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list of wwftds

Herein is a complete list of "wwftd"s™ dating from ca. 1987 to present. This started as a "word for the day up on the blackboard" sort of thing and has degenerated into its current form; irregular distribution to a mail list via e-mail... and now this.

 Copyright © 1995-2014 -- Michael A. Fischer 
    wwftd email


A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

J

jacinthe
a moderate orange
jackanory
[fr. a children's TV show of that name, wherein stories were often read by celebrities]
UK  rhyming slang for story, often used in the sense of a tall story  (also verbed, as in to include a real person in a story being told)
jackleg
an amateur; characterized by unscrupulousness, dishonesty or lack or standards; makeshift
jackpudding
a clown; a buffoon; a merry-andrew
jacquerie
[F. fr. jacques, peasant]  /zha KREE/
1) capitalized  the uprising of the French peasants against the nobility in 1358
2) a peasant revolt, esp. a very bloody one
jactancy
[fr. L. jactare, to throw]  boastfulness; boasting
jactation
[see previous]
1) boasting, bragging
2) restless tossing in bed, characteristic of severe fevers and certain mental disorders
jactitation
1) Law  the act of bragging; false boasting or assertion made to the prejudice of another person
2) Pathology  jactation (def. 2)
jaculation
[fr. L. jaculari, to hurl]   obs.  the act of throwing or hurling
jakes
[origin uncertain, perhaps from F. Jacques]  chiefly British  a privy
jalouse
1) Scot.  to suspect or surmise
2) to be jealous or begrudge jealously
jamais
[F.] never
jamais vu
[F., never seen]  the denial of something actually seen
jamfle
[Sc. jamphle <  jamph, travel with difficulty]
to shuffle in walking, as if in consequence of wearing too wide shoes  {Jamieson}
janissary
a member of a group of loyal supporters
jargogle
[origin unknown, but perhaps related to jargon]  obs.  to confuse or jumble
jargonaut
[fr. jargon + -naut < Gk nautes, sailor; after argonuat; cf. juggernaut]  humorous, colloq.   someone who uses an excessive amount of jargon
jarkman
archaic  a vagabond who fabricates counterfeit passes, licenses and certificates for others
jauk
[obscure origin]   /jahk/  Scot.  to trifle, to dally, in walking or work {Jamieson}
jawbation
a rebuke, reproof, esp. one of a lengthy and tedious character; a talking to, a lecture; also a long discussion  (cf. jobates)
jawhole
[fr. jaw, an outpour of liquid + hole]  Scot.  an uncovered sewer, house-drain, or cesspool
jeevesian
[after Jeeves, of the P.G. Wodehouse novels]
usu. capitalized  characteristic of the perfect valet: Jeeves-like
jehu
a coachman, especially one who drives at a rattling pace
"The driving is like the driving of Jehu the son of Nimshi; for he driveth furiously." - 2 Kings ix. 20
jejeunosity
jejuneness: lacking content; naiveté [coined by Maureen Dowd, NYTimes: Even officials with a combined century of international experience can behave with jejeunosity - if they start believing their own spin. (probably the same word as jejunosity, ostensibly coined by Woody Allen in Love and Death)]
jentacular
[fr. L. jentare, to breakfast]  obs.  pertaining to breakfast
jeofail
an omission or oversight in a law proceeding
jeopard
[back-formation < jeopardy (but see next)]  to put in jeopardy; to hazard, risk, imperil
jeopardous
[Middle English jupartous, fr.jupartie + -ous]  fraught with risk or danger; hazardous, perilous
jeremiad
a prolonged lamentation or complaint
jeroboam
an oversize wine bottle holding about four 26-ounce quarts
jerque
to search a vessel for smuggled goods
jesticulous
nonce-word  ridiculous(?)
jetsam
stuff thrown overboard to lighten the load in time of distress which sinks or is washed ashore
jicama
/HEE ka ma/  an edible starchy tuberous root of a leguminous tropical American vine
jiffy
1) 1/100 of a second  2) one millisecond  3) approximately one nanosecond   4) indeterminate time from a few seconds to forever
jim-jams
slang  1) the jitters  2) delirium tremens
jo
Scot.  sweetheart
jobates
scolds
jobation
[after the biblical Job]  chiefly Brit.  a long, tedious criticism: scolding, lecture
jobbernowl
Brit.  blockhead, nincompoop
jobbery
[fr. job or jobber]  the practice of turning a public office or position of trust to personal gain or political advantage; corruption in public office
jobsworth
[fr. It's more than my job's worth (not) to..]
Brit. colloq.  an official who mindlessly upholds petty rules
jocoserious
combining jocular and serious matters
"Was the guest conscious of and did he acknowledge these marks of hospitality? His attention was directed to them by his host jocosely, and he accepted them seriously as they drank in jocoserious silence Epps's massproduct, the creature cocoa." - James Joyce, Ulysses
joggle
to move shakily or jerkily
johnny
fellow, guy; a short-sleeved collarless gown with an opening in the back
jokul
a mountain covered with ice and snow (in Iceland)
jolterhead (or jolthead)
[origin obscure]  obs.  a blockhead
jubilate
[fr. L. jubilare, to rejoice]  to rejoice, exult; hence, jubilating
judder
[imitative, probably from shudder]  chiefly Brit.
[v] to shake and vibrate with intensity  the engine stalled and kept juddering
[n] an instance of juddering
jugulate
to slit the throat
jumentous
smelling of a stable, or horse urine
juste milieu
[F., lit. 'the right mean']  the happy medium, the golden mean; judicious moderation, esp. in politics
juvament
[fr. L. juvare, to help]  obs. rare  help, aid, assistance
juvenescence
the state of growing young


