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list of wwftds

Herein is a complete list of "wwftd"s™ dating from ca. 1987 to present. This started as a "word for the day up on the blackboard" sort of thing and has degenerated into its current form; irregular distribution to a mail list via e-mail...and now this.

 Copyright © 1995-2014 -- Michael A. Fischer 
    wwftd email


A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

M

macarism
[Makarism.. is a transliteration of the Greek word meaning 'blessing' (cf. Rom. 4:6, 9; Gal. 4:15) - Richard N. Soulen, ed., Handbook of Biblical Criticism]
Theol.  a beatitude; also gen. (rare) : joy in another's happiness
macaronic
1) characterized by a mixture of vernacular words with Latin words
2) characterized by a mixture of two languages
macaronicism
macaronic in style
macerate
[fr. L. macerare   to soften, steep]
1) to cause to waste away, esp. by fasting  2) to soften by or as if by steeping in a liquid
machicotage
[F.]  /ma shi KO tazh/
the embellishment of the solo part of plain song by the insertion of ornaments between the authentic tones
macquereau
pimp, procurer
macrologist
a dull conversationalist, usually met at dinners and parties
macrology
long and tedious talk; prolonged discourse without ideas; superfluity of words
macroscian
[fr. Gk makros, long + skia, shadow]  /muh KRASH iun/
[adj.] having a long shadow  [n] a person whose shadow is long, specif. an inhabitant of the polar regions
macrotous
having great big ears
macroverbumsciolist
nonce word 1) a person who is ignorant of large words
2) a person who pretends to know a word, then secretly refers to a dictionary
maculate
[fr. L. maculatus]  archaic or literary  1) marked with spots: blotched  2) besmirched, defiled, impure
maenad
a woman participant in orgiastic Dionysian rites
maffick
to celebrate with boisterous rejoicing
mafflard
[fr. maffle, to mumble or stammer + -ard]   /MAFF lard/  obs.  a stammering or blundering fool
maffle
Brit. dial.  to speak indistinctly: mumble, stammer; to cause to become confused or bewildered
magiric
[fr. Gk magiros(?), cook]  obs. rare  of or relating to cookery; the art of cooking
magniloquence
[fr. L. magniloquus]  /mag NI lo kwents/  the quality or state of being magniloquent: speaking in or characterized by a high-flown often bombastic style or manner
magnisonant
high-sounding
maieutic
relating to or resembling the Socratic method of eliciting new ideas from another
majuscule
[fr. L. majusculus, rather large]  /MA jus kyul/  compare minuscule
[n] a large (capital) letter  [adj] uppercase; so, majuscular
makeweight
[make + weight]
1) something added on a scale to make a desired weight
2) an unimportant person or thing thrown in to fill a gap
3) a counterweight; a counterbalance
malacissation
obs. rare  the act of making soft or supple
malapert
impudently bold: saucy
malapropos
in an inappropriate or inopportune way
malebolge
[It., from the eighth circle of Dante's Inferno, Malebolge f. L. malus, evil + bogia, valley]  /mal eh BOLGE/
literary  a pool of filth; a hellish place or condition
malefic
[fr. L. maleficus, wicked]
1) having an unfavorable or malignant influence: baleful
2) malicious
maleficate
[fr. L. maleficare, to enchant]  obs., rare  to exert a baleful influence on; to bewitch
maleficiate
[fr. L. maleficiare, to bewitch]  obs.  bewitched
malism
the belief that the world is evil
malison
[fr. LL. malediction-]  curse, malediction
malkin
Brit. 1) an untidy woman: slattern; 2) cat; hare
mallemaroking
the carousing of seamen on board Greenland whaling ships
malnoia
[fr. mal- : ill, wrong + Gk nous, mind]  /mal NOI ah/
a vague feeling of mental discomfort
malversation
corruption in an office, trust or commission; corrupt administration
mameluke
[fr. Arabic mamluk, slave]  /MAM uh look/
1) usu. cap.   a member of an Arabic military class, originally composed of slaves
2) lowercase  (in Muslim countries) a slave
mammothrept
rare  a child brought up (and spoiled) by its grandmother
mancinism
the condition of being left-handed
Manichaean
characterized by a belief in religious or philosophical dualism
manqué
[F.]  /ma{n}kay/  short of or frustrated in the fulfillment of one's aspirations or talents (a poet manqué)
manso
[prob. fr. Vulgar Latin mansus, tame]
[n]  a meek, tame, or cowardly person or animal, esp. a tame or timid bull
[adj] of a bull: tame, timid, lacking in aggression
mansuetude
[fr. L. mansuetus, tame]  the quality or state of being gentle: meekness, tameness
mantic
prophetic
manticratic
[fr. Gk mantisi, prophet + -cratic]  (found only in Lawrence)
of the rule by the prophet's family or clan
manumission
the act of manumitting; freeing from slavery
manxome
a nonsense word invented by Lewis Carroll to describe the Jabberwock: (perhaps) fearsome, monstrous; (or) related to the Manx cat
maquette
[F. fr. It. macchietta, little sketch]  /ma KET/
a sculptor's small preliminary model or sketch; a model of a room or building
marabout
[F. fr. Port. marabuto < Arabic murabit posted, stationed]  /MAR uh boo(t)/
a Muslim hermit or saint, esp. in northern Africa; a dervish monk believed to have supernatural power
marc
[F. fr. marchier, to trample]  /mark/
1) the pulpy residue left after a fruit has been pressed
2) brandy made from the residue of wine grapes after pressing
maritodespotism
[fr. L. maritus, husband + despotism]  /MAR i toh DES puh tiz'm/
ruthless, tyrannical domination by a husband  (see also uxorodespotism)
maritorious
[humorously fr. L. maritus, husband]  nonce-word  fond of one's husband
dames maritorious ne'er were meritorious
marmalize
[origin uncertain; perhaps fr. marmalade, after pulverize]
Brit. slang  (also marmalise) to thrash; to crush or destroy; also fig.: to defeat decisively
marmoreal
[fr. L. marmoreus < marmor, marble]  /mar MOR ee ul/
resembling marble, as in smoothness, whiteness, or hardness
marplot
one who frustrates or ruins a plan or undertaking by his meddling
masculinist
an advocate of men's rights, opp. feminist; cf. hominist
mastigophorer
obs.  a fellow worthy to be whipped
mataeology
needless or foolish conversation
mataeotechny
obs.  an unprofitable art or science (from Greek roots meaning vain art)
matelot
[F.]  /MAT low/  British  sailor
materteral
suggestive of an aunt; cf. avuncular
mathesis
[Gk., action of learning]  archaic  mental discipline; learning or science, esp. mathematics
matinal
[fr. L. matutinus, of the morning]  pertaining to the matins (morning prayers); see also matutinal
matriotism
nonce-word  love of one's mother country or of one's alma mater
mattoid
[fr. It. matto, mad + -oid, resembling]  /MAD oid/
[adj] semi-insane  [n] a semi-insane person; a borderline psychopath
matutinal
[fr. L. matutinus, early]  /mat yoo TI nul/  relating to or occurring in the morning
matutolagnia
antemeridian sexual desire
matutolypea
getting up on the wrong side of the bed
maudle
[back-formation fr. maudlin]  obs. rare  to make maudlin; to talk in a maudlin manner
mauger
[adj]  dial.  thin, emaciated
[n]  obs.  ill will: spite
[prep]  archaic  in spite of; notwithstanding
maunder
grumble (Brit); to wander slowly and idly; to speak indistinctly or disconnectedly
maundy
1) the celebration of washing the feet of the poor (on Maundy Thursday)
2) alms distributed in connection with this celebration
3) obs.  feast
mazuma
[Yiddish]  money, cash
medicaster
a medical quack
megalonisus
[fr. Gk megalo- great, exagerrated + L. nisus, striving]  /meg ah LON ih sus/?
