Nerves of the Hand

The nerve supply to a region is usually broken down into a superficial (or cutaneous) group and a motor group. In the hand, we will examine the superficial nerves first. A knowledge of the territories supplied by specific nerves is important clinically in order to solve nerve damage problems.

We will take a look at the classical distribution of the nerves to the skin of the hand. Realize that there are several variations in the pattern of distribution of these nerves.

There are 4 nerves coming into the general area of the hand:

and these are responsible for supplying the skin of the hand. The distribution is shown in the figure.
dorsum of the hand nerves of dorsum of hand
superficial nerves
of palm of hand
superficial nerves of palm of hand deep nerves of palm of hand deep nerves of palm of hand
The classical distribution of the cutaneous nerves of the hand are as follows:

Dorsum of Hand

posterior antebrachial cutaneous skin of dorsum of wrist
radial nerve skin of dorsum of thumb and
2 1/2 digits as far as
the distal interphalangeal joint
ulnar nerve ulnar 1 1/2 digits and
adjacent part of dorsum of hand

palm of hand

ulnar nerve sensory to skin of ulnar 1 1/2 digits
motor to muscles of hypothenar eminence
motor to ulnar two lumbricals
motor to 7 interossei
motor to adductor pollicis muscle
median nerve sensory to skin of palmar
aspect of thumb and 2 1/2 digits
including the skin on the dorsal aspect
of the distal phalanges
motor to muscles of thenar eminence
motor to radial two lumbrical muscles

Veins of the Hand Muscles of Posterior Forearm


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