically mentioned above for which you think the guilty persons should be punished:

NO.

If any question is answered YES then state the facts in 8 (f) and on pages 3 and 4.

8. Details of Atrocities.--

(a) Kind of crime

BEATING

(b) When and where it happened

KUMAMOTO NO. 1 CAMP

(c) Who was the victim? (Give complete description including name and whether military or civilian personnel)

GUNNER FERN W., BRITISH ARMY

(d) Who was the perpetrator? (Give complete description and as much information as possible)

JAPANESE CAMP INTERPRETER KATSURA, FIRST CLASS SOLDIER

(e) State if you saw it yourself. If you did not see it, who told you about it? (Give names and addresses of other witnesses)

WITNESSED PERSONALLY

(f) Give brief story of crime. Full statement required on pages 3 and 4.

GNR FERN W. BEATEN UNTIL HE COLAPSED.

To the best of my belief the above particulars are correct.

J. ASTILL SGT RA
(Signature.)

F. L. RYANS W/O RAF
(Signature of Interrogating Officer.)

25 SEPT 1945
(Date.)

SPOW (U.S.) R.D.
(Place and/or Unit at which interrogation was made.)

Comment by Interrogating Officer:

NIL.

* Other war crimes not specifically mentioned include:--

(i) Usurpation of sovereignty during military occupation.
(ii) Compulsory enlistment of soldiers among the inhabitants of occupied territory.
(iii) Attempts to denationalize the inhabitants of occupied territory.
(iv} Confiscation of property.
(v) Exaction of illegitimate or of exorbitant contributions and requisitions.
(vi) Debasement of the currency and issue of spurious currency.
(vii) Deliberate bombardment of undefended places.
(viii) Wanton destruction of religious, charitable, educational and historical buildings and monuments.
(ix) Use of explosive or expanding bullets and other inhuman appliances.
(x) Directions to give no quarter and refusal of quarter.
(xi) Misuse of flags of truce.

FULL STATEMENT OF ATROCITY OR CRIME

This MUST be signed by the person making the statement and countersigned by the interrogating officer at the end of the statement.

18 NOVEMBER 1943.

NO. 1 CAMP FUKUOKA

GNR. FERN W. HAD BEEN WORKING FROM EARLY MORNING APROX. 5 AM AND MENTIONED AT 9 AM HE WAS HUNGRY, THE INTERPRETER OVERHEARD HIM AND BEAT HIM WITH SLIPPER, UNTIL HE COLAPSED.

(C) VERY POOR HOUSING CONDITIONS, NO SANITARY ARRANGEMENTS

(E) P.W. CONSTRUCTING AIRDROMES AT FUKUOKA

(G) TROOP SHIP FROM JAVA VERY OVERCROWDED. NO SANITARY ARRANGEMENTS, NO MEDICAL FACILITIES, FOOD VERY POOR.

(I) AT NO TIME DURING PERIOD AS PW. WAS FOOD OR CLOTHING SUFFICIENT.

(J) IN SEVERAL INSTANCES THE RATIONS OR CIGARETTE ISSUES FOR THE WHOLE CAMP WAS STOPPED.

(K) NEVER AT ANY CAMP WAS I ISSUED WITH A RED CROSS PARCEL.

J ASTILL SGT: RA (signed)

F. L. RYANS W/O RAF (signed)


Aylott, Alfred Edward

When COMPLETED this document must be classified as SECRET.

AUSTRALIAN WAR CRIMES COMMISSION.

QUESTIONNAIRE.

NOTES:--

(a) This questionnaire should be completed by:--
(i) All repatriated Australian prisoners of war (A.I.F., R.A.A.F. and R.A.N.).
(ii) All repatriated Australian civil internees.
(iii) All repatriated British civil internees in the Pacific Area (excluding Malaya and China).
(iv) All members and ex-members of the Allied forces who have actual knowledge of war crimes committed by the enemy.

(b) It will be completed in the presence of an officer who will countersign the signature of the person making the statement.

(c) It is important that a full statement on page 3 (carried on to page 4 if necessary) be furnished as well as the answer to 8(f).

1. Army number:

1734006

2. Rank:

GUNNER

3. Full name (in BLOCK letters):

ALFRED EDWARD AYLOTT

4. Unit at time of capture and/or place of capture (State here unit in which soldier was serving at time of capture, e.g. 2/1 Fd. Regt. or H.Q. 6 Aust. Div., etc.):

95TH BATT 48TH REGT LAA, RA, JAVA

5. Home address:

96 BENNETTS AVENUE, GREENFORD, MIDDX, ENG.

6. At what enemy camps and hospitals were you confined and when were you at each?

MOJI NO. 4, FUKUOKA NO. 1, NOVEMBER 20TH 1942 - AUG 12TH 1944

7. Do you have any information about any atrocities against, or mistreatment of, Allied soldiers, prisoners of war, civilian internees or the civilian population for which you think the perpetrators should be punished? (Answer by stating YES or NO in the spaces provided below)--

(a) Killings or executions:

NO.

(b) Rape, torture, beatings or other cruelties:

YES.

(c) Imprisonment under improper conditions:

YES.

(d) Massacres, wholesale looting, pillage, or burning of towns or villages:

NO.

(e) Use of prisoners of war or civilians on enemy military works or operations:

NO.

(f) Exposure of prisoners of war to danger of gunfire, bombing, torpedoing, or other hazards of war:

YES.

(g) Transportation of prisoners of war under improper conditions or deportation of civilians:

YES.

(h) Public exhibition or exposure to ridicule of prisoners of war:

YES.

(i) Failure to provide prisoners of war or internees with proper medical care, food or quarters:

YES.

(j) Collective punishment of a group for offence of others:

YES.

(k) Breaches of rules relating to the Red Cross:

YES.

(l) Cannibalism:

NO.

(m) Mutilation of the dead:

NO.

*(n) Any other war crimes not specifically mentioned above for which you think the guilty persons should be punished:

NO.

If any question is answered YES then state the facts in 8 (f) and on pages 3 and 4.

8. Details of Atrocities.--

(a) Kind of crime

SMOKING AFTER HOURS

(b) When and where it happened

MARCH 9TH, FUKUOKA NO. 1

(c) Who was the victim? (Give complete description including name and whether military or civilian personnel)

ALFRED E. AYLOTT, MILITARY

(d) Who was the perpetrator? (Give complete description and as much information as possible)

JAP GUARD KATSURA. MADE TO GO DOWN ON MY HANDS FOR 1 HOUR, BEAT WITH A STICK ON BACK, BACK BRUISED NO TREATMENT

(e) State if you saw it yourself. If you did not see it, who told you about it? (Give names and addresses of other witnesses)

---

(f) Give brief story of crime. Full statement required on pages 3 and 4.

---

To the best of my belief the above particulars are correct.

A E AYLOTT
(Signature.)

JOHN BEATHAIN(?) O/C
(Signature of Interrogating Officer.)

21-9-45
(Date.)


(Place and/or Unit at which interrogation was made.)

Comment by Interrogating Officer:

* Other war crimes not specifically mentioned include:--

(i) Usurpation of sovereignty during military occupation.
(ii) Compulsory enlistment of soldiers among the inhabitants of occupied territory.
(iii) Attempts to denationalize the inhabitants of occupied territory.
(iv} Confiscation of property.
(v) Exaction of illegitimate or of exorbitant contributions and requisitions.
(vi) Debasement of the currency and issue of spurious currency.
(vii) Deliberate bombardment of undefended places.
(viii) Wanton destruction of religious, charitable, educational and historical buildings and monuments.
(ix) Use of explosive or expanding bullets and other inhuman appliances.
(x) Directions to give no quarter and refusal of quarter.
(xi) Misuse of flags of truce.

FULL STATEMENT OF ATROCITY OR CRIME

This MUST be signed by the person making the statement and countersigned by the interrogating officer at the end of the statement.

7B. MEN BEAT WITH STICKS

7C. KEPT IN CONFINED SPACE, NO FOOD

7F. CAMP BUILD IN WOODS, NO. 1

7G. SHIPS FROM JAVA OVERLOADED, LACK OF MEDICAL TREATMENT, MEN DIED FROM EXPOSURE

7H. PUBLIC JEERED AT US, MEN STRUCK WITH STONES

7I. MEN DIED FROM WANT OF TREATMENT, RED CROSS FOOD HELD BACK FOR MONTHS

7J. USUAL FORM OF PUNISHMENT, CIGAREETS STOPPED, NO REST DAY

7K. MAIL HELD BACK

A E AYLOTT (signed)

JOHN BEATSON(?) (signed)


Bartholomew, Gaythorne

When COMPLETED this document must be classified as SECRET.

