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list of wwftds

Herein is a complete list of "wwftd"s™ dating from ca. 1987 to present. This started as a "word for the day up on the blackboard" sort of thing and has degenerated into its current form; irregular distribution to a mail list via e-mail...and now this.

 Copyright © 1995-2014 -- Michael A. Fischer 
    wwftd email


A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

R

rabiator
[of obscure origin, perhap assoc. with rabid]
Scot., rare  A violent, noisy, greedy person.  {Jamieson}
rabulistic
characterized by railing or pettifoggery
Rachmanism
[after Peter Rachman, London landlord, whose unscrupulous practices became notorious in the early 1960s]
Brit. eponym  the exploitation and intimidation of tenants by unscrupulous landlords
rack-rent
(also rack rent or rackrent) a rent equal or nearly equal to the full annual value of the property: an excessive or unreasonably high rent; spec. in English law, a rent of at least two thirds of the annual value of the property
raddled
confused, befuddled, worn
ragabash
Scot.  an idle worthless fellow; a ragamuffin; collectively, rabble, riff-raff
ragmatical
[origin uncertain (after pragmatical?)]  archaic  turbulent, riotous
ramageous
[ramage + -ous]  obs.  wild, untamed
ramfeezled
[origin unknown]  /ram FEEZ uld/  Scot.  exhausted, worn out
rampallion
[origin unknown]  /ram PAL yen/  (also rampallian)
good-for-nothing scoundrel: wretch
ramsquaddle
to beat, thrash  {DARE}
ramsquaddled
unkempt and in disarray; drunk
raniform
[see following]  frog-shaped
ranivorous
[fr. L. rana, frog + -vorous]  /rae NI ver ous/  frog-eating
rannygazoo
chiefly U.S. dial. or slang  (see also similar forms ranikaboo, reinikaboo)
a prank, trick; horseplay, 'nonsense'
rantipole
[n] a wild, reckless person;
[adj] characterized by a wild, unruly manner
rapparee
[Ir. rapaire, ropaire, lit., thruster, stabber]  /ra puh REE/
1) an Irish irregular soldier or bandit  2) vagabond, plunderer
raree-show
peep show; street show
rataplan
the iterative sound of beating
rathe
[OE hræth]  /rayth/
appearing or ripening early in the year  bring the rathe primrose that forsaken dies - John Milton
ratiocination
the process of exact thinking: reasoning; a reasoned train of thought
ravelin
a projecting out-work in a fortification, having two embankments forming a salient angle; half-moon
razbliuto
[Russian?? "The origin is not as important as the basic fact that (listen up, now) there is no such Russian word." - Languagehat, April 17, 2005]  probably a spurious word 
a feeling a person has for someone he or she once loved but no longer feels the same way about - Christopher Moore, In Other Words
razoo
Austral. and N.Z. slang  an imaginary coin of trivial value, a 'farthing'; used only in negative contexts (also in the phrase, brass ~   not worth a brass razoo)
razoo (razzoo)
N. Amer. slang  ridicule; the arousing of indignation, provocation; a sound of contempt, a 'raspberry' (also in phr. to give the ~: to ridicule)
...but all I get there is the big razzoo. - R. Chandler, The Big Sleep
rebarbative
[F. rébarbatif < rebarber, to be repellent]  repellent, irritating, crabbed
reboant
reverberant
rebozo
a long scarf worn chiefly by Mexican women
réchauffé
[F., warmed over] 1) something that is rehashed  2) a warmed-over dish of food
recherché
exquisite, choice; exotic, rare; excessively refined, affected; overblown, pretentious
recidivist
a habitual criminal (one who relapses)
reck
worry, care; matter
reckling
a weak child or animal; the runt of the litter
recondite
concealed; deep; having to do with something obscure
recreancy
mean-spiritedness; apostasy; treachery
recreant
coward; apostate, deserter
recrement
[fr. L. recrementum refuse, filth, dross, slag]
1) the superfluous or useless portion of any substance; refuse, dross, scum, off-scouring
2) spec. a waste product or excretion of an animal or vegetable body; also Physiol., a fluid which is separated from the blood and again absorbed into it, as the saliva or bile (opp. to excrement)
recrementitious
of or pertaining to recrement
recrudescence
to break out anew after a dormant period
rectalgia
a pain in the rectum, cf. proctalgia
rectirostral
[fr. L. rectus, straight + rostrum, beak]  /REK ti ROS tral/  Zool.  having a straight beak
recto
[fr. L. rectus, straight, right]  /REK toe/
1) the front side of a printed sheet  2) the right-hand page of an open book (compare verso)
rectopathic
[fr. L. recto, straight + -pathic, suffering]  /rek to PATH ic/  easily hurt emotionally; thin-skinned
recumbentibus
a knockdown blow
the advantage of inflicting upon an assailant a recumbentibus - J. R. Newman
recusant
[fr. L. recusare to object to, refuse]
1 a) a person (as a Roman Catholic) refusing to attend the services of the Church of England
   b) one that dissents: nonconformist
2) one who refuses to comply with some regulation or to conform to some general practice or opinion
