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list of wwftds

Herein is a complete list of "wwftd"s™ dating from ca. 1987 to present. This started as a "word for the day up on the blackboard" sort of thing and has degenerated into its current form; irregular distribution to a mail list via e-mail... and now this.

 Copyright © 1995-2014 -- Michael A. Fischer 
    wwftd email


A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

G

gaberlunzie
[origin unknown]  /gab er LUN zie/
Scot.  a strolling beggar, peddler or tinker
gadarene
[from the demon-possessed Gadarene swine that rushed into the sea (Matthew 8:28)]
headlong, precipitate   Gadarene poets - T. E. Lawrence
gadzookery
Brit.  the use of archaisms (as in a historical novel)
gafty
Cheshire dialect  sly; tricky; cunning; not to be trusted; mischievous {Joseph Wright's Eng. Dialect Dict.}
galeanthropy
the delusion that one is a cat
galericulate
[fr. L. galea, helmet]  covered as with a hat
galgenhumor
[G., Galgenhumor]  /GAL gen hyu mor/  gallows-humor
galimatias
nonsensical talk; gibberish; gobbledygook
galliard
archaic  1) gay, lively  2) stouthearted
galliardise
[fr. F. galliard]  (or galliardize)  /GAL yeh(r) dize/
archaic  exuberant merriment, (extreme) gaiety
gallimaufry
[F. galimafrée]  medley, jumble
gallionic
[characteristic of Gallio, a Roman proconsul whose refusal to take action is recorded in Acts xviii. 17]
usu. capitalized : marked by indifference or easygoing carelessness of irresponsibility
galluptious
wonderful, delightful, delicious [also galoptious, and perhaps best, goluptuous after voluptuous]
galumph
to move with a clumsy heavy tread -- coined by Lewis Carroll
gamboge
[fr. N.L. gambogium]   /gam boje/
1) an orange to brown gum resin that becomes bright yellow when powdered, used by artists as a yellow pigment and in medicine as a cathartic
2) a strong yellow that is redder and less strong than yolk yellow or light chrome yellow
gambrinous
being full of beer
gamine
a homeless girl: urchin
gammer
a rustic title for an old woman, corresponding to gaffer for a man (regarded as a corruption of grandmother)
gammerstang
Brit.  a tall, awkward person, usually a woman
gamophobia
an extreme fear of marriage
ganch
to execute by impaling on stakes or hooks
gangue
[fr. F., < G. Gang, vein of metal]  /gan/  (var.: gang)
the worthless rock or earthy matter in a mineral deposit
gaposis
a gap between buttoned buttons or closed snaps on a garment
garboil
a confused disordered state: turmoil
She's dead, my queen: Look here, and at thy sovereign leisure read the garboils she awaked; at the last, best: see when and where she died. - Shakespeare, Antony and Cleopatra
garbology
the study of society or culture by examining or analyzing its refuse
garderobe
[fr. F. garderobe, < garde-r, to keep + robe]  /GA(r)D robe/
now only Hist.  properly, a locked-up wardrobe (or its contents); by extension, a private room, a bed-chamber; a privy, built into or extending out from a wall
gardyloo
Scot.  used as a warning cry when throwing slops from the window into the street
garniture
embellishment, trimming; a set of decorative objects
gasbaggery
a nonce-word which refers to garrulous politicians
gasconade
boasting, bravado
gasogene
[F. gazogène, from gaz, gas + o-gene]  a late Victorian device for producing carbonated water
gastrolith
[gastro-, stomach + -lith, related to stone]
a stone or pebble ingested by an animal to aid in food processing or buoyancy
gastropub
[fr. gastro- in gastronomic, etc. + pub]
Brit.  a public house which specializes in serving high-quality food (as opposed to pub-grub)
gaudiloquent
[fr. L. gaudium, joy + -loquus, speaking]  obs. rare  speaking with joy or happiness
gavage
[F.]  /ga VAZH/  introduction of material into the stomach by a tube: forced-feeding (as of poultry or infants)
gaydar
[portmanteau of gay + radar]  slang  the supposed ability to discern whether a person is homosexual, at a glance
gazump
Brit./Austral.  to unfairly acquire a property by bidding more than an offer that has already been accepted
gazunder
UK colloq.  to arbitrarily reduce the offered price for a property, esp. near the date of exchange of contracts; cf. gazump (from gazump + under)
geck
an object of scorn; a dupe
gegenschein
[G., counter-glow]  /GAY gen shine/
the 'opposition effect,' a diffuse, faint light sometimes visible almost directly opposite the sun in the night sky, thought to be sunlight reflected by dust particles in the atmosphere - best seen in September and October
geis
[Irish]  /gesh?/  (also gaysh, geas; pl. geasa)
Irish folklore  a solemn injunction, prohibition, or taboo; a moral obligation
gelastic
[fr. Gk gelastos, laughable]  /juh LAS tik/  serving the function of laughter, risible
gelid
extremely cold: icy
gemebund
[L. gemebundus]  /JEM eh bund/  inkhorn term, rare  groaning; sighing
gemeinschaft
a spontaneous social relationship characterized by strong reciprocal bonds of sentiment and kinship within a common tradition
gemelliparous
/gem el LIP ah rous/  [from L. gemellus, twin + parere, to produce]  
rare  producing twins
gemutlich
[G.] agreeably pleasant: comfortable
gemütlichkeit
[G., fr. gemütlich, congenial]  /geh MOOT lik kite/  cordiality, warm friendliness
genethlialogy
[Gk genethlialogía, casting of destinies]  /jeh neth lee OL uh jee/
the science of calculating positions of the heavenly bodies on nativities; the act or art of casting nativities; astrology
hence, genethlialogic
genizah
[Heb., hiding place < ganaz, to hide]  /geh NEE zah/  (also geniza)
a repository for Hebrew documents and sacred books that are no longer in use, e.g. because they are old and worn, but must not be destroyed
geocacher
[see next]  one who participate in geocaching
geocaching
[blend of geo + cache]  a type of scavenger hunt in which participants are given the geographical coordinates of a cache of items, which they then locate using GPS navigation; hence, geocacher
geomancy
[ad. L. geomantia, a. late Gk geomanteia]
divination by means of signs derived from the earth; hence, usually, divination by means of lines or figures formed by a series of random dots
geophagous
[fr. geo-, of earth + -phagia, eating]  earth-eating
gephyrophobia
[fr. Gk gephyra, bridge + phobos, fear]  an abnormal and persistent fear of crossing bridges
gephyrophobiac
someone who fears crossing bridges
gerascophobia
a morbid, irrational fear of, or aversion to, growing old
gerful
[fr. gere (a wild or changeful mood) + -ful]  obs.   changeful; wild, wayward
gerontic
[fr. Gk geront-, old man + -ic]  of or relating to decadence or old age   gerontic nursing
gesellschaft
a rationally developed mechanistic type of social relationship characterized by impersonally contracted associations between persons
gest
a tale of adventures, esp: a romance in verse; adventure, exploit
gezorgenplatz
nonsense word   a random thingname  (various spellings)
gharnao
a raft made of inverted ceramic pots
ghastful
1) full of fear, timid, scared
2) dreadful, frightful, terrible 3) ghastly
ghost word
an accidental word form never in established usage; especially: one arising from an editorial or typographical error or a mistaken pronunciation (as phantomnation or dord)
giaour
an infidel
gibbet
a gallows
gigantomachize
[fr. Gk gigantomachia, war of the giants against the gods]
obs.   to rise in revolt against one's betters
gilderoy
Newf. dial.  /GIL de roy/  a proud person
gilflurt
[see also flirt-gills, Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet]
obs  a proud minks, a vain capricious woman  {Grose's 1811 Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue}
gillie
Scot.  a professional fishing and hunting guide (also ghillie)
gilravage
[origin unknown]
chiefly Scot.  to practice intemperate eating and drinking; to be noisy and boisterous in merrymaking
girouette
[F] a rooster-shaped weather vane
glabella
the space between the eyebrows, just above the nose
glabrous
smooth, esp: having a surface without hairs or projections
glaikit
[ME (Scot) glaikit]  chiefly Scottish  foolish, giddy, thoughtless
glandaceous
[from L. gland-, the fruit of the oak]  yellowish-brown : acorn-colored
glaver
[fr. M. Eng. glaveren]  obs.  to talk in a deceitfully kind or pleasant manner: flatter
gleek
to joke or jest, to gibe
gleg
Scot.  quick, sharp
glisk
[origin unknown]  chiefly Scot.
