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list of wwftds

Herein is a complete list of "wwftd"s™ dating from ca. 1987 to present. This started as a "word for the day up on the blackboard" sort of thing and has degenerated into its current form; irregular distribution to a mail list via e-mail... and now this.

 Copyright © 1995-2014 -- Michael A. Fischer 
    wwftd email


A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

D

dacrygelosis
1) a mental state characterized by extreme mood swings
2) a condition of alternating laughing and crying
dactylonomy
counting using one's fingers
daedal
ingenious; intricate; varied
daedalian
[fr. Daedalus, mythical Greek craftsman and inventor noted especially for the construction of a labyrinth to contain the Minotaur and for the invention of wings with which he and his son Icarus escaped imprisonment]
usu. capitalized  ingeniously formed: intricate; skillful, ingenious
daltonism
[after John Dalton, who first described it]
eponym  (esp. red-green) colorblindness  (also fig.)
dap
to skip or bounce, as a stone off the surface of a lake; hence dapping, the act of skimming stones
dap
[of imitative origin]  urban slang  a knuckle-to-knuckle fist bump, as a greeting or form of respect
dapatical
[L. dapaticus, magnificent (of a feast) < dapis, feast]  obs.  sumptuous in cheer {Bailey}
dapocaginous
low-spirited; having feelings of little self-worth
darg
Scot.  a day's work, the task of a day  (from daywark (daywork) through the series of forms dawark, da'ark, dark, darg)
dartle
[dim. of dart]  /DART ul/  (cf. sparkle)
archaic, rare  to dart or shoot forth repeatedly
dastard
coward; esp one who sneakily commits malicious acts
dasypygal
having hairy buttocks
davit
a crane that projects over the side of a ship hatchway for moving cargo
daw
a sluggard
deasil
clockwise (compare widdershins)
debarrass
[F.] to disembarrass; to disencumber from anything that embarrasses
debellation
obs.   the action of vanquishing or reducing by force of arms; conquest, subjugation
deblaterate
[fr. L. deblaterare, to prate of, blab out]
rare  to babble, prate
deblateration
the act of prating or babbling  (usu. in the phrase quisquiliary deblaterations)
decamp
to break up a camp; to depart suddenly: abscond
deckled
[G. deckel]  having a rough edge; used of handmade paper or paper resembling handmade  (so that's what that's called)
declination
the angular distance north or south from the celestial equator measured along a great circle passing through the celestial poles
decoct
to boil down; hence, to figure out by deduction what the true meaning is of a statement, a symbol, or an oblique communication
decollate
to behead
deconstruction
1) to extract the flavor of by boiling 2) boil down, concentrate by or as if by boiling
3) transf., interpreting literature so as to show the impossibility of a definite interpretation
decorticate
[fr. L. decorticare, to remove the bark from]
1) to remove the bark or outer layer; peel
2) to remove the outer layer or covering (of an organ or structure)
decretive
[fr. L. decernere, to decree + -ive]  /dih KREE tiv/
having the force of a decree: decretory   decretive will
decubitus
one's posture or position in bed
decussate
[fr. L. decussis, the number ten (X), intersection of two lines]
to intersect; hence, decussation: an intersection esp. in the form of an X
dedolent
[L., giving over grieving]  (also dedolant)
 rare  that feels sorrow no more; feeling no compunction; insensible, callous; apathetic
A tanker sinks into a dedolant sea. - W.H. Auden
deedbote
obs.  penance, repentance   (also dedbote)
defalcate
deduct; curtail; to engage in embezzlement, e.g. as a trustee  (see also peculate)
defatigable
[a lost form then back-formed fr. indefatigable]  capable of being wearied or tired out: fatigable
defeasible
[OF de(s)faisible, cf. feasible]  /di FEE zuh bul/
1) Law  capable of being annulled or voided: subject to defeasance (a rendering null and void)   a defeasible claim
2) Logic  capable of defeat by contrary evidence
defenestrate
[back-formation from next]  to throw something out of a window (see also adfenestrate)
defenestration
throwing a person or thing out the window
defi
[F.]  /DAY fee/  challenge, defiance
deflexed
turned abruptly downward
defoedation
(var. of defedation)  pollution, defiling
defossion
[fr. L. defodere, to bury (in the earth)]  /dee FOSH un/  burying (alive)
degringolade
[F.] a rapid decline or deterioration; downfall
de gustibus non est disputandum
[L.] there is no disputing (with) taste
dehort
[fr. L. dehortari, to dissuade]  now rare  to (attempt to) dissuade
dehortation
advice against something: dissuasion [marked rare in 1913]
dehortatory
dissuading
deictic
[fr. Gk deiktos, able to show]  /DIK tik/
showing or pointing out directly  the words this, that, and those have a deictic function
deinotherian
[fr. L. Deinotherium, a genus of prehistoric mammals related to but often larger than the elephants]
fig.  uncommonly large: elephantine
deipnetic
[fr. Gk deipnon, the principal meal + -etic]
obs. rare  pertaining to dinner; fond of eating
deipnosophist
a person skilled in dinner conversation
deipnosophobia
a fear of dinner conversation
dejecta
excrements
delapsation
[?] a spurious word in Webster, copied in subsequent Dicts.
De`lap*sa"tion (?), n. See Delapsion (a falling down). Ray.  {Webster's Revised Unabridged, 1913}
< DELAPSATION, n. A falling down.  {Webster's 1828 Dictionary}  (see also delassation)  [the Ray citation actually has delassation.]
delapse
[fr. L. delabi, to slip or fall down]  archaic  to slip down: descend, sink
delapsion
[fr. L. delabi]  obs.  a falling down
delassation
[fr. L. delassare, to weary or tire out]  obs. rare   fatigue, weariness
delation
[fr. L. delatio, an accusation, denunciation]  accusation, denouncement
delator
[L. informer, accuser]  an informer, a secret or professional accuser
delectation
delight, enjoyment
delible
capable of being deleted
deliquesce
to melt away; to dissolve gradually and become liquid by attracting and absorbing moisture
deliquescent
[fr. L. deliquescere, to melt away, dissolve, disappear]  /de li KWE sunt/
1) tending to melt away or dissolve
2) having repeated division into branches [also transf. and fig.]
delirament
[fr. L. deliramentum, < delirare, to be crazy]
archaic  an insane fancy: craze, delusion
delitescent
[fr. L. delitescere, to hide]  /del eh TES sent/
lying hidden: obfuscated, latent; thus, delitescence: latent state, concealment, seclusion
Delphic
/DEL fik/ 1) of or relating to the oracle of Apollo at Delphi  2) obscurely prophetic; oracular
delphically
[fr. Delphic pronouncements; i.e., obscurely prophetic]  ambiguously, obscurely
delphinity
[fr. L. Delphinidae, after humanity]  humorous nonce-word   dolphin-kind, the nature of dolphins
deltiologist
one who collects postcards
deltiology
the collecting of postcards
delusive
[fr. delusion + -ive]  1) deceptive, beguiling  2) delusional
démarche
[F. literally, gait]
a) a course of action: maneuver  b) a diplomatic or political initiative or maneuver
demegoric
[fr. Gk demegoros, popular orator]  /dee muh GAW rik/  of or pertaining to public speaking
dementate
[fr. L. dementare < demens, mad]  archaic   to deprive of reason
demephitize
[fr. de- + mephit-ic + -ize] rare 'To purify from foul unwholesome air' {Webster 1828}
hence, demephitization
demigorgon
[fr. LL. Demogorgon]
a terrifying ancient deity or demon of the underworld (Melville's mistaken(?) usage for Demogorgon, evidently conflating it with demiurge)
demimonde
1) a class of women on the fringes of respectable society supported by wealthy lovers
2) a group having little reputation
demisemiquaver
a 1/32 note in music [see also semiquaver]
demiurge
something that is an autonomous creative force or decisive power
demonomania
[demon + -mania]  a delusion of being possessed by evil spirits
demonym
[fr. Gk demos, people + onuma, name]
a name for a resident of a particular locality, derived from the name of that locality
demotic
relating to the common people: popular  demotic idiom
dendrochronology
the study of growth rings on trees
denegate
[fr. L. denegare]  obs.  to deny
denouement
[F.] the final outcome
dentiloquy
speaking through clenched teeth; thus, dentiloquist
deontic(s)
[from Gk deon, that which is obligatory]
1) [adj] of or relating to moral obligation: deontological
2) [n] pl. the science of duty: deontology
deontology
the theory or study of moral obligation
depalmate
obs.  to give one a box on the ear {Cockerham}
deparadisation
[de- + paradise + -ation]  nonce-word  expulsion from the Garden
depauperate
[fr. L. pauper poor, impoverished]  obs.   to render poor, impoverish
depeditation
[coined by Johnson(?), after decapitation]  amputation of a foot
depertible
[fr. L. dispertire  to distribute, divide (as if fr. depertire]
obs.  capable of being divided into parts; divisible
dephlogisticate
[cf.. phlogiston]  to remove or deprive of phlogiston; to take away the ability to burn (now understood to be chemically impossible)
deponent
one who gives evidence
deponticate
[fr. L. de, down from + pons, bridge + -ate]
nonce-word  to hurl from a bridge; hence
We will defenestrate and deponticate.
depontication
[ad L. pons/pontis, bridge; after defenestration]  the act of hurling from a bridg
deprehend
[fr. L. deprehendere  to seize, catch, detect, etc.]