redaction
an act of redacting (to put in writing); an edit; redacted material (edited)
redeless
[fr. G. rede + -less]  archaic  without counsel or advice; foolish, heedless; resourceless, perplexed, confused
redivivus
[L. redivivus, renewed]  reborn
refactory
[fr. L. reficere, to remake or restore, cf. refectory]
a place for remaking or restoring an object through reanalysis of its structure without changing its behavior
wwftd is an obscure word refactory
refection
[fr. refect < L. reficere, to refresh]  /rih FEK shun/
1) now rare  refreshment of the mind or spirit: nourishment
2) the taking of food and drink: repast
refectory
a communal dining hall (as in a monastery or college)
refluctuation
[re- + L. fluctuation-em]  /re fluk tu A shun/  very rare  A flowing back {Webster 1828}; reflux
refocillation
[fr. L. refocillare  to revive, reanimate or refresh]
now rare  refreshment, reanimation, reinvigoration
refractory
[fr. L. refragor, to oppose]  /ri FRAK t(u)ree/
1) resistant to control or authority: stubborn, unmanageable
2) resistent to treatment; unresponsive; immune  3) capable of enduring high temperature
refragable
[fr. L. refragabilis]  obs.  that may be refuted or gainsaid
refulgent
brilliant
regargletate
[after regurgitate]  nonce-word  to spew forth the same old arguments(?)
regolith
the unconsolidated solid material covering the bedrock of a planet
reify
to regard (something abstract) as a material thing
relict
1) widow  2) a persistent remnant of an otherwise extinct organism  3) something left unchanged
reluct
[ad. L. reluctari, to struggle; but in later use prob. a back-formation from reluctance]
1) to make a determined resistance : struggle
2) to feel or show repugnance or reluctance : revolt
reluctate
archaic  to offer resistance; to strive or struggle against something; to show reluctance
relume
to light or light up again: rekindle
remplissage
[F., padding]  filling or padding used in music and literature
remugient
[fr. L. remugire, to bellow again]  /ruh MYOOH juhnt/  resounding, reverberating; mooing, lowing
renascible
capable of being reproduced; able to spring again into being
renegacy
[fr. renege]  the action of renouncing: renegation(?)
renidification
[re- + L. nidus, nest + facere, to make]  /re NID i fi KAY shun/
Zool., rare  the action of building a nest a second time. {Webster 1864}
renidify
[see previous]  to make another nest
reniflement
[F., a sniff]  a sniff; sniffling
renitent
resisting physical pressure; resisting constraint or compulsion: recalcitrant
rere-dorter
rare  a privy situated at the rear of the dormitory (dorter) in a convent or monastery
reredos
a usually ornamental wood/stone screen or wall behind an altar
resile
to recoil, retract; esp: to return to a prior position
resipiscence
[L. resipiscentia < resipiscere to recover one's senses]  /res eh PIS ense/
repentance for misconduct; return to a sane, sound, or correct view or position
resipiscent
[see previous]  /res eh PIS ent/  returning to one's senses; learning from experience
resistentialism
Paul Jennings's mock philosophy which maintains that inanimate objects are hostile to humans
"'Things are against us.' This is the nearest English translation I can find for the basic concept of Resistentialism." - P. Jennings, Oddly Enough (1950)
resorb
1) to absorb again: reabsorb 2) Biol. to dissolve and assimilate
retection
[fr. L. retegere,  < re- + tegere, to cover]
obs.  the act of disclosing or uncovering something concealed
retiarius
[fr. L. rete, a net]  a Roman gladiator armed with a net for entangling his adversary (and a trident for dispatching him)
reticulem
the second of the four stomachs of a ruminant (see rumen)
retiracy
[fr. retire, after such pairs as conspire : conspiracy]  /re TIRE uh see/
U.S.  1) retirement, seclusion  2) sufficient means or property to make possible retirement
retrogenesis
[fr. retro- backward + -genesis, origin]  /ret troh JEN uh sis/
the loss of mental abilities in old age in the opposite order in which they are gained in childhood, esp. as exhibited by Alzheimer's patients
retroitive
[fr. L. retro, backward + ire, to go + -ive]  nonce-wd in Coleridge  directed backwards
retromingent
passing urine in a backward direction
retronym
[fr. L. retro- + Gk onymon, name]
a term consisting of a noun and a modifier that specifies the original meaning of the noun
"analog watch" and "film camera" are retronyms
retrosexual
neologism  the antithesis of the metrosexual: a man with an undeveloped aesthetic sense who spends as little time and money as possible on his appearance and lifestyle
retroussé
[F.]  /re tru SAY/  turned up   a retroussé nose
revanche
[F.] revenge: esp a usually political policy designed to recover lost territory or status
revanchist
one who advocates a policy of revanche
revehent
carrying back
revenant
one that returns after death or a long absence
rhabdomancy
divination by wands or rods
rhadamanthine
inflexibly rigorous or severe
rhetorication