very rare  a tendency to exaggerate(?)  {Mrs. Byrne}
megalophonous
[fr. Gk megalophonos, loud-voiced]
rare  of imposing sound; clamourous
megatherial
resembling the megatherium; fig., ponderous unwieldy (the megatherium is an extinct, giant slothlike creature)
megrim
migraine, vertigo; whim, pl.: low spirits
meiotic
deliberately understated
meleagrine
[fr. L. (ad Gk. meleagris,a guinea fowl]  /mel e A grine/
belonging to a genus of American gallinaceous birds; pertaining to or like a turkey
meliorism
the belief that the world tends to become better and that humans can aid its betterment
melisma
see next
melismatic
[fr. Gk melisma, a song or tune]
Music  relating to, or being a melisma, the style of singing several notes to one syllable of text (cf. Gregorian chant)
melomaniac
an abnormally dedicated musical fan
meme
[fr. Gk mimema; shortening of mimeme]
an idea which spreads (coined by Richard Dawkins, in The Selfish Gene)
memorous
[fr. L. memorosus memorable, mindful]  obs. rare  memorable
menckenian
characterized by vitriolic social criticism (in the style of H.L. Mencken)
mendaciloquence
[fr. L. mendacium, falsehood + -iloquent, speaking]  lying as a fine art; adroit prevarication
mendaciloquent
obs. rare  skillful or artful at telling lies
mendacious
given to or characterized by deception or falsehood or divergence from absolute truth
mendacious tales of his adventures
menhir
a single upright rude monolith of usually prehistoric origin
menology
a calendar of the feastdays of saints and martyrs (see also feria)
mensch
[Yiddish, a human being] a person of integrity and honor
menstruum
[Med. L., literally., menses]  a substance that dissolves a solid or holds it in suspension: solvent
menticide
[fr. L. ment-, mens; mind + cidium, killing]
the undermining or destruction of a person's mind or will, esp. by systematic means such as mental and physical torture, extensive interrogation, suggestion, training, and narcotics: brainwashing
mentimutation
[fr. L. mens, mind + mutation]  /men ti myoo TAY tion/  obs. rare  a change of mind
the exceedingly rare mentimutations of a major league umpire - David Grambs
mephitic
foul-smelling
meracious
[L. meracus, fr. merus pure, unmixed]  /meh RAY shus/
obs. rare  pure, unadulturated; hence, strong, racy
merdivorous
[fr. L. merda, dung + -ivorous]  dung-eating
meretricious
[fr. L. meretrix - a prostitute]
1) of or relating to a prostitute : having the nature of prostitution   meretricious relationship
2) tawdrily and falsely attractive  meretricious trash; pretentious
merry-andrew
one who entertains people by means of antics and buffoonery; a clown; properly (in early use), a mountebank's assistant
meshugaas
[Yiddish] /mish eh GOSS/  lit.  insanity, madness; usu. used in a lighter vein
mesonoxian
[fr. Gk meso-, middle + L. nox, night]   /mezz uh NOCK see un/?
obs. rare  of or belonging to midnight {Cockeram}
mesopygion
[fr. Gk meso-, middle + pyge, the rump]  rare the cleavage of the buttocks
metagrobolize
to puzzle or mystify
metagrobologist
one who does or makes puzzles
metamorphosable
rare  (after F.)  that is able or liable to change form
metanalysis
[fr. meta- + analysis]  /me teh NA leh ses/
a reanalysis of the division between sounds or words resulting in different constituents (as in the development of an apron from a napron)
metastasize
[fr. NL metastasis] //
Pathol.  to spread to other parts of the body by metastasis; in extended use, to change form or matter; to transform
metempsychosis
passing of the soul into another body
metemptosis
[fr. Gk meta- + emptosis, falling]  /met emp TOE sis/
Astron. obs.  the suppression of a (leap) day in the calendar to prevent the date of the new moon being set a day too late, or the suppression of the bissextile day once in 134 years (the opposite to this is the proemptosis, or the addition of a day every 330 years, and another every 2,400 years)
metensomatosis
[fr. Gk meta- + en- + somat-,  soma, body + -osis]
the migration of a soul from body to body  (to be confused with metempsychosis)
metic
[from Gk metoikos, fr. meta, change and oikos, house]
an alien resident of an ancient Greek city who had some civil privileges
meticulosity
[fr. meticulous (after curious:curiosity)]  /muh tik yuh LAS ud ee/
the quality or state of being meticulous: meticulousness
metonymy
/met ON ah me/  a figure of speech in which one word or phrase is substituted for another with which it is closely associated, as in the use of Washington for the United States government or of the sword for military power
metromania
[fr. Gk metron  measure, meter + -mania]  (also metromanie)  excessively fond of writing verses
metrosexual
an urban male with a strong aesthetic sense who spends a great deal of time and money on his appearance and lifestyle (aesthete, bon vivant, epicure, sensualist)
mezzobrow
a middlebrow, in a fashionable and superior way (coined in the U.S. in the 1920s)
micawberish
characteristic of an improvident person who lives in expectation of an upturn in his fortunes
mickle
Scot.  great, much
microlipet
a very small portion(?); someone who gets worked up about trivial things: a nitpicker
micrologist
a specialist in micrology, see following
micrology
[fr. Gk mikrologia minute discussion, frivolity]  /mahy KROL uh jee/
attention to petty details or distinctions; nitpicking
micrology
[fr. micro- + -logy]  a science dealing with the handling and preparation of microscopic objects for study
micronymy
[micro-, small + -onymy, method of denotation]
obs. nonce word  the use of short terms or names in scientific nomenclature
midden
a dust-bin; a dungheap
millenarian
1) apocalyptic
2) of or relating to 1000 years
millihelen
[fr. milli-, thousandth + Helen (of Troy, whose beauty supposedly launched a thousand ships)]
jocular  the quantity of beauty required to launch precisely one ship
mim
Scot. and dial.  affectedly shy or modest, demure; also, affecting great moderation in eating and drinking (Jamieson)
miminy-piminy
(also niminy-piminy)
[adj] ridiculously delicate or over-refined; finicky
[n] finicky or affected compostion
minacious
[fr. L. minax, threatening]  /meh NAY shus/  
now rare  meanacing, threatening: minatory
minatory
[fr. L. minari, to threaten]  having a menacing quality: threatening
minger
[prob. fr. minging : stinking; foul, unpleasant]
Brit. slang (derogatory)  an ugly or unattractive person, esp. a woman
mingy
mean, stingy
mirabile dictu
[L., wonderful to relate]  incredible
mirabiliary
[fr. L. mirabilis, marvel]
obs.  a person who deals in marvels, a miracle-worker; a collector of marvelous things
mirabilist
[fr. L. mirabilis, wonderful] one who works wonders; a conjuror
miridically
[fr. L. miridicus, < mirus, wonderful]  obs. rare  amazingly, remarkably
mirific
[fr. L. mirare, to wonder]  (also mirifical)
causing or working wonders: marvelous
mirifical
see previous
misandry
a hatred of men
misanthrope
one who hates or distrusts mankind
miscible
[fr. L. miscere, to mix]  /MIS uh bul/
capable of being mixed: mixable
mise-en-scene
[F. mise en scène, putting into the scene]  /meez ahn sen/
narrowly, a stage setting; broadly, visual style