obs.  1) to seize, capture  2) to take by surprise  3) to perceive or detect
deprehendible
obs.  capable of being detected
deprehensible
obs.  see previous
deracinate
[fr. L. dis- + racine, root]  to uproot
deracination
eradication, extirpation
derecho
[Sp., straight ahead]  /day-RAY-cho/
a widespread and usually fast-moving windstorm, which may produce damaging straight-line winds
derf
Scot.  bold, daring
dermatoglyphics
skin patterns on the hands and feet (palms and heels)
dern
[fr. Fris. dern  hidden, secret, obscure]  now chiefly dialect
1) hidden, secret; crafty, underhanded  2) drear, dark, somber, dire  3) UK  earnest, determined
derogate
[adj] diminished in value; dishonored; degraded
deruncinate
inkhorn term  to weed
desideratum (pl. desiderata)
[L.] something desired as essential
the concept that peace of mind is the great desideratum - Warren Weaver
desidious
[fr. L. desidere to sit long, sit idle]  obs.  idle, indolent, slothful
desipience
1) foolishness, silliness
2) relaxed dallying in enjoyment of foolish trifles
desipient
foolish
desition
an ending, or conclusion
desitive
final, serving to complete, conclusive
desperadoism
[fr. desperado + -ism]   /des peh RAHD o izem/  a wave or period of unusual activity by desperadoes
despiteous
/dis PIT ee us/  also, dispiteous
archaic  despiteful; malicious; cruel
desudation
[fr. L. desudare, to sweat greatly]  /de sjui DAY shun/
Med.  a profuse and inordinate sweating
desuetude
discontinuance from use or exercise; disuse
desuperpollicate
to give a 'thumbs down'
"Mr. Warford peers over at this wife, who for the second time tonight desuperpollicates..."  - Thomas Pynchon
detenebrate
obs. rare  to free from darkness or obscurity  (from L. de + tenebrare, to darken)
detritivore
[ad. Gk Detritivore > L. detritus, rubbing away + -vore]  /deh TRID uh vore/
Zool.  an organism that feeds on detritus; also, detritivorous : feeding on detritus
detur
[L., let it be given] a prize of books given annually to meritorious undergraduate students at Harvard Univ., U.S.
deuteragonist
1) the actor taking the part of second importance in a classical Greek drama
2) a person who serves as a foil to another (second banana?)
deuterogamist
someone who remarries after a spouse's death; also called a digamist
devenustate
[fr. L. de- + venustare, to beautify]  obs.  to deprive of beauty or comeliness; to disfigure, deform
devenustation
obs. rare  the condition or process of being reduced from Venus status: de-aestheticization
devorative
[fr. L. devorare, to devour]  /de VOR uh tiv/
Med., obs.  capable of being swallowed whole
diablerie
1) black magic: sorcery
2) demon lore
3) mischievous conduct or manner
diapason
/dye uh PAY zun/  
1 a) a burst of harmonious sound  b) the principal foundation stop of an organ  c) (i) the entire compass of musical tones (ii) range, scope
2 a) tuning fork  b) a standard of pitch
diaphone
a foghorn with a two-toned, penetrating sound
diaphor
a metaphor that implies the possibility of something (compare diaphor)
diaphoretic
having the power to increase perspiration
diastema
[Gk diastema, interval]  /die uh STEE muh/  a gap or space between two teeth
diasyrm
/DAI a sirm/  a figure of speech expressing disparagement or ridicule; also, damning with faint praise
dicacity
[fr. L. dicacitas]  archaic  raillery: biting wit
dictionatical
[dictionary + -ical, relating to]  authorized or approved by the dictionary
didactic
designed or intended to teach; intended to convey instruction and information
diddicoi
[fr. Romani didikai]  also diddicoy
Eng. dialect  a gypsy or other nomadic person
diddly-squat
[prob. euphemistic, cf. doodly-squat]
U.S. slang  the least amount: nothing (in negative constructions, anything)
 if everyone ignores it, it won't be worth diddly-squat -- Andrew Tobias
diddums
UK, interj.  an exclamation indicating that the speaker thinks that the person addressed is being childish and petulant (in speech to children: did 'ems did they?)
didymous
[fr. Gk didumos, twin]  /DID uh mus/  arranged or growing in pairs; twin
diegesis
a recitation; a narration
diegogarcity
[fr. Diego Garcia, Indian Ocean atoll; after serendipity]
"a term used [at Wordorigins.org] to denote the appearance of another term in multiple sources shortly after you have looked it up in the dictionary" (or first noticed it)
dietrologia
[It.] the science of what's behind it all
the art of finding dark, ulterior motives behind the most obvious decisions - Alessandra Stanley
diffidation
[fr. L. diffidare, to renounce one's vassalage, renounce friendship]  /dif uh DAY shun/
archaic, historical  a renunciation of faith or allegiance; formal severing of peaceful relations
diffidelity
[dis- + fidelity, after infidelity]  obs. rare  disbelief, unbelief
diffident
hesitant in acting or speaking; reserved, unassertive
digamist
one who marries a second time (legally); cf. deuterogamist
digerati
people who are knowledgeable about digital technologies such as computer programming and design [digital + literati]
digladiation
(dai-gla-di-a'-tion) [from L. dis + gladius, a sword]
1) fighting or fencing with swords  2) fig. strife or bickering of words; wrangling, contention, disputation
dilogy
[rhet.] 1) the use of an ambiguous or equivocal expression; the word or expression so used
2) repetition of a word or phrase, in the same context
dimbox
someone who settles a controversy or dispute
diminute
[fr. L. diminuere]  obs. diminished, diminutive
dimmening
[fr. dimmen, to grow dim (rare)]  rare  growing dim
dingbat
[origin unknown]
a typographical ornament or symbol used typically to call attention to an opening sentence or to make a break between two paragraphs; also, any of the pi fonts
(not to be confused with Archie Bunker's dingbat spouse)
dinsome
Scot.  loud; noisy
dioristic
serving to distinguish
dipsetic
[(n), adj] (something) causing thirst
dirdum
[origin unknown]  Scot.  [n] 1) uproar, tumultuous noise or din  2) outcry; loud reprehension, obloquy, blame
direption
[fr. L. diripere : to tear asunder, lay waste, snatch away]
obs.  1) the sacking or pillaging of a town  2) an act of plundering
direptitious
[after surreptitious, fr. L. direption, the sacking or pillaging of a town < diripere, to tear asunder)
obs. rare  characterized by plundering or pillaging; hence direptitiously
disambiguation
the establishment of a single semantic or grammatical interpretation
discalceation
[fr. L. discalceare, to pull off the shoes]  obs.  to put off the shoes {Johnson, 1828}
the act of taking off the shoes, esp. in token of reverence
discalced
unshod; barefoot  discalced friars
discinct
rare  loosely dressed; also: loose, negligent
discobolus
a discus thrower
discordianism
the veneration of Eris (a.k.a. Discordia) -- the goddess of chaos, discord and confusion
disembogue
to discharge or pour forth from the mouth (as from a river)
disfluency (dysfluency)
[dis-, apart or away + fluency]  /dis FLOO un see/
1) Pathol.  impairment of the ability to produce smooth, fluent speech
2) an interruption in the smooth flow of speech, as by a pause or the repetition of a word or syllable; lack of skillfulness in speaking
disincommodate
[erroneous (or jocular) mixture of discommodate and incommodate (themselves rather archaic forms for discommode and incommode)]  to cause inconvenience to: trouble
disintermediate
[originally a banking term, now more broadly used]
Econ.  to withdraw one's money from intermediate institutions for direct investment; to eliminate the middleman
dislimn
to dim
disponible
[ad. L. disponere, to set in different places, place here and there, arrange, dispose; cf. F. disponible]
capable of being assigned or disposed of as one wishes: available
disposophobia
[dispose + -phobia]  the fear of throwing anything away
disquiparant
[fr. med. L. disquiparantia]  Logic obs.  pertaining to the relation of two correlates which are heteronymous, i.e. denoted by different names, as father and son, or husband and wife
disquixote
[dis- + quixote, to act like Don Quixote]  to disillusion
dissemble
to hide under a false appearance; disguise
dissentient
[fr. L. dissentire, to dissent]  disagreeing, esp. with a majority
dissmell
the reflex to avoid a bad smell (contrast with disgust)
disworth
[fr. the archaic verb worth, to happen, to become; the stem is prob. the same as that of L. vertere, to turn]
obs. rare  to deprive of worth; to render worthless or unworthy
dithyrambic
wildly enthusiastic in statement or writing
diurnal
[fr. L. diurnalis]
1) recurring every day; having a daily cycle  2) occurring in the daytime
diurnality
[see previous]  behavior characterized by activity during the day
divagate
[fr. L. dis- + vagari, to wander]  /DI vuh gate/
to wander or stray from a course or subject: diverge, digress
divagation
/di vuh GAY shun/  a divergence or digression from a course or subject
divaricate
to diverge
diversiloquent
[fr. L. diversus, diverse + loquentem, speaking]  /dy ver SIL o kwent/?
rare  speaking diversely
diversivolent
[fr. L. diversus, diverse + volentum, wishing]  /dy ver SIV o lent/?
desiring strife or differences: contentious
divertissement
a diversion or entertainment
divinate
[fr. L. divinare, to divine (back-formation from divination?)]
to foretell future events, soothsay, augur, prophesy
divulgate
[fr. L. divulgare, to divulge]  /duh VUL gate/
1) obs.  divulge  2) archaic  disclose, reveal; publish
divulsion
[fr. L. divello, to rend asunder]  (now used chiefly in surgery)
the act of pulling away; a tearing asunder; a violent separation
dizen
[fr. earlier disen to dress a distaff with flax]
archaic  to attire or array with finery, to deck out, adorn: bedizen; also fig.