AUSTRALIAN WAR CRIMES COMMISSION.

QUESTIONNAIRE.

NOTES:--

(a) This questionnaire should be completed by:--
(i) All repatriated Australian prisoners of war (A.I.F., R.A.A.F. and R.A.N.).
(ii) All repatriated Australian civil internees.
(iii) All repatriated British civil internees in the Pacific Area (excluding Malaya and China).
(iv) All members and ex-members of the Allied forces who have actual knowledge of war crimes committed by the enemy.

(b) It will be completed in the presence of an officer who will countersign the signature of the person making the statement.

(c) It is important that a full statement on page 3 (carried on to page 4 if necessary) be furnished as well as the answer to 8(f).

1. Army number:

D/JX 188479

2. Rank:

ABLE SEAMAN

3. Full name (in BLOCK letters):

BARTHOLOMEW, GAYTHORNE

4. Unit at time of capture and/or place of capture (State here unit in which soldier was serving at time of capture, e.g. 2/1 Fd. Regt. or H.Q. 6 Aust. Div., etc.):

H.M.S EXETER, SUNK IN JAVA SEA

5. Home address:

23 CARLTON CLOSE, WORKSOP, NOTTS

6. At what enemy camps and hospitals were you confined and when were you at each?

MACASSAR CAMP 8/3/42
NAGASAKI CAMP 30/10/42
FUKUOKA CAMP 2/12/44

7. Do you have any information about any atrocities against, or mistreatment of, Allied soldiers, prisoners of war, civilian internees or the civilian population for which you think the perpetrators should be punished? (Answer by stating YES or NO in the spaces provided below)--

(a) Killings or executions:

YES.

(b) Rape, torture, beatings or other cruelties:

YES.

(c) Imprisonment under improper conditions:

NO.

(d) Massacres, wholesale looting, pillage, or burning of towns or villages:

NO.

(e) Use of prisoners of war or civilians on enemy military works or operations:

NO.

(f) Exposure of prisoners of war to danger of gunfire, bombing, torpedoing, or other hazards of war:

NO.

(g) Transportation of prisoners of war under improper conditions or deportation of civilians:

YES.

(h) Public exhibition or exposure to ridicule of prisoners of war:

NO.

(i) Failure to provide prisoners of war or internees with proper medical care, food or quarters:

YES.

(j) Collective punishment of a group for offence of others:

YES.

(k) Breaches of rules relating to the Red Cross:

YES.

(l) Cannibalism:

NO.

(m) Mutilation of the dead:

NO.

*(n) Any other war crimes not specifically mentioned above for which you think the guilty persons should be punished:

NO.

If any question is answered YES then state the facts in 8 (f) and on pages 3 and 4.

8. Details of Atrocities.--

(a) Kind of crime

3 MEN TRIED TO ESCAPE, WERE CAPTURED AND BEHEADED

(b) When and where it happened

4/6/42 IN MACASSAR

(c) Who was the victim? (Give complete description including name and whether military or civilian personnel)

DUTCH ARMY, NAMES UNKNOWN

(d) Who was the perpetrator? (Give complete description and as much information as possible)

JAP IN CHARGE OF CAMP. JAP IN CHARGE OF CAMP GALLEY EXECUTED THE THREE MEN. NAME OF JAP COCCU.

(e) State if you saw it yourself. If you did not see it, who told you about it? (Give names and addresses of other witnesses)

GALLEY SARGEANT RETURNED TO CAMP AND TOLD GALLEY STAFF.

(f) Give brief story of crime. Full statement required on pages 3 and 4.

3 MEN TRIED TO ESCAPE, WERE BETRAYED BY NATIVES AND BROUGHT BACK TO CAMP, WERE TAKEN AWAY AND EXECUTED.

To the best of my belief the above particulars are correct.

G. BARTHOLOMEW
(Signature.)

?? ?? F/O, RAE
(Signature of Interrogating Officer.)

23.9.45
(Date.)

3 AWAT, POW RECEPTION CAMP, MANILA
(Place and/or Unit at which interrogation was made.)

Comment by Interrogating Officer:

* Other war crimes not specifically mentioned include:--

(i) Usurpation of sovereignty during military occupation.
(ii) Compulsory enlistment of soldiers among the inhabitants of occupied territory.
(iii) Attempts to denationalize the inhabitants of occupied territory.
(iv} Confiscation of property.
(v) Exaction of illegitimate or of exorbitant contributions and requisitions.
(vi) Debasement of the currency and issue of spurious currency.
(vii) Deliberate bombardment of undefended places.
(viii) Wanton destruction of religious, charitable, educational and historical buildings and monuments.
(ix) Use of explosive or expanding bullets and other inhuman appliances.
(x) Directions to give no quarter and refusal of quarter.
(xi) Misuse of flags of truce.

FULL STATEMENT OF ATROCITY OR CRIME

This MUST be signed by the person making the statement and countersigned by the interrogating officer at the end of the statement.

IN MACASSAR CAMP ABOUT THE 4TH OF JUNE 1942. 3 DUTCHMEN TRIED TO ESCAPE, THEY WERE BETRAYED BY NATIVES AND BROUGHT BACK TO CAMP AFTER BEING BEATEN ALMOST TO DEATH BY JAP GUARDS WHO TIED THEM UP AND BEAT THEM WITH RIFLES UNTIL ALL 3 OF THEM HAD BROKEN ARMS - LEGS AND RIBS, POURED IODINE DOWN THEIR NOSTRILS, IN THEIR EARS, AND THEN THEY WERE THROWN IN JAIL AND BEATEN UP EVERY DAY UNTIL THE JAPS FINALLY TOOK THEM OUT AND BEHEADED THEM.

JAP MO. IN NAGASAKI SENT MEN OUT TO WORK IN DOCKYARD WHEN THEY WERE SERIOUSLY ILL, SEVERAL OF THEM DIED THROUGH THIS IN THE WINTER OF 1942-1943.

I WORKED AT P.O.W. HEADQUARTERS IN FUKUOKA WHERE ALL RED CROSS WAS STORED. WHILE THE MEN IN CAMP WERE DYING OF MALNUTRITION, THE JAP OFFICERS AND MEN WERE LIVING ON ALLIED RED CROSS FOOD AND SMOKING RED CROSS CIGS. RED CROSS FOOD IN SEVERAL STORES IN FUKUOKA WAS GOING ROTTEN BUT THE JAPS WOULD NOT SEND IT TO THE CAMPS.

THE CAMP COMMANDANT AT FUKUOKA NO. 1 CAMP WAS THE CAUSE OF MANY SUFFERINGS. HE WOULD COME INTO THE CAMP AND INSTRUCT THE GUARDS TO GO AROUND BEATING UP THE PRISONERS. HE WOULD CUT DOWN THE FOOD FOR ANY TRIVIAL OFFENSE, SOMETIMES FOR NO REASON AT ALL. ONE DAY WE HAD RED CROSS SUPPLIES IN CAMP AND SOME OF IT WAS STOLEN. WE KNEW THE JAP GUARDS HAD STOLEN IT BUT THE COMMANDANT BLAMED US AND WOULD NOT LISTEN TO REASON. HE STOPPED ALL PRIVILEGES SUCH AS SMOKING AND PLAYING CARDS, WHICH WERE THE ONLY PRIVILEGES WE HAD.

THE COMMANDANT'S NAME WAS SAKAMOTO. ONE OF THE GUARDS WHO DID THE STEALING WAS UNDA [HONDA].

G. BARTHOLOMEW (signed)


Carston, A. C.

E.I.16778/45.
SUPREME ALLIED COMMANDER, SOUTH EAST ASIA.
(Copy to:- Allied Land Forces, South East Asia).

REPORT ON CONDITIONS IN THE PRISONERS OF WAR CAMPS AT FUKUOKA AND MUNTOK.

The attached reports received from Lieutenant A.C. Carston, Royal Naval Reserve, are forwarded for information.

