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list of wwftds

Herein is a complete list of "wwftd"s™ dating from ca. 1987 to present. This started as a "word for the day up on the blackboard" sort of thing and has degenerated into its current form; irregular distribution to a mail list via e-mail...and now this.

 Copyright © 1995-2014 -- Michael A. Fischer 
    wwftd email


A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

P

pachycephalosaurus
[sci. L.(genus name) < ancient Gk, thick-headed lizard]
Paleontology  a bipedal herbivorous dinosaur of the late Cretaceous, characterized by a thickened, dome-like skull
pachydermatous
thick; callous, insensitive; thick-skinned
paedomorphism
retention in the adult of infantile or juvenile characters
pahoehoe
Hawaiian  /pa HO eh HO eh/ or /pa HOY HOY/  lava with a smooth glassy surface (compare a'a)
palamate
web-footed
palaveration
discussion
palaverous
full of or given to palaver: wordy, verbose
paleomnesia
[fr. Gk paleo-, ancient + -mnesia, condition of memory]
nonce-wd(?)  a good memory of events of the distant past
palfrey
a saddle horse, esp. a light easy-gaited horse suitable for a woman
palimpsest
writing material (as a parchment or tablet) used one or more times
palinode
1) an ode or song recanting or retracting something in an earlier poem
2) a statement retraction
palinoia
[fr. Gk pali-n, again + -noia, thought]  /pal ih NOI uh/
the compulsive repetition of an act as a way to master its performance
palooka
a clumsy, inept, or untalented boxer; a stupid, clumsy, or obnoxious person; oaf; lout
palpate
[probably by back-fromation from palpation]  to examine by touch
palpation
[fr. L. palpatio] an examination by touch, esp. medical
palter
[origin uncertain, perhaps related to paltry]  /POL ter/
archaic  1) to act insincerely or deceitfully: equivocate  2) (palter with) to trifle with
3) now rare  to haggle, chaffer
hence, paltering
palterer
[fr. palter + -er]  one who palters: a triffer; a huckster, a haggler
paludal
[fr. L. palus, swamp]  having to do with, or produced by, swamps or marshes
panache
dash or flamboyance in style; verve
pandiculation
a stretching out when drowsy or when waking; loosely used for 'yawning'
panegyric
an eulogistic oration or writing; a formal or elaborate praise
paneity
the quality of being bread; e.g., the paneity of the eucharistic bread
paneulogism
[fr. pan- + eulogy]  obs. rare  universal or indiscriminate praise
panglossian
[after Pangloss, the absurd, pedantic tutor of (Voltaire's) Candide < pan, all + Gk glossa, tongue]
often capitalized  blindly or naively optimistic
panjandrum
a powerful personage or pretentious official
panspermia
the theory that microorganisms or biochemical compounds from outer space are responsible for originating life on Earth and possibly in other parts of the universe where suitable atmospheric conditions exist
pantagruelism
1) a semi-serious philosophy of laughter
2) a cynical humor
pantarbe
[ab. Gk, some kind of precious stone]
obs.  a precious stone fabled to act as a magnet to gold: the stone of the sun
pantechnicon
Brit.  a usu. enclosed wagon or motortruck used for transportation of goods or animals; also : caravan
pantography
a general description of an object; an overview [other senses may apply]
pantophagous
[see next]  eating or requiring a variety of foods
pantophagy
[Gk pantophagia, indiscriminate eating]  the eating of all kinds or a great variety of food
pantophobia
the fear of everything
panurgic
[fr. a Gk word meaning knavish, ready to do anything; see also Panurge, a witty rascal and companion of Pantagruel in Rabelais's Pantagruel, from the same root]
rare  able or ready to do anything; skilled at all kinds of jobs
paperasserie
[F.] excessive bureaucratic procedure or paperwork; bureaucracy; red tape  (see also: bumf)
paphian
pertaining to elicit love: wanton
papilionaceous
1) resembling the butterfly
Bot.  2a) having a winged corolla somewhat resembling a butterfly, as in the blossoms of the bean and pea  b) belonging to the suborder of leguminous plants which includes the bean, pea, vetch and clover
papillote
[F.] /PA pe YOTE/
1) a greased paper wrapper in which food (as meat or fish) is cooked
2) Hist.  a small triangular piece of paper used as a curl-paper for damp hair
papuliferous
pimply
parachronism
[fr. Gk para- beyond + kronos, time]  /pa RAK ruh niz uhm/
an error in chronology; esp. the placing of an event later than its actual date
parachronistic
misdated, esp. dated too late
paraclete
[fr. L. paracletus < Gk paracletos]
1) capitalized  the Holy Spirit  2) allusively  an advocate; a comforter
paracme
[fr. Gk parakma, to be past the prime]  the point at which the prime is past (and decline has set in)
paradiastole
[L. paradiastole, putting together of dissimilar things]  /PAR eh DI es teli/
Rhet.  a figure of speech in which a favorable turn is given to something unfavorable by the use of euphemism or partial truth
paradiorthosis
[Gk, a marginal correction]  /parr uh dye or thoh sis/
obs. rare  a false correction
paraffle
Scot. obs.  an ostentatious display
paraleipsis
a figure of speech which implies something more serious by deliberately concise treatment (also written as paralepsis)
(e.g. "I don't have time to mention Representative Jones's other faults.")   [compare apophasis]
paralogism
a piece of false or erroneous reasoning; an illogical argument; a fallacy, esp. one of which the reasoner himself is unconscious (as distinct from sophism)
paramnesia
disorder resembling loss of memory: deja vu
paranymph
best man; bridesmaid
paraph
a flourish at the end of a signature
parapraxis
a slip of the tongue, a Freudian slip
paraprosdokian
[fr. Gk para prosdokian, contrary to expectations]  /par ah proze DOKE ian/
a figure of speech in which the latter part of a sentence or phrase is surprising or unexpected in a way that causes the reader or listener to reframe or reinterpret the first part
as in, I've had a perfectly wonderful evening, but this wasn't it. - Groucho Marx
parasang