dizzard
archaic  a foolish fellow, idiot, blockhead
docent
1) a college or university teacher orlecturer
2) a person who leads guided tours esp. through a museum or art gallery
doch-an-dorris
Irish, a drink at the door  /dakh un DOORus (kh as in Bach)/
a parting drink
docity
[perhaps alter. of docility]  dial.  teachableness; quickness of comprehension
doddle
[origin unknown]  Brit. colloq.  a very easy task; a 'walk-over'
dogdayed
[fr. dog-days, the hottest, sultriest days of summer]  poetic nonce-word  of or relating to the dog-days
doggery
a cheap saloon, dive
doggo
in hiding
dogsbody
one whose work is routine and boring: drudge
doit
a trifle
dol
[fr. L. dolor, pain]  a unit of intensity of pain
dolent
obs.  attended with or causing sorrow or grief; grievous, distressing
dolorifuge
[fr. L. dolere, to feel pain, grieve + fuga, flight]  /dah LOR ah fyuj/
archaic  something that banishes or mitigates grief
dolorimeter
a psychological torture instrument which measures pain in units called dols
domnoddy
[origin uncertain]  /DOM noddy/
fool, ninny, nincompoop, simpleton  (also, noddypoll, noddy)
donnicker
a toilet: bathroom, lavatory
donsie
1) Brit.  unlucky
2) Scot.  restive; saucy
3) slightly ill
doofusistic
[fr. doofus, a stupid, incompetent person]  done by a doofus, or with a doofus, or to a doofus, or in the name of a doofus, or in lieu of a doofus, or just with a doofus-like flair
doolally
[spoken form of Deolali, India; from 'doolally tap']  characterized by an unbalanced state of mind
doppelganger
[G.] a ghostly counterpart of a living person
dord
non-word  defined in WNI2 as "density"; began life as an error made when transcribing a card that read "D or d" (meaning a capital D or small d) as an abbreviation for "density" -- subsequently cited in WNI3 definition of the term ghost word
dorts
Scot.  a mood of bad temper: sulks
doryphore
[F. doryphore, Colorado beetle (a pest)]  /dor i fo(r)/  (coined by Sir Harold Nicholson) also doriphore
one who gains inordinate pleasure from detecting minor errors; a pedantic nitpicker
dosh
Brit. slang  money
dotterel
[fr. ME; related to dote, dotard]  /DAH teh rel/ or /DAH trel/  also dottrel
1) a species of plover (said to be very easily caught)
2) Brit.  a silly, foolish person, esp. one who is easily duped
dottle
unburnt and partially burnt tobacco caked in the bowl of a pipe
double entente
There is no use pointing out that double entendre does not exist in French and that the proper [French] phrase for a double meaning, one of them usually indelicate, is double entente. - B. & C. Evans, A Dictionary of Contemporary American Usage
doula
[modern Gk, female helper < Gk doule, female slave]  /DU luh/
a woman experienced in childbirth who provides advice, information, emotional support, and physical comfort to a mother before, during, and just after childbirth
dowless
Scot.  /DOW lis/  without strength or energy; feeble; infirm
dowsabel
[fr. the female name Dulcibella]
obs.  sweetheart (perhaps first used in some pastoral song, whence applied generically to a sweetheart)
doxology
an expression of praise to God
doxy
a woman of loose morals: prostitute; mistress
doyen
[F., doyenne is the feminine form]
1) the eldest or senior member of a group
2) a person uniquely skilled by long experience in some field of endeavor
3) something which is the best of its kind
drachenfutter
[G.] a peace offering to a wife from a guilty husband (literally: dragon fodder)
draff
refuse; dregs; hogwash
draffsack
(also draftsack)  Brit. dialect
a sack of draff or refuse; also fig. a big paunch; a lazy glutton
draffy
worthless [also draffish]
drammock
Scot.  raw oatmeal mixed with cold water
drasy
[fr. drast, obs. : dregs, lees]
obs.  dreggy; fig. vile, worthless, rubbishy
drawcansir
a blustering, bullying fellow; a pot-valiant braggart; a bully
dree
Scot.  to suffer; endure
dreich
Scot.  /dreek or dree/  dreary (also dree or dreigh)
drogulus
an entity whose presence is unverifiable because it has no physical effects
drongo
Austral. slang   a simpleton; a stupid, worthless person
dropsonde
a cylindrical cannister that acts like a miniature weather station when dropped into the eye of a hurricane, transmitting back to the aircraft a vertical atmospheric profile of temperature, humidity, barometric pressure and wind data every half second
droumy
[origin uncertain, but see Sc. drumlie]  obs. rare  troubled; muddy: turbid  to fish in droumy waters - Bacon
dryasdust
[coined by Sir Walter Scott]  boring; pedantic
dubiety
doubtfulness; uncertainty; doubt
dudgeon
a fit or state of angry indignation usually provoked by opposition; ill humor, resentment
duende
[Sp.]  /dw'ende/  a) a ghost, an evil spirit  b) (transf.) inspiration, magic, fire
duff
[origin uncertain]
Scot. and U.S.  decaying leaves and branches covering a forest floor; in extended use for a lake bottom
dumbledore
1) Brit.  the bumblebee; "the most good-natured of God's Insects" -Southey
2) Brit dial.  the dung-beetle
dummerer
[< dumb]  slang, archaic  the cant name for a beggar who pretended to lack the faculty of speech
duncical
rare  of or pertaining to a dunce; dull-witted, stupid, blockheaded
dunkle
Scot. [v] to make a dint or pit in; to dint  [n] the cavity produced by a blow, or in consequence of a fall
durance
imprisonment
durbar
[fr. Pers. and Urdu darbar, court]  East Indian  /DUR bar/
1) the court of an Indian prince; an audience held by a prince
2) a hall or place of audience
duumvirate
government or control by two people
duvet
a comforter
dybbuk
[fr. Yiddish dibek]  the wandering soul of a dead person believed in Jewish folklore to enter and control a living body
dyslogy
[dys- + stem of eulogy]  dispraise, censure (as opposed to eulogy)
dysnomy
[fr. Gk dys, bad + nomos, law]  /DIS noh mee/
rare  bad legislation; the enactment of bad laws {Cockeram}
dysphemism
the substitution of a disagreeable or offensive expression for an agreeable or inoffensive one
dysphoria
a state of feeling unwell or unhappy
dysteleology
the doctrine of purposelessness in nature (compare teleology)
dysthymia
[fr. Gk dysthymos, despondent]  a depression
dysthymic
[see previous]  /dis THY mik/  affected with despondency or depression of spirits
dystmesis
[fr. Gk. tmesis, act of cutting + dys-, bad]
defined variously as: a synonym for tmesis; tmesis at syllable boundaries, as opposed to between parts of a compound; separation at an inappropriate or unlikely position [considering the lexemes, it seems as if the actual meaning should be closer to the last of these; e.g., unbefreakinglievable (as opposed to the tmesis of unfreakingbelievable)]
dystopia
an imaginary society in which social or technological trends have culminated in a greatly diminished quality of life or degradation of values
dystychiphobia
the fear of accidents
dyvoury
[fr. Sc. dyvour, beggar (perh. related to diver -- drowned in debt?)]
Scot. obs.  bankruptcy; beggary
dziggetai
[fr. Mongolian tchikhitei]   /DZIG uh tai/  the wild ass of Mongolia


E

eagre
[origin unknown]  /E-gur/ or /A-gur/
chiefly Brit.  a tidal bore or flood tide (up an estuary)
earworm
[G. ohrwurm]  a song or tune that repeats over and over inside a person's head
ebriection
mental breakdown from too much boozing
ebullition
the act, process or state of boiling or bubbling up; a sudden violent outburst or display
eccedentesiast
a person who fakes a smile, such as on television
[coined by Florence King, of whom George Will wrote, "If Mencken were alive, he would be her."]
eccentricate
obs.  to go out of one's proper sphere
ecdemomania
[fr. Gk ekdmeos, being away from home + -mania]  
rare!  a compulsive wandering
ecdysiast
one who performs a striptease  (coined by H. L. Mencken in 1940, see following)
ecdysis
[fr. Gk ekdusis, a stripping off]  /EK di sis/
the shedding of an outer layer of skin, as by insects, crustaceans, or snakes; molting
echolalia
the often pathological repetition of what is said by other people as if echoing them
echt
[G.]  /ekt/  genuine, authentic, typical  as performances these are echt masterpieces
eclaircise
[back-formation fr. F. éclaircissement, clearing up]  rare  to clear up
eclipsis
[ad. Gk ekleipsis, omission]
Ling./Rhet.  an omission or suppression of words or sounds  (sometimes erroneously given as a synonym of ellipsis)
eclogue
a poem in which shepherds are introduced conversing
ecphonesis
[Gk ekphonesis < ekphonein, to cry out]  /ek feh NEE sis/
Rhet.  an emotional exclamation; e.g., O tempora! O mores! - Cicero
ecphorize (also ecphore)
[fr. Gk ekphoros, (to be) made known]  /EK fur ize/  
Psychol.  to evoke or revive an engram (an emotion, a memory, or the like) by means of a stimulus
ecphory (or ecphoria)
the evocation of an engram from a latent to a manifest state
ecumenicity
[L. oecumenicus, of the whole Christian world]  also oecumenicity
universality, catholicity; ecumenical character
edacious
[fr. L. edax < edere, to eat]  /i DAY shus/
voracious; devouring, often said of time
Tempus edax rerum. (Time devours everything.) - Ovid, Metamorphoses
edacity
1) ravenousness  2) voraciousness  3) A href="#esurient">esurience  4) greediness
edentulous
 [fr. L. edentulus]  /ee DEN chu lus/  toothless, edentate, agomphious
edulcorate
to make pleasant, sweeten
eellogofusciouhipoppokunurious
dubious  good, perhaps very good
eesome
attractive or gratifying to the eye
effable
utterable; that that can be uttered or spoken
effigiate
/ef FIG i ate/  rare  to form as an effigy; hence, to fashion; to adapt
effluxion
[fr. L. effluere, to flow]
1) the process of flowing out  2) effluence; emanation
effrenate
[fr. L. effrenare, unbridled]  obs.  of passions: unbridled, ungovernable
effrenation
unruliness
effulgence
radiant splendor: brilliance
effutiation
[fr. L. effutire, to prate]  nonce-word  twaddle, balderdash
eggcorn
[sounds like acorn]  a word which is changed into another which is either said the same or is closely similar and which seems to make at least as much sense in context as the original  (see also mondegreen)
eglomerate
[faux L. from e- + glomerare, to wind or gather into a ball]
obs.  to unwind, as thread from a ball
egoism
[fr. ego + -ism]  the ethical doctrine that morality has its foundations in self-interest; hence egoist
eidetic
marked by or involving extraordinarily accurate and vivid recall
eidolon
an unsubstantial image: phantom; ideal
eidos
[Gk, literally, shape, form]
1) something that is seen or intuited  a) idea (Plato)  b) form, essence (Aristotle)
2) the cognitive part of cultural structure
einfuhlung
[G.] understanding so intimate that the feelings, thoughts, and motives of one person are readily comprehended by another
eisegesis
the interpretation of a text (as of the bible) by reading into it one's own ideas
eisteddfod
/eis TEDD vod/  an annual Welsh competitive arts festival [early Aug.]
eiswein
a sweet German wine made from grapes that have frozen on the vine
ejulation
[L. ejulatio, fr. ejulare to wail, lament]  /EJ u Lay shun/?