?? ??
(Signature)
for ADMIRAL

Enclosures:

1. Lieutenant A.C. Carston's Report on Fukuoka.

2. Lieutenant A.C. Carston's Report on Prisoner of War Camps.

REPORTS ON PRISONERS OF WAR CAMPS

16.2.42 to 3.3.42.

MUNTOK, Banka Island. Under army authority. Work; repairing an airfield.

4.3.42 to 26.8.42

PALEMBANG, Sumatra. Under Army authority. Work, extending P.1. Airfield, working in docks and PLADJOE oil refinery. While in this camp, under instructions from Commander P.H.S. REID. R.N. I recorded the narratives of survivors, regarding the fate of Singapore local craft. I handed a copy of these narratives to Commander SIFFRE R.N. at the liberated P.O.W. Camp in Manila on 27.9.45.

27.8.42 to 29.8.42

Aboard Japanese oil-tanker YOYO MARU, en route for Singapore. This ship had loaded a cargo of crude oil at PLADJOE.

30.8.42 to 19.9.42

Aboard S.S. HAURAKI, Naval Base, Singapore. This ship had been captured by two armed merchant raiders south of Colombo on 12th July 1942.

20.9.42 to 23.9.42

Aboard MATA HARI for passage to Japan. The First Lieutenant, all Engineer Officers and a few ratings had been forced to remain in the ship; the ship had taken part in the capture of RENGAT and had carried troops to Borneo. All European personnel had been transferred, to work aboard an oil-tanker prior to my boarding.

24.9.42 to 1.10.42

Aboard S.S. HAURAKI for passage to Japan, but the Nipponese had difficulty in getting the engines to work.

2.10.42 to 9.10.42

Aboard S.S. TOKIO MARU, en route to Japan.

10.10.42 to 13.10.42

Naval shrine at BOTOKODEN, nine miles from SASEBO.

14.10.42 to 15.1.44

IANOURA [Ainoura]. Transit camp about nine miles from SASEBO.
This was a Naval camp used for transit of P.O.W. landed at Sasebo. Also used as a depot for lodging foreign Asiatic crews who had brought salvaged ships to Japan, and awaited return to their own countries. Some members of the Chinese crews gave me the impression that they were more than mere sailors and would make intelligent reports on their return to China.
One British and four Philipine merchant service officers and myself, were kept as a permanent maintenance squad. Work consisted chiefly of camp upkeep and road repair. On one occasion, when no ox was available, we were hitched to a plow and had to tow it round a rice field. Food in this camp was ample, and working hours reasonable. Quarters were good and there was no striking.

16.1.44 to 17.4.44

FUKUOKA. No. 18 Branch P.O.W. Camp. Situated in hills at UNIKI about twelve miles from Sasebo. Army in charge of the camp. Navy in charge at work. P.O.W. employed building a dam. Special report attached, Commandant IKIGAMA [Ikegami] CHUI.

18.4.44 to 4.12.44

FUKUOKA No. 1. Branch P.O.W. Camp. Situated on outskirts of Fukuoka city. A Military camp. Prisoners employed in building an airfield. Prisoners 300 British, 200 Americans and 250 Dutch. Quarters bad. Food, fair in quantity and quality. Striking of prisoners prevalent. P.O.W. forced to slap each other for the amusement of the guards. Commandant SAKAMOTO CHUI.

5.12.44 to 18.4.45

FUKUOKA No. 2. Branch P.O.W. Camp. Situated in city of UBE in Inland Sea, in S.W. corner of HONSHU island. A Military Camp. Prisoners employed in a coal mine. P.O.Ws. 283 British. Except for the extremely hard and wet work in the mine, this was a good camp; for we had two good Commandants, NURMI Chui and TAHARA Chui.

19.4.45 to 13.9.45

HIROSHIMA No. 5 Branch P.O.W. Camp. On April 18th the camp was transferred from FUKUOKA to HIROSHIMA command. A new, weak Commandant HYSASHIDA Chui, was appointed. The camp deteriorated immediately. Striking was authorised, food dropped to 360 grammes of rice or beans per day, and hours of work increased.

13th September. 1945

Liberated by U. S. 8th Army.
Throughout the time that I was a P.O.W. in Japan, my status as an Officer was not recognised and I received no P.O.W. Officer's pay.
I was classed as Warrant Officer 1st Class, but this rank carried no privileges, for I was forced to do manual labour with other ranks.
At Fukuoka Nos. 18, 1 and 2 branch camps, and Hiroshima No. 5 branch camp, I was paid at the rate of 25 sen (three pence), for each day I worked; outside this I received no money from the Nipponese.
Privates received 10 sen (1 1/3 penny) per day.

R C CARSTON (signed)
LIEUTENANT, R.N.R.
COMMANDING OFFICER.
H.M.S. "MATA HARI".

[For original report, see Detailed Report on Circumstances Attending Capture of H.M.S. "Mata Hari" - Reports on Prisoner of War Camps]


Castle, Sydney John

When COMPLETED this document must be classified as SECRET.

AUSTRALIAN WAR CRIMES COMMISSION.

QUESTIONNAIRE.

NOTES:--

(a) This questionnaire should be completed by:--
(i) All repatriated Australian prisoners of war (A.I.F., R.A.A.F. and R.A.N.).
(ii) All repatriated Australian civil internees.
(iii) All repatriated British civil internees in the Pacific Area (excluding Malaya and China).
(iv) All members and ex-members of the Allied forces who have actual knowledge of war crimes committed by the enemy.

(b) It will be completed in the presence of an officer who will countersign the signature of the person making the statement.

(c) It is important that a full statement on page 3 (carried on to page 4 if necessary) be furnished as well as the answer to 8(f).

1. Army number:

1556109

2. Rank:

SERGEANT

3. Full name (in BLOCK letters):

CASTLE, SYDNEY JOHN

4. Unit at time of capture and/or place of capture (State here unit in which soldier was serving at time of capture, e.g. 2/1 Fd. Regt. or H.Q. 6 Aust. Div., etc.):

89/35 L.A.A. REGIMENT R.A. (ATTACHED 6 H.A.A. REGT. R.A.)

5. Home address:

205 BOTLEY ROAD, OXFORD, ENGLAND

6. At what enemy camps and hospitals were you confined and when were you at each?

29/3/42 - 22/10/42 LANDJONG DRUK JAVA
29/11?/42 TO 4/12/43 NO. 4 CAMP, MOJI
4/12/43 - 7/9/45 NO. 1 CAMP (FUKUOKA AREA)
8/9/45 TO 13/9/45 NO. 4 CAMP, MOJI

7. Do you have any information about any atrocities against, or mistreatment of, Allied soldiers, prisoners of war, civilian internees or the civilian population for which you think the perpetrators should be punished? (Answer by stating YES or NO in the spaces provided below)--

(a) Killings or executions:

NO.

(b) Rape, torture, beatings or other cruelties:

YES.

(c) Imprisonment under improper conditions:

YES.

(d) Massacres, wholesale looting, pillage, or burning of towns or villages:

NO.

(e) Use of prisoners of war or civilians on enemy military works or operations:

YES.

(f) Exposure of prisoners of war to danger of gunfire, bombing, torpedoing, or other hazards of war:

NO.

(g) Transportation of prisoners of war under improper conditions or deportation of civilians:

YES.

(h) Public exhibition or exposure to ridicule of prisoners of war:

NO.

(i) Failure to provide prisoners of war or internees with proper medical care, food or quarters:

YES.

(j) Collective punishment of a group for offence of others:

YES.

(k) Breaches of rules relating to the Red Cross:

YES.

(l) Cannibalism:

NO.

(m) Mutilation of the dead:

NO.

*(n) Any other war crimes not specifically mentioned above for which you think the guilty persons should be punished:

NO.

If any question is answered YES then state the facts in 8 (f) and on pages 3 and 4.

8. Details of Atrocities.--

(a) Kind of crime

BEATING & TORTURE.

(b) When and where it happened

NO. 1 CAMP (MUSHIRODA, FUKUOKA AREA)

(c) Who was the victim? (Give complete description including name and whether military or civilian personnel)

MYSELF.

(d) Who was the perpetrator? (Give complete description and as much information as possible)

MILITARY GUARD COMMANDER & HIS GUARDS. (CAMP COMMANDANT - SAKAMOTO CHUI)

(e) State if you saw it yourself. If you did not see it, who told you about it? (Give names and addresses of other witnesses)

---

(f) Give brief story of crime. Full statement required on pages 3 and 4.