[Latin parasanga < Gk parasanges, of Iranian origin]
an ancient Persian unit of distance; about four miles (or 6 kilometers)
pareidolia
a type of illusion or misperception involving a vague stimulus which is perceived as clearly being something
parfilage
the unravelling of gold or silver thread from laces, epaulets, tassels, etc.; fashionable as a pastime among ladies, esp. in France, in the latter part of the 18th century
parisology
the deliberate use of equivocal or ambiguous words
paroemia
/puh REE mee uh/  a proverb, adage or saying
paroeomiographer
[L. paroemiographus]  (also paramiographer)  /Par a mi OG ra pher/
a writer or collector of proverbs
paronomania
[coined by Reginald Hill, after paronomasia]  a clinical obsession with word games
paronomasia
a play on words, pun; hence, paronomastic
paronomastic
relating to paronomasia, punning
parorexia
a craving for unusual foods
Parousia
[Gk, presence]  the second coming (of Christ)
parrhesia
[Gk]  1) boldness or freedom of speech  2) Rhet.  candid speech (sometimes considered a vice)
parthenolatry
virgin-worship (the Parthenon was the temple sacred to Athena, the virgin goddess)
partialist
[partial + -ist]
1) one that is partial to one side; specif.: a partisan
2) rare  a believer in or advocate of theological particularism, or exclusiveness
parti pris
[F., side taken] a preconceived opinion: prejudice
parton
a hypothetical particle that is held to be a constituent of nucleons
parvanimity
[fr. L. parvus, little + animus, mind]  /PAR vuh NIM i tee/
the state or quality of having a small or ignoble mind; pettiness; meanness  (opposed to magnanimity)
parvenu
one that has suddenly risen to an unaccustomed position of wealth or power and has not yet gained the manner associated with it; a pretentious snob of the nouveau riche
parvenue
a woman who is a parvenu
parviscient
[from L. parvus, small + scientem, knowing]  knowing little, uninformed
pasquinade
a lampoon posted in a public place; satire
passéist
[fr. F. passéiste : passé, the past]  contrast futurist
[adj]  having an excessive regard for the traditions and values of the past; backward-looking
[n] a person, esp. a writer or artist, with excessive regard for the traditions and values of the past; a backward-looking person
passerine
[L. passerinus of sparrows, fr. passer sparrow]
of or relating to the largest order of birds, comprising mainly songbirds of perching habits
passim
here and there
pastinaceous
[fr. L. pastinaca, parsnip]  obs. rare  of the nature of or akin to the parsnip
pataphysics
"The science of imaginary solutions, which symbolically attributes the properties of objects, described by their virtuality, to their lineaments" - Alfred Jarry, 19th Century French absurdist
 Joan was quizzical 
 studied pataphysical 
 science in the home...
    -Lennon/McCartney
patavinity
the use of local words or expressions; local pronunciation from the peculiar style or diction of Livy, the Roman historian, who was born in Patavium (now Padua)
patible
[fr. L. pati, to suffer + -ibilis]  obs.
1) capable of suffering or undergoing something  2) sufferable; tolerable; endurable
{found in Cockerham, Bailey, Johnson}
patootie
/pa TOO tee/  U.S. slang  a sweetheart, girl-friend; a pretty girl
suggested by sweetheart and sweet potato(?)
patrioteer
[patriot + -eer, cf. profiteer]  U.S. depreciative  an insincere, misguided, or false patriot: flag-waver
patulent
rare, see next
patulous
[L. patulus, from patere, to be open]  /PACH ul us/
1) Zool. and Med.  expanded; gaping (also fig.)  a wound with patulous margins
2) Bot.  spreading out   an old tree with patulous branches
patzer
[fr. G. patzer, a blunderer]  an inept chess player  
pauciloquence
[fr. L. pauci; few, little + loquent-em speaking]  rare  uttering few words, speaking briefly  
pauciloquy
[fr. L. pauciloquium, the fact of saying little]
archaic  brevity in speech hence, pauciloquent - that uses few words in speech; laconic
pavid
afraid; timid
pavisand
to display a formidable array of clothing and ornament; to flaunt one's appearance
pawky
[fr. obs. Eng. dial. pawk, trick]  chiefly Brit.  artfully shrewd: canny
peach
[v] to inform against: betray; to turn informer: blab
pear-shaped
[fr. earlier senses, shaped like a pear; rich, mellow]
chiefly Brit. colloq.  to go badly wrong, to go awry
peccable
liable or prone to sin
peccavi
[L., I have sinned]  /pe KAH wee/ or /~ vee/  an acknowledgment of sin
pecksniffian
selfish and corrupt behind a display of seeming benevolence: sanctimonious
peculate
embezzle (see also defalcate)
pedascule
archaic nonce-word  a contemptuous diminutive of 'pedant', coined (or discovered) by WS
peenging
[prob. an imitative alteration of whinging]
Sc. and n. Eng. regional  whining, complaining, moping; peevish
peevologist
[see next]  one who practices peevology
peevology
[peeve + -ology]
1) the collecting and public airing of language peeves  2) the study of such peevish behavior
peirastically
[Gk peirastikos, tentative]  in the way of attempt or experiment, tentatively
pejorate
[fr. L. pejorare to become worse, make worse]  to make worse: depreciate
pelagic
[fr. classical L. pelagicus, of the sea]  of or relating to the open sea, oceanic; also, pelagian
pelf
money, riches
pellucid
admitting maximum passage of light; reflecting light evenly
pencil-necked
[pencil + neck-ed]  orig. U.S. slang
having a pencil-neck; thin, underdeveloped; weak, effete, or excessively studious
NB: Freddie Blassie, late of the pro wrestling business, is said to have coined the phrase pencil-necked geek.
pendulate
[NL pendulum + -ate]  /PEN jul ate/
1) to swing as a pendulum  2) fig.  fluctuate, undulate
penelopize
to undo what you have earlier done, in so delaying a decision due upon completion
[after Penelope, the wife of Ulysses and the model of all domestic virtues]
penetralia
1) the innermost or most private parts, esp. of a temple or palace
2) hidden things or secrets
penny-farthing
an old bicycle with a huge front wheel
pennyworth
[penny + worth]  chiefly Brit.