obs.  a wailing, lamentation
ekistic
relating to ekistics
ekistician
one who studies or is versed in ekistics
ekistics
[fr. Gk oikistikos, relating to settlement]  /i KIS tiks/
a name given by C. A. Doxiadis to the study of human settlements and the way they develop and adapt themselves to changing circumstances (first used in his lectures of 1942 at the Athens Technical University)
ekpyrotic
[fr. Gk ekpurosis, conflagration]  referring to the destruction and recreation of the world in fire:  ekpyrotic universe
elbedritsch
[Penn. G.]  /EL buh drich/  (cf. snipe hunt)
an imaginary creature which, as a practical joke, a greenhorn is sent to hunt or capture
{DARE - Dictionary of American Regional English}
eldritch
weird, eerie
eleemosynary
of, relating to, or supported by charity
elenchus
refutation; esp. one in syllogistic form
elenctic
[Gk elenktikos, < elenktos]  /ee LENC tic/  variants: elenchtic, elenctical, elenchtical
serving to refute; refutative (used of indirect modes of proof)  opposed to deictic
Eleusinian
of or relating to ancient Eleusis or to the religious mysteries celebrated there in worship of Demeter and Persephone:  Eleusinian mysteries
elide
to suppress or alter by elision; to strike out (a word or passage)
elogium
eulogy
eloign
to move to a distant/unknown place
elozable
[fr. OF esloser, to praise]  /el LO za bul(?)/  obs. rare  amenable to flattery  
a very insecure and elozable widow - D. Grambs
elsewhen
[else + when]  obs.  at another time, at other times
but used by R. A. Heinlein in 1941 as a novella title; so now (in time-travel situations) at another point in time
elucubrate
[fr. L. elucubrare, to compose by lamplight]  to work out or express by studious effort; to burn the midnight oil
elysian
1) pertaining to Elysium  2) blissful, delightful
emacity
[fr. L. emacitas, a desire to buy]   /ee MAS i tee/  rare  a fondness for buying things
emberlucock
[fr. F. emburelucocquer, a nonce-word of Rabelais]  to bewilder, confuse
embolalia
the use of... um... virtually meaningless filler words, phrases, or... er... stammerings (or so-called hesitation-forms) in speech, whether as... uh... unconscious utterings while arranging one's thoughts or as... like... a vacuous, inexpressive... you know... mannerism
embonpoint
plumpness of person; stout
embracery
an attempt to corruptly influence a jury
embrangle
[en- + brangle (obs.)]  embroil, confuse, entangle
embuggerance
Brit. military slang  a natural or artificial hazard that complicates any proposed course of action
eminentissimo
[It. (used as a title for cardinals) fr. eminente]  /em eh nen TIS eh mo/  a person of superlative eminence
eminento
[mod. of It. eminente]  an eminent person (but often used as a disparaging epithet)
emmet
[fr. emmet, a synonym of ant]  in Cornwall, mildly disparaging
a holiday-maker or tourist; a summer visitor (cf. grockle)
empennage
the tail assembly of an airplane
empleomania
a mania for holding public office
emption
the act of buying: purchase
empyreal
1) celestial
2) sublime
empyrean
1a) the highest heaven or heavenly sphere in ancient and medieval cosmology usually consisting of fire or light
b) the true and ultimate heavenly paradise
2) firmament, heavens  3) an ideal place or state
emunctory
1) [adj] of or pertaining to the blowing of the nose; that has the function of conveying waste matters from the body
2) [n] a cleansing organ or canal; a term applied to the excretory ducts and organs of the body
enallage
[L.] 1) Gram.  the substitution of one grammatical form for another; e.g., the editorial we for I
2) obs.  a Rhet. figure whereby we change or invert the order of terms in a discourse
enantiodrome
a word which has two (nearly) opposite meanings: a Janus word, contranym; e.g. sanction, cleave
enantiodromia
the changing of something into its opposite
enantiodromic
characteristic of something which has become its opposite
enantiomorph
[fr. Gk enantios, opposite + -morph, form]   /eh NAN tee uh morf/
a form which is related to another as an object is related to its image in a mirror; a mirror image
enantiomorphic (or enantiomorphous)
of or relating to, or exhibiting properties of an enantiomorph
enantiomorphism (or enantiomorphy)
the condition or property of being enantiomorphous (esp. in Crystallography)
enantiosis
the rhetorical device of stating the opposite of what is meant, usually ironically; affirmation by contraries
enatic (also enate)
[L. enatus]   related on the mother's side   enatic clans  (compare agnatic)
encephalophone
an apparatus that emits a continuous hum whose pitch is changed by interference of brain waves transmitted through oscillators from electrodes attached to the scalp and that is used to diagnose abnormal brain functioning
enchiridion
a manual or handbook
encomiastic
[fr. Gk enkomiazein, to praise]  /en CO mi AS tic/
praising; eulogistic; laudatory
encomium
[L. fr. Gk enkomion, praise for a victor]  glowing and warmly enthusiastic praise; an expression of said praise
encumbrous
obs.  cumbersome, distressing, troublesome
endochronic
relating to transformed or modified internal time
endomusia
silent recall of a melody; endomusia often appears as a type of obsessive thought   {Psychiatric Dictionary, 4th ed., Hinsie and Campbell}
energumen
[see next]  a person supposedly possessed by an evil spirit
energumenist
[fr. Gk energoumenos, possessed by an evil spirit]
obs. rare  one possessed by demons
enervate
to weaken; to debilitate
engastration
the action of stuffing one fowl inside another
engastrimyth
a ventriloquist (the Greek equivalent of the Latin-based ventriloquist)
enigmatologist
[see next]  one who studies enigmas
enigmatology
[enigmato- + -logy; fr. L. (Gk) ænigma]
the investigation or analysis of enigmas
also, the art and science of puzzle construction
ennead
a group of nine
enology
the science dealing with wine and wine-making
enormity
[fr. L. enormitas]
1) great wickedness  2) an improper, vicious or immoral act  3) usage problem: great size, immensity
enracinate
[en- + L. racine, root]  to put forth roots  (compare deracinate)
enracination
the act or process of taking root
ensorcel
to bewitch
entasis
[fr. Gk word for tension]  /EN tuh sis/
 archaic  a slight convexity or swelling, as in the shaft of a column, intended to compensate for the illusion of concavity resulting from straight sides
entelechy
[fr. Gk entelekheia]  /en TEL eh key/
Philos. 1) [Aristotle] the condition of a thing whose essence is fully realized; actuality
2) a vital force that directs an organism toward self-fulfillment
entheastic
[fr. Gk entheastikos, inspired]   /en thee AS tic/
obs.  agitated by divine energy; inspired
entheate
[fr. L, entheos, divinely inspired]  obs.  possessed or inspired by a god
entheomania
[fr. L, entheos + -mania]
a passion for divine inspiration; religious mania (cf. demonomania)
enthymeme
[fr. Gk enthyméma, thought, argument]  /EN thuh meem/
Logic  a syllogism or other argument in which a premise or the conclusion is suppressed
entrechat
[F.] /A(n) tre shaw/  a ballet leap in which the dancer repeatedly crosses the legs; used figuratively, as in his verbal entrechats
entrepôt
[F.]  /A(n) tre po/  an intermediary center of trade and transshipment
enturbulate
[coined by L. Ron Hubbard, prob. fr. turbulent/disturbed]
used as a shibboleth by Scientologists  to disturb; to harass
entwicklungsroman
[G.]  a novel dealing with the protagonist's character development from childhood to maturity [compare bildungsroman]
eolithic
of or relating to the early period of the Stone Age marked by the use of crudely chipped flint
eonism
[eponym, fr. the Chevalier Charles d'Éon (1728-1810), a French adventurer who wore women's clothes + -ism]  transvestism, esp. by a man
epact
a period added to harmonize the lunar with the solar calendar
epanorthosis
the correcting of a statement as one is making it
epassyterotically
[fr. Gk epassuteros]  nonce-word  one after another
epenthesis
[fr. Gk epentithenai, to insert a letter]   /e PEN(t) thuh sis/
the insertion (or development) of a sound or letter within a word; hence epenthesize, to so insert
epeolatry
/epe OL atry/  the worship of words; hence, epeolatrist
epexegesis
additional explanation
ephebophile
 [fr.Gk phepius, youth]  /ef FEE bo file/
an adult who is attracted to youths who are postpubescent; hence, ephebophilia
ephectic
 [fr. Gk ephektikos, to hold back]  /e FEK tik/  characterized by suspense of judgement
ephemeral
beginning and ending in a day
ephemerist
[fr. Gk ephemeris, diary]  /ee PHEM er ist/
1) obs.  one who keeps an ephemeris; a journalist
2) obs.  one who studies the daily motions and positions of the planets
3) a collector of ephemera [paper items (as posters, broadsides, and tickets) that were originally meant to be discarded after use but have since become collectibles]
ephesian
/i FEE zhen/  a jovial companion; a thief; a roysterer
ephialtes
[fr. Gk ephialtes, an incubus; fr. epihallomai, to leap upon)
a demon supposed to cause nightmares; the nightmare itself
ephorize
[fr. Gk ephoros, uplifted]  obs.  to exercise a controlling influence over
epicaricacy
/EP i kar IK i see/?  taking pleasure in another's misfortune: schadenfreude
epicritic
[fr. Gk epikrinein, to decide]  /ep i KRIT ik/
of or relating to sensory nerve fibers that enable the perception of slight differences in the intensity of stimuli, esp. touch or temperature  (compare protopathic)
epideictic
rhetorically demonstrative (showing off)
epigone
an inferior imitator of a creative thinker or artist; hence, epigonic
epimyth
the moral of the story
epinician
[fr. Gk epinicion, song of victory]  /ep eh NI si un/  in celebration of victory
epiphenomenon
/EP uh fi NOM uh non/
1) a secondary phenomenon that results from and accompanies another
2) Pathol.  an additional condition or symptom in the course of a disease, not necessarily connected with the disease
epiphor
[Gk. epiphora, a bringing to or upon]
a metaphor that expresses the existence of something