obs.  the action of speaking or writing rhetorically; a piece of rhetoric, a rhetorical flourish
rhinotillexomania
compulsive nose-picking
rhonchus
a whistling or snoring sound heard when the air channels are partially obstructed
rhotacism
the excessive use or faulty pronunciation of the letter R
riant
mirthful, gay
ricercar
any of various contrapuntal instrumental forms esp of the 16th and 17th centuries
rinkafadda
an Irish dance resembling the Virginia reel
riotocracy
[riot + -ocracy, rule]  violent or disorderly rule
riparian
relating to or living or located on the bank of a stream or river
risible
capable of or disposed to laughing; provoking laughter: funny; associated with laughter
risorgimento
[It., rising again] a time of renewal or renaissance: revival; specif: the 19th century movement for Italian political unity
rixation
[fr. L. rixari, to quarrel]  obs.  quarreling, brawling
roborant
[fr. L. roborare, to strengthen]  healthful(?); restoring vigor or strength
rocambolesque
[F.] incredible, fantastic
rodentially
in the manner of rodents
rodomontade
a bragging speech; vain boasting or bluster; rant
roky
Prov. Eng.  misty; foggy; cloudy
roman-fleuve
[F., river novel]  /roe maan FLOEV/
a novel in the form of a long chronicle of a social group (as a family or a community) often in many volumes -- coined for Balzac's Comedie Humaine
rondure
gracefully rounded curvature
"...which combine the callipygian rondure observed among the races of the Dark Continent with the taut and noble musculature of sturdy Olaf...."  - Thomas Pynchon, Gravity's Rainbow
ronyon
obs.  a mangy or scabby creature
roorback
a defamatory falsehood published for political effect
rorifluent
[fr. L. roris, dew + fluere, to flow]  rare  flowing with dew (Johnson, 1755)
roscian
[after Roscius, a celebrated Roman comic actor who died c.62 BC.]  /ROSH (i) un/  
usu. capitalized  famous or eminent in regards to acting
rote
[prob. of Scand. origin]  U.S  the sound of the surf crashing on the shore
rouleau
[F.] a roll of coins, wrapped in paper
rowdy-dow
to be noisy or boisterous
rowel
a revolving disk with sharp marginal points at the end of a spur
roynish
[fr. roin, scurf, scab + ish; fr. (assumed) Vulgar Latin ronea]
archaic  (also roinish and roinous)  mangy, scabby; coarse, mean, base
rubicund
inclining to redness; ruddy; red
ruction
a noisy fight; disturbance, uproar
rudas
Scot.  a hideous, vile and loathsome old woman
rudery
[fr. L. rudis, rough, unwrought]  /RUE duh ree/
rudeness; a rude remark, comment, practical joke, etc.
rudesby
obs.  an uncivil, turbulent fellow
ruly
obedient, orderly   a ruly crowd
rumble-bumble
[rumble + bumble]  a miscellaneous mass or mixture: jumble, hodgepodge
rumbustious
[prob. alt. of archaic robustious]  informal, chiefly Brit.  boisterous or unruly
rumen
the first of the four stomachs of a ruminant (see abomasum)
rumpy-pumpy
Brit/Austral, humorous  sexual activity
runagate
fugitive, runaway; vagabond
runcible
nonsense word  from the phrase runcible spoon;
They dined on mince, and slices of quince,
Which they ate with a runcible spoon.
 - E. Lear, The Owl & The Pussy-Cat (1871)
rupicolous
living among, inhabiting, or growing on rocks
rusticate
[fr. L rusticari, to live in the country]
to retire into the country; to stay or sojourn in the country; to assume rural manners, to live a country life;
also, (chiefly Brit.)  to suspend from school or college, esp. at Oxbridge
ruthful
full of sorrow: woeful; full of ruth: pitiful
rutilant
having a reddish glow
ruvid
rough; tough; barbaric


S

sabrage
[F. sabrer]  /sah BRAHDZH/  the act of opening a bottle, usu. champagne, with a sabre
saccade
1) the rapid movement of the eyes in looking quickly from one thing to another, as in reading
2) the act of checking a horse with a strong tug of the reins
3) music  a sudden strong pressure of the violin bow that causes two or more strings to sound at once
sacerdotal
[fr. L. sacerdos, one who offers sacrifices]
1) relating to priests or priesthood: priestly
2) relating to undue emphasis on a need for the authority of a priesthood or of priests
sachem
an Indian chief; a Tammany leader
sackbut
medieval trombone
sagination
the act of fattening, or state of being fattened
salmagundi
potpourri
saltation
1) the action or process of leaping or jumping; dance
2) the origin of a new species or a higher taxon in essentially a single evolutionary step that in some esp. former theories is held to be due to a major mutation or to unknown causes; mutation
salubrious
beneficial, healthful
salvific
[fr. L. salvificus]  /sal VI fik/  having the intent or power to save or redeem
Samhain
/saun/ or /SAW in/  Irish  The first day of November, celebrated by the ancient Celts as a festival marking the beginning of winter and of the new year according to their calendar; All Saint's Day or Hallowmass. cf. Beltane -- Samhain Eve became known as All-Hallows' Eve, corrupted to Hallow-e'en and now spelled Hallowe'en or Halloween.