1) a penny's worth; that which can be bought for a penny
2) a bargain  3) a small amount; a modicum
pentapopemtic
jocular  divorced five times
penultimate
next to the last
peotomy
amputation of the penis
peradventure
doubt, chance
percontation
[fr. L. percontari : to inquire, interrogate]  /per kon TAY shun/
archaic  a questioning or inquiry, esp. one which requires more than a yes or no answer
percrebrate
[fr. L. percribro, to sift thoroughly < cribrum, sieve]
obs. rare  to sift; pass through a sieve
percussedness
a nonce-word referring to a level of noisy carrying on
perdu
[adj]  remaining out of sight: concealed
[n] obs.  a soldier assigned to extremely hazardous duty
perdurable
1) very durable 2) eternal
perdurance
[fr. perdure + -ance]  (also, perduration)
the state or quality of being everlasting: permanence, persistence
perdure
[fr. L. perdurare  to endure, persist]  to continue; to survive
peregrinate
[adj] rare  having the air of one who has traveled or lived abroad: foreign
peregrinate
[vi] to travel, esp. on foot: walk
[vt] to walk or travel over: traverse
peregrinity
[fr. L. peregrinitas, foreignness, outlandishness, condition of being a foreigner or alien]
now rare  (considered to be a foreign word by Johnson)
foreignness in style, fashion, dialect, etc.; strangeness, outlandishness
perendinate
[fr. L. perendie, on the day after tomorrow]  /puh REN din ate/  rare 
a) [vt] to put off until the day after tomorrow, to defer from day to day
b) [vi] to stay from day to day, to make an indefinite stay
perestroik
[back-formation from Russ. perestroika]  to build, to restructure
perfervid
marked by overwrought or exaggerated emotion: excessively fervent
perfidious
faithless, disloyal: treacherous
perfricate
to rub thoroughly
pericope
[Gk perikope, section]  /puh RIH kuh pE/
a selection from a book; specif.  a liturgical reading for a particular day
peripatetic
walking about from place to place, pedestrian, itinerant
peripeteia
[Gk]  (also peripetia)  a sudden or unexpected reversal of circumstances or situation, esp. in a literary work
periphrasis
using longer phrasing in place of shorter form of expression
perirrhanterium
[fr. Gk perirranth, to besprinkle]  rare  an instrument used for sprinkling holy water, esp. upon the newly baptised, or the font used for such  (cf. Lat. aspergillum)  [from the hogwash files]
periscian
[fr. Gk periskios, throwing a shadow all around]  /peh RIS kian/
rare  having shadows revolving all around, as happens during the course of a summer day in the polar regions
perissology
superfluity of words: pleonasm)
peristalsis
[fr. Gk peristaltikos, peristaltic]
Medical  successive waves of involuntary contraction passing along the walls of a hollow muscular structure (as the esophagus or intestine) and forcing the contents onward; also fig. and transf.
perlustrate
[fr. L. perlustrare : to travel through, to scrutinize]
to travel through and view all over; to survey thoroughly
perlustration
1) the act of inspecting, surveying, or viewing a place thoroughly; a comprehensive survey
2) the act of examining documents for purposes of surveillance; specif. the inspection of posted letters, etc.
permanganate
a salt of a dark purple color
pernickety
[origin unknown]  chiefly Brit.  characterized by excessive precision and attention to trivial details; fussy, meticulous, persnickety
pernoctation
[L.< pernoctare, to stay all night]  /per nak TAY shun/
the act of staying up all night; an all-night vigil
peroration
concluding part of a discourse; a highly rhetorical speech
perpension
[fr. L. perpensio]  careful weighing in the mind
give me the results of your perpensions - R.L.Stevenson
perpession
[fr. L. perpessio, endurance of suffering]  /per PES sion/
obs.  endurance of suffering
perpilocutionist
jocular  someone who talks through his hat
perpotation
[fr. L. perpotare, to drink heavily]
obs. rare  the act of drinking largely {Johnson, 1824}; excessive drinking
perquisquilian
[fr. L. quisquiliae, trifles, rubbish]  (cf. quisquilious)
obs. nonce-word  thoroughly worthless
perscrutation
[fr. L. perscrutari, to examine thoroughly]  a thorough examination: careful investigation
perseverating
[fr. L. perseverare, to persevere]   /pe(r) SEV uh rating/
repeating something insistently or redundantly
perseveration
continuation of something (as repetition of a word) usually to an exceptional degree or beyond a desired point; hence, perseverate, by back-formation  "perseverate, perseverate, perseverate.." - anon
persiflage
[see next]  frivolous, bantering talk
persiflate
[fr. F. persifler, to banter lightly]  rare  to indulge in persiflage, to talk banteringly
persifleur
[F., see also persiflate]
a person who indulges in persiflage: one given to frivolous banter especially about matters usually given serious consideration
Persil
[Persil, a brand of laundry detergent in UK]  of no interest in intelligence matters: clean
perspicacious
[fr. L. perspicere, see next]  of acute mental vision or discernment
perspicuous
[fr. L. perspicere, to see through]  /pur SPI kyu wus/
simple and elegant as well as clear
perstringe
[fr. L. perstringere, to bind tightly]
now rare (literary and archaic)  to censure or criticize; to pass strictures on
pertinacious
perversely persistent; stubbornly unyielding
peruke
17th - 19th century   a wig
pervicacious
very stubborn
pervigilation
[fr. L. pervigilare, to watch all night]  /per VIJ i lA tion/
obs.  a careful watching {Bailey}; a night vigil
pervious
[fr. L. pervius passable, accessible]  /PUR vee us/
1) permeable  2) archaic  accessible; open-minded
pesematology
the science of falling; e.g., feline pesematology is the science of falling cats
pessimal
[fr. L. pessimus, worst; after optimal]  worst, or least ideal; maximally bad
Pessimisterian
pessimism as a state of mind  (coined by Ian Rankin?)