IT WAS DISCOVERED THAT I HAD COOKED FOR A GUARD DURING A COOKHOUSE NIGHT SHIFT & REPORTED THE ABUSE OF AUTHORITY & WAS BEATEN ABOUT THE FACE BY THE GUARD CONCERNED, HIS FELLOW GUARDS & SERGEANT. PLACED ON THE "HANDS DOWN" DOING "PRESS UPS" BEATEN WITH BAMBOO POLES, PUNCHED & KICKED IN STOMACH & TESTICLES. THEN I WAS MADE TO BEAR MY WEIGHT IN THIS POSITION ON A CROSS BAMBOO POLE BY MY SHINS, THEN ONE SHIN AT A TIME WITH THE OTHER LEG RAISED. AS I ULTIMATELY FLOPPED WITH FATIGUE I WAS BEATEN & KICKED & WHEN THE SERGEANT SAW THE PERSPIRATION RUNNING OFF MY FACE, HE PUT A BOWL OF WATER UNDERNEATH ME SO THAT I FELL IN IT EVERYTIME I COLLAPSED. IN THE END I HAD TO SAY I WAS A LIAR TO ESCAPE. THE WHOLE EPISODE LASTED BETWEEN AN HOUR & 1 HOURS.

To the best of my belief the above particulars are correct.

S. J. CASTLE
(Signature.)

E. RUSSELL U/O? RAF
(Signature of Interrogating Officer.)

23/SEPT/1945
(Date.)

U.S. REPLACEMENT, MANILA
(Place and/or Unit at which interrogation was made.)

Comment by Interrogating Officer:

* Other war crimes not specifically mentioned include:--

(i) Usurpation of sovereignty during military occupation.
(ii) Compulsory enlistment of soldiers among the inhabitants of occupied territory.
(iii) Attempts to denationalize the inhabitants of occupied territory.
(iv} Confiscation of property.
(v) Exaction of illegitimate or of exorbitant contributions and requisitions.
(vi) Debasement of the currency and issue of spurious currency.
(vii) Deliberate bombardment of undefended places.
(viii) Wanton destruction of religious, charitable, educational and historical buildings and monuments.
(ix) Use of explosive or expanding bullets and other inhuman appliances.
(x) Directions to give no quarter and refusal of quarter.
(xi) Misuse of flags of truce.

FULL STATEMENT OF ATROCITY OR CRIME

This MUST be signed by the person making the statement and countersigned by the interrogating officer at the end of the statement.

(B) AS AT 8(F), NORMAL BEATINGS ABOUT THE FACE WERE ALMOST AN EVERY-DAY OCCURENCE.

(C) NO. 1 CAMP (MUSHIRODA). WE SERVED THE WINTER HERE WITH SEVERE WEATHER. THE HUTS HAD THIN BARK WALLS WHICH WERE OPEN & THE ROOF WAS THATCHED & LEAKED BADLY. THE PRIVATION HERE CAUSED MUCH PNEUMONIA, FROST-BITE AND MANY DEATHS. NO FIRES ALLOWED.

(E) KASHII CAMP. BUILDING ORDINANCE DEPOT.
MUSHIRODA CAMP. LEVELLING FOR AERODROME.

(G) SINGAPORE TO JAPAN. SEVERAL THOUSANDS OF PRISONERS & JAP ARMED SOLDIERS WERE ON THE "SINGAPORE MARU." THE ONLY WAY WE COULD LIE DOWN IN THE HOLDS WAS BY WEDGING IN HEAD TO FEET. WATER WAS EXTREMELY SCARCE & DURING THE TRIP DYSENTERY BROKE OUT. TINNED MILK (EATEN 3 TINS AT A TIME BY NIPS) WAS REFUSED BY JAP COMMANDER. IN THE HOLDS PETROL CANS WERE USED FOR LATRINES & TOWARDS THE END CONDITIONS WERE SO BAD THAT THESE OVERFLOWED & BLOOD WAS SEEPING AROUND US. I SHOULD SAY 100 BODIES WERE PUT OVERBOARD ON THE TRIP. I WAS TAKEN OFF WITH THE SURVIVING SICK TO MOJI NO. 4 (260 ODD STRONG). OF THESE 121 DIED WITHIN A MONTH OR SO FROM LACK OF MEDICAL SUPPLIES.

(K) RED CROSS FOOD & MEDICAL SUPPLIES WERE ABUSED GENERALLY CAUSING A RED CROSS PARCEL ISSUE TO BE 1 BETWEEN 2, 4, 11 AND EVEN 22 MEN.

(I) AS AT (C). HERE TINNED MILK OUT OF THE RED CROSS SUPPLIES WOULD HAVE HELPED TO SAVE MANY LIVES BUT IT WAS REFUSED. THE LAST 2 MONTHS OR SO OF CAPTIVITY WE LIVED ON PINT OF BEAN FLOUR & WATER & LESS THAN A POUND OF COOKED BEAN FLA?? [illegible] TASTED SOUR & WERE THICK WITH HAIR. IT HAS BEEN SAID THAT IT WAS REALLY A FERTILISER.

(J) IT WAS A COMMON OCCURENCE FOR A SQUAD OF MEN TO BE PUNISHED (USUALLY BEATEN) FOR THE OFFENCE OF 1 MEMBER.

S. J. CASTLE (signed)


Chalkley, Arthur Edward

IN THE MATTER OF WAR CRIMES COMMITTED BY JAPANESE NATIONALS
AND IN THE MATTER OF THE ILL-TREATMENT OF PRISONERS OF WAR
AT FUKUOKA SUB-CAMP NO. 1 PRISONER OF WAR CAMP.

I, Arthur Edward CHALKLEY, of 1, Hangleton Gardens, in the Borough of Hove, make oath and say as follows,

I am a Wood Machinist by trade and at present live with my parents at 1, Hangleton Gardens, Hove, Sussex. I am a single man.

On the 12th of June, 1941, I joined the 48th Light Anti-Aircraft Regiment at Deepcut, my Regimental Number was 1801570.

In December, 1941, I went with my Regiment to Java and served there until I was captured by the Japanese on the 8th March, 1942. The whole of my Regiment was captured at Garoot. The whole Regiment remained at the side of the road under Japanese Guards for three weeks, after which about 2,500 officers and men including myself, were removed to Gladock Gaol in Batavia. We remained at the Gaol for five months and the conditions and food were fair. At the end of this period, I was transferred with about 260 other officers and men by ship to Japan. The treatment on the ship, which was named Dei Ichy Moru [Dai-Ichi-maru], was fair, and after five weeks journey it landed at Moji and we were then all transferred to Fukuoka Sub-Camp No. 1, Kumamoto. The Camp consisted of wooden huts, each hut accommodating about 80 men. The officers were in separate quarters in the same Camp. The Senior Officer of the British men was Colonel Saunders of the 21st Light Anti-Aircraft Regiment. Other Officers were Captain Whiteman, Major Steel, Major Beatty, Major Moxton and Lieutenant Pritchard, all of the same Regiment with the exception of Major Moxton, who was attached to the 6th Heavy Anti-Aircraft Regiment.

We actually arrived in the Camp in November, 1942. The Commandant of the Camp was a Lieutenant SAKAMOTO and there were about 22 Japanese Guards under his command.

After we had been at this Camp about 6 weeks, a Gunner James KEENAN of the 48th Light Anti-Aircraft Royal Artillery, who had been ill for some time and was supposed by his colleagues to have Pneumonia, was in the same Hut as myself. Despite his condition he was made to work with other in building an Aerodrome in the same district. On one of these days KEENAN was obviously very ill and in a collapsed condition. In my presence and hearing, a complaint was made by KEENAN and others that he was too sick to continue work, this complaint was made to Lieutenant SAKAMOTO, who in my presence and hearing instructed the Guards to stand over him and make him work. I cannot remember the name of the Guards, but there were about five of them and when KEENAN showed signs of being unable to continue his work, the Guards punched and kicked him every time he stopped work or was slow. This treatment of KEENAN went on for several days, until one morning he was too weak to move from his bed and our party went to work without him. When we arrived back at the Hut at the end of the day, we were told he had died and his body had been removed from the Hut. I saw him removed in a wooden box the following day by some Japanese Guards and some of our own men who attended the Funeral in a Cemetery about 5 or 6 miles away. In my opinion KEENAN died from neglected and brutal treatment.