miserabilism
[fr. L miserabilis, miserable]  /MIZ er(a) ba LIZ em/
a philosophy of pessimism; self-indulgent pessimism; gloomy negativity
mishanter
misadventure; misfortune; mishap
misocainea
[fr. Gk misos, hatred + kainos, new]  /miso KINE eah/
an abnormal aversion to new things or ideas  (cf. misoneism)
misocapnist
one who hates tobacco/smoking
misodoctakleidist
someone who hates to practice the piano (of unknown origin)
misogamist
one who hates marriage
misogynist
one who hates or distrusts women
misology
a hatred of argument, reasoning or enlightenment
misoneism
a hatred, fear or intolerance of innovation or change
misopedia
a severe dislike of children, esp one's own
misoscopist
1) a hater of beauty  2) a recluse
misosophy
[fr. Gk misosophos, hating wisdom]  the hatred of wisdom
misprision
[borrowed fr. F. as a legal term]  /mis PRI zhun/
1a) neglect of an official duty  b) concealing of treason or felony by one who did not participate in the act  c) seditious conduct against the governement or courts
2) a mistake, or the mistaking of one thing for another
misprision
[fr. misprize]  contempt, scorn; failure to appreciate or recognize the value of something
misprize
[MF mesprisier, fr. mes- mis- + prisier, to appraise]  /mis PRIZE/
1) to hold in contempt: despise  2) undervalue
mistemious
[fr. mis-, bad + L. temetum, intoxicating beverage]
nonce-word?  marked by the misuse of alcohol: drunken
mitching
[fr. mitch, to pilfer; to lurk or skulk; to play truant]
Brit. regional  skulking, lurking; playing truant
mithridate
[after Mithridates VI, who is said to have acquired tolerance for poison]
an antidote against poison
mithridatism
[see previous]  tolerance or immunity to a poison acquired by taking gradually larger doses of it
mitigate
[fr. L. mitigare, to soften]  to make less intense or serious or severe; appease
mizzle
1) to rain in very fine drops: drizzle
2) Brit.  to depart suddenly: absquatulate
moai
[fr. Rapanui (the Polynesian language of Easter Island), literally: statue, figurine]
any of the gigantic carved stone figures found on Easter Island
moanworthy
rare  worthy of moans; lamentable
modoc
[origin unknown]  U.S. slang, now rare  (also modock)
a person who takes up aviation for reasons of self-promotion or social prestige; also, a pilot who talks boastfully about flying, but rarely flies
moeurs
[F.] the behaviour, customs, or habits of a people or a group of people
autres temps, autres moeurs  (other times, other customs)
mog
to move away; jog
mogigraphia
writing only with difficulty; writer's cramp
mogue
Brit. slang, orig. regional  to deceive, fool, trick; to play a joke on, make fun of
moider
[origin uncertain]  /MOI dur/  Irish & Brit. dial.  (also moither, etc.)
[tv] 1) to perplex, bewilder  2) to distract, bother
[iv] 1) to talk incoherently: be delirious  2) to wander about aimlessly or confusedly
(not to be confused with U.S. vernacular for murder)
moiety
1) one of two equal parts: half; one of two approximately equal portions  2) component, part; obs.  a small portion: fraction
moil
hard work: drudgery; confusion, turmoil
moira
[Gk]  individual destiny, will of the gods: fate
moirologist
[fr. Gk moira, fate]  obs. rare  a hired mourner (cf. Sc. saulie)
(not to be confused with morologist)
mokita
[Papuan]  the truth that everyone knows but no one talks about
mole
Chem.  the molecular weight of a substance expressed in grams; gram molecule
moliminous
[fr. L. molimin- + -ous]  /mo LIM in us/?
obs.  massive, cumbrous; weighty, momentous
molligrant
Scot.  a wailing lamentation: complaint
mollitude
rare  softness; effeminacy; weakness
mollock
[an alteration of morlock, to frolic, dance; play about, perhaps after rollick]
Brit. coloq.  to cavort; spec. to engage in sexual play; also fig.
mome
[n] a stupid, boring person
mome
[a factitious word introduced by Lewis Carroll]
nonce-word  [adj] (explained by Carroll as) grave, solemn
momist
[obs. fr. Momus, the Greek god of ridicule, who for his judgments of the gods was banished from heaven; hence a fault-finder, a captious critic (a daughter, disciple or son of Momus is a facetious or humorously disagreeable person; a wag, a buffoon]  /MOM ist/  a fault-finder
mommixity
[(?) fr. mommuck, to bother]  nonce-word?  fuss, bother
"All this mommixity and foofaraw was compressed into a street no more than three paces wide.." - Louis de Bernières, Birds Without Wings
momser
[fr. Hebrew mamzer]
1) a child who is born out of wedlock; a bastard  2) slang  a contemptible person, a jerk
mondegreen
the mishearing of a song lyric
mongo
[origin unknown]  /MAWNG goh/  New York City dial.  an object retrieved from rubbish; a scavenger
monish
now rare, chiefly literary and archaic  to admonish; to give counsel, warning, or criticism
monomyth
[mono- single, one + myth; coined by James Joyce and borrowed by John Campbell]
an archetypal myth; a theme that underlies a number of superficially different myths: the hero's journey
monopsony
[fr. mon(o)- + Gk opsonia, purchase of food]  /muh NOP suh nee/
a market situation in which there is only one buyer
mook
an incompetant or stupid person, a gullible person; a contemptible person (esp. with reference to low social status)  cf. moke
mooncalf
simpleton, blockhead
moonglade
the track made by moonlight on water
mooreeffoc
Mooreeffoc is a fantastic word, but it could be seen written up in every town in this land. It is Coffee-room, viewed from the inside through a glass door, as it was seen by Dickens on a dark London day; and it was used by Chesterton to denote the queerness of things that have become trite, when they are seen suddenly from a new angle. - J. R. R. Tolkien, On Fairy-stories
mordacious
[ad. L. mordax fr. mordere, to bite + Eng. -ious]  /mo(r) DAY shus/
1) biting or given to biting  2) biting or sharp in manner: caustic
mordant
[see previous]  biting and sarcastic in manner, thought or style
moreish
[more + -ish]  Brit. colloq.  of food or drink: that makes one want to have more
morganatic
[fr. NL matrimonium ad morganaticam; literally, marriage with morning gift (or, that's all she got)]
of, relating to, or being a marriage between a member of a royal or noble family and a person of inferior rank in which the rank of the inferior partner remains unchanged and their children have no claim to royal possessions or title
morigeration
obedience, compliance, obsequiousness
morigerous
[fr. L. morem gerere, to humor or comply with the wishes of a person]  also, morigerant
obedient, compliant, submissive
morologist
[morology + -ist < Gk moros, foolish]  /moh ROHL uh jist/
obs. rare 1) a boring fool who speaks utter nonsense; 'a foolish talker' {Bailey, 1727}
2) a student of fools or folly
morology
1) the study of foolish and nonsensical talking
2) deliberate nonsense or foolishness for effect
morosis
[NL]  idiocy; fatuity; stupidity
morosoph
[fr. Gk morosophos  foolishly wise, wise fool]
now rare  a) a wise fool, a jester  b) a foolish pedant or would-be philosopher
mosker
a person who pawns articles for more than their real value
motch
to eat little, slowly, quietly and secretly; to consume or waste imperceptibly