pessimize
[fr. L. pessimus, worst]  /PES uh mize/
to take a negative view of; make the worst of; also, to act or speak in a pessimistic manner   cf. pessimal
petaflop(s)
[fr. peta-, one thousand million million + FLOPS, floating point operations per second]
a unit of computing power equal to one quadrillion operations per second
petard
a case containing an explosive to break down a door or gate or breach a wall; a loud firework
petarding
[fr. petard, explosive]  rare  the action of setting off petards
pettifog
to act like a pettifogger
pettifogger
petty, quibbling, unscrupulous lawyer
pettifogulize
[fr. pettifogger]  nonce-word  to quibble; to use contemptible tricks
hence, pettifogulizer
phallocratic
[F. phallocratique]  /FAL uh KRAD ik/  relating to masculine power and dominance
also, phallocrat, phallocracy
phantomnation
[misinterpretation of 1725 quot.]  ghost word
appearance as of a phantom; illusion. (Obs. and rare.) Pope. {Webster 1864}
Pharisaic
1) of or belonging to the Pharisees
2) laying great stress upon the external observances of religion and outward show of morality, and assuming superiority on that account; hypocritical; self-righteous
pharos
[fr. Gk after Pharos, an island off Alexandria, Egypt, the site of an ancient lighthouse, one of the Seven Wonders of the World]
/FAR os/  any lighthouse or beacon to direct mariners
phatic
relating to discourse that is social rather than informative
philippic
tirade
phillumenist
a collector of match-books
philocalist
[fr. Gk philo- + kalos, beautiful]  rare  a lover of beauty
philodox
someone enamored of his/her own opinions
philography
the collecting of autographs
philogynist
a lover or friend of women; one who esteems women as the higher type of humanity
philologaster
an incompetent philologist; a dabbler in philology
philomath
a lover of learning; a scholar
philopolemic
disputatious, as of a person who loves to argue or debate
philoprogenitive
1) tending to produce offspring: prolific
2) of, relating to, or characterized by love of offspring
philosophaster
[post-classical L. philosophaster, person who dabbles in philosophy]  /feh LAS eh fast er/
a pretender or dabbler in philosophy  (cf. poetaster, philogaster, criticaster, grammaticaster)
philosophunculist
[fr. the Latinate form philosophunculus]  rare  a petty or insignificant philosopher (see also philosophaster)
philotimia
"love of honor" [one of Aristotle's ten moral virtues]
philter
love potion; magic potion
philtrum
the vertical groove in the middle of the upper lip
phiz
phisiognomy: face
phlogiston
the hypothetical principle of fire regarded formerly as a material substance
phlyarologist
[fr. ancient Gk phlyaros(?)  silly talk, nonsense]  /fly ah RAL ah gist (?)/
obs. nonce-wd  a person who talks nonsense
phobosophy
[fr. Gk phobos, fear + -sophia, knowledge]
neologism (1949)  fear of knowledge, or of abstract thinking  (hence, phobosopher)
phoenixity
the quality of being unique
phonus-bolonus
[alt. of phoney baloney, after L. nouns ending in -us]  nonsense, exaggeration; insincerity; fraud, trickery
phosphene
[Gk phos, light; + phainein, to cause to appear]  /FOS feen/
a sensation of light caused by excitation of the retina by mechanical or electrical means rather than by light, as when the eyeballs are pressed through closed lids
photokinesis
motion or activity induced by light
phreaking
[vbl. n.] the use of a telephone network without payment; now, generally, to use an electronic device to invade some type of network or system  [U.S., coined in the 60s - from modified spelling of 'freak', under the influence of 'phone']
phrontifugic
helping to escape from one's thoughts or cares; relieving anxiety
phrontistery
a place for study and contemplation
phthartic
[fr. Gk phthartikos, destructive]   /THOR tik/  obs. rare  deadly, destructive
phylogeny
(compare ontogeny)
evolution of the group; history or course of the development of something
piacular
1) sacrificial, expiatory  2) requiring expiation: sinful, heinous
piblokto
a winter-related hysteria and depression among the Inuit
picaroon
[Sp. picaron]  /pik uh ROON/
1) a rogue or adventurer; a bohemian  2) a pirate, corsair  3) a small pirate ship
picayune
1) a silver 5-cent coin struck by the U.S. mint from 1792-1873: half dime
2) something trivial:  not worth a picayune
pickelhaube
[G.]  /PIK el how bee/  a spiked helmet once worn by German soldiers  (file under: so that's what that's called)
pickthank
one who strives to put another under obligation; an officious person; hence, a flatterer
picktooth
obs.  a toothpick
picul
Chinese unit of weight (133.33 pounds)
pied-à-terre
[F., foot on ground]  /pyA da TAR/  a secondary or temporary place of lodging
pie-faced
[pie + faced]  orig. U.S. slang,  chiefly derogatory
having a round, flat face or a blank expression; stupid
a pair of pie-faced louts - A.J. Liebling
piepowder
[fr. F. pied-poudreux]  1) [adj] 'dusty-footed'; wayfaring, itinerant
2) [n] a. a traveling man, a wayfarer, esp. an itinerant merchant or trader; chiefly used in Court of Piepowders, a summary court formerly held at fairs and markets to administer justice among itinerant dealers and others temporarily present   b. attrib.  Piepowder Court = Court of Piepowders (in a.), of which the steward of him who owned or had the toll was the judge
pieriansipist
[Perian + sip + -ist]  neologism  a dabbler in learning: one who learns a little about many subjects, or 'sips' from the Pierian spring (a source of knowledge and inspiration, from the Muses)
pigritious
[fr. L. pigritia, sloth]  obs. rare  slothful; so, pigritude and pigrity - slothfulness
pig's ear
rhyming slang  beer
pigsney
1) darling, sweetheart
2) a small eye
pilgarlic
a bald head, bald-headed man; a man looked upon with humorous contempt or mock pity
pillion
[Scot. Gaelic pillean]  /PIL yun/
1) a pad or cushion for an extra rider behind the saddle on a horse or motorcycle
2) a bicycle or motorcycle saddle  (file under: so that's what that's called)
pilliwinks
an instrument of torture designed to crush fingers
pilpul
[fr. Heb. pilpel, to search, argue] /PIL pool/
a) casuistic argumentation especially among Jewish scholars on talmudic subjects
b) rabbinical dialectic  c) critical analysis and hairsplitting
pilpulistic
characterized by subtle reasoning
pinchbeck
something counterfeit or spurious
pinetum
a scientific collection or living coniferous trees
pinguid
[fr. L. pinguis, fat]  usu. humorous or affected