(opposed to diaphor, a metaphor that expresses the possibility of something)
epiphyte
[fr. Gk epi, upon + phyton, plant)  /EP uh fite/  
a plant which grows on another plant; usually restricted to those which derive only support (and not nutrition) from the plants on which they grow: air plant
episematic
[fr. Gk epi- + sematic, of mimetic colors]
Biol.  (esp. of coloration) serving to assist members of the same species in recognizing each other
epistemic
[fr. Gk epistem(é), knowledge]  /ep uh STEE mik/
of or pertaining to knowledge or the conditions for acquiring it
epistemology
the study of the nature and grounds of knowledge, esp. its limits
epistrophe
repetition of a word or expression at the end of successive phrases, clauses, sentences or verses especially for rhetorical or poetic effect
e.g., government of the people, by the people, for the people
epitasis
the part of the play developing the main action and leading to the catastrophe
epizootic
/ep i zo OT ik/  [n] an outbreak of disease affecting many animals of one kind at the same time; also: the disease itself
eponymous
of, relating to, or being the person for whom something is believed to be named
epopt
one instructed in a secret system
ept
[back-formation fr. inept < L. ineptus < L. in- + aptus]  (so the positive of inept is actually apt)
used as a deliberate antonym of inept: adroit, appropriate, effective
eptitude
the quality of being ept
epulose
[fr. L. epulum, a feast]  /EP u lose/
obs. rare  feasting to excess; hence epulosity, a feasting to excess
equanimity
evenness of mind esp. under stress; right disposition, balance
equanimous
[fr. L. æquanimis, having an even mind]  /EE kwa nuh mus/
possessing or displaying equanimity: even-tempered
equifinality
the property of allowing or having the same effect or result from different events
equinoctial
relating to the equinox
equipoise
[fr. equal poise]  1) a state of equilibrium  2) a counterbalance
equitation
the act or art of riding on horseback
equivoque
an equivocal word, specif: pun, wordplay
erastophilia
the obsession to meddle in and gossip about the sexual lives of others
eremite
a hermit, esp: a religious recluse
eremophobia
the fear of being left alone
ereptation
[fr. L. ereptare, to creep forth]
obs.  'A creeping forth'  {Bailey, 1736}
ereption
[fr. L. ereptio < eripere, to snatch away]   /e REP tion/
obs.  'A taking away.'  {Cockeram, 1623}
erethism
[fr. Gk erethizein, to irritate]
abnormal irritability or sensitivity to stimulation (of an organ or body part)
ergodic
[erg + Gk hodos, way + -ic]
1) of or relating to a process in which every sequence or sizable sample is the same statistically and therefore equally representative of the whole
2) involving or relating to the probability that any state will recur; hence ergodicity
ergophobia
the fear of work
ergotism
[fr. L. ergo > ergot, to argue, wrangle]
a) arguing, quibbling, wrangling  b) logical conclusion
ergotize
to quibble, wrangle
eric
[Irish Gaelic eiric]  /ER ik/
a payment imposed for homicide in medieval Irish law upon the slayer and his kin consisting of a fixed price for the life of the slain and the honor price of the slayer: blood fine  (cf. wergild)
eristic
pertaining to dispute, argument or controversy; argumentative, controversial
erlking
a spirit that does mischief or evil, esp. to children
erme
obs.  to grieve; to feel sad
eroteme
/ER uh teem/  rare  a question mark
erotomane
[back-formation from NL erotomania]  someone having excessive sexual desire
erotomania
an unusually strong sexual desire
errant
1) traveling
2) straying outside the proper path; moving about aimlessly; deviating from a standard; fallible
erstwhile
former, previous; formerly, in the past
eructation
an act or instance of belching
erumpent
bursting forth
escamotage
[fr. F. escamoter to juggle, conjure, make vanish]
/es kah mo tazh/  juggling, sleight of hand, trickery
eschatology
a branch of theology concerned with the end of the world
eschaton
the last thing (the end of the world)
immanentizing the eschaton - R.A. Wilson
esclandre
[F.]  /esk la(n)dr(eh)/
an incident that arouses unpleasant talk or gives rise to scandal: scene
esculent
[adj] edible, or [n] something which is edible
esemplastic
having the power to shape disparate things into a unified whole
esne
obs. except Hist.  OE designation of a class of domestic slaves: serf
esperable
[Sp.] nonce-word in C. S. Pierce?  expected, hoped for
esperance
[fr. L. sperare, to hope]  obs.  hope, expectation
espièglerie
[F. fr. espiègle]  /es pyeg luh REE/  the quality or state of being roguish or frolicsome
espiocrat
[fr. espionage aristocrats, a John Le Carré coinage]
the governors of the intelligence service (MI6); transf.
esprit de l'escalier
also, esprit d'escalier [F, lit. spirit of the staircase]
a retort or remark that occurs to a person after the opportunity to make it has passed  cf. treppenwitz
esquivalience
[perhaps from F. esquiver, dodge, slink away]
"the willful avoidance of one's official responsibilities"  {this is a factitious entry in the New Oxford American Dict., inserted for the purpose of foiling copyright violations}
estaminet
a small cafe; bistro
estoppel
a bar to alleging or denying a fact because of one's own previous contrary actions or words
esurient
hungry, greedy
etaerio
Bot.  an aggregate cluster of fruit derived from a single flower; e.g., raspberry, blackberry
ethos
the distinguishing character, sentiment, moral nature or guiding beliefs of a people or group
etiolate
to bleach and alter the natural development of by excluding sunlight; to make pale and sickly
etrennes
[F.] New Year's gifts
ettle
[fr. ON ætla, to think, purpose]  /ET'l/
Scot. 1) aim, intent, purpose  2) chance, opportunity
eudaemonia
[fr. Gk eu-, good + daimon, spirit]  (also eudemonia) a contented state of being happy and healthy and prosperous; a feeling of well-being and happiness
eudaemonism
the theory that the highest ethical goal is happiness and personal well-being
eudemonic(s)
also eudaemonic(s); see eudaemonism
1) [adj] conducive to or producing happiness and well-being
2) [n] pl. the art of applying life to the maximization of well-being
euhemerism
interpretation of myths as traditional accounts of historical persons and events
eumoirous
[fr. Gk eumoiros, well-endowed by fortune]  /yoo MOI rus/?
rare  happy or lucky as the result of being good
euneirophrenia
[fr. Gk oneiros, dream + eu-, good + -phrenia]  /eu NI ro FRE ni uh/
rare  peace of mind after a pleasant dream
euonym
[from Gk eu, good + onym, name]  a name well-suited to the person, place or thing named
eupathy
[Gk eupatheia, comfort; innocent emotions]  /EU pa thy/
Stoic Philos.  good affections; right feeling
eupeptic
1) cheerful, optimistic
2) of, relating to or having good digestion
euphrasia
 [L.]  /you FRAY zjee uh/  1) an eyebright  2) in etymological sense: cheerfulness
euphuism
artificial elegance of language
euphuistic
[after Euphues, in Euphues, the Anatomy of Wit, by John Lyly; from Gk euphues, shapely]  /YU fyu IS tic/
of the nature of or characterized by euphuism (high-flown diction); hence, euphuistically
eutrapelia
/yoo trap el EE ah/  Aristotle's word for pleasantness in conversation: wit, repartee; liveliness; urbanity
eutrapely
[fr. Gk eutrapelia]  see previous
evaginate
to turn inside out
evancalous
pleasant to embrace
eventerate
[fr. L. e-, out + venter, belly; cf. F. eventrer]
obs. rare  to open the bowels of; to disembowel
evirate
[fr. L. evirare, to deprive of virility]  to emasculate; to render unmanly
exanimation
lifelessness
excantation
obs.  disenchantment by a countercharm; an act of freeing by enchantment (as opposed to incantation)
excarnate
obs.  to deprive or strip of flesh
ex cathedra
[L., from the chair (esp. the seat of a bishop)]
by virtue of, or in the exercise of one's office; with authority  
an ex cathedra pronouncement
excerebrose
brainless
exclaustration
a release from religious vows to return to the secular world
excoriate
abrade; to heap abuse
excruciate
1) to inflict intense pain on: torture
2) to subject to intense mental distress
excubant
[fr. L. excubare, to lie on guard)]  /EX cu bant/
rare (pedantic)  keeping watch
exeat (also exeant)
[L., let him go out]
Brit.  a permit for temporary absence (as from a college or monastery)
exegesis
exposition, esp .an explanation or critical interpretation of a text
exeleutherostomize
[fr. Gk ex-, out + eleutherostom-os, free-spoken]  (also exeleutherostomise)
nonce-word  to speak out freely
exemplum
[L., model, example]  /eg ZEM plum/
1) example, model   an exemplum of heroism
2) a story illustrating a moral point or sustaining an argument
exenterate
[fr. L. exenterare]   obs. in literal sense
to take out the entrails of; to eviscerate, disembowel
exergue
a space on a coin, token or medal usually on the reverse below the date
exflunct
[back-formation from exfluncticate]
to demolish, to overcome or beat thoroughly; to exhaust, completely use up
exfluncticate
[mock Latinism from U.S. pioneer days]
(now used historically) also, exflunctify  
to overcome or beat thoroughly; to completely use up
exigible
[F.] that may be exacted, non-optional; repairable [rare]
exiguous
scanty in amount: meager
eximious
inkhorn term  choice, excellent
exinanition
/eg zina NISH en/  1) archaic  an emptying or enfeebling: exhaustion
2) humiliation, abasement
exnihilation
[f. L .ex nihilo, out of nothing]  something created out of nothing
exobiology
[fr. Gk exo, outside + biology]]
the branch of biology that deals with the search for extraterrestrial life and the effects of extraterrestrial surroundings on living organisms; hence exobiologist
exodist
[fr. exodus + -ist]  /EK suh dust/
rare  one who departs from one place to settle in another; an emigrant
exogamous
relating to or characterized by marriage outside a specific group, especially as required by custom or law
exonumia
[NL]  /EK-su-nOO-me-uh/  objects that resemble money but are not designed to circulate as money; e.g., medals, tokens, badges, scrip, etc.