K

kakidrosis
see bromidrosis
kakistocracy
government by the worst men of the state
kalon
the ideal of physical/moral beauty esp as conceived by the Greek philosophers, the kind of beauty that is more than skin deep
kalopsia
[fr. Gk kalos, beautiful < kallos, beauty + opsis, sight] /kuh LAHP see uh/
the delusion that things are more beautiful than they really are
kankedort
[?] obs. rare  a state of suspense; a critical position; an awkward affair
Was Troylus nought in a kankedort...? - Chaucer, Troylus
karoshi
/ka RO shi/  Japan  death brought on by overwork or job-related exhaustion
katabatic
[Gk katabatikos, pertaining to descent < katabatos, descending]  /KAT uh BAT ik/
of or relating to a cold flow of air traveling downward: a katabatic wind
katzenjammer
[G.] 1) hangover
2) distress, depression or confusion resembling that caused by a hangover
3) a discordant clamor
kayfabe
[borrowed from carny slang : protecting the secrets of the business]  /KAY fabe/
the illusion that professional wrestling is not staged or 'worked'
keck
to heave or retch, as in an effort to vomit
keckish
rare  (or kecklish) inclined to vomit; squeamish
kedogenous
[from Gk kedos; care, anxiety, grief + -genous, produced by]  inkhorn term  brought about by worry, or anxiety
keech
[origin obscure]  obs. exc. dial  a lump of congealed fat
keek
to glance; to peep
kef
a state of dreamy tranquility; a smoking material that produces such a state
kegler
a bowler
kelemenopy
[fr. the alpha sequence klmnop]  /kay el em EN oh pee/
a sequential straight line through the middle of everything, leading nowhere
a strictly sequential irrelevance - John Ciardi
keming
[fr. misreading kerning]  /KEM ing/  the result of improper kerning
kenosis
the relinquishment of the form of God by Jesus in becoming man
kenspeckle
Scot.  obvious, conspicuous
kentledge
[of obscure origin, perh. related to quintal, a unit of wt]
Naut.  pig iron or scrap metal used as permanent ballast; also attrib.
kepi
/kep EE/  a cap with a circular top, and a nearly horizontal visor (that French military cap that men in the Foreign Legion wear)
kerfuffle
Brit.  disturbance
kerning
[fr. F. carne, corner of type + -ing]  the addition or removal of space between individual characters in a piece of typeset text to improve its appearance or alter its fit
kerygma
[see next]  the apostolic proclamation of salvation through Jesus Christ
kerygmatic
[fr. Gk kerygma, proclamation]  /kerig MAD ik/
belonging to or of the nature of preaching; also transf.
ketchcraft
 [after Jack Ketch, an infamous London executioner]  the hangman's craft
khazeray
(Yiddish, from Heb. khazir, pig)  /khoz zair EYE/  or chazeray, also chozzerai  
1) food that is awful  2) junk, trash  3) anything disgusting, even loathsome
kheda
[Hindi] an enclosure used for the capture of wild elephants
kibosh
[origin obscure, possibly Yiddish or Anglo-Hebraic]  slang
1) in the phrase to put the kibosh on, to dispose of finally, finish off, check or stop