of the nature of, resembling, or abounding in fat; unctuous, greasy, oily; of soil  rich, fertile
pinguidity
[fr. post-classical L. pinguidus fatty, greasy]  /pin GWID ity/
now rare  fatty, greasy, or oily matter; fatness, obesity
pirogue
[F. fr. Sp. piragua]  a dugout canoe
piscary
[fr. L. piscis, fish]  fishery
piscicapture
capture of fishes, as by angling: fishing
piscicapturist
one who catches fish: fisherman
pisiform
resembling a pea in size or shape
pismire
[fr. the smell of the formic acid that ants secrete]  ant
pismirism
[with reference to the behaviour of ants in hoarding food]  /PIS mer izem/
nonce-word  the hoarding of money; miserliness
piste
[F. piste < It. pista, track]  /peest/
1) a beaten track or trail made by an animal; more generally, any track or trail
2) a hard packed ski trail or course
pistic
[fr. Gk pistikos, faithful < pistos, faith]  /PIS tik/  of, relating to, or exhibiting faith  pistic nard
pistology
branch of theology concerned with faith
pixilated
slightly unbalanced mentally, bemused
plagium
[L., kidnapping]  /PLAY jee um/  Civil Law  the crime of kidnapping (esp. of children); an instance of this
plagosity
[fr. L. plagosus, given to blows, fond of flogging]
obs. rare  the inclination or tendency to beat or flog people
plangent
having a loud, reverberating sound; having an expressive esp plaintive quality
plangonologist
a collector of dolls
plastinated
[fr. plastic, after plastination]  preserved by plastination
plastination
an embalming and preserving technique using synthetic materials such as epoxy or polyester polymers
plastography
rare  a counterfeiting or false writing: forgery
platitudinary
[fr. platitude, after e.g. latitudinary]
rare  characterized by or tending to use platitudes (usually seen in the form platitudinarian)
platypygous
Zool.  /plae ti PAI gus/  having broad buttocks
pleach
interlace, plait
pleather
[blend of plastic + leather]  faux leather, usually of polyurethane  compare naugahyde
pleionosis
[fr. Gk pleos, filled + L. nos, us (?)]  /PLAY o NO sis/
obs. rare  the exaggeration of one's own importance   (cf. nosism, egotism)
pleistodox
[fr. Gk. pleistos, most + doxa, opinion; after orthodox]
nonce-word  holding the opinion of the majority
plenary
complete, full (absolute)
plenipotentiary
[adj] 1) invested with full power  2) relating to a person so invested
pleonasm
the use of more words than necessary
pleonexia
avarice, greed, covetousness (regarded as mental disease)
plerophory
[fr. Gk plerophoria]  archaic  complete assurance; full conviction
plesiosynchronous
[fr. Gk plesios, near + synchronous]  nearly simultaneous; broadly  happening at the same time
plexor
the small, rubber-headed hammer that physicians use to test reflexes
plip
the remote control for some European roadsters, such as Peugeot, Renault, MG  [presumably from the sound made by the device]
pliskie
practical joke; trick
plonk
[perhaps alt. of F. vin blanc]  chiefly Brit. slang  /plongk/ cheap or inferior wine; short for earlier plink-plonk
plonker
[fr. plonk, to set down heavily or carelessly]  Brit. informal  a foolish or inept person
plotz
(Yiddish) 1) to sit down wearily, to flop; to slouch, loaf (around)
2) to burst; usu. in fig. senses, esp. to explode in anger
plumeopicean
[fr. L. plume-us, feathery + pice-us, pitchy + -an]
humorous nonce-word  composed of tar and feathers (alluding to the practice of tarring and feathering an obnoxious person)
plumpendicular
[blend of plumb line + perpendicular (fr. L. pendeo, to hang)]
obs. dial.  perpendicular (to the ground); hanging perpendicularly
plunderbund
political corruption  (coined by Adlai Stevenson?)
pluperfect
[fr. the L., more than perfect]  grammar  past perfect
pluterperfect
[perhaps a corruption of F. plus-que-parfait; ad. L. plus quam perfectum, more than perfect]
nonce-word  cf. pluperfect, (more than?) more than perfect
The pluterperfect imperturbability of the department of agriculture. - James Joyce, Ulysses
pluto
[fr. Pluto, the declassified planet]  to demote or devalue someone or something
plutomania
an abnormal desire for wealth
plutonian
of, relating to, or characteristic of Pluto or the lower world: infernal
plutonic
[fr. L. Pluto]  1) of deep igneous or magmatic origin: plutonic rocks  2) plutonian (relating to Pluto)
pluviose
[ad. L. pluviosus, rainy]  /PLU vee ose/
rare  marked by or regularly receiving heavy rainfall  a pluviose period; fig. tearful
hence, pluviosity, a state characterized by much rain
pluvious
rainy; heavy rainfall
pococurante
indifferent, nonchalant
pocosin
an upland swamp of the coastal plain of the southeastern U.S.
poculation
[fr. L. poculum, a drinking vessel]  /pok yoo LAY shun/  obs. nonce-word  the drinking of wine
poecilonym
[fr. Gk poikilo-, many-colored, variegated, various, a combining form in scientific terms + -nym, name]
one of various names for the same thing; a synonym
poecilonymic
having several names; synonymic
poecilonymy
the use of several names for the same thing; synonymy
poetaster
an inferior poet
po-faced
Brit.  humorless; excessively priggish
pogonip
dense winter fog containing frozen particles formed in deep mountain valleys
pogonology
the study of beards
pohutukawa
Maori  /po hutu KAwa/  a New Zealand evergreen which bears clusters of red flowers in December and January; thus called the Christmas tree
poietic
creative, formative, productive, active
polemology
[fr. Gk polemos, war + -logy]  /po luh MOL uh jee/
the science and study of human conflict and war  (compare irenology)
poliosis
graying of the hair
politicaster
a petty politician; a pretender in politics
poltroon
[Middle F. poultron, fr, Old It. poltrone]  an abject coward: craven
poltroonery
mean pusillanimity: cowardice
polymath
a person of encyclopedic learning
polynya
[Russian] an area of open water amidst sea ice, as in the Arctic
polyonymosity
[fr. polyonymous + -osity]  rare  the use of several different names for the same person or thing
polyphiloprogenitive
very prolific, spec. of a person's talent, imagination, inventive powers, etc.
polysemous
having multiple meanings
pompatus
[perhaps fr. puppetutes, coined by Vernon Green?]  nonsense word (or maybe not)
Some people call me the space cowboy. 
Yeah! Some call me the gangster of love. 
Some people call me Maurice, 
Cause I speak of the Pompatus of love.
  - Steve Miller, "The Joker"

("It doesn't mean anything--it's just jive talk.")