1) a glimpse  2) a gleam or glimmer  3) a brief moment: instant
gloppen
[fr. ON glupna, to be downcast]  Brit. dialect  surprise, shock, astonish
glossator
[fr. L. glossare, to gloss]
1) one that makes textual glosses; a commentator; spec. one of the mediæval commentators on the texts of Civil and Canon Law
2) a compiler of a glossary
glossatorial
of the nature of glosses
glossolalia
speaking in tongues
glossomachicall
[as if f. Gk. glossomachos, f. glosso, tongue + -machos, fighting]
obs. nonce-word  given to wordy strife
glottogonic
[see next]  /glot oh GON ik/  relating to the origin of language
glottogony
[fr. Gk glossa, tongue + gonikos, of the seed]  /glo TOG uh nee/
the study of the (putative) origin of language
glurge
improbable stories with moralistic undertones, intended to tug at your heartstrings; coating a kernel of an idea with a saccharine layer of deception to make the inspiration that much easier to swallow
glutinous
[fr. L. glutinosus < gluten, glue]  /GLOOT (e)n us/
of the nature of or resembling glue; sticky
glutless
[fr. glut, satiate + -less]  nonce-word  insatiable
glyptic
the art or process of carving or engraving esp on gems
gnatho
[fr. L. Gnatho, a parasite in Terrence's play, The Eunuch]
a person resembling the Gnatho of Terence; a parasite, sycophant
gnathonic
[see previous]  obsequious, toadying, parasitical, flattering and deceitful
gnathonize
obs. rare  to act the sycophant; to play the smell-feast, to flatter {Blount, 1656}
gnome
[fr. Gk. gnome, thought, judgement, opinion]
a short pithy statement of a general truth; a proverb, maxim, aphorism, or apophthegm
gnome
[fr. L. gnomus]  
1) an ageless and often deformed dwarf who lives in the earth and usu. guards treasure
2) an elemental being (in the theory of Paracelsus) that inhabits the earth
gnomon
an object that by the length of it shadow indicates the hour of the day
gobemouche
[F., flycatcher] a credulous person; esp. one who believes everything he hears
gobsmacked
[prob. from Irish/Gaelic gob, mouth + smack; literally, smacked in the mouth]
UK slang  flabbergasted, astounded; speechless or incoherent with amazement
goditorium
[after auditorium]  slang  a church, perhaps a huge and gaudy one
goety
[fr. Gk goeteia]  /GO ed y/  archaic  witchcraft or magic performed by the invocation and employment of evil spirts; necromancy
golem
artificial man endowed with life
gombeen
Irish  usury; chiefly used attrib. as gombeen-man, a money-lender, usurer
gomeral
Brit. dialect  a half-wit; dunce, fool
gonfalon
a flag that hangs from a crosspiece or frame
gongoozler
[perhaps from Lincolnshire dial. gawn + gooze]  Brit. slang or dial.  originally, an idler who stares at length at activity on a canal; hence, an idle spectator
goniometer
an instrument for measuring angles; direction finder
gonkulator
[gonk + calculator]  /GON kyoo lay tur/
1) a pretentious piece of equipment that actually serves no useful purpose
2) a word used in place of an actual technical term for a mechanical device
google
[a play on the word googol, reflecting the immense amount of information  to be found on the web]  to search the web with a standard search engine such as Google® or Yahoo!
googol
the figure 1 followed by 100 zeroes (10 raised to the hundredth power)
googolplex
the figure 1 followed by a googol of zeroes (10 raised to the googol power)
goombah
[fr. It. dial. compare, gumbare : literally, godfather]
1) a close friend or associate - esp. among Italian- American men
2) mafioso; broadly: gangster  3) a macho Italian-American man
goop
[arbitrary formation]  slang (orig. U.S.)  a stupid or fatuous person
gorbellied
corpulent
gorgeosity
[a blend of gorgeous + generosity (?)]  an abundance (generosity) of gorgeousness
gorgonize
stupefy, petrify
gork
medical slang  a patient with unknown ailments (god only really knows)
gormless
Brit.  stupid, brainless
gormlessness
[gormless + -ness]  the state of lacking intelligence; foolishness
gormster
[related to gormless < gorm, gaum, gome : understanding]
someone of little sense or discernment, a fool
goropism
[eponymous]  Leibniz coined the term (after Goropius Becanus, who tried to prove that Dutch was the Ur Sprache of all languages) to characterize the practice of basing historical linguistic relationships on absurd etymologies
gowpen
 /GAU pen/  Scot.  a double handful
A hanfu' o' trade is worth a gowpen o' gold. - old Scottish proverb
gracile
[L. gracilis]  /GRAS ul/ or /GRAS ile/
1) gracefully slender  2) graceful
gralloch
[fr. Sc. Gaelic grealach, entrails]  UK  to remove the offal from (a deer)  also transf.  
gramarye
/GRAM er eye/  occult learning, magic, necromancy
grammaticaster
[med. L. f grammatic-us + -aster, expressing incomplete resemablance]  /gram MAT i CAS ter/
contemptuous  a petty grammarian; a pretentious grammatical pedant
grammatolatry
[fr. Gk grammato- + Eng. -latry, worship of or fanatical devotion to]  /GRAM eh TAL eh tree/
the worship of letters or words; fig. concern for the letter with disregard for the spirit  cf. epeolatry
grandiloquence
lofty or pompous eloquence: bombast
grandiloquent
characterized by lofty or pompous eloquence: bombastic
grandiloquism
[fr. L. grandiloqu-us + -ism]  the practice of using bombastic language
granfalloon
any large bureaucratic figment of people's imagination
(sing along with Bokonon:)
If you wish to study a granfalloon,
Just remove the skin of a toy balloon.