hence, motching, fond of dainties, with the idea of eating in secret; (also) slow, quiet eating, with the idea of fondness for good living; imperceptible use, with the notion of thriftlessness
mother
[fr. Fris. moder(?)]  /muhth er/
dregs, sediment; scum; mold; esp. the lees or sediment of wine; the scum rising to the surface of wine or beer (not to be confused with your mother)
mothery
[see previous]  thick, moldy
moulage
an impression made for use as evidence in a criminal investigation
mountebank
1) a person who sells quack medicines from a platform
2) a boastful unscrupulous pretender: charlatan
mountweazel
[after Lillian Virginia Mountweazel, a fountain designer turned photographer who never existed]
a bogus entry purposely inserted into a reference work: a copyright trap
muckle
Irish or N. Eng. dial.  var. of mickle,  great, much
muculent
[L. muculentus, sniveling < mucus]
slimy; moist, and moderately viscous; resembling mucus
mudlark
[fr. mud + lark]
1) archaic  an urchin who grubs for a living along the tide flats of the English Thames
2) someone who scavenges in river mud for items of value (riverside equivalent of a beachcomber)
mudsill
1) the lowest sill of a structure, usually suspended in soil or mud
2) a person of the lowest stratum of society
muff
A dull, stupid person. Sir Henry Muff, one of the candidates in Dudley's interlude, called The Rival Candidates (1774), is a stupid, blundering dolt. - Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase and Fable
muffish
[fr. colloq. muff, itself of uncertain origin, but see Brewer for muff]
Brit. colloq.  foolish; incompetent; clumsy
muffishness
foolishness; awkwardness
muffism
[fr. muff, an oaf + -ism]  /MUF izm/
UK colloq. obs.  the action characteristic of a muff or incompetent person; foolishness
mugwump
a bolter from the Rep. party in 1884; a political independent
muliebrity
[fr. L. mulier, woman]  the state of being a woman: womanhood; femininity  
mulierosity
[fr. L. mulierositas, excessive fondness for women]
obs. rare  a (excessive) fondness for women; also, mulierose : (excessively) fond of women
mulligrubs
a state of depression of spirits; a fit of megrims or spleen; in early use in the phrase: sick of the ~; hence, jocularly  stomach-ache or colic
multivious
[L. multivius, having many ways]  /mul TI vi us/
now rare  having many ways or roads; going in many directions
mumchance
[fr. G. mummenschanze, a dice game that mummers played]  /mum chans/
archaic  silent; unable to speak
mummery
a performance by mummers (pantomimes); a ridiculous, hypocritical or pretentious ceremony
mumping
Brit. slang  to obtain by begging or scrounging; the acceptance of small bribes
mumpsimus
someone who obstinately clings to old ways, in spite of the clearest evidence that s/he is wrong
mundicidious
[fr. L. mundus, world + -cidious (-cida, killer)]  /mun di SID ee us/  (cf. homicidious, also rare)
obs. rare  likely or able to destroy the world
mundivagant
[fr. L. mundus, world + vago, to wander]  /mun DIV uh gant/
rare  wandering through the world {Johnson, 1755}; world-wandering
mundungus
foul-smelling tobacco
murcid
[fr. L. murcidus, lazy]  /MUR sid(?)/  obs. rare  slothful
murdermonger
1) rare  a writer or purveyor of murder stories
2) a person who commits or incites murder; a professional murderer
murdermongeress
[fr. mudermonger]  nonce-word  a female writer of murder mysteries
I repeat that one book by this murdermongeress
Will last you as long as the Library of Congress.
  - Ogden Nash (writing of Agatha Christie)
murdrum
[ML]  /MUR drum/  early English law, now hist.
1) the killing of someone in a secret manner
2) a fine imposed by the Crown on a manor or hundred (district) in which such a killing had been committed (also called the murder fine)
murmuration
[fr. L. murmuratio, muttering, grumbling]
1a) now chiefly literary: the act of murmuring; the uttering of low continuous sounds or complaining noises  b) Scot. obs.  rumoring; the action of spreading rumors
2) of starlings: a flock
murth
[origin uncertain]  /murth/  also: morth, mort
(obs?) N. Eng. dial.  a great quantity, an abundance  a murth of cold
musaceous
of, pertaining to, or resembling bananas or plantains
musard
[F., fr. muser  to loiter, trifle]  /MU sard/
obs.  a dreamer; an absent-minded person
mussitate
[fr. L. mussitare, to mutter]  obs.  to mutter
mussitation
muttering to oneself soundlessly; murmuring
musteline
[fr. L. mustelinus, of a weasel]  relating to or characteristic of a weasel or similar fur-bearing mammals such as badger and otter
mutatis mutandis
[L.] 1) with the necessary changes having been made
2) with the respective differences having been considered
mutuatitial
[fr. L. mutuatio, a borrowing]  /myoo choo uh TISH ul/
obs. rare  [adj] borrowed  [n] something which is borrowed
muzzy
muddled or confused in mind; lacking in clarity, dull, gloomy
mycterism
[fr. a Gk word meaning to sneer at]  /MIK ter izm/  rare  a disdainful gibe or scoff
myrmidon
[fr. Gk Myrmidon, one of a legendary Thessalian people accompanying Achilles to the Trojan War]
a loyal follower, esp: a subordinate who follows orders unquestioningly or pitilessly
myrmidonize
[myrmidon + -ize]  obs. rare  to make hard, to harden
mysophobia
an abnormal fear of filth
mysterium
a hypothetical substance to which a galactic radio emission at 1665 megahertz was attributed until it was identified as an exceptionally strong component of a set of four lines emitted by the hydroxyl radical, OH
mythomane
[back-formation fr. mythomania]  one who has an excessive propensity for lying or exaggerating
mythomania
an excessive or abnormal propensity for lying and exaggerating
mythopoeia
[fr. Gk mythopoiia, the making of myths]
the creation of myths  (cf. mythopoeic)
mythopoeic
relating to the making of myths
mythopoesis
mythopoeia


N

naff
Brit. slang  worthless, useless; tacky, tasteless, unfashionable; hence, naffly : in a naff manner
naffin
[origin uncertain, but see It. gnaffa, a dreary man]
Brit. colloq.  one who is almost an idiot
nanometric
[fr. nanometer, after metric]
pertaining to a nanometer, which is a billionth part of a meter (pretty small)
napiform
turnip shaped
nates
the buttocks
natiform
resembling the buttocks
naufragous
causing shipwrecks
naumachia
an ancient Roman spectacle representing a naval battle
nauscopy
the alleged ability to spot land or ships at sea from far away
nautch
an entertainment in India consisting chiefly of dancing by professional dancing girls
neanimorphic
[fr. Gk neanikos, youthful]  looking younger than one's years
neatherd
a herdsman
nebbish
Yiddish  a timid, meek or ineffectual person
nebulochaotic
[fr. L. nebula, mist, fog + chaotic]
nonce-word, obs.  hazily confused
necessarium
[post-classical L., privy]  /NES eh SAR ium/
Hist.  a privy, esp. in a monastery; humorous  a toilet, lavatory
necessitous
[fr. necessity + -ous, after F. nécessiteux]
1) needy, destitute  2) urgent, pressing  3) necessary
necrological
/nek ruh LOJ uh kul/  of, relating to, or having the nature of a necrology
necrology
an obituary
necromancy