poncey
Brit.  1) effeminate  2) snobby, ostentatious (also poncy)
pong
[origin uncertain]  UK  a strong smell, usually unpleasant; a stink
pongy
[origin unknown]  /PON gy/
Brit. informal  having a strong, usually unpleasant smell; stinky, smelly
pons asinorum
[NL, asses bridge]  critical test of ability imposed on the inexperienced or ignorant
pool-pah
the wrath of god; a sh*t storm (coined by Kurt Vonnegut)
pootle
Brit. colloq.  to move or travel about in a leisurely manner (a blend of poodle and tootle)
popination
[fr. L. popinari, to frequent eating-houses]
obs. rare  an outrageous drinking; a haunting of taverns {found in Bailey (1623) and Phillips (1658)} (barhopping, according to Beyond Balderdash®)
porlock
to interrupt an artist engaged in aesthetic creation
pornocracy
government by harlots
porrect
Zool.  stretched out or forth; extended, especially forward   porrect antennae  [v] to extend; to present, to tender
portmanteau
traveling bag
portmanteau word
Linguistics  a word that is formed by combining two or more words (also called blend, portmanteau or frankenword)
posada
in Mexico, each of a series of visits traditionally paid to different friends during the days before Christmas, representing Mary and Joseph's search for lodging in Bethlehem
poshlost
[Russian]  /POSH lust/  a well-rounded, untranslatable whole made up of banality, vulgarity and sham; it applies not only to obvious trash (verbal and animate), but also to spurious beauty, spurious importance, spurious cleverness
posslq
/POS sul cue/  initialism  Person of the Opposite Sex Sharing Living Quarters
postmodernism
genre of art and literature and especially architecture in reaction against the philosophy and practices of modern movements that is typically marked by revival of traditional elements and techniques (but virtually meaningless in other contexts)
postpositive
[fr. L. postpositus, pple of postponere, to put after]   /post POZ i tiv/
[adj] a modifier placed after or at the end of a word  [n] a postpositive word
postprandial
[fr. post-, after + L. prandium: late breakfast, luncheon]  /post PRAN dee ul/
following a meal, esp. dinner  (cf. antejentacular)
pother
noisy disturbance, fuss; choking cloud of dust/smoke; mental turmoil
potsherd
[short for pottery shard] a pottery fragment
pottiness
[fr. potty + -ness]  (first attested to P. G. Wodehouse)
the state or condition of being potty
potty
chiefly Brit.  1) trivial  2) slightly intoxicated  3) addlebrained
pot-valiant
(also potvaliant)  bold or courageous under the influence of alcoholic drink
pot-walloper
1) a person who qualified to vote in parts of England by having boiled (walloped) his own pot for six months, thereby establishing residency
2) U.S. slang  one who cleans pots; a scullion
powfag
to tire bodily from overwork; to become worn out in mind from care or anxiety; to work to the point of exhaustion {Francis Taylor's Folk-Speech of South Lancashire, 1901}
prastuphulic
[unconfirmed]  heavyset, fat (with a hint of slatternliness)
praxeology
[fr. praxis + -ology]  the study of human conduct
praxis
[Gk]  exercise or practice of an art, science, or skill; customary practice or conduct
preantepenultimate
that precedes or stands immediately before the antepenult; the last but three, defined most often as 'fourth from the last', and applied to syllables
prebend
a stipend furnished by a cathedral to a chapter canon
precative
see precatory
precatory
[fr. L. precari, to pray]  /PREK uh tor E/
expressing entreaty, expressing a wish; also, precative
precess
[back-formation from precession (fr. L. præcedere, to precede)]  to move in or be subjected to precession
precession
Astron.  precession of the equinoxes; any motion analogous to that of the earth's axis or the earth itself in the precession of the equinoxes; e.g. the slow rotation of the axis of a top spinning rapidly in a sloping position
precisian
1) a person who stresses or practices scrupulous adherence to a strict standard especially of religious observance or morality
2) a Puritan
precisianist
see previous
prelapsarian
of or relating to the time before the fall of mankind
premonish
[pre- + monish (admonish), fr. L. monere: to warn]
now rare  to forewarn; to give warning in advance
prepensely
[by extension from prepense, which is usu. seen postpositionally (as, malice prepense)]
with premeditation: deliberately, purposely
preponderate
[fr. L. praeponderare to exceed in weight or influence]  /pri PON duh rate/
1) to exceed in weight: turn the scale
2) to exceed in influence, power, importance or numbers; predominate
presagition
[fr. L. praesagere, to forebode, portend]
obs.  an omen, a prognostication; (also) foresight, prevision
presenteeism
[after absenteeism] /prez un TEE iz um /
the fact or condition of being present, esp. at work; (a) the practice of working more hours than is required by one's terms of employment, or of continuing to work without regard to one's health, esp. because of perceived job insecurity; (b) the practice of attending a job but not working at full capacity, esp. because of illness or stress (usually opposed to absenteeism)
presque vu
[F., nearly seen]  a feeling that you are on the edge of grasping something very, very important
preterist
1) one whose chief interest is in the past; someone whose main pleasure is in reliving the past
2) Theol.  one who believes the prophecies of the Apocalypse to have been already fulfilled
preterition
1) the act of passing, or going past; the state of being past
2) Rhet.  paraleipsis
3) Law  the omission by a testator of some one of his entitled heirs
preterlapsed
[classical L. praeterlapsus]   /pre ter LAPST/  now rare  past, bygone; ended, over with
pretermit
1) to let pass without notice: omit
2) to leave undone: neglect
3) suspend, break off
preternatural
[fr. L. praeter naturam, beyond nature]
1) existing outside of nature: nonnatural; sometimes : supernatural
2) abnormal, exceptional  3) inexplicable by ordinary means
prevenient
[fr. L. praevenire, to precede]  1) preceding  2) anticipatory
priapic
phallic
pricket
a) a small point or spike for holding a candle upright  b) a candlestick having such a spike
pridian
of or pertaining to the previous day
primaveral
[fr. It. primavera, springtime]  rare  of or pertaining to the earliest springtime; also fig.