samhainophobia
[Irish Samhain, 'All Saints' Day' + -phobia]  jocular  a fear of Halloween
sanable
[L. sanabilis, < sanare, to heal]  /SAN ah bul/
obs.  capable of being healed or cured; susceptible of remedy   hence, sanability
sanative
healing or restorative
sangfroid
[F., cold blood]  /sa{n} f{r}wa/  self-possession or imperturbability especially under strain
sanguinopurule
full of blood and pus
sapid
flavorful
saponaceous
slippery, elusive; soapy
saporific
flavorful
saprogenic
producing decay or putrefaction
saprostomous
[fr.om Gk roots meaning literally 'putrid mouth']  /sa PRAHS tuh mus/  having foul-smelling breath
saraband(e)
a stately court dance of the 17th and 18th centuries, resembling the minuet
sarcology
the study of soft, fleshy parts of the body
sarculate
[fr. L. sarculum]  rare  to hoe, weed (also sarcle); hence sarculation, hoeing
sardoodledom
[fr. sardoodle (blend of Victorien Sardou, French playwright criticized by G. B. Shaw, for the supposed staginess of his plays and doodle) + -dom]
usu. capitalized  mechanically contrived plot structure and stereotyped or unrealistic characterization in drama: staginess, melodrama
sargasso
a) gulf-weed; also a mass or a species of this; also fig., esp. in sense a confused or stagnant mass
b) attrib., as sargasso bed, weed; Sargasso Sea
sarky
Brit. informal  sarcastic
saros
a cycle of 6585.32 days in which eclipses of the sun and moon occur in same sequence and at the same intervals as in the previous such cycle
sarsen
one of the numerous large boulders or blocks of sandstone found scattered on the surface of the English chalk downs
satisdiction
nonce-word  saying enough
They desire not satisfaction, but satisdiction, whereof themselves must be judges. - Nathaniel Ward
satrap
ruler, henchman
saturnine
cold and steady in mood, of a gloomy or surly disposition, having a sardonic aspect
saudade
[Port.]  yearning or longing, but more than that...
saulie
Scot., obs. except Hist.  one paid to attend a funeral as a mourner
saurian
any of a group (Sauria) of reptiles, lizard like
sawney
fool, simpleton
saxify
to turn into stone, to petrify
scabrous
1) rough to the touch; covered with roughened, unwholesome patches
2) difficult, knotty
3) salacious, naughty
scalawag
[origin unknown] or scallywag
/SKAL uh wag/ or /~ lee wag/  1) rascal, scamp, reprobate
2) an undersized or ill-conditioned animal
3) a white Southerner who supported reconstruction policies
scapegrace
a man or boy of reckless and disorderly habits; an incorrigible scamp - often used playfully
scaphism
an old Persian method of executing criminals by covering them with honey and letting the sun and the insects finish the job
scaramouch
a cowardly buffoon
scarper
Brit.  to run away
scatophagous
habitually feeding on dung: coprophagous
scaturient
[fr. L scatere, to flow out]   /skah TUR e ent/  gushing forth, overflowing; effusive
schadenfreude
[G.] enjoyment gained from others' troubles (see also epicaricacy)
schemozzle
see shemozzle
schistaceous
[fr. L. schistos, fissile + -aceous]  /schis TAY ceous/  slate-colored, blue-gray
schizothemia
[fr. Gk schizo-, < schizein, to split + thema, theme]
rare  digression by means of a long reminiscence; repeated interruptions of a conversation by the speaker introducing other topics
schizothymic
a schizoid (split personality) tendency remaining within the bounds of normality
schlimmbesserung
[G.] making something worse through an attempt to make things better
schlub
[Yiddish]  (also shlub) a worthless person, a jerk, an oaf
schm- (or shm-)
[fr. various Yiddish words]  colloq., chiefly U.S.