About a month after the death of KEENAN, which would probably be about March, 1943, I was with a party of our men in the Camp and in my Hut. Also in the Hut was Gunner Percy BARRATT of the 21st Light Anti-Aircraft Royal Artillery, who was suffering from some ailment in the stomach. It was a wet day and we had not been out to work as usual. About 4.30 p.m. a Private CASSURA [Katsura] of the Japanese Army, who acted as interpreter, was outside the Hut and shouted for those inside the Hut to come outside. The men filed out into the open and Gunner BARRATT, who was ill, was the last to go out. He was obviously not in a fit condition to leave his bed and this was the cause of his being slow in obeying the order. When he arrived outside the Hut CASSURA hit him over the head with a Bamboo stick. He continued this treatment for some minutes and BARRATT collapsed unconscious on the ground. CASSURA waited for BARRATT to recover and then ordered him to do some digging in the Camp enclosure. I understand that CASSURA had lived in America for 15 years and was employed in a Hotel.

About April the same year, a Gunner Sidney HOYE of the 48th Light Anti-Aircraft Royal Artillery, also a member of my Hut, was lying in bed suffering from Beri Beri. About 7 p.m. that day, the Interpreter CASSURA came into the Hut and ordered all men who were complaining of being ill to report outside the Hut. HOYE with about six other men, whose names I cannot remember, struggled outside as instructed. They were lined up by CASSURA, who said to them, "When I call you out you must get out quicker than that." He then went along the line of men and deliberately hit each man over the head with a steel hammer and one or two of the men including HOYE collapsed unconscious on the ground. CASSURA then walked away and left those men who had collapsed lying on the ground. I, together with others, assisted the injured men back into the Hut and I noticed that HOYE had a large bruise on top of his head.

In about September, 1943, I was working with a party of men on the Air Field at Kumamoto and we were resting during lunch hour, which was between half past eleven and half past twelve. About ten past twelve, two of the Japanese Guards, who were nicknamed Buckteeth and Freckles, shouted out for the men to start work. As this was before time, Gunner James MONK of the 21st Light Anti-Aircraft Royal Artillery and who was about the smallest man in the party, shouted out that they hadn't completed their dinner hour. The two Guards then ordered MONK to go to them and they both beat him with their fists about the head and body and threw him over their shoulders in Ju Jitsu fashion. They continued this treatment for about 45 minutes until Regimental Sergeant Major James JAMES of the 21st Light Anti-Aircraft Royal Artillery, who was one of our party, intervened and was able to stop this treatment of MONK. MONK was in pretty bad state after the Guards had finished with him but they made him continue to work. MONK's face was badly cut and swollen as a result of this treatment. All these brutalities which occurred at the Camp were condoned by the Camp Commandant SAKAMOTO. The feeding at this Camp was very bad and number of men died of starvation. The only food we got was Rice, Seaweed and some kind of greens. Very occasionally we had British Red Cross parcels.

In November, 1943, out of the 265 men that had arrived at the Camp in November, 1942, only 227 men were alive, the others having died from ill treatment or starvation. The whole of the number, together with the Guards and Commandant, were moved to another Camp site at Fukuoka, the Camp was given the same name, namely Fukuoka Sub-Camp No. 1. The conditions at this Camp were more or less the same as the previous Camp.

About September, 1944, a quantity of Red Cross parcels arrived at the Camp and these were commandeered by the Japanese Guards. As a result, Gunner Gavin MARSHALL of the 21st Light Anti-Aircraft Royal Artillery, knowing this, broke into the store where he knew the Japanese Guards had hidden the Red Cross parcels. The Guards subsequently discovered this, searched the men's Hut and discovered MARSHALL in possession of some of the property. As a result, the Camp Commandant SAKAMOTO instructed the Guards to tie MARSHALL to a telegraph post and beat him with Bamboo sticks. Eight or nine Guards beat MARSHALL while he was tied to the post. The Guards, who I remember by name, who were concerned were Buckteeth, Freckles and Unda [Honda]. This treatment continued in the presence of the Commandant for two or three hours and I witnessed it. During this treatment the Commandant took several running kicks at MARSHALL, who, before they had finished, collapsed. They then removed him from the post and placed him in the cells for about ten days after which they brought him back to our Hut. He was then in a very bad physical condition and MARSHALL died a month or two later at Camp UBE, undoubtedly as a result of this brutal treatment. Colonel SAUNDERS made a protest to the Commandant of MARSHALL's treatment.

In December, 1944, the Camp was split up and about 32 of my party went to Camp UBE which was about 80 miles from Fukuoka. The treatment at this Camp was fair and we were released from captivity by the American Army in September, 1945.

Sworn by the above named Deponent at the Town Hall in the Borough of Hove, on the Sixth day of March, 1946, before me

ARTHUR CALLY (signed)
Justice of the Peace
for the Borough aforesaid.

A. E. Chalkley (signed)


Chilton, Frederick

IN THE MATTER OF JAPANESE WAR CRIMES AND
IN THE MATTER OF THE ILL-TREATMENT OF
PRISONERS OF WAR AT FUKUOKA CAMP.

A F F I D A V I T

I, Frederick CHILTON, formerly Lance-Bombardier in the Royal Artillery, with permanent home address at 15D, Manor Street Estate, Chelsea Manor Street, S.W.3., make oath and say as follows:-

1. I was captured at Timor on 23 February 1942.

2. I arrived at FUKUOKA Camp area on 29 November 1942 and I remained in that area until liberated.

3. In this camp area there was a Japanese interpreter, a 1st Class Soldier, named TAKEO KATSURA. This man had lived in America for about 12 years and was a very clever and shrewd man.

4. Whenever the prisoners misbehaved in any way, the Japanese Commandant who was a Captain named SAKAMOTO, used to send for KATSURA and blame him for not keeping order. This used to infuriate KATSURA and he used to take it out of the prisoners by beatings.

5. I remember one occasion when I saw KATSURA beat a sick man who was lying in bed in hospital. The name of this man was Gunner Albert CLEEVES. I was on the hospital prison staff at the time. KATSURA beat Cleeves because Cleeves had told him a lie about some corned-beef. The prisoners had had an issue of corned-beef and their stomachs not being accustomed to such food, many of them had gone sick after eating it. As a result the Camp Commandment, SAKAMOTO, ordered all the corned-beef to be withdrawn and KATSURA came around the quarters collecting it. Each man had to put any corned-beef he had in his possession at the end of his bed. When KATSURA arrived at the bed in the hospital in which Cleeves was lying, Cleeves told KATSURA that he had no corned-beef in his possession. KATSURA asked him several times whether he was sure he had none and then asked me to open Cleeves' haversack. I opened the haversack and found a tin of corned-beef. KATSURA then completely lost his temper and beat Cleeves violently with a bamboo pole for about five minutes.

6. On several occasions another prisoner, Gunner Albert Henry Newman, was also beaten by KATSURA who invariably used a piece of wood or a metal-headed hammer for all beatings that he administered. KATSURA used to go completely crazy with rage whenever he had been told off by the Commandant. I was never beaten by him myself.

7. I remember another occasion when two Dutchmen reported sick after a working party. They came to the hospital and I saw them there. One of them had broken ribs and the other a dislocated jaw. These Dutchmen said that they had been beaten up by KATSURA for a very slight technical offence. The Dutch doctor, who was a prisoner, named Lieutenant F. De Wyn decided to report the matter to SAKAMOTO. He did this and SAKAMOTO told him that the doctor's business was that of a doctor and he had no right to interfere with the discipline of the camp. SAKAMOTO must have given KATSURA a free hand to beat up the doctor because I saw the doctor after he had been beaten by KATSURA and he was in a very bad state. His face was discoloured for at least ten days after the beating. We all knew that KATSURA had beaten him and many of the prisoners had actually witnessed the beating.

8. In the camp also was a Japanese medical orderly called MASATO HATA. This man was fairly decent towards the prisoners to begin with but later on he began to be very hostile towards them. He frequently used to tear up medical prescriptions sent to him by the four Allied camp doctors, although the drugs were available and I consider that he was directly responsible for the deaths of many men through these actions. The camp doctors were Captain De Wyn whom I have already mentioned, Captain Wallace, a British doctor, Major Kostecki an American, and Captain Ensing a Dutchman. On another occasion I remember MASATO HATA ordering sick men from the hospital to take part in physical exercises ordered for the rest of the camp. The exercises were quite strenuous and some of the hospital patients were old men between 50 and 60, some with Hernias.