- Kurt Vonnegut, Cat's Cradle
grangerism
[fr. James Granger who published a 'Biographical History of England', with blank leaves for the reception of engraved portraits or other pictorial illustrations of the text.]
the practice of illustrating a book with engravings, prints, etc. cut from other books
grangerize
to illustrate a book with engravings, prints, etc. cut from other books
granitic
[fr. granite]  having unyielding firmness or austere inflexibility
grannyism
[granny + -ism]  (also old-grannyism)  a characteristic or mannerism of an old woman
graphospasm
writer's cramp
grassation
[fr. L. grassari to go about, attack, rage against]
obs.  an act of attacking violently; a lying in wait to attack
gratulate
 archaic  congratulate
graunch
[imitative, compare crunch]
UK dial.  to make a crunching or grinding sound  (also graunchy)
graunching
Brit.  crunching, grinding
graupel
granular snow pellets
graustark
1) an imaginary place of high romance
2) a highly romantic piece of writing
gravamen
the material part of a complaint
gravaminous
obs.  grievous, annoying, distressing
gravedinous
[ad. L. gravedinosus, fr. gravedo, heaviness]
obs. rare  drowsy, heavy-headed {in Bailey}; hence, perhaps, gravedinously
graveolent
rank smelling, fetid
gravitas
high seriousness
gregarian
[fr. L. gregarius < grex  flock, herd]  obs., rare  belonging to the herd or common sort; common  (cf. gregarious)
gregarization
[fr. L. gregaria, the gregarious phase of locusts]  the swarming of locusts
gregger
Hebrew  (also gragger, grogger)  a rattle noisemaker {A Popular Dict. of Jadaism}
gregicide
[fr. L. grex flock, crowd + -cide (after regicide)]
nonce-wd.  involving the slaughter of the common people
gremial
of or relating to the lap or bosom
greyhoundy
[gray + hound + -y]  resembling a greyhound dog in appearance
gribble
a small crustaceon which destroys submerged timber
gridironic
[fr. gridiron, after ironic]  related to the game of (American) football  [suitable for ironic usage]
grimalkin
a cat; esp: an old female cat
grimgribber
a lawyer; also, technical jargon, as in legal matters
grimoire
a magician's manual for invoking demons and spirits of the dead
grimpen
[unknown origin] a marshy area (?)
grimthorpe
Brit.  to remodel or restore an old building without proper grounding or knowledge of its authentic character or without exercising care to remain faithful to its original quality and uniqueness
grinagog
a perpetual grinner
grith
[fr. Old Norse gridh : domicile, asylum]
obs. exc. Hist.  protection or sanctuary provided by Old English law to persons in certain circumstances
grivoiserie
[F.] lewd and lascivious behavior
groak
one who stands around while others eat, in hopes he will be asked to join
grobian
a crude, slovenly person; a lout
grockle
[origin uncertain]  Brit. dialect, mildly disparaging
holiday-maker or tourist (esp. in southwest England); a summer visitor
grosz
[Polish] 1/100 of a zloty
grotendous
[portmanteau (coined by Neal Stephenson)]   neologism   grotesque, horrendous
grotendously
see previous
grotty
wretchedly shabby; of a poor quality
growlery
a retreat for times of ill humor
This, you must know, is the growlery. When I am out of humour, I come and growl here. -- Dickens, Bleak House
grue
[Scot., akin to OHG ingruen, to shiver, shudder]  /gru/
[v] to shiver or shudder especially with fear or cold  [n] 1) a shiver  2) a gruesome quality or effect
grum
glum, morose
grumbletonian
[fr. grumble, after Grindletonian (a British sect)]  a discontented person; a grumbler
gruntle
[by back-formation fr. disgruntle]  to put in good humor  [originally, to grumble, complain (or grunt)]
gruntled
[see previous]  satisfied, pleased
gry
[fr. Gk gru grunt of a pig; dirt under the nail]
obs.  anything of little value, as the paring of the nails {Johnson, 1805}
guano
[Sp., fr. Quechua huanu dung]  seafowl (or bat) excrement used as fertilizer
gubbins
Brit.  a collection of unimportant objects
gubernate
[fr. L. guberno, to steer/govern]  obs. rare  to govern; hence, gubernation (and gubernatorial)
gubernatiion
now rare  the act of governing:  governance
guddle
[prob. imitative]  /GUD ul/  hence, guddling
1) to grope for fish in their lurking places
2) chiefly Scot.  to feel one's way with or as if with the hands: grope
gudget
[perhaps related to F. goujat, an army valet; a soldier's boy]  Scot., obs.  a camp-follower; hence, a person of menial or low type
guerdon
[Middle F.]  /GER dun/
something that one has earned or gained: reward, recompense
guetapens
[F. guet-apens, < MF, de guet apens, with premeditation]
ambush, snare, trap  a trick to lure him into some guetapens
guffin
[of unknown origin]  Brit. dial. and slang  a stupid, clumsy person
guidwillie
Scot.  cordial, cheering
gulosity
greediness
gulous
[fr. L. gula - gullet, gluttony]  obs. rare  gluttonous
gump
a complete nitwit
gumpheon
Scot.  a funeral banner
gunge
[of uncertain origin; perh. associated with goo, grunge, gunk, etc.]
Brit. slang  any messy or clogging substance, esp. one considered otherwise unidentifiable; also, general rubbish, clutter, filth
gunkhole
a slimy bay or anchorage
gurning
making funny, ugly or scary faces
gurry
the parts left over after cleaning fish
gutterblood
Scot. 1) a low-bred person; one of the rabble
2) someone brought up one's immediate neighborhood, who is on equal footing as to their station
guttle
to eat greedily
gyascutis
a large imaginary four-legged beast with legs on one side longer than on the other for walking on hillsides
gymnosophist
one of a sect of naked ascetics of ancient India
gynecocracy
political supremacy of women
gynotikolobomassophilia
a proclivity for nibbling on women's earlobes
gyre
to move in a circle or spiral
gyrovague
a monk who was in the habit of wandering from monastery to monastery


H

haboob
[Arab. habub, blowing furiously]  /ha BOOB/
a hot, violent wind which causes duststorms or sandstorms, esp. of the Sahara in Sudan
habromania
[fr. Gk Habros, graceful, + mania, insanity]
Psych.  a morbid impulse toward gaity
habromanic
euphoric
hackbut
harquebus; a matchlock gun invented in the 15th century
hackette
[hack + -ette]  a jocular or disparaging term for a female journalist
hadal
of, relating to or being parts of the ocean below 6000 meters
hadeharia
constant use of the word 'hell'
hadiwist
[had-I-wist; from (archaic) wit, to know; akin to Latin videre, to see]
obs.  the awareness that, if only one had known, one must have acted otherwise; a vain regret, or the heedlessness or loss of opportunity which leads to it
haecceity
[from L. haec, this]  /hek-SEE-ih-ty/  
Scholastic Philos.  that which gives something its unique quality: thisness (compare quiddity, whatness)
haggersnash
[Sc. term applied to tart language {Jamieson}]
Scot. dialect  a spiteful person
hagiography
biography of saints; idealizing or idolizing biography
hagiophobia
the fear of saints or holy things
hagriding
[hag + ride, cf. hagridden]  archaic  tormenting
hagseed
the offspring of a hag
ha-ha
[fr. F. haha, an expression of surprise] a ditch with a retaining wall used to divide lands without defacing a landscape: sunk fence
haka
[Maori]   /HA kuh/
a Maori ceremonial war dance involving chanting, a version of which is performed by New Zealand rugby teams before a match
halal
[fr. Arab. halal, lawful]  to kill an animal in the manner prescribed by Muslim law; hence, lawful food; also attrib. and as adj.