the practice of communicating with the spirits of the dead in order to predict the future
necromimesis
feigning death; the delusion of being dead
nefandous
[fr. classical L. nefandus : wicked, impious, abominable]
/neh FAN dous/  archaic  unspeakable, unmentionable
nelipot
[fr. Gk nelipous (nelipodos), unshod, barefooted]  /NEL i pot/
someone who walks about barefooted
nemophilist
rare  one who is fond of forest or forest scenery; a haunter of the woods
neologization
[fr. neologize [v] < neology [n]]  
rare  the coining of new words or phrases  (coined by Th. Jefferson)
neoteric
recent in origin: modern
nepenthe
a drug used by the ancients to give relief from pain and sorrow; hence anything soothing and comforting
nephalism
refers to total abstinence from alcoholic drinks
nephelococcygia
[first used in the play The Birds, written in 414 B.C. by the Greek comic poet Aristophanes, this was to be a city in the clouds; fr. nephele, cloud + kokkyx, cuckoo]  /ne fê lê kak SI jee yê/
1) capitalized  cloud cuckooland  2) the act of finding shapes in clouds
nephologist
[see next]  one who studies clouds
nephology
[fr. Gk nephos, cloud + -ology]  /neh FOL eh jee/
the scientific study of clouds; the branch of meteorology that deals with clouds
nescience
lack of knowledge or awareness: ignorance; the doctrine that nothing is truly knowable
nescio
[classical L., cf. nescience]  
obs., rare  taken into thieve's jargon; a claim not to know: I do not know
nibby
[cf. Sc. nebby, nebbie]  U.S. regional  nosy, inquisitive, interfering
nictitate
to wink
niddering
[fr. a misreading of nithing in an early text]  archaic  a cowardly person; a wretch  [adj.]  cowardly
nidification
the act, process or technique of building a nest
nidor
the savory aroma of cooked food, especially meat
nidus
1) a nest in which small animals deposit their eggs
2) a breeding place for germs
3) fig.  a source or origin; a place where some quality or principle is fostered
niffy
[fr. niff, an unpleasant smell (perhaps fr. sniff)]
Brit. informal  having an unpleasant smell: malodorous
niggardly
stingy; scanty
night-foundered
distressed for want of knowing the way in the night
nihilarian
[fr. L. nihil, nothing + -arian, producer]  /NI eh lar ian/?
obs. rare  a person who deals with things of no importance; someone with a meaningless job
nihilartikel
[fr. L. nihil, nothing + G. artikel]  /NI hil AR ti kul/
a deliberately erroneous entry in a dictionary or other reference book  (cf. esquivalience, for instance)
nihilification
rare  the action of setting aside or slighting
nihilism
1) the belief that existence is senseless
2) the belief that conditions are so bad as to make destruction desirable; terrorism
nihil obstat
[L., nothing hinders]
1) certification of a book by an official censor
2) official approval
nikhedonia
[fr. Nike, the Greek goddess of victory + hedoné, pleasure]  the pleasure derived from anticipating success
nilometer
an instrument for measuring the height of water in the Nile during flood
nimiety
excess, redundancy
nimious
now chiefly as a Scot. legal term  overmuch, excessive; inordinate
nimrod
[fr. Nimrod, a mighty hunter]
1) not capitalized  a hunter  2) N. Amer. slang  a stupid or contemptible person; an idiot
nincompoopery
the action(s) of a fool or simpleton
ninnyhammer
[app. fr. ninny + hammer (fr. hammer-headed?)]  a fool, simpleton; a blockhead
nipperkin
[of obscure origin]  rare  1) a measure or vessel of small capacity used for liquors
2) Scot.  the quantity of liquor that can be contained in such; a small quantity of wine, ale or spirits
Nissen hut
[after Peter Nissen, Brit. mining engineer]  a prefabricated shelter with a semicircular arching roof of corrugated iron sheeting and a concrete floor  (cf. Quonset hut)
nisus
/NIE sus/  a mental or physical effort to attain an end: striving
nival
of or relating to a region of perennial snow
niveous
of or relating to snow, relating to snow (as in whiteness): snowy
nocent
causing injury; harmful
noctilucent
[fr. L. nox, night + lucere, to shine]
1) rare  luminescent at night or in the dark (see next)
2) Meteorol.  designating a cloud that appears luminescent at night; specif. a silvery or bluish-white cloud occasionally seen in summer at high latitudes
noctilucous
shining at night, phosphorescent
noctivagant
wandering by night
noctuary
[fr. L. noctu, by night + Eng. -ary; after diary]
archaic  a journal of nocturnal incidents
noctuolent
[fr. L. noctu, by night + olent, redolent of]
obs. rare  of a flowering plant: more strongly scented at night than during the day
nocuous
[fr. L. nucere, to harm]  /NAH kyu wus/
harmful; noxious    hence: nocuously, nocuousness (both rare)
nodus
complication, difficulty
noetic
based on purely intellectual apprehension
noisome
noxious, unwholesome; offensive to the senses, esp: smell
noli me tangere
[L.] do not touch me
nolleity
[fr. L. nolle, be unwilling]  /nol LEE ity/
rare  unwillingness (also nolition)  cf. velleity/volition
nomocentrism
[fr. Gk nomos, law] centered in the law
nomothetic
[fr. Gk nomothetikos, of legislation]  /nom uh THET ik/  relating to law; based in general laws
nonce-word
a word occurring, used, or made only once or for a special occasion
nonesuch
a person or thing without an equal
nooning
[after morning, evening]
1) rare  midday  2) a rest taken an noon; a lunch break  3) a midday meal
nosism
[fr. L. nos, we + -ism]  conceit on part of a group; use of 'we' in speaking of oneself
nosocomology
the study of hospital management
nostrum
a panacea
notaphilist
[fr. L. nota, note + -phile]  /no TAF il ist/
a person who studies notaphily; a collector of banknotes
noumenon
in the philosophy of Kant: an object of purely intellectual intuition: the thing-in-itself; contrast with phenomenon
nouniness
[fr. nouny + -ness]  the (excessive) use of nouns or nominal constructions; also, (Linguistics)  the state or condition of being noun-like
nouny
having or using many nouns; noun-like
novercal
[fr. L. novercalis, of or like a stepmother, hostile]  /no VUR kul/
now rare  stepmotherly; freq. in extended use: cruel, malicious, hostile
novercant
[see previous]  obs. rare  having characteristics attributed to a stepmother; hostile
novio
[Sp.] sweetheart; lover
nowanights
[now + anight(s), at night; after nowadays]  on present nights (in contrast with the past)
noyade
[F.] /nwa YAD/
[n] a mass execution carried out by drowning, as practiced at Nantes in France during the Reign of Terror; also fig
[v] to execute by drowning
nubivagant
[fr. classical L. nubivagus, wandering among the clouds]
obs. rare  passing through the clouds
nudiustertian
[fr. L. nudius tertius]  obs. rare  of the day before yesterday
nudzh
[Yinglish, from nudge]  /nooj/ or perhaps /nooj-eh/  also nudge, nooge
[n] one who persistently pesters, annoys, or complains
[vt] to annoy persistently; pester  [vi] to complain or carp persistently
nugacity
[fr. L. nugacitas]  /noo GAS i ty/
1) trifling, triviality, futility
2) a trifling or frivolous idea
nugatory
of little or no consequence; trifling , inconsequential; inoperative
nugiperous
[fr. L. nugae, nonsense or trifles]  /nju DZI pur us/?