an element used to form a nonsense term of derision by preceding the initial vowel or by replacing the initial consonant or consonant cluster (forming a rhyme)  fancy, schmancy
schmegeggy
[Yiddish]  /shmeggy/  also shmegegge
1) a contemptible person; an idiot  2) baloney; hot air; nonsense
schnorrer
[Yiddish]  beggar; esp one who wheedles others into supplying his wants
schnozzling
[fr. snozzle < Yiddish shnoitsl, diminutive of shnoits, snout + -ing]  nuzzling
schrecklichkeit
[G. Schrecklichkeit, a deliberate policy of terrorizing the enemy (esp. non-combatants) as a military asset]
/SHREK likh kahyt/  frightfulness (in the above sense); also trans. and fig.
schwa
that upside-down e sound/symbol
schwarmerei
[G.]  /shver ma RYE/  excessive or unwholesome sentiment
sciamachy
[fr. Gk skia, shadow + mache, battle]  /sye AM uh kee/
a futile battle with an imaginary foe; fighting with a shadow -- shadow-boxing, against an imaginary opponent in training for the ring, is a specialized form of sciamachy
sciapodous
[fr. Sciopodes, a fabulous people of Libya ‘with immense feet which they used as sunshades’ (Liddell & Scott)]  having very large feet
scientintically
a ludicrous nonce-word formed by blending scientifically and tint
scilicet
[L.]  abbr. sc., to wit; namely  (cf. videlicet)
sciolism
a superficial show of learning
sciolist
[fr. late L. sciol-us]  /SY uh list/  a superficial pretender to knowledge; a conceited smatterer
sciomancy
divination using ghosts or a spirit guide, a method generally employed by channelers
sciurine
/sI yoo RINE/  (also sciurid, -roid)  of or pertaining to the squirrel family of rodents
scobberlotcher (scobolotcher)
[related to scopperloit, also of obscure origin]  an idler
scodgy
Scot.  one who works hard at a menial, unpleasant or boring job
scopophilia
voyeurism
scorse
[prob. alt of corse, to barter]  obs., rare  barter, exchange
scortatory
pertaining to or consisting in, fornication or lewdness  {Webster, 1828}
scot
money assessed or paid
scotoma
[fr. Gk skotoma, dimness of vision < skotos, darkness]  /skuh TOE muh/  
Path.  an obscuration of part of the visual field (also fig.)
scrannel
harsh, unmelodious
scree
loose rock debris; a slope at the base of cliff of said debris
scribacious
[fr. L. scribere, to write + -acious]  (also, scribatious)
rare  given to, or fond of, writing
scrimshank
[origin unknown]  (also skrimshank)  
Brit. mil. slang  [v] to shirk duty  [n] a) an act of 'scrimshanking'  b) a scrimshanker
scriptorium
[Med. L]  /scrip TOR eum/
a room in a monastery set aside for the copying, writing, or illuminating of manuscripts and records
scripturient
[L .scripturire, to desire to write]
obs.  having an overwhelming urge to write
scrivello
[< Pg. escrevelho]   /SKREH ve low/
an elephant's tusk of small size (less than 20 pounds?), once commonly used to produce billiard balls
scrivener
a professional or public copyist or writer; scribe; notary public
scrofulous
having a diseased appearance, morally contaminated
scrolloping
characterized by or possessing heavy, florid, ornament  [coined by V. Woolf]
scrump
Brit.  to steal fruit (esp. apples) from trees; hence, scrumping
scrutate
[fr. L. scrutari, to examine, scrutinize]  rare  to search out; to investigate; hence, scrutation
scrutator
a close examiner or inquirer
scry
[fr. shortening descry]  1) obs.  descry  2) to practice crystal gazing; hence, scrying
scud
to move or run swiftly esp as if driven forward; to run before a gale
scumble
1) a : to make (as color or a painting) less brilliant by covering with a thin coat of opaque or semiopaque color
    b : to apply (a color) in this manner
2) to soften the lines or colors of (a drawing) by rubbing lightly
3) broadly  to soften or subdue
scunner
Scot.  to be in a state of disgusted irritation
scurrifunging
[a word of jocular formation] (cf. scurryfunge)
Newf. dial.  a brisk and thorough cleaning
scurryfunge
[used in various senses with little obvious connection]  also scurrifunge
Brit. dial. (jocular)  a) ? to scrub, scour  b) ? to wriggle about
(also a Maine colloquialism?)  a hasty tidying of the house between the time you see a neighbor coming and the time she knocks on the door - Paul Dickson, Words
secateurs
[F.] a kind of pruning shears with crossed blades (rare in sing.)
seddity
[perh. fr. alt. of sedate]  (also saddity, siddity, seditty, etc.)