halation
a spreading of light beyond its proper boundaries
halcyon
golden, peaceful, happy, prosperous
halieutics
the art or practice of fishing
halitotic
[fr. L. halitus, breath]  /HAL uh TOT ic/?  (characterized by) having bad breath
hallux
the big toe
hamartia
tragic flaw
hamartiologist
jocular?  an expert on the subject of sin
hamartiology
a part of theology treating the doctrine of sin
hand-ahin
the back, left-hand horse of a plow team  [cf. furrahin]
handsel
1) a gift made as a token of good wishes or luck especially at the beginning of a new year
2) something received first (as in a day of trading) and taken to be a token of good luck
3 a) a first installment: earnest money b) earnest, foretaste
hangashore
[hang + ashore]  Newf. dial  a lazy person (a fisherman who doesn't fish)
hantu
[Malay.] an evil spirit, a ghost
hapax legomenon
[Gk, something said only once]  a word evidenced by a single citation
haplography
[fr. Gk haplo- single + -graphy writing]  /hap LOG ruh fee/
the inadvertent omission of a repeated letter(s) in writing (e.g. writing philogy for philology)  compare haplology, for pronunciation
haplology
the contraction of a word by the omission of one or more similar sounds or syllables (as in mineralogy for mineralology or prob-ly for probably)
haptic
relating to the sense of touch
harbouration
Cheshire dial.  a collection (of unpleasant things?)
hardscrabble
1) being or relating to a piece of barren or barely arable soil
2) marked by poverty
harridan
an ill-tempered scolding woman: shrew
hart
the male of the red deer esp when over five years old; stag
haruspex
an inspector of entrails
haruspicy
[fr. L. Haruspex, the title of a lower order of priests who performed the act]  /huh RUS puh see/
divination from the entrails of sacrificial animals (see extispicy])
haver
[origin unknown]
chiefly Brit.  to hem and haw: stall for time (as by useless talk)
Scot.  to talk foolishly; babble  Tom havered on
havering
stalling for time  she was exasperated by all this havering
hebdomad
a group of seven; a week
hebetate
to make dull or obtuse
hebetation
[ad. L. hebetare, fr. hebes: dull]  /heh buh TAY shun/  (see also: hebetude)
the state of being dull; lethargy; stupidity
Aphrodite--sitting graveolent in her royal hebetation, surrounded by all her holouries... - John Gardner
hebetude
lethargy, dullness
hecatomb
[fr. L. hecatombe < Gk hekatombe]  /HEK uh tome/ (or -tum)
1) an ancient Greek and Roman sacrifice consisting typically of 100 oxen or cattle  transf. and fig.: 2) the sacrifice or slaughter of many victims 3) a large number or quantity
hector
to intimidate or harass by bluster or personal pressure
hederated
[fr. L. hederatus]  /HED ur ated/
adorned or crowned with ivy
hedgehoggy
[hedgehog + -y]  archaic  having a prickly nature, of a forbidding appearance or manner; tending to arouse aversion
hedgehogginess
see previous
hedonics
the doctrine of pleasure; that part of ethics which treats of pleasure
hedonometer
an apparatus for measuring pleasure
hegemon
[fr. Gk. hegemon, leader]  /HEJ uh mon/
one that exercises hegemony; a leading or dominant power
hegemony
[Gk hegemonia, fr. hegemon leader, fr. hegeisthai to lead]  /hi JE muh ne/
preponderant influence or authority over others: domination
hegira
a journey esp when undertaken to escape from a dangerous or undesirable situation; exodus
heidyin
usu. in the phrase 'high heidyins'  /hi heed yins/
Scot.  (high) head one(s)
heisenbug
[after Heisenberg's Uncertainty Principle]
Programming jargon  a software bug that alters its behavior or disappears when you try to isolate it or examine it  (compare schroedinbug)
helliferocious
[blend of hellacious + ferocious]  Hist:  hellaciously ferocious
helluation
[fr. L. helluari, to gormandize]  obs. rare  'A devouring gluttony' {Blount}
hemidemisemiquaver
a 1/64 note in music [see also demisemiquaver]
hemipygic
[fr. Gk hemi- half + pyg, buttocks + -ic]  jocular nonce-word  having only one buttock (or, half-assed)
hendecasyllabic
[(n), a] (a verse or poem) consisting of eleven syllables
hendiadys
[L., one through two]  /hen DIE uh dis/
the expression of an idea by the use of two words connected by conjunction which normally would be expressed by an adjective and a substantive; e.g., grace and favor instead of gracious favor
henotheism
worship of one god, without denying the existence of others
henotic
[fr. the G. word for unification]   promoting harmony or peace, unifying; irenic  cf. henotheism
heresiarch
[L.L. haeresiarcha, from L.Gk hairesiarches]  /huh REE zee ark/
the founder of a heresy or the leader of a heretical sect
hermeneutical
of or relating to hermeneutics: interpretive (also hermeneutic)
hermeneutics
the study of the methodological principles of interpretation (as of the Bible)
hermetic
[fr. Hermes Trismegistus] 1) mysterious, occult; recondite 2) sealed airtight
herpetical
[fr. Gk herpein, to creep]  /her PED ik al/
1) of the nature of herpes  2) rare  related to serpents
herpetological
[fr. Gk herpeto, a creeping thing]  relating to the study of reptiles and amphibians
hesitude
[fr. L. haes- (< haerere, to hold fast) + -tude]  obs. rare  doubtfulness
hesternal
[fr. hesternus, of yesterday]  pertaining to yesterday
hesternopothia
[fr. L. hesternus + pother(?), mental tumult]  jocular  a pathological yearning for the good old days  
hesychastic
soothing, calming, as some ancient Greek music
[fr. the Hesychasts, fourteenth century Eastern mystics who contemplated their navels, seeing therein the Divine Light]
heteroclite
[F. < Gk. heteroklitos, different form]  /HE-tuh-ruh-klite/
[adj] 1) irregular or abnormal; anomalous  2) Gram. irregular in inflection
[n] 1) a person or thing that deviates from the ordinary rule or form; fig., a maverick  2) Gram. a word irregularly inflected
heteroclitical
[F. hétéroclite]  deviating from the ordinary rule; irregular, abnormal
heterological
non-self-descriptive (used by Hofstadter to describe words such as monosyllabic and long)
heterozetesis
ignoratio elenchi
heuristic
of or relating to exploratory problem-solving methods that utilize self-educating techniques to improve performance
hexaemeron
the (biblical) six days of creation
hexakosioihexekontahexaphobia
[fr. Gk hexa^kosioi-, six hundred + hexekonta-, sixty + hex, six + -phobia]
fear of the number six-hundred and sixty-six  hence, hexakosioihexekontahexaphobiac
hexerei
[Pennsylvania German, fr. G. Hexe, witch]  /hek seh RYE/  witchcraft
hibernaculum
[L. hibernaculum, winter residence < hibernare]
1) obs.  a greenhouse for wintering plants
2) a shelter occupied in winter by a dormant animal
hiccius doctius