primogeniture
rights of the first-born
princox
a pert youth: coxcomb
priscianist
[fr. Priscian, a celebrated Roman grammarian]
arch. rare  a grammarian; (in extended use) a person who uses grammar cleverly in dissembling
procacious
[see next]  bold; impertinent
procacity
[fr. L. procacitas  pertinacity, obtrusiveness, impudence]  /pro KAS uh tee/
petulence; impudence
procellous
[L. procellosus, stormy < procella, a storm]  /pro CEL lous/
rare, now literary  tempestuous, stormy  {Bailey}
procerity
[fr. L. proceritas: height, tallness]  /pro SER udi/
now rare  tallness, loftiness, height
procrustean
marked by arbitrary often ruthless disregard of individual differences or special circumstances
proctalgia
a pain in the anus
prodnose
[fr. the name Prodnose, a pedantic and interfering character in the humorous columns of J.B. Morton]
[v] rare : to pry, to be inquisitive (more commonly found used in Britain as a colloq. noun or adj. used to refer to the British public)
prognathous
[fr. Gk pro- + gnathos]  of jaws or a lower jaw: prominent, protruding
prolepsis
anticipation: as
a) the representation or assumption of a future act or development as if presently existing or accomplished
b) the application of an adjective to a noun in anticipation of the result of the action of the verb  (as in: while yon slow oxen turn the furrowed plain)
proleptic
[ab. Gk proleptikos, anticipative]  /pro LEP tic/
of, pertaining to, or characterized by prolepsis or anticipation; anticipative, anticipatory
proleptically
by prolepsis: by way of anticipation; antecedently
prolix
long-winded; wordy
prolocutor
spokesman
proneur
[F.] one who praises another; an extoller, eulogist, flatterer
pronunciamento
[fr. Sp. pronunciamiento, a pronouncement]
a pronouncement, a proclamation, a manifesto; often applied to one issued by insurrectionists
propaedeutic
[fr. Gk propaideuein, to teach beforehand]  /pro pE DYU dik/
needed as preparation for learning or study; introductory to an art or science
logic is not philosophy; it is a propaedeutic discipline - Times Literary Supplement
propination
[f. L. propinatio, a drink to one's health]
obs. rare  the action of offering drink to another in pledging; the drinking to the health of someone
proprioception
[fr. L. proprius, one's own + (per)ception]  /PRO pree oh SEP shun/
the unconscious perception of movement and spatial orientation arising from stimuli within the body itself
prorogue
[fr. L. prorogare, to prolong, extend]  /pro ROGUE/  defer, postpone
prosody
the study of versification; esp: the systematic study of metrical structure
prosopolepsy
respect of persons; undue favour shown to a particular person, partiality
prosopopoeia
1) a figure of speech in which an imaginary or absent person is represented as speaking or acting
2) personification
prospicience
the act of looking foreward: foresight
prostibulous
pertaining to a prostitute, meretricious; addicted to the company of prostitutes
pro tanto
[LL., for so much]  [adv] to that extent; accordingly  [adj] commensurate, resultant
protean
1) of or resembling Proteus in having a varied nature or ability to assume different forms
2) displaying great diversity or variety: versatile
protervity
peevishness
prothalamion
a song in celebration of a marriage
prothonotary
a court clerk; a chief clerk of any of various courts of law
protopathic
of or relating to sensory nerve fibers that enable the perception of strong rather crude stimuli  (compare epicritic)
prudhomme
[F.] a trustworthy citizen; a skilled workman
psaphonic
planning one's rise to fame
psephologist
someone who pursues the scientific study of elections
psephology
the scientific study of elections
pseudandry
/SU dan dry/  the use of a masculine name by a woman as a pseudonym (not to be confused with pseudogyny)
pseudepigrapha
spurious writings, esp. writings falsely attributed to biblical characters or times
pseudepigraphy
the ascription of false names of authors to works
pseudoantidisestablishmentarianism
false opposition to the withdrawal of state support from an established church
pseudogyny
/su DAJ uh nee/  the use of a feminine name by a man as a pseudonym
pseudology
[fr. Gk pseudologia]  1) false speaking; the making of false statements, esp. when humorously represented as an art or system; the art of lying
2) the science or subject of false statements; a false or pretended science
pseudomorphosis
[fr. Gk pseudomorphos, disguising one's form]  Mineralogy  conversion into a false or deceptive form; by transf., forced into an abnormal state
psilanthropy
belief that Christ was not divine but divinely inspired
psilology
[alteration of philology; fr. Gk psilo- mere, bare]  /psi LOL o gy/
obs. nonce-word  (love of) empty talk
psittacism
/SiD eh sizem/  mechanical, repetitive (parrot-like) speech without thought of the meaning of the words spoken
psychasthenia
an incapacity to resolve doubts/uncertainties or to resist obsessions/compulsions that one knows are irrational
psychomachy
a conflict of the soul (as between good and evil)
psychomancy
divination by means of spirits
psychopomp
[fr. Gk psychopompós, conductor of souls]  /SAI koh pomp/
someone who conducts spirits or souls to the afterworld, as Hermes or Charon
psychrolute
[fr. Gk psychrolusia, bathing in cold water]  /SAI kruh lyut/
one who bathes in the open air daily throughout the winter; spec. a member of a society formed c. 1840 to promote this practice (thus, psychrolusia - bathing in cold water)
psychrolutist
[fr. L. psychrolutes]  obs. rare  an advocate of bathing in cold water
ptyalism
an excessive flow of saliva
pucelage
[F.]  /PU cel age/ obs  the state of being a girl; maidenhood, virginity
pudibund
[fr. L. pudibundus]  prudish
pudibundery
prudery, bashfulness
puggle
[freq. of pug (poke)]  chiefly dial.  [v] to clear out or stir up by poking
puggry
[Hindi pagi, turban]  /PUG gry/  (also puggree, etc.)
1) a turban worn in India
2) a light scarf wound around a hat or helmet to protect the head from the sun
puissance
power; potency; might
pulicous
[ad. L. pulicos-us, fr. pulex, flea]  (erroneously, pulicious)
archaic  abounding with fleas; fleay; so, pulicose : infested with fleas
pullulation
[fr. L. pullulare, to sprout]  1) germination  2) a rapid and abundant increase
pulverulent
[L., pulverulentus; fr. pulver-, dust + -ulentus, abounding in]  /pul VER yuh lent/
consisting of or reducible to fine powder; covered or looking as if covered with dust or powder: dusty, crumbly
pumpkinification
an apotheosis; a parody of deification: apocolocyntosis (the usual translation of apocolocyntosis, in Seneca's Apocolocyntosis divi Claudii, a parody of the deification of the emperor Claudius)
punctilio
minute detail of conduct; careful observance of forms
pundigrion
[origin unknown, but prob. the source of pun; perhaps a humorous alteration of It. puntiglio  equivocation, trivial objection]
obs. rare  a play on words; pun
punditocracy
[pundit + -ocracy]  /pun dih TOK ruh see/  a group of pundits who wield great political influence
pundonor
a point of honor
pungle
[fr. Sp. pongale, put it down]  /PUN gul/  to make a payment or contribution (of money)
punkah
a large fan suspended from the ceiling used esp in India
purblind
partly blind; lacking in vision, insight or understanding: obtuse
purdah
seclusion of women from public observation among Muslims and some Hindus
purfle
to ornament the border or edges of
purfler
one who purfles; spec. one who inlays the ornamentation in violins
The prince of purflers was Stradivarius. -- Grove Dict. of Music (1883)
purlieu
haunt; confine(s); an outlying or adjacent district; environ(s)
pursy
fat; characterized by arrogance arising from wealth
pusillanimous
lacking courage and resolution; marked by contemptible timidity
putz
dial.  in Penn. Dutch homes, a representation of the Nativity scene traditionally placed under a Christmas tree
puzzlepated
having or based on confused attitudes or ideas
puzzomous
[puzzom (poison) + -ous(?)]   (glossed as 'poisonous' in old glossaries)
disgustingly obsequious(?)