9. Also in the camp was a Japanese civilian guard called HAJIME HONDA. He had very strong sadistic tendencies and I think he was a little unbalanced. He was very fond of beating prisoners and would do it on the slightest pretext. He invariably used the butt of his rifle or a bamboo pole for these beatings. I myself was several times beaten by him though not very badly but I know that he administered several severe beatings to other prisoners. His favourite trick was to come through the hut and if a prisoner did not spring to attention, he used to bang them on the head with the butt of his rifle. I have seen him do this many times.

SWORN by the said Frederick CHILTON, at 6, Spring Gardens in the City of Westminster, this twenty-third day of May 1946.

(Signed) F. CHILTON

BEFORE ME,

(Signed) R. S. MARSHALL,
Captain Legal Staff,
Military Department,
Office of the Judge Advocate General.

IN THE MATTER OF WAR CRIMES COMMITTED BY
JAPANESE NATIONALS AND IN THE MATTER
OF THE ILL TREATMENT OF PRISONERS OF WAR
AT KASHII PRISONER OF WAR CAMP.

I, Frederick CHILTON, of 6B, Manor Street Estate, Chelsea Manor Street, S.W.3.
in the County of London, a textile buyer,
make oath and say as follows:-

(1) On 29th July, 1940, I was called up for service in the Army, and was posted as a Gunner, No. 1614712, to the 36th Regiment, Light A.A., Royal Artillery. After training in this Country, I was sent to TIMOR where I was captured by the Japanese on 23rd February, 1942.

(2) After being in a camp at TIMOR, I was sent with other prisoners to KYUSHU Island, Japan, via Java, Singapore, and thence to MOJI, where we arrived on 28th November, 1942.

(3) For the next twelve months I was in the KUMAMOTO, FUKUOKA sub-camp No. 1, and the whole camp was then transferred to KASHII prisoner of war camp, arriving there during November, 1943.

(4) At the KASHII camp the food was not so good as we had been having in the previous camp, and consisted of boiled rice, vegetable soup and fish occasionally. There were three meals a day, breakfast about 6 a.m., lunch at noon, and the main meal at 5.30 p.m. to 6 p.m. All meals were taken in the camp. Warm clothing was supplied by the Japanese, but could only be worn at certain times, i.e., in camp, on rest days, and for all evening roll calls. We were not allowed to wear it at work.

(5) Hygiene and sanitation at the KASHII camp was the best I experienced whilst a prisoner, although the lavatories were the usual Japanese standard, i.e. a pit, with separate closets, which was unusual. There was only cold water for washing purposes, and 300 prisoners had to use one washhouse, which was insufficient. Hot water baths were permitted twice a week, or more for people doing dirty work.

(6) The camp consisted of one large wooden and plaster hut, with a concrete floor, divided into five sections, for other ranks, and separate officers quarters and hospital accommodation. We slept on tatami mats, on raised wooden platform, each man having about a yard space in width.

(7) A Japanese doctor named MYGOWA [Maekawa], or something similar, from MOJI No. 4 camp, was in charge of Japanese medical supplies, and issued them freely to the prisoners when requested by Captain W. P. Wallace, of the R.A.M.C., who ran the camp hospital. Some American and Canadian medical supplies, particularly chloroform and surgical instruments, were held back at the main store at FUKUOKA by the Japanese, as we had to salvage the remains after the store was destroyed in an American air raid in April or May, 1945.

(8) At Christmas, 1943, one British Red Cross parcel was issued between each seven prisoners, and in February, 1944, one Canadian Red Cross parcel between each two prisoners. I believe there was one other issue but cannot be sure about this. At the KASHII camp it was rumoured that the Japanese guards were keeping back for themselves some of the Red Cross parcels, but this could never be verified.

(9) The prisoners at this camp were employed mainly on the construction of roads, and the shifting of material for the building of a Japanese Army store. There was no danger in the work, and it was not hard.

(10) In late February or early March, 1944, I was in charge of a small party of about a dozen prisoners, working under a Japanese civilian ganger, pushing full and empty railway trucks on a siding. The ganger asked for two men to drop off this work to do another job, and I told two of my party to see what he wanted done. I thought they had gone to do the job, and told the other men to keep pushing the trucks. The ganger then got excited and started calling for "two men," and so I told him he already had them. He then got mad, told me to fall the men in, and marched us back to camp.

(11) Upon reaching the camp gates, the semi-military guard there asked the ganger the reason for the early return of the party. From what I understood of the conversation, the ganger told them we refused to work, and one of the guards, whose name I now forget, but who was nicknamed "FRECKLES," for no particular reason, walked through the two lines in which the party was drawn up and punched each man on the jaw.

(12) We were then marched into camp and the interpreter, named KATSURA, was sent for. He arrived, accompanied by the Japanese camp commandant Lieutenant SAKAMOTO. The ganger spoke to SAKAMOTO, but I was too far away to hear what he said. KATSURA then asked me if we had refused to work, and I replied "No." SAKAMOTO then got excited and spoke to me in Japanese. I understood he accused me of lying, which I denied, and he then took a flying leap at me, which I attempted to evade, and he fell to the ground. I saw SAKAMOTO aim a kick at my head with his boot, which struck me behind the right ear, and then lost consciousness. I only remember this one kick, but later I was told there were others.

(13) When I recovered consciousness I was laying in the hut, and "FRECKLES" was trying to revive me by patting my face and speaking to me. I know that orders were given, probably by SAKAMOTO, that I was not to receive any medical treatment. I had an abrasion on the back of the head and a grazed face, and Bombardier Woods, of the Royal Artillery, brought me some cold compresses which had been sent, surreptitiously, by the Japanese medical Sergeant Major, TANAGUCHI. These compresses were brought on five or six nights running by Woods, and I eventually recovered.

(14) Immediately after I recovered consciousness I was ordered to return to work and rejoin the remainder of my party. I then learned that they had each been struck with a heavy wooden sword-stick by SAKAMOTO, before being sent back to work. None of us were allowed lunch on this day. The guards were pretty easy on us afterwards, and I did no more work that day.

(15) About April or May, 1944, I was working as a dresser and orderly in the hospital, under Captain Wallace. I was told by one of a returning working party that three prisoners, Lance Bombardier Saunders, Gunner Jock Gillan, and another Gunner, whose name begins with a B., who lives at Nottingham, had been caught in the vicinity of the Korean hutment scrounging for food, and had been returned to camp and placed in the cells. That same evening, after roll-call, the three men were brought out in front of the guardhouse, and thrown by ju-jitsu methods, by Sergeant HOSEMI, one of the Japanese camp staff. I did not see this take place, but when I saw them about three days later, each had black eyes and abrased faces which necessitated treatment.

(16) Camp regulations were severe, but in keeping with those of the Japanese Army.

(17) I remained at KASHII camp until about June, 1944, and was then transferred to one at MUSHIRODA, later being sent to another camp outside FUKUOKA, from which I was released after the Japanese war ended. Eventually I returned to this Country and was demobilised on 13th January, 1946.

SWORN at 47 Parliament Street, Westminster
in the County of London
this 20th day of March 1947.

F CHILTON (signed)

Before me

R E GARDNER (signed)
A Commissioner for Oaths.


Davis, William John

When COMPLETED this document must be classified as SECRET.

AUSTRALIAN WAR CRIMES COMMISSION.

QUESTIONNAIRE.

NOTES:--

(a) This questionnaire should be completed by:--
(i) All repatriated Australian prisoners of war (A.I.F., R.A.A.F. and R.A.N.).
(ii) All repatriated Australian civil internees.
(iii) All repatriated British civil internees in the Pacific Area (excluding Malaya and China).
(iv) All members and ex-members of the Allied forces who have actual knowledge of war crimes committed by the enemy.

(b) It will be completed in the presence of an officer who will countersign the signature of the person making the statement.

(c) It is important that a full statement on page 3 (carried on to page 4 if necessary) be furnished as well as the answer to 8(f).