obs. rare  given to inventing trifles
nullibicity
[fr. L. nullibi, nowhere]  (or nullibiety, or nullibility)
the condition or attribute of being nowhere; non-existence
nullibiety
see previous
nullibiquitous
[fr. L. nullibi, nowhere + -biquitous, cf. ubiquitous]
rare   existing nowhere
nullifidian
[n] 1) one of no faith or religion; a skeptic in matters of religion
2) transf.  one who lacks faith; a disbeliever
[adj] having no faith or belief
nulliverse
a world devoid of any unifying principle or plan
nulutative
[coined by David Brin in "The Uplift War"]  neologism  a nonsense word suggesting a future mental process  associative, extrapolative, intuitive, holographic, or nulutative
numinous
1) supernatural, mysterious
2) filled with a sense of the presence of divinity
3) appealing to the higher emotions or to the aesthetic sense: spiritual
nuncupate
to declare publicly or solemnly; to proclaim formally
nuncupative
not written: oral  as in nuncupative will
nundination
[L.]  archaic  an act or instance of bartering: sale
nupson
fool, simpleton
nutant
[fr. L. nutare, to nod]  chiefly Bot.  nodding; drooping
nutarian
a vegetarian whose diet is based on nut products
nyaff
Scot. and Irish  a diminutive, insignificant, or contemptible person; often as wee nyaff
nychthemeral
[fr. nychtermeron + -al] of or relating to a nychthemeron or 24-hr period
nychthemeron
[fr. Gk nyx, night + hemera, day]  /nik THEM er on/
the full period of a night and a day
nycterent
[fr. G. nycto- < nyx, night]  (relating to) one who hunts by night
nyctinastic
relating to or caused by nyctinasty
nyctinasty
[G. nyktinastie]  /NIK teh NAS ti/
Botany  plant movement associated with diurnal changes of temperature or light; e.g. the shutting of the petals of a flower at night
nympholepsy
[fr. Gk numpholeptos]  /NIM feh LEP sy/
1) a frenzy supposed by ancient peoples to have been induced by nymphs
2) an emotional frenzy, as for something unattainable


O

obacerate
[fr. L. obacerare, to contradict, interrupt]  to shut someone's mouth; contradict
obaceration
[see previous]  /oh BASS uh RAY shun/?  obs. rare  the act of shutting someone's mouth
obambulate
[fr. L. obambulare, to walk to]  /oh BAM byuh late/
archaic  to walk about; wander aimlessly
obdormition
numbness caused by pressure on a nerve, as when your foot is asleep
obelus
[L. < Gk obelos  spit, pointed pillar]
1) a mark (- or ÷) used in ancient manuscripts to indicate spurious or doubtful passages; also, the division sign
2) the dagger sign (†) used as a reference mark or to indicate that a person listed is deceased
obflisticate
U.S. colloq., obs. rare  humorous alteration of obfuscate, perh. after flustrate
obfuscate
1) to cast into darkenss, obscure
2) to confuse, bewilder
objurgate
to castigate
objurgation
a harsh rebuke
objurgatory
[L. objurgatorius]  /ob JURG uh tor ee/  expressing (a harsh or violent) rebuke
objurgatrix
a scolding, sharp-tongued, shrewish woman, a Xanthippe; a common scold  :)
oblast
a political subdivision of a republic in the [former] USSR
oblectation
pleasure; satisfaction; recreation; delight
obligurate
[fr. L. obligurire, perh. a misreading of abligurire]
obs. rare  to feast, to spend (time) feasting(?)  cf. abligurition
oblivionize
[fr. L. oblivion-, forgetfulness + -ize]
now rare  to consign to oblivion
Oblomovian
[fr. Ivan Goncharov's novel, Oblomov]  characterized by sloth or lassitude
Oblomovism
[see previous]  sluggish inertia
obloquy
1) abusive language  2) ill repute
obluctation
[fr. L. obluctari, to offer resistance]  (not to be confused with oblectation!)