/HICK shius DOCK shius/  a slang word for a juggler; one that plays fast and loose
hiemal
[fr. L. hiems, winter]  /HYE uh mul/  
now rare  characteristic of or relating to winter; wintry (see also hibernal, brumal)
hilasmic
[fr. the Gk word for propitiation]  rare  propitiatory
himation
rectangular garment draped over left shoulder and wrapped around the body (ancient Greece)
hinky
[of uncertain origin]  US informal
1) dishonest or suspect  he knew the guy was hinky
2) unreliable  my brakes are a little hinky
hipped
[fr. hypochondria, by shortening and alt.]  /hipt/
1) marked by worry, depression, or hypochondria
2) absorbed to an extreme or unreasonable degree: obsessed (usu. used with on)
hircine
characteristic of a goat, esp its odor
hircismus
having smelly armpits
hircosity
[fr. L. hircus, billy goat, thus by extension from that legendary aspect of a goat's character]  goatishness, lewdness
hirdum dirdum
Brit. dial.  an uproar  (cf. dirdum)
hirple
Scot.  to walk lamely (rhymes with purple)
hirsute
roughly hairy, esp. coarse pubic hair
hirsutulous
see next
hirtellous
[fr. L. hirtus : rough, hairy + -ellus (diminutive suffix)]  /hur TEL us/  (also hirsutulous)
finely hirsute  thickened hirtellous leaves
hirudinal
[fr. L. hirudinem, leech]  obs.  of or pertaining to a leech
historicity
[prob. fr. F. historicité, < L. historicus]
1) the quality or state of being historic esp. as opposed to ficticious or legendary
2) a condition of being placed in the stream of history; also: a result of such placement
hobson-jobson
/HOB sun JOB sun/  1) a glossary of colloquial Anglo-Indian words and phrases
2) the alteration of a word or phrase borrowed from a foreign language to accord more closely with the orthoepy and orthography of the borrowing language; as in English hoosegow from Spanish juzgado, or British plonk from French vin blanc
Hobson's choice
the option of taking the one thing offered or nothing [after Thomas Hobson (1544-1630), English keeper of a livery stable, from his requirement that customers take either the horse nearest the stable door or none]
(also, rhyming slang for voice)
hoddypeak
[fr. hoddy-dod, a shell-snail + peak] obs.  a fool, simpleton, blockhead
hodiernal
[fr. L. hodiernus]  /ho di UR nal/  of or belonging to the present day   cf. diurnal
hoggerel
Brit.  a young sheep
hogg-night
Scot.  Hogmanay
It is still the custom in parts of Scotland for persons to go from door to door on New Year's Eve asking in rude rhymes for snacks or money (hog meaning a piece of money, is any silver coin - sixpence, shilling, or five-shilling).
Hogmanay
Scot.  New Year's Eve
hogshead
a large cask measuring 54 gallons
hoick
[prob. alt. of hike]  to move or pull abruptly: yank
holophrasis
expression of a complex of ideas in a single word
holour
obs. - Chaucer  a whoremonger
holouries
fornicators and debauchees, usually female
Aphrodite -- sitting graveolent in her royal hebetation, surrounded by all her holouries
  - John Gardner, Jason and Medeia
holus-bolus
[prob. reduplication of bolus, a large pill]  /HO lus BO lus/
all at once: altogether
homeopape
[coined by P. K. Dick, prob. fr. homeo-, similar + pape, paper]
a futuristic (hardcopy) newspaper that has been filtered such that you see only the news which interests you
homiletics
[fr. Gk homiletos, conversation]
plural but singular in construction  the art of preaching
hominist
someone who advocates equal rights for men
honeyfuggle
[fr. honey + fugle] (also -fugle, -fackle, -fogle)
U.S. colloq.  a) to dupe, deceive, swindle  b) to obtain by cheating or deception
honorificabilitudinitatibus
[fr. med. L. honorificabilitudinitas, honorableness (roughly)]
with honorableness; also honorificabilitudinity
hoodoo
U.S., of African origin
1) a body of practices of sympathetic magic traditional esp. among blacks in the southern U.S.: voodoo
2) a natural column of rock in western No. America, formed usu. by differential weathering; an earth-pillar, often in fantastic form
3) something that brings bad luck
hookem-snivey
[fr. earlier hook and snivey, prob. fr. hook (to steal)]
NE U.S. (orig. Brit.)  petty; deceitful, sneaky (Brit. sp. is often hookum-snivey)
hoon
[origin unknown, but perhaps a blend of hooligan and goon]
Austral./NZ slang  1) a lout or hooligan
2) someone, esp. a young man, who drives fast and recklessly
3) an act of driving fast and recklessly
also, [v.] to drive fast and recklessly; so, hooning
hooplehead
[origin uncertain, but see Quinion]  a foolish, ridiculous or worthless person
hoopty
(or hoopty ride)  slang  any undesirable or less-than-ideal mode of transportation; a beat up old car, of the sort you see in Shaft movies  
moving quickly rolling swiftly in da hoopty ride
hornswoggle
colloq.  to get the better of; to cheat or swindle; to hoodwink, humbug, bamboozle
horologist
[fr. horology, concerned with measuring time + -ist]   /huh RAL uh just/
a person skilled in the practice or theory of horology; a maker of clocks or watches
horology
[fr. Gk hora, hour + Eng. -logy]  the science of measuring time
horrent
[fr. L. horrere to stand on end, bristle]  /HOR unt/
archaic  1) bristled  2) bristling
horripilation
the erection of the hair of the head or body from fear or cold
horrisonant
[fr. L. horrere + sonant]  sounding horribly; of terrible sound; also horrisonous
hors de combat
[F.] out of combat; disabled
hortatory
giving exhortation; advisory
hosel
a socket in the head of a golf club into which the shaft is inserted
houghmagandy
fornication
Houstonize
[after Texan Sam Houston]  eponym  to beat someone up, esp. a Congressman
howdah
a seat or covered pavilion on the back of an elephant or camel
howff
Scot.  haunt, resort
hoyden
woman of saucy, boisterous or carefree behavior
huckery
[fr. huckster, or origin unknown]
1) obs. ME  the business of a huckster {OED2}
2) NZ slang  ugly {Collins Eng. Dict. 5th Ed.}; often used to describe a woman or moll {Partridge}
huderon
Scot.(?) obs.  lazy {or slovenly, according to Jamieson}
huffduff
[fr. HFDF, initials for high frequency direction finder]
a device for determining the direction of shortwave radio signals, enabling their source to be located when bearings are obtained by two or more such devices
hugger-mugger
1) disorderly confusion; muddle 2) secrecy; concealment
humbucker
music  an electric guitar pickup that has a pair of coils of reverse polarity connected in series, so as to "buck the hum" (also known as 'humbucking pickups')
humbuggery
deception
humdudgeon
Scot.  1) a loud complaint or noise  2) an imaginary pain or illness
humectant
[see next]  [(n) adj]  (a substance) promoting  the retention of moisture  (ad. L.)