exoptable
[fr. L. exoptare  to wish earnestly, desire greatly]  obs.  highly desirable
exordium
[L.]  /eg ZOR dee um/  a beginning or introduction especially to a discourse or composition
exornation
[fr. L. exornare < ornare, to adorn]  obs., chiefly Rhet.  an adornment; decoration, embellishment
exosculate
[fr, L. exosculari]  obs.  to kiss heartily
exoteric
[fr. Gk exoterikos, external]  compare esoteric
1a) suitable to be imparted to the public  b) belonging to the outer circle
2) relating to the outside: external
expede
inkhorn term  to expedite, to hasten
expediate
[fr. L. expedire, to make ready, prepare]
[adj]  obs.  expeditious
[v]  error for expedite (in Cockeram)
expergefaction
[fr. L. expergefacere < expergere, to awake]  /ek SPURJ uh FAK shun/
archaic  the act of rousing; the condition of being aroused
expergefactor
someone or something that awakens: an awakener; e.g., an alarm clock
expiscate
[fr. L. expiscari, to fish out]
chiefly Scot.  to learn through laborious investigation; to search out; literally, to fish out
expiscation
[see previous]  a fishing out; an investigation of or into
expiscatory
chiefly Scot.  tending to expiscate or fish out: searching
explaterate
to talk continuously without stop; to run off at the mouth
exponible
capable of being explained
exprobration
1a) obs.  an act of reproach  b) Rhet.  the reproaching of a person with ingratitude, and unmindfulness of some benefit conferred upon him
2) a reproachful or upbraiding utterance; reproachful language
exsanguination
the process of draining or losing blood
exsiccosis
[fr. Latin exsiccare]  /ek suh KO sus/
insufficient intake of fluids or the state of bodily dehydration produced thereby
exsufflate
[L. exsufflare, to blow at or upon]  /ex SUF flate/
obs. exc. Historical  to blow away; to exorcise or renounce by blowing  (compare insufflate)
also, rare  exsufflicate, puffed up(?)
exsufflation
blowing out; forced breathing
extirp
[fr. F. extirper, ad. L. ex(s)tirpare]
obs. or arch.  extirpate (to root out, exterminate)
extirpate
[fr. L. exstirpo, to uproot]  /EK stur pate/
1a) to destroy completely: wipe out b) to root out
2) to cut out by surgery
extirpation
the act of extirpating
extispicy
/ek STIS picy/
Roman Antiq.  inspection of the entrails of sacrificial victims for the purpose of divination; haruspicy
extraforaneous
outdoors
extramundane
[fr. late L. extramundan-us]
situated in or relating to a region beyond the material world; fig. out of this world
extravagate
[fr. Med. L. extravagari, to wander]
archaic  1) to wander widely  2) to exceed proper limits
extravasation
[fr. extra, outside + vas, vessel + -ation]  /ex TRAV uh SAY shun/
1) Pathology  forcing of the flow (of blood or lymph) from a vessel out into surrounding tissue
2) Geology  effusion of molten rock from a subterranean reservoir
extremophile
an organism that lives under extreme environmental conditions (as in a hot spring)
extroitive
[fr. L. extro, outward + ire, to go + -ive]  rare  directed to external objects
extropian
an advocate or adherent of the theory of extropy; a person who believes that cultural and technological development tends to oppose, and will overcome, entropy
extropy
the extent of a system’s intelligence, information, order, vitality, and capacity for improvement
extund
[fr. L. extundere, to beat out]  obs.  to beat or force out  {Bailey, 1727}
exuviate
[fr. L. exuere, to take off]  to shed (a skin or similar outer covering): molt; also fig
eye-service
archaic  work done only when an employer is watching


F

fabulist
[F. fabuliste, fr. L. fabula, fable]  /FAB yuh list/
1) a creator or writer of fables  2) a teller of tales; a liar
facinorous
wicked
facticity
[fr. F. facticité, fr.G. faktizität, fr. faktum fact (fr. Latin factum) + -izität (fr. Latin -icitat-, -icitas -icity)]
the quality or state of being a fact: factuality   historical facticity
factious
inclined to form factions: seditious
factitious
contrived; artificial
factotum
a general servant
faculent
[fr. L. fax, torch]
obs. rare  giving forth light like a torch; bright, clear (compare luculent)
(not to be confused with feculent!)
facund
eloquent
facundity
[fr. L. facundus]  eloquence; effective communication in speech
fadiddy
nonce-word,  used euphemistically
...the air was as cold as a witch's fadiddy. - Janet Evanovich
faff
Brit.  to spend your time doing a lot of unimportant things instead of the thing you should be doing
I wish you'd stop faffing about and do something useful!  {Cambridge International Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs}
fainaigue
[origin uncertain]  /fuh NEYG/
1) Brit. dialect  to shirk; evade work or responsibility
2) to renege at cards; cheat or resort to devious means (cf. finagle)
fainéant
given to do nothing, idle, lazy
faineantise
[F.] do-nothing-ness; indisposition to do anything; indifference, inactivity
fakeloo
[arbitrary formation?]  dated U.S. slang (but now used by gamers)  a made-up story; a con
fakement
[from fake + -ment, but origin unknown]
slang  something faked : a contrivance or device used to deceive
falciform
[f. L. falc-em sickle + -(i)form] curved, hooked, shaped like a sickle (falcate)
faleste
[F., thrown into the sea]  cf. infalistatus
obs.  a form of capital punishment inflicted upon a malefactor by laying him bound upon the beach sands until high tide carries him away
"Iinfalistatus. L. Lat. In old English Law. Exposed upon the sands, or sea shore. A species of punishment mentioned in Hengham... See Faleste." - A. M. Burrill, A Law Dictionary and Glossary
famigerate
[fr. L. fama, fame + gerere, to carry]
obs.  to divulge or disseminate; found now only in olde dictionaries {Cockeram, Bailey}
hence: famigeration, famigerous
fanfaronade
empty boasting, bluster
fantod
1) a state of irritability and tension
2) an emotional outburst: fit
fap
intoxicated, fuddled
farb
jargon  a reenactor of (esp. U.S. Civil War) battles who is not authentic
farblondjet
(Yiddish)  /far BLAWN jit/ (also farblondzhet)  lost (but really); mixed up
farcinate
to cram, fill, stuff: a) (a place) with something b) (the stomach) with food
farctate
Botany  stuffed, full or crammed
fard
to paint (esp the face) with cosmetics; gloss over
fardel
(also fardle) bundle; burden
farfetch
[back-formation from far-fetched]
[vt] to derive (a word) in a farfetched manner
[vi] to make farfetched derivations
hence, farfetchedness: the state or fact of being farfetched
far-fetched
1) brought from a remote time or place
2) not easily or naturally deduced or introduced: improbable
farinaceous
[fr. L. farinaceus < farina]
1) having a mealy or powdery texture
2) containing or rich in starch
farolitos
[Sp., little lanterns]  candles set in brown paper bags filled with sand
farouche
marked by shyness or a lack of polish; wild
farraginous
comprising a hodgepodge (of materials)
farrago
a confused collection, mixture: hodgepodge
fartlek
a training technique, used esp. among runners, consisting of bursts of intense effort alternating with less strenuous activity
fascicle
/FA si kul/ 1) a small or slender bundle (as of pine needles or nerve fibers)
2) one of the divisions of a book published in parts
fascine
Mil.  a long cylindrical faggot of brush or other small wood, firmly bound together at short intervals, used in filling up ditches, the construction of batteries, etc. usually pl.
fash
Scot.  to vex, to annoy, to trouble
fashimite
someone who is a slave to fashion
fastuous
haughty, arrogant; ostentatious, showy
fatidic
[fr. L. fatidicus < fatum, fate + dicere, to say]  of or relating to prophecy
fatiferous
[fr. L. fatum, fate + -fer, producing]  /fa TIF er ous/
obs. rare  fate-bringing; deadly, destructive {found in Blount and in Johnson; whence in modern dictionaries}
fatigable
[fr. L. fatigare, to fatigue]  /FAT uh guh bul/  subject to fatigue; easily tired: defatigable
(where defatigable was truly lost, and then back-formed from indefatigable; whence de- is used to intensify and in- to negate)
fatwa
an Islamic religious decree issued by the ulama
faugh
used to express contempt, disgust or abhorrence
faunch
to display angry excitement: rant and rave
faust
[fr. L. faustus]  rare  happy, lucky
fauxonry
[fr. OF faussoner, to deceive]   obs.  fraud, in the legal sense; falsification of deeds or measures, coining false money, etc.
favela
[Brazilian Pg. favela, perh. fr. Favela, hill outside Rio de Janeiro]
a settlement of jerry-built shacks lying on the outskirts of a Brazilian city
favonian
[fr. L. favonius, west wind] of or belonging to the west wind (or zephyr): mild, bland
feazings
a ragged or ravelled rope end
febrile
feverish
februate
obs.  to purify
februation
[fr. L. februare, to purify (also L. Februarius, the Roman festival of purification, held on the 15th of this month)]
now rare  a ceremonial purification or cleansing; a sacrifice
feck
/fek/  feck has several vernacular meanings and variations..
[n] Scots  1) efficacy; force; value (whence, feckless)
2) (large) amount/quantity  3) greater or larger part (used with definite article)
[v] Irish Eng.  1) to steal  2) to throw  3) to leave hastily
[intj]  chiefly Irish  an expletive, without sexual connotation; as in: damn, blast
feckful
Scot. 1) efficient, effective  2) vigorous; powerful
feckless
[fr. Sc. feck, effect + -less]
1) weak, ineffective  2) worthless, irresponsible
fecklessness
worthlessness due to being weak and ineffectual
feckly
[feck + -ly]  /fek ly/  chiefly Scot.
1) for the most part  2) almost, nearly
feculent
1) filthy, scummy, muddy or foul
2) of the nature of containing waste matter
fedifraction
[fr. L. foedus, compact + fraction-em, a breaking]  /feh di FRAK shun/?  (see also fedifragous)
obs. rare  a breach of faith or covenant
fedifragous
[fr. L. foedus + frangere, to break]  /feh di FRAG ous/?  