U.S., in African-Amer. usage  affecting white middle-class values, esp. characterized by an air of superiority; conceited
sederunt
a prolonged sitting (as for discussion)
sedulous
involving or accomplished with careful perseverance; diligent in application
seely
[ME sely (cf. silly)]  /SEE lee/
archaic 1) foolish, simple  2) pitiable especially because of weak physical or mental condition: frail
seiche
[F. seiche, to sway back and forth]  /saysh/
a standing wave that oscillates in an enclosed body of water, such as a lake, bay or gulf
seidel
a large glass for beer
seigneurial
relating to a man of rank or authority
seism
an earthquake
sejugate
[fr. L. sejugo, to disjoin]  rare  to separate, disjoin
selcouth
unusual, strange
selvage
[fr. M. Eng. selfegge]
1 a) the edge of a fabric that is woven so that it will not fray or ravel  b) an edge (as of fabric or paper) meant to be cut   off and discarded
2) an outer or peripheral part: border, edge
semblable
[fr. OF sembler, to resemble]  /SEM bluh bul/
archaic  1) having a resemblance: suchlike  2) seeming; apparent
semiotician
a philosopher of signs and symbols
semiotics
a philosophical theory of signs and symbols
semiquaver
a 1/16 note in music [see also quaver]
semordnilap
a word, phrase or sentence that spells a different word, phrase or sentence when reversed; e.g., desserts <> stressed
sempiternal
[fr. L. sempiternus < semper, always]  of never-ending duration: eternal
sempiternity
the property of being perpetual
sennet
a trumpet call used for formal stage entrance or exit
sennight
the space of seven nights and days, week
sententious
moralistic, pithy
septenary
[fr. L. septenarius < septem, seven]
pertaining or relating to the number seven; forming a group of seven
septentrion
[fr. L. septentriones, the seven stars of Ursa Major]  obs.  the northern regions, the north
septentrional
[see previous]  northern
sequacious
subservient, tractable; intellectually servile
seraglio
harem; a palace of a sultan
seriatim
[L.] one after another; in a series
serendipity
[fr. its possession by the heroes of the Persian fairy tale The Three Princes of Serendip]
the faculty or phenomenon of finding valuable or agreeable things not sought for
sermocination
1) obs.  talk, conversation; a discourse, sermon
2) Rhet.  a form of prosopopoeia in which the speaker, having made a remark or put a question, immediately answers it herself
sesquipedalian
[fr. L. sesquipedalis, of a foot and a half in length]
n. a long word  adj. 1) given to the use of long words 2) polysyllabic
sesquipedalophobia
[sesquipedalian + -phobia]  (coined by Byran A. Garner in a Verbatim article)
the fear or hatred of long words
sevocation
[fr. L. sevocare, to call aside]  /sev uh KAY shun/
obs. rare  a calling apart or aside
sexotropic
constantly thinking about sex
sgriob
(Gaelic)  the itchiness that comes upon the upper lip just before taking a sip of whiskey
shaconian
someone who is convinced that Bacon ghosted Shakespeare's plays
shalloon
coat-lining material
shambolic
[prob. fr. shambles, after symbolic]  chiefly Brit. slang  chaotic, disorderly, undisciplined
shammes
[fr. Hebrew shamash, servant]  /SHAH mes/  (rhymes with promise)  Yiddish
1) the sexton or caretaker of a synagogue
2) Am. slang  a detective, a policeman; a 'private eye' (see Irish shamus)
3) an unimportant menial   a shammes in a pickle factory
4) a sycophant, a hanger-on
5) an informer: stool-pigeon
6) the ninth candle of the Chanukah menorah, used to light the others
shanachie
an Irish storyteller
shandy
[of obscure origin]  wild, boisterous; also visionary, scatter-brained
shandrydan
a chaise with a hood; a rickety vehicle
sharoosed
Newf. dial  (also sharooshed, sharoused)
taken aback, surprised; (also) disappointed, disgusted
shebeen
[fr. Irish Gaelic séibín, measure of grain, grain tax, bad ale]  /shu BEEN/
chiefly Irish : an unlicensed or illegally operated drinking establishment (also Scot. and S. Afr.)
shemozzle
[perhaps fr. Yiddish shlimazl, "misfortune”]  (var. spellings, as usual with Yiddish anglification)
slang  a muddle or complication; a quarrel, row, rumpus, mêlée
shend
chiefly Brit dial.  injure, mar; ruin, destroy
sheveled
[by shortening]  (also shevelled)  rare, archaic  disheveled  (in modern use, not dissheveled)
shibboleth
slogan, catchword; a custom or usage regarded as a criterion for distinguishing membership
shillaber
a shill
shilpit
Scot. 1) (of persons) pale and sickly-looking; weak, feeble, puny  2) (of liquor) insipid, weak, thin
shipoopi
[neologism of Wolfe or Meredith?]  slang  a woman; the girl who's hard to get(?)