2) nonsense, rot, stuff, humbug  3) the proper style or fashion  (senses 2 and 3 are mainly archaic)
kidon
[Hebrew, bayonet or ‘tip of the spear’]  an assassin (of the Mossad)
kilderkin
a cask measuring 18 gallons (1/2 barrel)
kingling
a little king, a kinglet (a weak or petty king)
kip
1) a unit of Laotian currency
2) the hide of a small animal
3) a place to sleep; a bed
4) a unit of weight (1,000 pounds)
kipple
[coined by Philip K. Dick in Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?]
the collection of useless bits of trash we wallow in; all the paper and junk that is not recycled; decaying entropic trash
kippleization
the tendency of the universe towards decaying entropic trash
kiskeedee
slang  a French-speaking person who is unable to understand English and keeps asking, "Qu'est-ce qu'il dit?" (What is he saying?)
klazomania
compulsive shouting; thus klazomaniac, one who shouts compulsively
kloof
[Afrik] a deep ravine
knackatory
[fr. knick-knack, itself a redup. of knack, a toy or trifle] also knick-knackatory
a shop for finnimbruns (knick-knacks)
knacker
Brit. 1) a buyer of worn-out domestic animals/carcasses for use esp. as animal food or fertilizer
2) a buyer of old structures for constituent materials
knackered
Brit. slang  tired; exhausted
knees-up
Brit. informal  a lively party, usu. including dancing
knobkerrie
[Afrikaans knopkierie]  a short wooden club with a knob at one end used as a missile or in close attack, especially in southern Africa
knobstick
Brit.  one who refuses to join, or withdraws from, a trade union; a blackleg
knout
[F. < Russ. knut]  /nout/
[n] a leather scourge used for flogging  [v] to flog with a knout
knouted
past tense of knout, flogged with a knout
koan
[fr. Jap. ko, public + an, proposition]  /KO an/
a paradox used in meditation in the training of Zen Buddhist monks to abandon dependence on reason and rather gain sudden intuitive enlightenment
krotoscope
[fr. Gk krotos, clapping of hands + -scope]  an applause-measuring instrument: applause meter
Kulturkampf
[G. fr. Kultur + Kampf, conflict]   /kul TUR kam(p)f/
broadly  a conflict between cultures or value systems
kumatage
a bright appearance in the horizon, under the sun or moon, arising from the reflected light of those bodies from the small rippling waves on the surface of the water - Bowditch's Navigator, 24th Edition (1854)
kursaal
[G.] a public building at a German health resort, provided for the use and entertainment of visitors; hence, a similar building at an English watering-place
kvetch
[Yiddish] to complain habitually: gripe
kwyjibo
a nonsense word from the television series The Simpsons, made up by Bart Simpson during a game of Scrabble; when Homer asks Bart what a kwyjibo is, Bart replies, "A big, dumb, balding North American ape. With no chin." Marge chimes in, "..and a short temper". - Wikipedia
kyacting
[unknown origin]  /KYE ac ting/  UK slang, rare  clowning at work