pygal
[Gk, the rump]  Anat.  pertaining to the rump
pygalgia
a pain in the buttocks, cf proctalgia
pygephanous
showing one's buttocks: mooning
pygophilous
buttock-loving
pyknic
characterized by shortness of stature, broadness of girth, and powerful muscularity
pyretic
of or relating to fever: febrile
pyriform
[fr. L. pirum, pear + -form]  pear-shaped; compare napiform
Pyrrhic
achieved at excessive cost   a Pyrrhic victory
[after Pyrrhus, king of Epirus who sustained heavy losses in defeating the Romans]
pyrrhonism
[fr. Gk skeptic philosopher Pyrrho]  /PIR eh nizem/  usu. capitalized
Philos.  the doctrine of the impossibility of attaining certainty of knowledge; absolute or universal skepticism; hence generally, skepticism esp. when total or radical
pysmatic
[fr. the Gk. word for question]  obs. rare  interrogatory, questioning
Pythia
[fr. Gk pythein, to rot]  the priestess of Apollo at Delphi
pythonic
[fr. Gk python, spirit of divination]
A.1) of or relating to divination; prophetic, oracular
2) of, relating to or like a python; huge, monstrous [Python, monstrous serpent killed by Apollo at Delphi]
B) of or relating to the Monty Python comedy group
C) of or relating to the Python programming language
pyx
1) a container for the consecrated Host
2) a box used in a Mint for deposit of sample coins


Q

qiviut
[Inuit qiviuq, down, underhair]  /KEE vee ut/
the soft wool of the undercoat of the musk ox
quacksalver
[obs. Dutch (now kwakzalver)]  /KWAK sal vur/  
a charlatan or quack; also transf.
quadragesimal
consisting of 40; specifically, in regard to a 40-day fast occurring during Lent
quadrigamist
[cf. L. quadrigamus, married four times]
one who has married four times; esp., one who has four wives or four husbands at the same time
quadrivium
[L., place where four roads meet]  /kwa DRIV eum/
the higher division of the seven liberal arts in the Middle Ages, comprising geometry, astronomy, arithmetic, and music (compare trivium)
quaesitum
[L.] that which is sought for; an object of search; the answer to a problem
quaggy
1) resembling a marsh; soggy  2) soft and flabby  (cf. quagmire)
quagswagging
[fr. quag, to quake + swag, to sway]  obs. rare  the action of shaking to and fro
quahog
[fr. Narraganset poquaûhock]  /KO hog/  a thick-shelled edible clam of the U.S.
quakebuttock
a coward
quale
[L., of what kind]  /KWA lee/  pl. qualia
a property considered independently from things having the property
qualisign
[fr. quali(ty) + sign]
Philos.  a term originally used by C. S. Peirce in his theory of signs; Peirce often used the designations legisign/sinsign/qualisign for concepts that lexicographers may designate as type, token, or tone
quant
[prob. short for quantitative]
slang  an expert in the use of math and related subjects, esp. in investment management and stock trading
quaquaversal
[fr. L. quaqua, wheresoever + versus, towards]  /kway kwuh VER sal/
mainly Geol.  turning or dipping in any or all directions
transf.  going off in all directions at once
quatopygia
[fr. L. quatio, to shake + Gk pyge, buttocks]  /kwah tuh PIJ ee uh/
the shaking of the buttocks when walking
quaver
a 1/8 note in music
querent
a questioner; specifically, one who seeks the advice of astrologers
querida
[Sp.] a sweetheart, darling: freq. used as a term of address (also querido, the male equivalent)
querimonious
complaining, querulous, apt to complain
questuary
[fr. L. quaestus, gain, profit]  (also quaestuary)   
 obs.  [n] one who seeks for gain  [adj] concerned with gain; money-making
quibbleism
rare  the practice of quibbling
quiddity
[fr. L. quid, what]  1) the essence of a thing or person: whatness  2) a trifling point: quibble
quiddle
[fr. L. quid, what]  (not to be confused with quibble) chiefly dialect  to trifle or waste time; to dawdle
quiddler
[perh. a blend of quiddity and fiddler or twiddler]  dawdler, trifler
quiddling
dawdling
quidnunc
one who seeks to know all the latest news or gossip, busybody
quidnunckery
[fr. L. quid nunc, what now]  nonce-word  curiosity, love of news or gossip (also quid-nunc-ism)
quietism
a passive mysticism; a state of calmness or passivity
quincunx
an arrangement of things with one at each corner and one in the middle [of a square/rectangle]
quisquiliary
[fr. L. quisquiliæ fr. pl., waste matter, refuse, rubbish]
obs. rare  quisquilious
quisquilious
of the nature of rubbish or refuse; trashy, worthless
quisquos
perplexing
quixotry
visionary schemes; quixotic behavior
quodlibet
1) a philosophical or theological point proposed for disputation
2) a whimsical combination of familiar melodies or texts
quodlibetarian
someone who engages in elaborate arguments about theoretical fine points of any subject (for the sake of argument)
quondam
former
quonking
also quonk
imitative  noise (as from conversation) that disturbs or disrupts a television or radio program due to proximity to the microphones or cameras; or, noise from the sidelines that interrupts an athlete's (or a performer's) concentration
(both of these are validated Scrabble words)
quorate
[fr. quor(um) + -ate]  of a meeting: attended by a quorum; hence inquorate, not attended by a quorum
quotha
[alteration of 'quoth he']  archaic  used to express surprise or sarcasm, after quoting the word or phrase used by someone else
quotidian
commonplace; occurring every day
quotinoctian
occurring every night, nightly  (phony Latinate? compare quotidian)
quoz
archaic  queer; absurd

resume


Copyright © 1995-2014 -- Michael A. Fischer

"You try spell-checking this stuff!"

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