Now a woman who'll kiss on a very 1st date, 
Is usually a hussy, 
And a woman who'll kiss on the second time out, 
Is anything but fussy, 
But a woman who'll wait 'till the 3rd time around, 
Head in the clouds, feet on the ground, 
She's the girl he's glad he's found, 
She's his Shipoopi.
 - Meredith Willson, The Music Man
shlimazel
[Yiddish] an unlucky person; one with perpetual bad luck
shlump
[Yiddish]  untidy person, slob
shlumperdik
[Yiddish, fr. shlump, untidy person, slob]  /shlump puh dik/?
unkempt, sloppy, dowdy
shmata (or shmatteh)
[Yiddish]  a rag; hence, anything worthless
shmendrik
[Yiddish]  nincompoop; an inept or indifferent person (cf. shlemiel)
shonky
[origin unknown]  Austral. informal  of poor quality, shoddy; inferior
shot-clog
obs. rare  an unwelcome companion tolerated only because he pays the shot, or reckoning, for the rest
shram
[a parallel form to scram]  Brit. dial.  to benumb or paralyze with cold; chill
shrike
the only predatory songbird
shrive
to minister the sacrament of penance to; pardon, purge; to confess one's sins esp to a priest
shtook
[origin unknown (app. not Yiddish)]  /shtook/  (also shtuck or schtuck)
U.K. informal, esp. in phrase, in (dead) shtook  a problem situation
shtoom
[Yiddish, from G. stumm]  (also schtoom, shtum(m), etc.)
[adj] silent, speechless, dumb; esp. in phrase, to keep (or stay) shtoom
[vi] to be quiet, to shut up  [vt] 'shut it'
shunamitism
rejuvenation of an old man by a young woman (also shunammitism)
sialagogic
promoting the flow of saliva
sialoquent
[f. Gk sialo- saliva and L. -loquent speaking]  /sy AL uh kwent/
obs.  spraying saliva when speaking (hence, sialoquence)
sibylline
oracular, occult, mysterious (pertaining to one or more of the Sibyls)
sicarian
[fr. L. sicarius < sica, dagger]  rare  (relating to) a murderer, esp. an assassin
sicker
Scot.  secure, safe; also: dependable
siderate
[fr. L. siderari, to be struck by a star]
obs.  to blast or strike down (as with lightning)
sidereal
of, relating to, or expressed in relation to stars or constellations: astral
siderism
1) a phenomenon similar to animal magnetism (or mesmerism) formerly supposed to result from the bringing of iron or other inorganic bodies into contact with the human body
2) the doctrine of a sidereal influence upon terrestrial things or events
siffilate
[modif. of F. siffler, to whistle]  /SIF uh layt/  rare  to whisper
simoniac
[fr. LL. simonia, simony]  /sy MOE nee ak/
one who practices simony, or the buying and selling of church offices and preferments
simony
the buying or selling of a church office or ecclesiastical preferment
sinecure
a position that requires little or no work, but provides income
sinisterity
[fr. L. sinisteritas: awkwardness, untowardness, perversity]  now rare (opposed to dexterity)
1) sinister character; perversity; dishonesty
2) lack of skill or dexterity; clumsiness, awkwardness
3) use of the left hand; skill in this
sinter
[n] a deposit formed by the evaporation of spring water
[v] to form a coherent mass by heating without melting
sin-wat
"A man who wants all of somebody's love. That's very bad." - Kurt Vonnegut, Cat's Cradle
sipid
having a taste or flavor; savory   that was a wonderfully sipid meal
sitooterie
Scot.  /sit oot ery/  a summerhouse or gazebo; generally, a place to sit and contemplate
Sitzfleisch
[G., sitting flesh]  /ZITS flaish/  the ability to endure or persist in some activity
skainsmate
[origin and meaning uncertain]  obs.  a messmate, a companion(?)
Scurvy knave! I am none of his flirt-gills; I am none of his skainsmates. - Shakespeare
skellum
Scot.  scoundrel, rascal
skelp
1) to hustle
2) Brit.  slap, strike
skerrick
UK slang  a small amount; a small fragment; the slightest bit
skinker
one employed to dispense liquors in a bar: tapster
skite
1) a sudden, vigorous stroke or blow, esp. one given in an oblique direction; an oblique impact, or one which causes a rebound
2) a trick; a joke
3) a person who on some account or other is regarded with contempt (cf. blatherskite)
4) Austral. and N.Z. colloq.  a) boasting, boastfulness; ostentation, show; conceit  b) a braggart, a boaster; a conceited person
5) orig. and chiefly Scot.  a jollification, a spree, a binge; freq. in phrase on the skite
skive
[perh. ad. Fr. esquiver, to dodge, slink away]
UK slang (orig. Military)  to avoid work by absenting oneself, to play truant; hence, skiving (cf. mitching)
skybal(d)
Brit dialect  /SKY bal/  one that is worthless: good-for-nothing
skyhookery
[fr. skyhook < sky + hook]  nonce-word  use of an imaginary hook suspended in air to bootstrap a process; gen., the abandonment of reason
slangwhanger
[fr. slangwhang, to assail with abuse]  chiefly U.S.  a noisy or abusive talker or writer; a ranting partisan; also, slangwhanging
slaughterman
one whose occupation it is to kill for food
slaunchwise
U.S. dialect  slanting, oblique, crooked; diagonally, obliquely, crookedly
slipshoddity
[slipshod + -ity]  also slipshoddiness and slipshodness
carelessness, slovenliness
slobberknocker
two or more big guys beating the hell out of each other
sloff
(Welsh)  to eat greedily or untidily   Be not a groak nor a sloffer but a trencherman.