humectation
[fr. L. (h)umecto, to moisten]  /hyu mek TAY shun/
archaic  the act or process of moistening or wetting; irrigation; the condition of being moistened or wet
humicubation
[fr. L. humi, on the ground + cubare, to lie down]  /hyu mik yoo BAY shun/
obs., rare  lying on the ground, especially in penitence or humiliation
humuhumunukunukuapuaa
a small Hawaiian fish
hwyl
/HU il/  Welsh  an emotional quality which inspires and sustains impassioned eloquence; also, the fervor of emotion characteristic of Welsh gatherings
hylotheism
the doctrine equating god to matter, or the universe
hymeneal
[fr. L. hymenaeus  wedding song, wedding]  archaic  nuptial
hyperbole
/hi PER buh lee/  extravagant exaggeration
hyperbolic
/hi per BAH lik/  of, relating to, or marked by hyperbole
hyperborean
related to the extreme northern regions, frozen
hypercorrect
of, relating to, or marked by hypercorrection
hypercorrection
a linguistic construction or pronunciation produced by mistaken analogy with standard usage out of a desire to be correct, such as "open widely" or "on behalf of my wife and I"
hypercritical
[fr. hyper- + critical < L. critic-us]
extremely or unduly critical; addicted to excessive adverse criticism, esp. upon minute or trivial points
hypergol
any hypergolic agent
hypergolic
[fr. hyper-, extreme + Gk ergon, work]  /hi per GAH lik/
applied to two substances which spontaneously ignite or explode on contact
hyperhedonia
[fr. hyper-, above + Gk hedone, pleasure]  feeling abnormally great pleasure from a humdrum act
hypermiling
[coined in 2004 by Wayne Gerdes]
attempting to maximize gas mileage by making fuel-conserving adjustments to one's car and one's driving techniques
hypersnickety
[hyper- + snickety : fussy, pernickety]  /HY per SNIK iti/?
nonce-word  excessively over-particular
hyperthymia
[hyper- + Gk thymos soul, spirit]
Psych.  euphoria; excessive emotionalism (medically, considered a mild form of hypomania)
hyperurbanism
use of hypercorrect forms in language; also: such a form
hypnagogic
[F. hypnagogique, fr. Gk hupnos, sleep + agogos, leading]  /hip neh GAH jik/  (also hypnogogic)
1) sleep-inducing  2) of, relating to, or associated with the drowsiness preceding sleep (opposed to hypnopompic)
hypnopompic
[hypno- + Gk pompe, a sending away]  /hip neh POM pik/
associated with the semiconsciousness preceding waking
hypobulia
deficiency of will power
hypocorism
(use of) a pet name or nickname
hypophobia
lack of fear
hypostasis
/hi PAHS ta sis/
the substance or essential nature (of a person); an underlying principle
anger is just the hypostasis of drama, the digest of drama
hypotyposis
[Gk hypotyposis sketch, outline]  /hy po ty PO sus/  a vivid picturesque description
hysteron proteron
figure of speech consisting of the reversal of a natural/rational order;
e.g., then came the thunder and the lightning


I

icarian
1) flying beyond a safe height
2) unable to execute an ambitious project
ichnology
[from Gk ichnos, footprint + -ology]
that part of palæontology which treats of fossil footprints, or other traces
ichor
an ethereal fluid taking the place of blood in the veins of the Greek gods
ichthus
(also ichthys) a representation of a fish used in ancient times as a pagan fertility talisman or amulet, or as a Christian symbol for the Greek word ichthys interpreted as an acrostic; in modern usage you often see the symbol on the back of cars
ichthyolatry
the worship of fish
ichthyologist
[fr. Gk ichthys, fish + -ologist]  a zoologist who studies fishes
ichthyology
the study of fishes
ichthyomancy
fortunetelling with fish offal
ichthyophagous
[fr. Gk ikhthus, a fish, plus phagein, to eat + -ous]  /ik thE OFF uh gus/  feeding on fish
iconodule
Eccl. Hist.  one who worships or serves images (opposed to iconoclast) also, iconodulist
iconoduly
the worship of images
icosahedron
[Gk eikosaedron]  /eye kO suh HEE drun/  a polyhedron having 20 plane faces: link
ictus
recurring stress/accent in a rhythmic/metrical series of sounds; a mark indicating the syllable on which stress/accent occurs
ides
in the ancient Roman calendar, the eighth day after the nones, i.e. the 15th of March, May, July, October, and the 13th of the other months
idioglossia
see next
idiolalia
[NL fr. idio-, private + -lalia, speech]
an idiosyncratic language, one invented and spoken by only one or a very few people; often the private language of twins: idioglossia
idiopathic
from an unknown cause
idioticon
[fr. Gk idiotikos]  /id e OT ikon/  a dictionary of a dialect
idiotism
[(1) fr. L. idiotismus, common or vulgar manner of speaking  (2) idiot + -ism]
1) obs.  a peculiarity of phrase: idiom
2) archaic  a lack of knowledge: ignorance; idiocy
iggry
[Representing Egyptian colloq. Arab. pronunc. of ijri, imper. of jara, to run.] also iggri
int. Hurry up!  also as n. in phrase to get an iggri on
ignis fatuus
[L., foolish fire] deceptive goal or hope; light from marsh gas
ignominy
1) deep personal humiliation and disgrace
2) disgraceful or dishonorable conduct, quality or action
ignoratio elenchi
[L., ignorance of proof]  the fallacy of ignoring the point in question and arguing the wrong point
ignotarian
a person who avoids or limits the acquisition of (new) information  (compare infovore)
ignotism
[fr. L. ignot-us, unknown + -ism]  obs.  a mistake due to ignorance
ignotum per ignotius
[L.] the unknown (explained) by means of the more unknown: an annoyingly obscure explanation
ikebana
the Japanese art of formal flower arrangement
illaqueable
[fr. L. laqueare, to snare]  capable of being ensnared
illaqueate
[fr. L. illaqueare, to trick]  /eh LAK wee ayt/  archaic  to entangle, entrap, ensnare
illaqueation
[see previous]  /i lak wi A shon/
obs.  the act of entangling in a snare; esp. an entangling argument
illation
[L.] 1) the act of inferring or drawing conclusions
2) a conclusion drawn; a deduction (also called illative)
illecebrous
[fr. L. f. illicere, to entice]  inkhorn term  alluring, enticing, attractive
illeism
[fr. L. ille : he, that one, that + Eng. -ism]  /IL e ism/