L

labefaction
a weakening or impairment esp. of moral principles or civil order: downfall, overthrow
lability
[fr. L. labilis, prone to slip]  /lah BIL ity/
1) susceptibility to change; instability  2) Chem.  unstableness
lachschlaganfall
[G.]  /lok shlok en fol/
Med.  a condition in which a person falls unconscious due to excessive laughter
lackwit
[lack + wit]  /LACK wit/
a dull or witless person: blockhead, fool, yahoo, thickwit, dope, nitwit, dimwit, half-wit
lacuna
a gap
lagerphone
Austral.  a percussion instrument consisting of a long pole with a cross-piece at one end, to which numerous beer-caps are loosely nailed, producing a jingling noise when shaken or struck
lagniappe
a small gift given a customer by a merchant at the time of purchase; broadly, something given or obtained gratuitously
lalochezia
[fr. Gk lalia, speech, + chezo, to relieve oneself]  an emotional discharge gained by uttering foul language
la maladie sans maladie
[F.] the sickness without sickness; hypochondria
lambent
flickering; softly radiant; marked by brilliance of expression
lamia
a female demon: vampire
lampadedromy
[Gk lampadedromia]  (erroneously in Webster: lampadrome)
Gk Antiquity  a torch-race; a race (on foot or horseback) in which a lighted torch was passed from hand to hand; also lampadephore, a torchbearer
lamping
flashing, beaming, resplendent
lamster
fugitive
lanceolate
[fr. L. lancea, lance]  /LAN see uh late/
tapering from a rounded base toward an apex; lance-shaped  lanceolate leaves
langlaufer
a cross-country skier
lant
to mingle ale with stale urine to make it strong
lanterloo
[orig. the unmeaning refrain of a song popular in the 17th c.]  used as a meaningless refrain
The sun is bright, the grass is green: Lanterloo, lanterloo.
The King is courting his young Queen. Lanterloo, my lady.
 - Auden & Kallman, The Rake's Progress  [libretto] (1951)
laocoon
[after Laocoon, ancient Greek priest of Apollo who is portrayed in a 1st century B.C. sculpture in a heroic struggle against two giant serpents]  /lay AWK oh wan/
one that struggles heroically with crushing or baffling difficulties
Laodicean
[fr. the ancient city of Laodicea]
1) of or relating to Laodicea
2) indifferent or lukewarm, esp. in matters of religion or politics (in reference to Revelation 3:14-16)
lapidable
[fr. L. lapidare, to stone < lapis, stone]  /la PID uh bul/?
obs. rare  worthy of being stoned  (compare widdiful)
lapidary
sculptured in or inscribed upon stone
lapidate
to stone to death
largiloquent
/lar GIL oquent/  obs. rare  full of words; grandiloquent
larmoyant
[F.] tearful, weepy: lachrymose
larrikin
chiefly Austral.  hoodlum, rowdy
latibulize
[fr. L. latibul-um, a hiding-place]  rare  to hibernate; to retreat and lie hidden
latifundium
a great landed estate with primitive agriculture
latitudinarian
broad and liberal in standards of religious belief and conduct
latrate
[fr. L. latrare, to bark] /LAY trayt/
obs.  to bark like a dog  {Cockerham, 1623}
latration
[fr. L. latrare, to bark]  a barking
latrinalia
/LA tri NAY lee uh/  bathroom graffiti
latrinology
[fr. latrine, ad. L. lavatrina + -logy]  the study of bathroom graffiti (latrinalia); hence, latrinologist
coined by Professor Alan Dundes at Berkely, who made this an academic specialty
lebensfreude
[G.]  keen enjoyment: zest; joie de vivre
lectisternium
an ancient Greek/Roman religious rite in which the images of gods were placed on couches and food spread before them
lees
the sediment that settles at the bottom of a liquid, esp. a fermented liquid such as wine; dregs
legerity
[fr. F. legereté, lightness  (fr. L. leviarius?]  /le JER uh tee/  agility of mind or of limb: nimbleness
leguleian
an attorney whose methods are underhanded, petty and disreputable
lemures
spirits of unburied dead exorcised from homes in early Roman religious rites
lenitive
[adj] capable of easing pain or discomfort
[n] anything that softens or soothes; a palliative
lentiginous
[L. lentiginosus, freckled]  /len TIJ uh nuhs/  covered with freckles: freckled
leptology
a minute and tedious discourse on trivial matters
lethe
oblivion, forgetfulness
lethiferous
[fr. L. lethum, death + -ferous]  that causes or results in death, deadly
lethologica
the inability to remember the right word
lethonomia
the tendency to forget names
levant
chiefly Brit.  to run away from a debt
levin
/LEV in/ (also leven)  lightning; a flash of lightning; also, any bright light or flame
lexicographicolatry
[fr. lexicographic + Gk latriea, worship]  neologism
reverence for "the dictionary" (perhaps the UAD: Unidentifed Authorizing Dictionary)
lexiconophilist
a collector of dictionaries and word books
lexiphanic
bombastic, turgid, inflated