obs. rare  the action of striving or struggling against something
'a struggling or striving against; resistance' {Webster, 1828}
obmutescence
the act of becoming or keeping silent or mute
obnixely
[fr. L. obnixus  strenuous, resolute]  obs. rare  earnestly, strenuously  (cf. obnixiously)
obnubilate
to becloud
obnunciate
[fr. L. obnuntiare]  obs. rare  to announce an unfavorable omen
(and thus prevent, stop, or render void, some public transaction)
obnunciation
the act of obnunciating
obreptitious
done or obtained by trickery, or by concealing the truth
obscurantism
[fr. L. obscurare, to obscure]  opposition to the spread of knowledge; deliberate vagueness or abstruseness
obscurantist
a person who opposes reform and enlightenment
obsecrate
to beseech, supplicate or beg
obstipation
a severe and obstinate constipation
obstringe
obs. rare  to constrain, to put under obligation (from L. stringere - to tie, bind)
obstruent
causing obstruction; esp of a body passage
obstupefactive
[L. obstupefacere, to stupefy]  obs. rare  obstructing the mental powers; stupifying  {Johnson, 1828}
obtest
to beseech, supplicate
obtortion
rare  a twisting, distortion, wresting, perversion
obtractuous
obs. rare  slanderous, calumnious (erroneously from obtrect)
obtrect
obs.  to disparage: slander
obtrectation
slander; detraction; calumny  [marked little used in 1828]
obtund
to lessen the violence of; to dull
obturation
an obstruction
obvallate
[fr. L., surround with a wall]  obs. rare
[v] to surround with, or as with, a wall  [adj] walled-up
obvaricate
[fr. L. obvaricator, a person who obstructs another]  
obs. rare  to obstruct (a person or a person's progress)
obvelation
[fr. L. obvelare, to cover over]  rare  a veiling over, a hiding or concealing
obvolute
overlapping, convolute (coiled)
occultation
the state of being hidden from view
oche
darts  /(h)a' key/  (formerly /hockey/)
the line behind which a darts player must stand; the throwing-line
ochlocracy
government by the mob
ochlophobia
the fear of crowds (mobs)
ochone
Irish/Scot.  used as an expression of regret or grief
ocker
[fr. the name Oscar]  Austral. slang  a rough, uncultivated, or aggressively boorish Australian man (esp. as a stereotype); thus ockerdom, ockerish, ockerism
octarine
the color of magic (as used by Terry Pratchett)
octothorp(e)
the symbol # on a telephone or keyboard
(hash mark, pound sign, number sign)
odalisque
a female slave; a concubine in a harem
odobene
walrus-like
odontalgia
a toothache
oeillade
[F.]  /uh(r) yahd/  a glance of the eye; esp: ogle
off-piste
[see piste]  away from prepared ski runs   off-piste slopes
also transf.
offscum
archaic  that which is skimmed off; scum, dross, refuse; fig., that which is rejected as vile or worthless
ogerhunch
[origin unknown]  /OH ger huns/
Any frightful or loathsome creature, especially a bat. - Thomas Edmondston, A Glossary of the Shetland and Orkney Dialect, 1866
ogrous
[apparently adj. form of ogre]   /OH grus/?
having the appearance or characteristics of an ogre: ogreish
ogry
[from ogre, presumably]  resembling, or pertaining to, an ogre(?)
ogygian
[of or pertaining to Ogyges, a mythical king of ancient Attica, or to a great deluge in Attica in his days]
ancient, primeval; of obscure antiquity
oicotype
[fr. Gk oikos  house, dwelling + type]  /OY ko type/?  
a term proposed by Carl Wilhelm von Sydow to designate a local or regional form of a migratory folktale
oikology
[fr. Gk oikos, house + -logy]  rare  the science of the home; home economics; (the science of?) housekeeping
okhrana
[fr. Russ. oxrana, lit. guarding, protection, security]  /ah KRAH nuh/  (also okhranka)
Hist., in Imperial Russia  a secret police department set up in 1881 (after the assassination of Tsar Alexander II) to maintain state security and suppress revolutionary activities, and abolished after the February Revolution in 1917; transf. the security services of the Soviet Union or its successors
olamic
[fr. Hebrew olam; an age, eternity]  now rare  everlasting, eternal
oleaginous
resembling or having the properties of oil; unctuous
oligophagous
eating only a few specific kinds of food
oligophrenia
feeblemindedness
oligopolist
[see next]  one who supports limited competition
oligopoly
[fr Gk oligos, few + polein, to sell]  /ol uh GOP uh lee/
few sellers, many buyers: a sellers' market  (compare oligospsony)
oligopsony
few buyers, many sellers
Ollendorffian
in the stilted language of foreign phrase-books
ology
[abstracted from words with this ending]  /ALL eh jee/
an informal term for some unidentified branch of learning
omadhaun
(also amadan)  Irish  fool, idiot, simpleton
omasum
the third of the four stomachs of a ruminant (see reticulem)
ombibulous
[coined by H. L. Mencken; ultimately fr. L. imbibere, to drink in + omni, all]
referring to someone who drinks anything
omerta
It. dial.  /o MER ta/  refusal to give evidence by those concerned with Mafia activities : code of silence
ominate
[fr. L. ominari, to prognosticate; cf. omen]
[vt] archaic 1) to prophesy from signs and omens: augur 2) to be a portent or omen of
[vi] obs. 1) to utter prophecies or forebodings 2) to serve as a prophecy
omneity
that which is essentially all; that which comprehends all: allness
omnigenous
[L. omnigenus, fr. omnis, all + genus, kind]  /om NIH jen ous/
composed of or containing all kinds
omnilegent
[fr. omni- + L. legere, to read]  /om nilujunt/
reading or having read everything; having encyclopedic curiosity and knowledge
no historians have been more omnilegent, more careful of the document - George Saintsbury
omninescience
ignorance of everything, universal ignorance
omniscian
[fr. L. omniscius + -an]  obs. rare  a person who knows, or professes to know, everything
omnishambles
[omni-, all + shambles]
Brit.  a situation that has been comprehensively mismanaged, characterized by a string of blunders and miscalculations; a complete screw-up in all areas
omnist
[fr. classical L. omnis, all + -ist]
rare  one that believes in all faiths or creeds
omnisufficiency
obs., rare  the quality of being 'all-sufficient'
omphalopsychite
/om pha LAHP si kite/  one who contemplates his own navel; a name given the Hesychasts
omphaloskepsis
the contemplation of one's own navel to induce a mental trance
oneiric
of or relating to dreams; dreamy
oneirocrite
[fr. MF onirocrite, as trans. fr. Rabelais; < Hell. Gk, judge or interpreter of dreams]
obs. rare  a person who interprets dreams
oneirocritical
of, relating to or specializing in the interpretation of dreams
oniomania
an uncontrollable urge to buy things
onolatry
[fr. Gk onos, ass]  /oh NOL atry/  rare {until discovered by the net}
worship of the donkey or ass; also by extension, excessive admiration for or devotion to foolishness
onomasiologic
[fr. Gk onomasia, name + -ology]  /on uh may see uh LOJ ik/
Linguistics  relating to the gathering or comparison of lists of words that designate similar or associated concepts
onomastic
[Gk onomastikos, fr. onomazein to name]  /ah nuh MAS tik/
of, relating to, or consisting of a name or names; relating to onomastics
onomasticon
[blend of onomastic + lexicon]  /ON uh MAE stik on/
a vocabulary or lexicon of proper names or place names
onomastics
the science or study of the origins and forms of proper names of persons or places
onomatomania
[NL]  /AHN uh MAD uh MANE ea/
uncontrollable obsession with words or names or their meanings or sounds; esp. a mania for repeating certain words or sounds
onomatope
[back-formation fr. onomatopoeia]  an onomatopoeic word
onomatopeed
[fr. previous]  /AN eh ma TOPT/ or /-to PEED/ (?)