obs.  faithless, perfidious
feeze
a state of alarm or excitement; rush
fefnicute
[origin unknown]  Lancashire dialect  a hypocrite; a parasite, a hanger-on; a sneak
felicific calculus
a method of determining rightness of an action by balancing probable pleasures and pains that it would produce
felo-de-se
one who deliberately kills himself; an act of deliberate self-destruction, suicide
femtosecond
one quadrillionth part of a second
feracious
producing abundantly: prolific, fruitful
feria
a weekday of the church calendar on which no feast is celebrated
ferial
[L. feria, ordinary day]  /FE ri al/
of or relating to a weekday on which no feast is observed
feriation
[fr. L. feriari < feria, holiday]  obs.  holiday keeping; cessation of work
a welcome midwinter feriation - D. Grambs
ferroequinologist
[ferroequino- "iron horse" + -logy + -ist]  /FEH rO eek weh NAHL eh jest/
one whose hobby is railroads or model railroads: a railroad enthusiast, railfan
ferruginous
[fr. L. ferrugo, iron rust]  /feh-RU-ji-nous/
1) originally, of the nature of iron rust; now commonly, of the nature of iron
2) rust-colored; reddish-brown
ferrule
a band placed around the end of a stick (as a pool cue) for reinforcement
ferule
an instrument used to punish children; specif: a flat piece of wood (as a ruler)  also ferula
fescennine
[n] a style of poetry using coarse language
[adj] vulgar; obscene
fescue
a small pointer
festinate
[adj] hasty  [v] to hasten
Festschrift
a volume of writings by different authors presented as a tribute or memorial esp. to a scholar
feu de joie
[F., fire of joy]  the firing of guns as a symbol of joy; also transf. and fig.; obs.  a bonfire
feuilleton
[fr. F. feuillet, sheet of paper < foille, leaf]  /fuh yuh TO(n)/
1) the entertainment section of a European newspaper
2) something printed in a feuilleton
3) a novel printed in installments; a work of fiction catering to popular taste
4) a short literary composition
feuilletonist
[F. feuilletoniste]  /fuh yuh TO nust/
a writer of regularly appearing critical or familiar essays or of a column
fewmets (or fumets)
deer droppings
fewterer
[fr. F. veltre, greyhound] obs. a keeper of dogs, esp. greyhounds
ficelle
[F., string, twine] a trick, artifice, (stage) device
fico
[It., obscene gesture]  a contemptibly worthless trifle, fig
fidging
[fr. Sc. fidge, to move about restlessly]
Scot.  restless, fidgety; in phr. fidgin' fain, eager and twitching with excitement
fidimplicitary
[f. Eccl. L. fid-es implicita, implicit faith + -ary]  /fi dim PLI si ter ee/
nonce-word  that puts implicit faith in another's views
fido
[from freaks + irregulars + defects + oddities]  /FI do/  a coin having a minting error
figgum
obs.  a juggler's trick(s); conjuring; the fire-spitting trick of a carnival performer
filemot
[corruption of F. feuillemorte]  /FIL eh mot/  (also philamot and feuillemort)  of the color of a dead or faded leaf  
filipendulous
[fr. NL]   hanging or having the appearance of hanging by a thread   {in Webster's 1864 Dict.}
fillip
1a) a blow or gesture made by the sudden forcible straightening of a finger curled up against the thumb (cf. fyerk)
b) a short sharp blow: buffet
2) something tending to arouse or excite as a) a stimulus b) a trivial addition: embellishment c) a significant and often unexpected development: wrinkle
filty
Brit. Mining dial.  a Somersetshire term for combustible gases; also called fire-damp
fimblefamble
[perhaps from reduplication of fimble hemp]  an excuse, particularly a phoney one; a lying answer
fin de siecle
[F. end of century, (19th)]  relating esp. to its climate of sophistication, world-weariness and fashionable despair
finific
rare  a limiting element or quality
finiteless
/FI nite less/  Infinite. [Obs.] --Sir T. Browne. {Webster's 1913}  spurious? without bounds, unlimited
finity
[finite + –y, after infinity]  the state of being finite: finitude
finjan
the handleless coffee cup which fits within a zarf
finnimbrun
[of arbitrary formation]  obs. rare  a trifle, a gimcrack
firkin
a small cask measuring 9 gallons (1/4 barrel)
firkytoodle
archaic  to pet, caress; cf. canoodle  {from the Dictionary of Slang and Unconventional English, by Eric Partridge}
firnification
[fr. G. firn + -i + -fication ]  /FIR nu fi KAY shun/  the process whereby snow is changed to firn, or névé
firstfoot
Brit. 1) the first person entering a house on New Year's day, such a person being popularly believed to bring good luck to the household if brunet and bad luck if blond
2) the first person met on the way to a special event (as a christening or wedding)
fissilingual
having a forked or cleft tongue
fissiparous
[fissi- (being split) + L. parere, to bring forth]  divisive; factious
fizgig
a flighty, frivolous female
flabbergastation
[fr. flabbergast, to confound]  the state of being flabbergasted
flabellation
[fr. L. flabellum, a fan]  Med.  the act of fanning or cooling something, as of a fractured limb
flagitious
villainous
flamfew
[corruption of F. fanfelue(?)]  also flamefew, Sc. flamfoo
obs. rare 1) a gewgaw, trifle, trinket
2) Naut.  moonlight reflected on water  (cf. moonglade)
flane
to saunter, to laze
flaneur
[F. flâneur, idler]  an idle man-about-town; a lounger, gossiper
flaneuring
/FLAH nuhr ing/  idling; sauntering; wandering aimlessly
flapadosha
[origin unknown]  an eccentric, showy, superficial person
flappable
[back-formation from unflappable (1968)]
lacking self-assurance and self-control: easily upset  (a lost positive of the jocular kind)
flaskisable
obs.  pliable, inconstant, changeable
flatulopetic
[fr. L. flatus, blowing + Gk. -poietic, creation]  /flach uh lo PET ik/
rare 1) (Med.) pertaining to gas production in the bowels  2) pretentious, pompous, inflated
fleer
to laugh in a derisive manner: sneer
flexanimous
mentally flexible
flibbertigibbet
a silly, flighty person; hence, flibbertigibbety
flinders
bits; fragments; splinters
flirt-gill
a woman of light or loose behavior; cf. skainsmate
flivver
a small, cheap, usually old automobile
floccify
obs.  to set nought by {Cockerham}; to consider worthless
floccillation
a delirious picking at bedclothes
floccinaucinihilipilification
the categorizing of something as worthless
flocculent
[fr. L. flocculus + Eng. -ent]  /FLOCK yu lunt/
1) of the character of wool: woolly, flocky  flocculent cloud masses
2) made up of loosely aggregated particles or soft flakes  a flocculent white precipitate
floricide
[fr. L. flor(i), flower + -cide, killer]
nonce-word  one who destroys flowers
florilegium
a collection of writings
fluffer
slang  an off-stage person who keeps male porn stars "presentable"
flug
U.S dial  dust or lint that collects in pockets, under beds, and in similar places; also fig.  (also sp. phlug)
flummadiddle
[perhaps alteration of flummery]  also flumadiddle, flumdiddle
U.S. slang  1) something foolish or worthless : nonsense, trash  2) bauble, frill
flummer
[back-formation from flummery]
archaic  to get around (a person) especially by coaxing or flattery: beguile, humbug
flummery
[fr. Welsh llymru]  something poor, trashy, or not worth having; empty compliment or foolish deceptive language
flustrate
variant  fluster
flyting
a dispute or exchange of personal abuse in verse form
fly-tipping
[fly + tipping]  UK  the illegal dumping of garbage in an unauthorized place
fnarr
[imitative of stifled laughter]
intj.   representing lecherous or half-suppressed laughter; freq. used to indicate sexual innuendo  cf. nudge, nudge.. wink, wink
fnese
obs.  to breathe heavily; to snort; to sneeze
(sneeze is apparently an alteration of fnese due to misreading or misprinting it with the old-style ƒ after the initial combination fn- had become unfamiliar)
fnord
[neologism from the Principia Discordia popularized in the Illuminatus! trilogy]
1) a word held to be invisible to the conscious mind, but subliminally causing a sense of angst when encountered
2) a word defined as having no definition (but see fnard, as from P. K. Dick)
3) anything jarringly out of context (intentional or not)
fodgel
Scot.  plump and solidly built; buxom
fodient
[fr. L. fodere, to dig]  [n] a burrowing animal  [adj] pertaining to digging  
foetor
/FEE tor/  an offensive odor: stench (also fetor)
fogram
[origin unknown]  also fogrum  /FOE gruhm/
[n] an antiquated or old-fashioned person: fogy  [adj] obs. antiquated, old-fashioned
foison
Scot.  physical energy or strength
foma
harmless untruths; useful and harmless b.s. -- coined by Kurt Vonnegut
foofaraw
[origin uncertain; possibly fr. Sp. fanfarron, boaster]   /FOO fuh raw/
1) a great fuss over a trifling matter
2) an excessive amount of decoration or ornamentation
foo fighter
[fr. foo, nonsense word + fighter]
orig. U.S. Mil.  used in WWII to describe various mysterious aerial phenomena seen in the skies over Europe and the Pacific theatre
foolscap
[fr. a former watermark representing a fool's cap]
1) chiefly Brit.  a sheet of writing or printing paper measuring approximately 13 by 16 inches  2) a fool's cap
footle
to speak or act foolishly
footling
1) lacking judgment or ability, inept
2) lacking use or value, trivial
footpad
[fr. foot + obs. pad, highwayman]  historical  a highwayman who robs on foot
footy
insignificant; shabby
foozle
to manage or play awkwardly: bungle
forensic
[fr. L. forensis]  /feh REN sik/
A) pertaining to, connected with, or used in courts of law
B) ellipt. use, colloq.  a forensic science department or laboratory
forfex
[L.] a pair of scissors
forficate
[fr. L. forfex]  /FOR fi kit/  shaped like scissors; deeply forked
forficulate
nonce-word  to have a creeping sensation, as if a forficula {earwig} was crawling over one's skin
forfoughten
[fr. archaic form of fought]  /for FAUT un/   (also forfoughen)
Scot.  worn out (from fighting); exhausted
forjeskit
/for JES kit/  Scot.  jaded; worn out
formicate
[fr. L. formicare < formica, an ant]  to crawl like ants; transf.  to swarm with moving beings
formication
[see previous]  an abnormal feeling like the sensation of ants crawling on the skin
formicide
[fr. L. formica, ant + Eng. -cide]  /FOR muh side/  a substance used for killing ants
fornication
[fr. L fornix, an arch or vault]  a vaulting or arching: vaulted construction (as of a cloister)
fossarian
[fr. L. fossa, a ditch, trench]  one of the clergy of the 4th century who dug graves
(or, as Mrs. Byrne has it, a clergyman moonlighting as a gravedigger)
fosse
[fr. L. fossa]   (also foss) ditch; moat
fossick
Austral.  to rummage, to ferret out
fou
Scot.  drunk
foudroyant
sudden and overwhelming in effect; dazzling
fourberie
[F. < fourbe, a cheat, imposter]  /FUR buh ree/
obs.  trickery, deception
fraud: artifice, bamboozlement, bamboozling, blackmail, cheat, chicane, chicanery, con, craft, deceit, double-dealing, dupery, duping, duplicity, extortion, fake, fast one, fast shuffle, flimflam, fourberie, fraudulence, graft, guile, hanky-panky, hoax, hocus-pocus, hoodwinking, hustle, imposture, line, misrepresentation, racket, scam, sell, shakedown, sham, sharp practice, skunk, smoke, song, spuriousness, sting, string, swindle, swindling, treachery, trickery, vanilla - Roget's New Millennium™ Thesaurus (2006)  [vanilla?]
foziness
the quality of being fozy
fozy
[fr. Dutch voos, spongy + -y]  /FO zi/  chiefly Scot.