lexiphanicism
[fr. Gk lexiphanes, phrase-monger (title of dialogue by Lucian)]  /lex i FAN i sizm/
archaic  the use of pretentious phraseology
liberticidal
destructive of liberty
liberticide
the destruction of liberty
libricide
[fr. L. liber, book + -cide]  the slaughter (destruction) of books
librocubicularist
one who reads in bed (coined by Christopher Morley?)
licitation
the act of selling or bidding at auction
lickerish
greedy, desirous; lecherous
lickpenny
an absorber or devourer of money
Law is a lickpenny. -- Sir Walter Scott
lick-spigot
obs  one who licks the spigot; a contemptuous name for a tapster or drawer (tavern keeper); also, a revolting parasite
lickspittle
a fawning subordinate: toady
limacine
of, relating to, or resembling a slug
limacology
[fr. L. limax, slug, snail + -ology]
the branch of zoology which deals with slugs; hence, limacologist
limberham
in etymological sense: one who has 'limber hams', a supple-jointed person; fig. an obsequious person: lackey
liminal
[fr. L. limen, threshold]  /LI mi nal/
1) of or relating to a sensory threshold  2) barely perceptible
limivorous
swallowing mud for the organic matter it contains
limmer
Scot.  scoundrel; prostitute
limnology
[fr. Gk limne, lake + -logy]
the scientific study of bodies of freshwater, esp. lakes and ponds
so limnologist, one who studies lakes
limpid
pellucid
linguacious
[L. linguax, -acis, loquacious, fr. lingua tongue]  (also linguaceous)
rare  talkative, loquacious
linguaphile
[fr. L. lingua : tongue, language + Gk philos, loving]
a lover of language and words
lipogram
a bit of writing which contains words lacking a particular letter
lippitude
sore or bleary eyes
liripipe
[fr. Med. L. liripipium]  (also liripoop)
1) the long tail of a hood in medieval or academic costume
2) obs.  a lesson or role to be learned or spoken  3) obs.  a silly person
lirk
Scot. and Brit. dial.  a fold in the skin; a wrinkle
lirp
obs. rare  a snap of the fingers; also v., to snap with one's fingers
lirt
obs.  deception, trick
listful
archaic  inclined to listen, attentive
literatus
[L.]  a member of the literati
litherness
[fr. lither < G. liederlich, lewd + -ness]
obs. 1) wickedness  2) laziness, sloth
litotes
expressing an affirmative by the negative of the contrary
lixiviate
[fr. L. lixivus, made into lye; < lix, ashes, lye]
1) to impregnate with lixivium or lye
2) to subject to a washing process for the purpose of separating soluble material from that which is insoluble; to leach, as ashes, for the purpose of extracting the alkaline substances
lobcock
a stupid, blundering person: lout
loblolly
1) a thick gruel; mire
2) a lout
lobscouse
a sailor's dish prepared by stewing or baking bits of meat with vegetables
lobstick
[var. of lop-stick]  Canada  a tree with branches trimmed so that it may serve as a landmark or memorial
lockrum
[origin uncertain]  (also lockram)
dialect  a pack of gibberish; nonsense
locofoco
a match or cigar which can be lit by friction on any rough surface (also called a lucifer match)
locum
[fr. L. locum tenens]  a professional (typically a physician or clergyman) who substitutes temporarily for a peer
locupletative
[fr. L. locupletare, to enrich]  /lock you PLEA ta tive/?  inkhorn term  tending to enrich
lodestar
1) the pole-star
2) one that serves as an inspiration, model or guide
loganamnosis
/LAHG an um NOH sis/  an obsession with trying to recall a forgotten word
logastellus
"a person whose enthusiasm for words outstrips his knowledge of them" - John McClellan
logocentrism
[fr. Gk logos, word + -centrism]  /lo go CEN triz em/
1) literary analysis that focuses on words and language to the exclusion of non-linguistic matters such as the author's individuality or historical context
2) excessive attention paid to the meanings of words or distinctions in their usage   hence, logocentric
logodaedalus
[fr. Gk logos, word + Daedalus, famed artificer]
obs.  an artificer of words and phrases: wordsmith
logodaedaly
arbitrary or capricious coinage of words
logofascinated
[hybrid fr. Gk logos, word]  nonce-word  fascinated by words
logogogue
a person who lays down rules about words; a language dictator
logolepsy
an obsession with words
logolept
/LO go lept/  a word maniac; verbivore, logophile
logomachist
[Gk logomachia + -ist]  /lo GAM eh kest/
one given to disputes over or about words (also logomach)
logomachy
a dispute over or about words; controversy marked by verbiage
logomisia
disgust for certain words
logopandocie
nonce-word  a readiness to admit words of all kinds
logophile
[fr. Gk logos, speech + philos, loving]
a word lover or word buff
logorrhea
excessive and often incoherent talkativeness or wordiness
logorrheic