used onomatopoeia
onomatopoeia
the naming of a thing or action by a vocal imitation of the sound associated with it
ontogeny
the development or course of development of an individual organism (compare phylogeny)
ontology
a branch of metaphysics concerned with the nature and relations of being
onychophagia
[fr. Gk. onycho, nail + -phagia, eating]  /on i kO PHA juh, -jee uh/
Psychiatry  habitual biting of the nails, esp. as a symptom of emotional disturbance
onychophagy
nail-biting
onymous
bearing a name (not anonymous)  an onymous article in a magazine
oofy
wealthy, rich; hence oofiness, wealthiness
ooglification
[fr. uglification ooglified]  /oog li fi KAY shun/
the substitution of an "oo" sound for another vowel sound in a word to form a slang (or slangier) word
(e.g., snoot for snout)
oojah
Brit. slang  a "what's its name?", a thing whose name has been forgotten
oojah-cum-spiff
[origin uncertain]  (see previous) fine, all right
oolly
[India]  /OOL ly/  a lump or loop of iron, as wootz, when taken as a pasty mass from the crucible
operose
[fr. L. operosus  laborious, industrious] 1) tedious, wearisome  2) industrious, diligent
ophelimity
economic gratification
ophicleide
[F. fr. Gk ophis, snake + kleid-, key]
a keyed brass instrument of the bugle family with a baritone range that was the structural precursor of the bass saxophone and was replaced by the tuba and euphonium in brass sections
ophiophagous
rare  a snake-eater
ophiophilist
[fr. Gk ophio-, serpent + philos, loving]  rare  a person who loves snakes
opificer
[fr. L. opifex: craftsman, artisan + -er]  /uh PIF uh ser/
obs.  an artificer; a workman; one who creates something
opiniatry
[fr. F. opiniâtreté]  /eh PIN ieh tri/
now rare  the quality or state of being opinionated: mental obstinacy or inflexibility; also opiniatrety (obs.)
opioic
[opi(um) + -oid]  /OH pee oid/
[n]  an opium-like substance produced naturally in the brain
[adj]  possessing some properties characteristic of opiate narcotics but not derived from opium
opisometer
[fr. Gk opiso, backwards + -meter]  /AH peh SAH med er/
an instrument with a revolving wheel for measuring curved lines, as on a map
opisthenar
[fr. Gk opisth- + thenar]  the back of the hand
opprobrious
1) expressing contemptuous reproach: scurrilous  opprobrious epithets
2) bringing disgrace; shameful or infamous  opprobrious conduct
opprobrium
something that brings disgrace; infamy, contempt
oppugn
to fight against; to call in question
opsigamy
[fr. Gk opse, late + gamos, marriage]  /op SIG uh mee/
marriage late in life  (cf. opsimathy)
opsimath
[fr. Gk opsimathes, late in learning]
one who acquires knowledge or learning late in life
opsimathy
education late in life
opusculum
a minor work
orchidectomy
surgical removal of one or both testes: castration
orectic
pertaining to the desires and their satisfaction; hence, impelling to gratification
In psychoanalytic writings, the orectic is often contrasted with the cognitive.  - The Penguin Dictionary of Psychology
orexis
[Gk orexis, desire]  /aw REK sis/
Psych.  the aspect of mental activity concerned with emotion and desire rather than cognition; appetite, desire
organoleptic
[F. organoleptique, fr. Gk roots]
1) being, affecting, or relating to qualities of a substance that stimulate the sense organs
2) involving use of the sense organs
organon
an instrument for acquiring knowledge; specif. a body of principles of scientific or philosophic investigation
organonymy
[organ + -onymy]  /OR guh NAH nuh me/
1) Anat., obs. rare  the nomenclature of the body organs
2) rare  the study of the names of musical instruments
orgulous
proud
oriflamme
a banner, symbol or ideal inspiring devotion or courage
orignal
[fr. Canadian French orignac)]  Canad., now rare  the original aboriginal name of the N.A. moose
orismologic
pertaining to orismology
orismology
[fr. Gk orismos, definition + -ology]  the science of defining technical terms
orlop (deck)
the lowest deck of a ship having 4 or more decks
ornature
rare  ornamentation, adornment, decoration: embellishment; ornament
ornithocopros
the dung of birds: guano
ornithorhynchus
[shortened from Ornithorhynchus anatinus]  the duckbilled platypus
orogeny
the process of mountain making, esp by folding of the earth's crust
orrery
an apparatus showing the relative positions and motions of bodies in the solar system by balls moved by wheelwork
ort
a morsel left at a meal: scrap
orthoepy
the customary pronunciation of a language; the study thereof
orthographic
orthogonal; correct in spelling
oscar
[Rhyming slang on Oscar Asche (an Australian actor)] cash, money
oscine
[fr. L. oscen]   /OS Ine/  of or relating to a large suborder of passerine birds that includes most songbirds
oscitancy
/OS i tan see/  1) the act of yawning  2) the state of being drowsy or inattentive; dullness
oscitant
yawning
oscitation
1) the act of being inattentive 2) the state of being drowsy
osculate
to kiss
osirify
to identify with Osiris; (broadly) to deify; (perhaps) to give a new life in another world
Oslerian
[fr. the name of Sir William Osler (1849-1919), Canadian physician]
of or relating to Osler or to his theories and methods of practicing internal medicine
osmidrosis
see bromidrosis
ossuary
a depository for bones of the dead
ostend
to show, reveal; to manifest, exhibit
ostent
[fr. L. ostentum, something shown, a prodigy]
now rare  a sign, portent, wonder, prodigy
ostentiferous
[fr. L. ostentifer, portentous]   obs. rare  bringing omens or unnatural or supernatural manifestations
ostrobogulous
[attributed to Victor B. Neuburg, British writer]  /OS tro BOG ju lus/
chiefly humorous  slightly risqué or indecent; bizarre, interesting, or unusual
hence, ostrobogulation and ostrobogulatory
otiant
[fr. L. otiari, to be at leisure]  /OH she unt/
now rare  idle; resting; unemployed  (cf. otium)
otiose
/OH she ows/  1) lacking use or effect, functionless  2) being at leisure, idle  3) sterile, futile
otium
[classical L., leisure, ease, peace]  now rare  leisure; free time; ease
otium cum dignitate
[fr. classical L. cum dignitate otium]  leisure with dignity; specif. retirement from public life
otosis
mishearing; alteration of words caused by misapprehension of the sound
oubliette
a dungeon with an opening only at the top
outcumlins
[G. Ankömmling, a stranger]
Strangers [Coming from without; not dwelling in the neighborhood.] - Wm Holloway, A general Dictionary of Provincialisms, 1838
outmantle
[out- + mantle, to cover]  /out MAN tel/  obs. rare  to excel in dress or ornament
outpassion
to exceed in passion
outrecuidance
[F.]  rare  extreme self-conceit: presumption
overegg
[Yorkshire, 'we mustn't over-egg the pudding']
fig., orig. Brit. regional  to embellish or supply to excess, to overexaggerate
owling
the practice of smuggling wool (or sheep) out of England, formerly illegal, and done chiefly by night; by extension, to carry on any contraband trade
Oxbridge
[conflation of Oxford + Cambridge]
[n] 1) a fictional university, esp. regarded as a composite of Oxford and Cambridge  2) the universities of Oxford and Cambridge regarded together, esp. in contrast to other British universities
[adj]  regarding Oxbridge, often with implication of superior social or intellectual status
oxter
Scot.  the armpit
oytser
[Yiddish, fr. Hebrew o-tsar, treasure]  /OY tser/
1) a treasure  2) ironically  by no means a treasure
ozostomia
foulness of breath

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