1) (of a vegetable)  spongy and light-textured; overripe
2) (of a person)  a) fat and bloated: obese;  b) dull-witted and insipid: fatheaded
frab
[onomatopoeic(?)]  Brit. dial.   to harass, worry; to scold, nag
frabjous
[coined by Lewis Carroll in Through the Looking-Glass]  fabulous and joyful, splendid, magnificent
fractious
[fraction (discord) + -ous]  1) troublesome , unruly 2) irritable; quarrelsome
frampold
[of obscure origin]  (also frampled)
obs.  sour-tempered, cross, disagreeable, peevish  [from the hogwash files]
frangible
[fr. L. frangere, to break]  breakable; easily broken
franion
[of obscure origin]  obs.  a gay reckless fellow, a gallant, paramour
frankenword
[blend of Frankenstein + word]  a portmanteau word; formed by combining two words — the term used in linguistics is blend
frap
to draw tight (as with ropes or cables)   frap a sail
frass
[G.  Frass < fressen, to eat]  debris or excrement produced by insects
fratultery
[fr. L. frater, brother; after adultery]
nonce-word  an affair between a man and his brother's girlfriend or fiancé
fremd
[fr. OE fremde]  /fremd/  now chiefly Scot.
1) foreign, unfamiliar, strange  2) not belonging to one's own family: unrelated
fremescent
[fr. L. fremere, to roar]  /fre MES ent/
archaic, rare  murmuring, growing noisy and indignant
frenemy
[blend of friend and enemy]  someone with whom one is friendly, despite a fundamental dislike or rivalry; someone who combines the characteristics of a friend and an enemy
fress
[fr. Yiddish fresn (to devour), or G. fressen (to eat as an animal)]  to eat a lot and often
freudenschade
[as opposed to schadenfreude]  dissatisfaction, unhappiness, or pain as the result of someone else's good fortune
friable
easily crumbled or pulverized
fribble
trifle, dodder; to trifle or fool away
friggle
[freq. of frig]  Brit. dialect   to fuss over trifles: putter; hence: friggled
friggling
[see previous]  trifling about
frigorific
chilling
fripperous
gaudy; ostentatious
frippery
[F. friperie]  finery, esp. something showy, tawdry or nonessential; affected elegance: ostentation
frippish
[fr. fripp-ery + -ish < OF frepe, ferpe, feupe; rag, old garment < ML faluppa, piece of straw]
obs. rare  tawdry, gaudy
friscalating
[adj] (of dusklight) shimmering on the horizon at sunset  (coined by Wes Anderson)
frisson
shudder, thrill
fritinancy
[fr. L. fritinnire, to twitter]  /FRIT i nan see/  (also fritiniency)
obs.  twittering or chirping, as of cicadas or other insects
frivol
to act frivolously, to trifle
frob
see next
frobnicate
[perhaps fr. frobnitz, a thingname]  abbrev. as frob
slang  to manipulate or adjust; to tweak the controls
frogmarch
to carry (a prisoner) face downwards; now usually, to march a person against his will by any method after seizing him from behind
frondescence
[fr L. frondescere, to become leafy]  the condition or period of unfolding of leaves: leafing  (cf. frondescent)
frondescent
[fr. L. frondere, to put forth leaves]  springing into leaf; expanding into fronds
frondeur
[F., lit. slinger, from Fronde (from the revolt in which the rebels were compared to schoolboys using slings only when the teacher was not looking)]  /fro(n) dur/
1) a member of the Fronde (the name given to the party which rose in rebellion against Mazarin and the Court during the minority of Louis XIV)
2) transf.  a malcontent, rebel
frore
[pa. pple. of freeze]  now only poet.  intensely cold, frosty; frozen
frostification
jocular  the process of becoming frosty
frottage
1) the technique of taking a rubbing from an uneven surface, by rubbing graphite over paper laid on top of the rough texture
2) the practice of obtaining sexual gratification by rubbing against someone, both parties usually being clothed
frotteur
the active participant in frottage(2)
frou-frou
1) a rustling esp. of a woman's skirts
2) showy or frilly ornamentation
froward
1) habitually disposed to disobedience and opposition; perverse
2) archaic  adverse
frowsty
Brit. 1) musty  2) having a slovenly or uncared-for appearance: frowsy
frowy
(also froughy)  chiefly New Eng.
1) esp. of wood  spongy, brittle  2) stale, rancid; spoiled
frugivorous
[from L. frux, fruit + -vorous]  /fru JIV o rous/
feeding on fruit, as birds or other animals; fruit-eating  (cf. insectivorous)
frummagemmed
obs. cant   choked, strangled, suffocated, or hanged
{Grose's 1811 Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue}
fubbery
[fr. fob, to cheat + -ery]  obs. rare  cheating, deception
fubsy
[fr. obs. Eng. fubs, chubby person]  being chubby and somewhat squat
fucacious
see fucatious
fucate
[fr. L. fucare, to paint, rouge]  obs.   painted; hence, falsified, disguised, counterfeit
fucatious
[fr. L. fucatus: painted, falsified, counterfeit]  obs. rare  counterfeit; deceitful  (also fucacious, fucatory)
fucatory
see previous
fucivore
[see next]  one who eats seaweed
fucivorous
[fr. L. fucus. rock-lichen + -vorus, devouring]  /few SIV ur us/
eating or subsisting on seaweed
fud
[origin uncertain]  Scot. and Brit. dial.
1) the backside or rump  2) the tail of a hare or rabbit
fuddle
to confuse, muddle
fug
the heavy air of a closed room; a stuffy or malodorous emanation
fugacious
lasting a short time: evanescent
fugacity
[from fugacious, after such pairs as Engl. capacious : capacity]
lack of enduring qualities: transience
fugation
[f. L. fugare, to put to flight]  obs.  a chase; a royal hunt; trans. repulsion
fugle
[back-formation from fugleman]  1) to act as a model or guide  2) to make signals
fugleman
a leader (esp political); the lead soldier for a company
fulcible
[fr. L. fulcire, to support]  obs.  capable of being propped up
fulciment
a prop; specif. a fulcrum
fulgent
dazzlingly bright: radiant
fulgurant
[fr. L. fulgur, lightning]  flashing like lightning; brilliant
fulgurating
/FUHL gyuh rey ting/
flashing or sudden, like lightning: a fulgurating pain
fulham
a loaded dice
fuliginous
1) sooty; obscure, murky
2) having a dark or dusky color
fullage
refuse, street-sweepings, filth
fulminating
[see next]
1) hurling denunciations or menaces
2) explosive
3) coming on suddenly with great severity
fulmination
[fr. L. fulminare, strike with lightning]
1) the bursting forth of thunder and lightning
2) the act of fulminating or exploding
3) a thunderous verbal attack
fulminous
[fr. L. fulmen, a thunderbolt]  of or pertaining to thunder and lightning; also fig.
fulsome
[fr. full + -some]  1) copious; generous in amount
2) aesthetically, morally or generally offensive
3) exceeding the bounds of good taste: overdone
4) excessively complimentary or flattering: effusive
fumarole
a hole in a volcanic region from which hot gases and vapors issue
fumid
[fr. L. fumus, smoke]  (rhymes with humid)  smokey, vaporous
fumidity
smokiness
fumifugist
[L. fumus, smoke + fugare, to put to flight, fugere to flee]   /fu MIF u gist/?
'One who or that which drives away smoke or fumes.'  {Webster, 1864}
funambulist
a tightrope walker; one who is (mentally) agile
funest
lamentable; doleful; dire
funge
[fr. L fungusobs.
1) a mushroom or fungus  2) a soft-headed person
fungible
1) being of such a nature that one part or quantity may be replaced by another equal part or quantity in the satisfaction of an obligation  oil, wheat, and lumber are fungible commodities
2) interchangeable
funicular
a cable railway ascending a mountain
funipendulous
[fr. L. funis, rope + pendulus, hanging]  /fyu nuh PEN dyu lus/  hanging from a rope
furacious
given to thieving; thievish
furbelow
a ruffle on a garment; small piece of ornamentation
furciferous
[fr. L. furcifer, yoke bearer, scoundrel]  /fur CIF er ous/  
rare  rascally
furfuration
a flaking off, such as dandruff
furibund
frenzied
furphy
a false report or rumor; an absurd story
furrahin
Scot.  the right-hand hindmost horse that walks in the furrow in plowing  (but what about the back left-hand horse in a plow team? cf. hand-ahin)
fuscous
of any or several colors averaging a brownish gray
fusee
[fr. French fusée: spindle, rocket, flare, fuse (lit. spindleful of yarn), from L. fusus, spindle]  /FYU zee/  (also fuzee)
1) a friction match with a large head capable of burning in a wind
2) a colored flare used as a warning signal for trucks and railroad trains
3) a cone-shaped pulley with a spiral groove, used in a cord- or chain-winding clock to maintain even travel in the timekeeping mechanism
4) a combustible fuse for detonating explosives
fustian
[OF fustaigne]  pretentious and banal (writing or speech)
fustianist
[fr. fustian]  rare  a pretentious writer  (nonce-word from Milton?)
fustigate
to criticize severely
fustilarian
nonce-word  a low fellow; a stinkard; a scoundrel
Away you scullion! you rampallian! you fustilarian! -- Shakespeare
fustilugs
a ponderous clumsy person, esp. a fat and slovenly woman
futhark
the runic alphabet
futilitarian
one who believes that human striving is futile
futtock
one of the curved timbers scarfed together to form the lower part of a compound rib of a ship
futz
[perhaps fr. Yiddish arumfartsn zikh, lit. to fart around; or maybe just a euphemism]
1) with around  to fool around, waste time  2) with with  to mess with; to tinker or trifle with
fuzzle
obs.  to intoxicate, make drunk, confuse, muddle (a conflation of fuzz and fuddle)
fyerk
to flick away using one's finger and thumb
fysigunkus
someone who is totally devoid of curiosity

go forth


Copyright © 1995-2014 -- Michael A. Fischer

"You try spell-checking this stuff!"

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