1. Army number:

1547590

2. Rank:

GUNNER

3. Full name (in BLOCK letters):

DAVIS, WILLIAM JOHN

4. Unit at time of capture and/or place of capture (State here unit in which soldier was serving at time of capture, e.g. 2/1 Fd. Regt. or H.Q. 6 Aust. Div., etc.):

79TH LT. AA BTY R.A., TIMOR

5. Home address:

6 BOGNOR ST, BATTERSEA, LONDON SW8

6. At what enemy camps and hospitals were you confined and when were you at each?

23.2.42 - 23.9.42 TIMOR
1.10.42 - 21.10.42 JAVA
28.11.42 - 20.11.43 KUMAMOTO
20.11.43 - 18.4.44 KASHII
18.4.44 - 18.1.45 MUSHIRODA
18.1.45 - 14.9.45 FUKUOKA

7. Do you have any information about any atrocities against, or mistreatment of, Allied soldiers, prisoners of war, civilian internees or the civilian population for which you think the perpetrators should be punished? (Answer by stating YES or NO in the spaces provided below)--

(a) Killings or executions:

YES.

(b) Rape, torture, beatings or other cruelties:

YES.

(c) Imprisonment under improper conditions:

YES.

(d) Massacres, wholesale looting, pillage, or burning of towns or villages:

NO.

(e) Use of prisoners of war or civilians on enemy military works or operations:

YES.

(f) Exposure of prisoners of war to danger of gunfire, bombing, torpedoing, or other hazards of war:

YES.

(g) Transportation of prisoners of war under improper conditions or deportation of civilians:

YES.

(h) Public exhibition or exposure to ridicule of prisoners of war:

YES.

(i) Failure to provide prisoners of war or internees with proper medical care, food or quarters:

YES.

(j) Collective punishment of a group for offence of others:

YES.

(k) Breaches of rules relating to the Red Cross:

YES.

(l) Cannibalism:

NO.

(m) Mutilation of the dead:

NO.

*(n) Any other war crimes not specifically mentioned above for which you think the guilty persons should be punished:

YES.

If any question is answered YES then state the facts in 8 (f) and on pages 3 and 4.

8. Details of Atrocities.--

(a) Kind of crime

BEATINGS, MENTAL TORTURE OF MEN TOO SICK TO WORK

(b) When and where it happened

IN NO. 1 CAMP (KUMAMOTO, KASHII, FUKUOKA)

(c) Who was the victim? (Give complete description including name and whether military or civilian personnel)

GNR. W. RUSHTON, RA, KEENAN RD.
DUTCHMAN, NAME UNKNOWN
F. CHILTON, RA
T. LYALL
MYSELF

(d) Who was the perpetrator? (Give complete description and as much information as possible)

CAMP COM.: SAKAMOTO; KATSURA, HONDA
GUARD KNOWN AS BASHER, 74 REG, EARLY JAN 45, TERADA
GUARD IN 74TH REG, DATE JAN 45, NAME UNKNOWN

(e) State if you saw it yourself. If you did not see it, who told you about it? (Give names and addresses of other witnesses)

MYSELF

(f) Give brief story of crime. Full statement required on pages 3 and 4.

W. RUSHTON WAS DYING OF HIS FEET AND JAP M.O. TERADA SLAPPED HIM OUT OF M I ROOM. DIED NEXT EV: DIARRHEA
GNR KEENAN WHILST DYING WAS TREATED AS MALINGERER DIED 1 HOUR AFTER ADMITTANCE TO HOSP.
MYSELF HAD 2 TEETH KNOCKED OUT BECAUSE A BRIT R-SM DID NOT REPORT TO JAP. BY KATSURA

To the best of my belief the above particulars are correct.

W J DAVIS
(Signature.)

B J MORRIS? F/O RAAF
(Signature of Interrogating Officer.)

21/9/45
(Date.)

MANILA
(Place and/or Unit at which interrogation was made.)

Comment by Interrogating Officer:

* Other war crimes not specifically mentioned include:--

(i) Usurpation of sovereignty during military occupation.
(ii) Compulsory enlistment of soldiers among the inhabitants of occupied territory.
(iii) Attempts to denationalize the inhabitants of occupied territory.
(iv} Confiscation of property.
(v) Exaction of illegitimate or of exorbitant contributions and requisitions.
(vi) Debasement of the currency and issue of spurious currency.
(vii) Deliberate bombardment of undefended places.
(viii) Wanton destruction of religious, charitable, educational and historical buildings and monuments.
(ix) Use of explosive or expanding bullets and other inhuman appliances.
(x) Directions to give no quarter and refusal of quarter.
(xi) Misuse of flags of truce.

FULL STATEMENT OF ATROCITY OR CRIME

This MUST be signed by the person making the statement and countersigned by the interrogating officer at the end of the statement.

THROUGHOUT THE CAMP WHICH I WAS HELD AS P.W. BEATINGS FOR MINOR OFFENCES WERE FREQUENT. MEN THROUGH SICKNESS WERE UNABLE TO DO WORK TOLD TO THEM. WHOLE CAMP WAS PUNISHED FOR CRIMES COMMITTED BY GUARDS. MEN HAD TO WORK BAREFOOTED HAVING NO BOOTS, IN WINTER. MAN DIED OF FROSTBITE IN BOTH FEET, GANGRENE HAD SET IN, ONLY TREATMENT WAS USED? DRESSINGS. FROM FROSTBITE IN TOES GANGRENE ROTTED UP TO HEELS BEFORE HE DIED.

RED CROSS FOOD & COMFORTS WERE PILFERED & HELD AS MENTAL TORTURE. BEST WORKERS GOT MOST IN SOME CASES. RED CROSS SUPPLIES WERE PROMISED AT A GIVEN DATE IF ALL WENT WELL AND AT THAT DATE THERE WOULD BE A MINOR OFFENCE COMMITTED BY SOMEONE AND NONE WAS GIVEN.

W J DAVIS (signed)

B J MORRIS? F/O RAAF (signed)

IN THE MATTER OF WAR CRIMES COMMITTED BY
JAPANESE NATIONALS AND IN THE MATTER
OF THE ILL TREATMENT OF PRISONERS OF WAR
AT KASHII PRISONER OF WAR CAMP.

I, William John DAVIS,
of 6, Bognor Street, Battersea,
in the County of London, S.W.8, a carpenter,
make oath and say as follows:-

(1) As shown in my previous affidavit, I was serving as a Gunner, No. 1547590 in the 21st Regiment, Royal Artillery, when taken prisoner by the Japanese at TIMOR on 23rd February, 1942, and was eventually sent to Singapore, and thence to Japan on the S.S. "DAI ICHI MARU."

(2) We arrived at MOJI, Japan, during November, 1942, and was sent by rail to a station before KUMAMOTO, and then marched about six miles to that place, I feel sure for propaganda purposes.

(3) There were about 331 prisoners at the KUMAMOTO prisoner of war camp, and upon arrival we were given four blankets and a sheet. We slept on mats, on a double decker platform, each side of the hut. Sometimes we had two, and at others three meals a day, the first of the two meals being a double issue so that one could take some to work. It usually consisted of rice, with sometimes daikon (a kind of pickled radish), and in the evening a vegetable soup in addition. Two or three times a day green tea, or hot water, was supplied. We were issued with a thin, green coloured uniform and a cap, which were not warm enough for the prevailing weather. Later warmer clothing was issued for use in the camp only, and not at work. No boots were issued, and when those we had wore out, some men had to go to work barefooted. Clothing was taken from prisoners who died in the camp, and after washing was re-issued.

(4) There were usual Japanese type lavatories in the camp, consisting of a pit over which one squatted, the pit being emptied at intervals. Flies were prevalent, and at first there was no disinfectant supplied. Cold water was supplied for washing purposes, but could not be drunk.

(5) The camp consisted of five wooden huts for prisoners, a combined cookhouse and bath-house, with communal baths, and quarters for the Japanese. Only four of the huts were used, with about 80 prisoners in each. They had no windows to admit light, but wooden flaps could be opened and supported on sticks for ventilation. There was no heating in the huts during the winter.

(6) One of the huts was set apart for sick prisoners, and after a while, a fire was permitted in this, provided we could find fuel, which was very scarce. The Japanese had medical supplies, but did not issue them freely. Prisoners with acute diarrhoea were given medicated charcoal in the evening. Captain Wallace was still with us, but was sick and in the hospital in the camp, which only held 8 persons at first, and later about 20. Lance Bombardier Chilton, of the Royal Artillery, and five volunteers, including myself, acted as medical orderlies to look after the sick. Thirty five of the prisoners died whilst I was at the camp, mainly of malnutrition. One, Gunner Goodworth, got frostbite in his feet and developed gangrene. Captain Wallace performed an improvised operation, without proper equipment, but the man died soon afterwards.