orig. a nonce word of Coleridge, until jerked into current usage in referring to pop icons, such as certain sports figures, who became illeists
excessive use of third person pronoun, esp. in reference to oneself; by extension, referring to oneself by name; hence illeist, one who does this
illth
being poor or miserable (the opposite of wealth)
illuminati
people claiming to be unusually enlightened with regard to a subject
imbonity
[fr. L. imbonitas < im- + bonitas, goodness]  /im BON i tee/
obs. rare  the absence of good qualities, want of goodness
imborsation
[ad. It. imborsazione]  /im bur SAY shun/
an Italian mode of election in which the names of the candidates were put into a bag to be drawn by lot
imbrication
an overlapping of edges (as of tiles)
immane
[fr. L immanis brutal, frightful, enormous]  huge; monstrous in character
immanent
[fr. L. immanere, to remain]  inherent; subjective  (not to be confused with imminent)
immanentize
[fr. L. immanere + -ize]  to make immanent, to bring about
immanitous
nonce-word (Louis de Bernieres)  monstrous in size or strength; immane
immelmann
a turn in which an airplane in flight is first made to complete half of a loop and is then rolled half of a complete turn
immorigerous
[fr. im-, not + L. morigerus, compliant]  obs. obstinate, disobedient; rude, uncivil
imparlibidinous
[impar, unequal + libidinous]  /im PAHR li BID i nus/  (nonce/inkhorn term?)
very rare  relating to an unequal state of desire between two people
impavid
fearless; undaunted
impeccant
[fr. in- + L. peccare, to sin]  without sin; faultless
impercipience
lack of perception
imperdible
incapable of being destroyed or lost: indestructible, impregnable
imperscrutable
obs.  not capable of being searched out; inscrutable
impignorate
[fr. L. pignerare, to pledge]  obs.
[v] to place in pawn; to pledge or mortgage  [pple] pledged, pawned, mortgaged
impigrity
[fr. im- + L. piger slow, dull, sluggish]  obs. rare  quickness; diligence
impinguate
/im PING gwate/  obs.  to make fat; to fatten
imprecation
the act of cursing; to invoke evil upon
imprescriptible
[F.] not subject to prescription: inalienable; also, absolute
imprimatur
official license to print; sanction, approval
impudicity
immodesty, shamelessness
impuissant
powerless
impulregafize
[Urquhart's word, evidently coined to one-up Rebelais, who coined emburelucocquer for the nonce]
nonce-word  to strain(?)
inadequation
[in- + L. adaequare]  archaic  want of equivalence or exact correspondence
inamorata
a woman with whom one is in love or has intimate relations
inamorato
a male lover
inanition
lethargy
incalescence
a growing warm or ardent
incarnadine
flesh-colored; red, esp: blood red
inchoate
being only partly in existence, esp: imperfectly formed or formulated
incicurable
[fr. L. cicurare, to tame + in-]  that cannot be tamed
incogitable
[fr. L. incogitabilis, unthinking, unthinkable]
impossible to accept or believe: unthinkable, inconceivable
incogitancy
[fr. L. incogitantia]  /in COG i tan cy/
obs.  lack of thought or of the power of thinking: thoughtlessness
incompossible
[ad. L. incompossibilis]  /in kom POS sih bel/
now rare  not possible together; wholly incompatible or inconsistent; hence, incompossibility
inconcinnity
lack of suitability or congruity: inelegance
incondite
[fr. L. in- + condere, put together]
badly put together: crude  incondite prose
inconsonance
[fr. inconsonant, after consonance]  lack of harmony: disagreement
incrassate(d)
[fr. L. incrassare to fatten, make thick]   /in CRAS sate/
Botany, Zool.  thickened or swollen (inspissated)
incubus
an evil spirit that lies on [women] in their sleep; a nightmare
incunabulum
1) a book printed from movable type before 1501
2) artifact of an earlier age
indagate
to search into; investigate
indehiscent
[in- + L. dehiscent, opening wide]  /in di HIS uhnt/
Botany  not splitting open at maturity: indehiscent fruit; hence, indehiscence
indevirginate
unsullied (not devirginate)
indigeneity
[indigenous + -eity, quality or condition]  /IN di jeh NAE ity (?)/
the quality of being indigenous or native: indigenousness
indign
[fr. L. indignus, not worthy]  /in DINE/
1) archaic  unworthy, undeserving  2) obs.  shameful, disgraceful
indite
[fr. ME enditen] (also endite)
a) make up, compose  (indite a poem)
b) to give literary or formal expression to
c) to put down in writing  (indite a message)
(a and b give more thought to the wording than the actual writing)
indocible
[ad. late L. indocibilis]  /in DOS i ble/
archaic  incapable of being taught: unteachable; hence: indocibility, indocibleness
indocile
[fr. L. indocilis]  /in DOS ile/  unwilling to be taught or disciplined: intractable
mustang, n. An indocile horse of the western plains. - Ambrose Bierce
indurate
[fr. L. indurare]  /IN duh rate/
[v] 1) to harden  2) to inure  3) to make callous
[a] hardened; obstinate    cf. obdurate
ineffable
unspeakable, indescribable  (see also inenarrable, below)
ineluctable
inevitable
inenarrable
incapable of being narrated; indescribable
inerrancy
exemption from error: infallibility
inexpugnable
[fr. L. in- + expugnabilis, capable of being overthrown]  /in-ik-SPUG-nuh-bul/  
impregnable, unassailable, invincible
inexpungible
[fr. L. in- + expungere, to cancel, obliterate]  /in-ik-SPUN-juh-bul/  
ineffaceable, indestructible
infandous
too horrible to mention, unspeakably awful
infarction
medical  necrosis
infibulation
the act of fastening with ring, clasp or stitches to prevent sexual intercourse
inficete
[fr. L. inficetus]  rare  unfacetious; not witty; dull, unfunny, deadly serious, humorless
infixation
the act of inserting (as a sound or a letter) as an infix
influencive
[fr. L. influens + -ive, due to Coleridge]  rare  influential
infonesia
[blend of information and amnesia]  cf. internesia
informal  the inability to remember where one saw a piece of information
infovore
[info- + L. vorus, devouring]  /IN fo vore/
(introduced as a scientific term by neuroscientists Irving Biederman and Edward Vessel, after carnivore, omnivore, etc.)