[ad. NL logorrhea + -ic]  /LO geh RE ik/  characterized by excessive use of words
loid
slang  to open (a locked door) by sliding a thin piece of celluloid or plastic between the door edge and doorframe to force open a spring lock
longanimity
a disposition to bear injuries patiently: forbearance
longevous
(also longaevous) long-lived; living or having lived to a great age
longiloquence
long-windedness
longinquity
[L. longinquitas, fr. longinquus, distant]  /lan JIN kwed ee/
archaic  remoteness in space or time
longueur
[F., length]  /lo~ goer/  usu. used as pl. longueurs  a dull and tedious passage of writing (or music, etc.)
looby
an awkward clumsy fellow: lout, lubber
loofah
a bath or shower sponge; the dried fibrous part of the gourd-like fruit of a plant of the genus Luffa
lorem ipsum
[fr. L. dolorem ipsum, pain itself]  dummy text of the printing and typesetting industry
losel
a worthless person
louche
not reputable or decent
loup-garou
a werewolf
loxodrome
[back-formation from loxodromic, from Gk. loxos, oblique + dromos, course]  /LAK suh drome/
a rhumb line, a curve that appears to be a straight line on a Mercator map
loxotic
[fr. Gk loxos, oblique]   /lok SOT ik/  rare  distorted; oblique; lopsided
lubberland
[fr. Swed. lubber, a worthless idler]
an imaginary land of extreme luxury and ease : Cockaigne
lubberwort
[fr. lubber, a stupid person + wort, a plant]
obs. provincial Eng.  food or drink that makes one idle and stupid; food without nutritive value; junk food
lubricious
1) slippery
2) lecherous; salacious
lubricity
[fr. L. lubricus, slippery]  /loo BRIS ity/
the quality or state of being lubricious: slipperiness; lasciviousness
luciferous
[fr. L. lucifer, light-bearing]  /lu SI f(uh)rus/  archaic  bringing light or insight: illuminating
lucifugous
[L. from lux, light + fugere, to fly]  Nat. Hist.  shunning or avoiding light
lucriferous
[fr. L. lucr-um  gain, profit, advantage + -iferous]  obs.  lucrative, profitable
lucriferousness
the quality of being lucriferous
lucripetous
[fr. L. lucripeta]  /loo KRIP eh tous/  obs.  eager for gain  (money-hungry?)
lucubration
[fr. L. lucubratio, study or composition at night]  laborious study: meditation; studied or pretentious expression in speech or writing
luculent
[fr. L. luculentus < lux, light]  clear in thought or expression: lucid
Luddite
someone opposed to technological change
ludibrious
[fr. L. ludibrium, sport, jest]  /lu DIB ri ous/
1) now rare  inclined to scoff; scornful, mocking
2) obs.  ridiculous
ludibrium
[L., mockery, derision]  a divine comedy(?)
ludic
playful, sporting
ludification
an act of mockery
luftmensch
[Yiddish] an impractical dreamer having no definite business or income
lugubrious
mournful or doleful to a ludicrous degree
lumberly
[fr. lumber + -ly]  rare clumsy, cumbrous
luminaria
a traditional Mexican Christmas lantern orig. consisting of a candle set in sand inside a paper bag; or a small bonfire used to light the way [see farolitos]
luniversary
[L. luni-, moon + versus, turned; after anniversary]
the day of the month on which something recurs  (also lunaversary and mensiversary)
lunt
[fr. Dutch lont, a match]  chiefly Scot., now rare(?)
1) to smoke tobacco in (a pipe)  2) to set fire to : light up, kindle
hence, lunting (not to be confused with lant)
lunule
the whitish mark at the base of the fingernail
lupercalian
[fr. L. Lupercus, god of flocks]
related to or characteristic of an ancient Roman festival (Lupercalia) celebrated February 15 to ensure fertility for the people, fields, and flocks
lusk
[origin uncertain]  obs.  idle, lazy, worthless {Johnson, 1822}
lusory
[fr. L. lusus, from ludere - to play]
archaic  1) used in play  2) composed in a playful style
lustration
[fr. L. lustrare, to purify]  /luh STRAY shun/
a purifying ceremony; an act or instance of cleansing, esp. by moral or spiritual purification
lustrum
[fr. the Roman census]  a period of five years
luxated
[fr. L. luxare < luxus, dislocated]  put out of joint; dislocated
lycanthropy
the assumption of the form and characteristics of a wolf held to be possible through witchcraft or magic
lychnobite
[fr. Gk lychnos, lamp + bios, life]   /LIK no bite/
obs. rare  one who labors at night and sleeps by day; one who turns night into day; a fast-liver
lycophosed
[fr. Gk lykophos, twilight (app. misunderstood to mean keen sight)]  obs.  keen-sighted
lygophilic
[fr. G. lyge, twilight + -philic]  (soft or hard g?)
one who loves darkness (as opposed to lygophobic)
lygophobic
one who fears or hates darkness

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Copyright © 1995-2014 -- Michael A. Fischer

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