(7) For about a year no Red Cross parcels were supplied and it was not until the end of 1943 that one parcel between four men was issued. At this time some tins of bully beef, meat and vegetable stew, boxes of soup powder, and sacks of sugar arrived, all marked "British Red Cross." Three tins of bully beef were issued to each man, but about two days later, all tins of meat which had not been eaten were called in, on the excuse that it was giving the men diarrhoea. Some of the foodstuff was issued to the men and to the cookhouse for inclusion in our meals, but I saw the Japanese interpreter, KATSURA, a medical sergeant named YENDO [Ando], or something similar, and a medical orderly named TERADA, helping themselves to sugar and bully beef from the stores.

(8) The majority of the prisoners at the camp were employed during the day in constructing an aerodrome, about half a mile distant. The work mainly consisted of reducing a hill, the earth from the top being placed into trucks and emptied at the lower levels. The excavating was done with pick and shovel, and some of the trucks were pushed by prisoners, the others by petrol motors. Hours varied, according to season. In the winter, they were from about 6.30 a.m. until 6 p.m. and in the summer from 4 a.m. until 2 or 3 p.m. We were paid 10 sen a day, the N.C.O.'s receiving 15 sen.

(9) At times the work became dangerous, through earth falls, and several men were buried by these. There were no fatal accidents, so far as I know, but Lance Bombardier Ketcher, of the 21st Regiment, Royal Artillery, was buried alive, and received a fractured leg and back injuries. He was partially crippled as a result.

(10) Treatment of prisoners at the camp varied, in my opinion as the result of Japanese victories or losses. At times things were normal, provided no rules were broken, but at others beatings took place for no apparent reason. Normal temperature, by the Japanese thermometer, was about 36.7 degrees, and men were not considered unfit for work unless their temperature was 38 degrees or more. Any man who wanted to report sick had to do so in the evening, at sick parade. If his temperature was under 38, he had to go to work and was not allowed to go sick. The Japanese medical orderly on duty at the time would be responsible for this. I know that dozens of men were sent to work who were actually sick.

(11) About May, 1943, so far as I can remember, a Gunner named, to my knowledge, KEENAN, complained of acute pains in the stomach. He reported sick several times during the week, but as his temperature was not 38 or above, he was considered fit. On one of these occasions I saw KEENAN sitting on the doorstep of the medical hut and crying. One of the Japanese guards named TIRADA, or something similar, pushed KEENAN out of the hut and as he fell down, kicked him about the body. KEENAN spoke to Captain Wallace, who eventually got him into hospital. I was sick at the time and helping at the hospital, and soon after being admitted to hospital, KEENAN died.

(12) I have no personal knowledge of any other beatings at this camp, as I was sick for a considerable time and only did about five months work outside.

(13) I was at the KUMAMOTO camp until just before Christmas, 1943, and was then transferred with all prisoners at the camp to KASHII, in FUKUOKA. From there I eventually went to a camp at NAJIMA, or something similar, and was liberated there when the war ended. Later I returned to this Country, where I was demobilised on or about 25th April, 1946.

SWORN at 47 Parliament Street, S.W.1.
in the County of London
this 12th day of February, 1947.

W J DAVIS (signed)

Before me

R E GARDNER (signed)
A Commissioner for Oaths.


Dawson, Christopher

When COMPLETED this document must be classified as SECRET.

AUSTRALIAN WAR CRIMES COMMISSION.

QUESTIONNAIRE.

NOTES:--

(a) This questionnaire should be completed by:--
(i) All repatriated Australian prisoners of war (A.I.F., R.A.A.F. and R.A.N.).
(ii) All repatriated Australian civil internees.
(iii) All repatriated British civil internees in the Pacific Area (excluding Malaya and China).
(iv) All members and ex-members of the Allied forces who have actual knowledge of war crimes committed by the enemy.

(b) It will be completed in the presence of an officer who will countersign the signature of the person making the statement.

(c) It is important that a full statement on page 3 (carried on to page 4 if necessary) be furnished as well as the answer to 8(f).

1. Army number:

1623462

2. Rank:

GUNNER

3. Full name (in BLOCK letters):

DAWSON, CHRISTOPHER

4. Unit at time of capture and/or place of capture (State here unit in which soldier was serving at time of capture, e.g. 2/1 Fd. Regt. or H.Q. 6 Aust. Div., etc.):

241 BTY/77TH WALSH REG. R.A.

5. Home address:

11 ALBERT ROAD, BLACKLEY MANCHESTER ENGLAND

6. At what enemy camps and hospitals were you confined and when were you at each?

TANDJONG PRIOK - JAVA 7 MONTHS
FUKUOKA JAPAN - 33 MONTHS

7. Do you have any information about any atrocities against, or mistreatment of, Allied soldiers, prisoners of war, civilian internees or the civilian population for which you think the perpetrators should be punished? (Answer by stating YES or NO in the spaces provided below)--

(a) Killings or executions:

NO.

(b) Rape, torture, beatings or other cruelties:

YES.

(c) Imprisonment under improper conditions:

NO.

(d) Massacres, wholesale looting, pillage, or burning of towns or villages:

NO.

(e) Use of prisoners of war or civilians on enemy military works or operations:

YES.

(f) Exposure of prisoners of war to danger of gunfire, bombing, torpedoing, or other hazards of war:

YES.

(g) Transportation of prisoners of war under improper conditions or deportation of civilians:

YES.

(h) Public exhibition or exposure to ridicule of prisoners of war:

NO.

(i) Failure to provide prisoners of war or internees with proper medical care, food or quarters:

YES.

(j) Collective punishment of a group for offence of others:

NO.

(k) Breaches of rules relating to the Red Cross:

YES.

(l) Cannibalism:

NO.

(m) Mutilation of the dead:

NO.

*(n) Any other war crimes not specifically mentioned above for which you think the guilty persons should be punished:

NO.

If any question is answered YES then state the facts in 8 (f) and on pages 3 and 4.

8. Details of Atrocities.--

(a) Kind of crime

BEATING & TORTURE.

(b) When and where it happened

1944 FUKUOKA.

(c) Who was the victim? (Give complete description including name and whether military or civilian personnel)

B. SULLIVAN, GUNNER, RA.

(d) Who was the perpetrator? (Give complete description and as much information as possible)

LT. FUKUARA JAP. CAMP C.O.

(e) State if you saw it yourself. If you did not see it, who told you about it? (Give names and addresses of other witnesses)

YES. MOST MEN IN CAMP SAW IT.

(f) Give brief story of crime. Full statement required on pages 3 and 4.

S/LDR. WYRILL R.A.F. WHO IS IN THIS CAMP. CAMP C.O. HAS FULL DETAILS OF ALL THAT HAPPENED AT FUKUOKA.

To the best of my belief the above particulars are correct.

C DAWSON
(Signature.)

???
(Signature of Interrogating Officer.)

20.9.45
(Date.)

MANILA
(Place and/or Unit at which interrogation was made.)

Comment by Interrogating Officer:

* Other war crimes not specifically mentioned include:--

(i) Usurpation of sovereignty during military occupation.
(ii) Compulsory enlistment of soldiers among the inhabitants of occupied territory.
(iii) Attempts to denationalize the inhabitants of occupied territory.
(iv} Confiscation of property.
(v) Exaction of illegitimate or of exorbitant contributions and requisitions.
(vi) Debasement of the currency and issue of spurious currency.
(vii) Deliberate bombardment of undefended places.
(viii) Wanton destruction of religious, charitable, educational and historical buildings and monuments.
(ix) Use of explosive or expanding bullets and other inhuman appliances.
(x) Directions to give no quarter and refusal of quarter.
(xi) Misuse of flags of truce.

FULL STATEMENT OF ATROCITY OR CRIME

This MUST be signed by the person making the statement and countersigned by the interrogating officer at the end of the statement.

JOURNEY FROM JAVA WAS MADE ON SINGAPORE MARU. PARTICULARS OF JOURNEY ARE KNOWN TO COL. SCOTT, R.A.

C DAWSON (signed)


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