a person who indulges in and desires information gathering and interpretation
infracaninophile
a person who champions or favors the underdog
infralapsarian
pertaining to the doctrine of infralapsarianism (opposed to supralapsarian)
infralapsarianism
[fr. L. infra, later than + lapsus, fall]
a doctrine holding the view that God's election of some to everlasting life came after his prescience of the Fall of man, or that it contemplated man as already fallen, and was thus a remedial measure (opposed to supralapsarianism)
infrendiate
[fr. L. infrendere]  obs. rare  to gnash the teeth
infucation
the act of painting the face
infundibular
having the form of a funnel or cone
ingeminate
[fr. L. ingeminare; to redouble, repeat]  to repeat, reiterate (a word, statement, etc.), usually for the purpose of being emphatic or impressive
ingenuous
showing innocent or childlike simplicity and candidness; lacking craft or subtlety
ingravescence
[see next]  a worsening or increase in severity
ingravescent
[L., to become worse]  /in gra VES ent/  Medical  growing worse or more severe; also transf.
ingressant
[prob. borrowed from Sp. by Auden]  nonce-word  entering, ingoing
inimical
hostile; unfriendly; harmful, adverse
inimicitious
[fr. L. inimicitia, unfriendliness, enmity]  /in im ih SIH shuss/  obs.  inimical
iniquitous
characterized by gross injustice or wickedness; vicious
inkhorn
ostentatiously learned: pedantic
innubilious
cloudless
innumeracy
[after such pairs as illiterate : illiteracy]
marked by ignorance of mathematics and the scientific approach: mathematical illiteracy
innumerate
[see previous]  mathematically illiterate
inquorate
[quorate + in-]  not attended by a quorum
insalubrious
not conducive to health; unwholesome
insanable
[fr. L. insanabilis < sano, to heal]  obs.   that cannot be healed or remedied; incurable
insapory
[fr. L. sapor, taste]  obs. rare  tasteless, unsavory
inscient
[in- + L. scire, to know]
1) now rare  lacking knowledge; nescient, ignorant  2) rare  having inward knowledge or insight
insipience
a lack of intelligence
inspissate
to condense, thicken
instauration
[fr. L. instaurare  to renew, restore]
1) renovation, restoration  2) obs.  an act of starting or establishing something
insuavity
[fr. L. insuavitas < in- + suavis, sweet]  rare  unpleasantness; surliness
insufflate
to blow on or into; to disseminate by blowing
intemerate
[fr. in- + L. temerare, to violate]  pure, unspoiled
intenerate
[ad. L. tener, tender]  now rare  to make tender, soften (lit. and fig.)
interaulic
[fr. inter- + L. aula : hall, court]  /in TER au lik/
nonce-word  'Existing between royal courts' {Webster, 1864}
intercalate
to insert (as a day) in a calendar
interlacustrine
situated between lakes
internecion
[fr. L. internecare + -ion]  /in ter NESH un/
rare  (mutual) destruction, slaughter, massacre
internesia
[blend of internet + amnesia]  cf. infonesia
informal  the inability to remember either the location of or information contained on a web site  
interpellate
to question formally concerning an official action or policy or personal conduct
interregnum
the time during which a throne is vacant between two reigns; a lapse in a continuous series
interrobang
a punctuation mark {?!} designed for use esp. at the end of an exclamatory rhetorical question
interstice
a gap or break in something generally continuous
intertwingularity
a term coined by Ted Nelson to express the complexity of interrelations in human knowledge
intervenient
[fr. L. intervenire, to intervene]
1) coming in incidentally or extraneously  2) intervening  3) intermediary
intrigante
[F. < intriguer, to intrigue]  /in trE gahnt/
a woman who intrigues; a busybody (also intriguante)
intrinsicate
[app. fr. It. intrinsecato, familiar, confused in sense with intricato, intricate]
obs.  intricate, involved, entangled
introuvable
[F., incapable of being found]  /a[n] tru va bl[eh]/
[adj] immpossible to find; specif. of books (also as noun)
pamphlets, all now almost introuvable -- Times Lit. Suppl.
introvenient
[fr. L. introvenire, to come in]  obs. rare  coming in
inusitate
/in YEW si tate/  obs. rare  unwonted, unusual, out of use, unfamiliar
invigilate
1) to keep watch; esp. Brit  to supervise students at an examination
2) supervise, monitor
invigilator
chiefly Brit.  someone who watches examination candidates to prevent cheating; proctor (U.S.)
inwit
[ME., in + wit]  obs. (used as conscious archaism by modern writers)
1) conscience  2) reason, intellect, understanding; wisdom   (cf. agenbite of inwit)
ipsedixitism
an arbitrary or dogmatic argument; hence ipsedixitist, a dogmatic person
ipseity
[from L. ipse, self, himself]  individual identity: selfhood
iracund
easily angered
iracundulous
[fr. L. iracundus, inclined to anger]  nonce-wd  irascible; passionate
irenic
[fr. Gk irene, peace]  (also eirenic Brit)
conducive to or working toward peace, moderation or conciliation
irenology
the study or science of peace; compare polemology
iridology
[a. Gk. irido, comb. form of iris, + -logy]
in alternative medicine, the study of the iris as a basis for diagnosis
irony
primary use  the use of words to express something other than and esp. the opposite of the literal meaning
irpe
[origin unknown]  a fantastic grimace, or contortion of the body(?)
irredentism
advocating return of what is now foreign land to the former occupants
irrefragable
1) impossible to refute: irrefutable
2) impossible to break
irrefrangible
inviolable
irregardless
non-standard  regardless
irreption
[fr. L. irreptus]  /eh REP shun/  creeping or stealing in, stealthy entrance
the irreption of pseudoclassical plurals in technical language
irreptitious
characterized by creeping in, esp. into a text
irresolution
vacillation
irrisible
[fr. L. irredere, to laugh at]  obs. rare  worthy of derision; ridiculous
(but one 'modern' dictionary defines irrisible as 'not risible'; go figure.)
irrisory
[L. irrisorius < irridere, to laugh at]  /ih RIZ eh ree/  rare  mocking, derisive
irruption
1) a forcible or violent rush; a breaking in
2) of a natural population: a sudden upsurge in numbers
3) eruption
iscariotic
traitorous, treacherous
isepiptesis
[(NL, from is- + epi- + Gk. ptesis, flight]  /eye sep e(p) TEE sis/
rare  a line on a map or chart connecting localitites reached at one date by different individuals of a species of migratory bird (an isochronal line)
ithyphallic
obscene; lewd; indecent; salacious; lustful
izzard
zed

journey on


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