sloven
[ME sloveyn, rascal]
obs.  a person of low character or manners; a knave, rascal
slubber
[prob. from obsolete Dutch slubberen]  (see next)
1) dialect, chiefly English  stain, sully
2) to perform in a slipshod fashion, do carelessly
Slubber not business for my sake, Bassanio.. - W. Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice
slubberdegullion
dial.  dirty rascal: scoundrel, wretch
slugabed
one who stays in bed out of laziness; broadly: sluggard
slughorn
[erroneous use of slughorne, an early form of slogan]  ghost word  a trumpet
slumgullion
a watery meat stew
slurt
to squirt; to blurt (out)  {DARE}
smaragdine
/smah RAG deen/  1) of or relating to emeralds  2) of an emerald-green color
smatchet
Scot.  an insignificant contemptible person; a chit
smellfeast
[smell + feast]  archaic  one that is apt to find and frequent good tables; an epicure; a parasite {Johnson, 1828}
smellfungus
Brit.  a grumbler or faultfinder
smifligate
[Charles Dicken's nonce-word]  spiflicate
smirch
besmirch (to a lesser degree)
smirr
[origin obscure]  /smur/  also smur or smir
Scots  fine rain; drizzle
smoot
Brit.  a narrow passage (also, a unit of measurement [silly])
smug
[perhaps by back-formation fr. smuggling]  to steal, filch, run away with
snaffle
[of obscure origin]  Brit. dialect  to steal, purloin; to obtain by devious means, snatch
snallygaster
a mythical monster of Maryland, invented to frighten freed slaves  (compare snollygoster)
snarf
[prob. blend of scarf + snack]
orig. U.S. slang  to consume quickly or greedily  snarfed down some pizza
snarfle
[perh. blend of snarf and snuffle]  U.S. slang
1) to sniff or snort; to make snuffling noises
2) to use or consume in large amounts; to eat greedily.  cf. snarf
snarge
[prob. onomatopoia]  /snarj/
the Feather Identification Lab at the Smithsonian Institution has, sometime within the 21st century, coined this term for the goop that remains of a bird after it collides with an airplane
snarge
[origin unknown, but earlier than previous]  a person nobody likes; a total jerk
snark
a fictional animal, the quarry for a hunting party comprising some highly unlikely characters in Lewis Carroll's The Hunting of the Snark
snaste
[origin unknown]  /snAst/
[n] obsolete  the wick of a snuffed candle  [v] obs. rare  to snuff a candle
sneckdraw
Scot.  a sly, crafty person trying to worm his way in; a cozener, a cheat
snifty
U.S. slang  1) having a pleasant or agreeable smell  2) haughty, disdainful
snipocracy
[fr. snip + -ocracy]  obs. rare  the tailoring profession or its leading members
snollygoster
a shrewd unprincipled person, esp. a politician  (compare snallygaster)
snood
a flap of skin that hangs from the top of a turkey's beak
snook
[uncertain origin]  a derisive gesture, thumb to nose with fingers spread, usu. in phrase to cop a snook; also fig.
snooter
[fr. snoot : to nose, to snub (U.S. dialect)]
to harass, bedevil; to snub (only in P. G. Wodehouse)
snootitude
[fr. snoot, a snob; after attitude]  /SNOOT uh tude/
the state of mind of a snoot; esp. in regards to the usage of American English
snuggery
a snug cozy place; especially a small room
snurge
Brit. 1a) in schools, an informer b) one who curries favor, a toady
2) generally, an obnoxious person
sobornost
[Russ. sobornost, conciliarism, catholicity]  /so BOR nost/
Theol.  a unity of persons in a loving fellowship in which each member retains freedom and integrity without excessive individualism
sockdolager
U.S. slang  1) a heavy knock-down blow, a finisher
2) something sensational or exceptional
sockdologizing
[sockdolager + -izing]  nonce-wd  sensationalizing (?)
soi-disant
[F.]  /SWAH dee ZAN/
self-proclaimed, self-styled; so-called(?)
soigne
[F.]  /swan YAY/
dressed, adorned, tended, or prepared with great care and attention to detail; well-groomed
solatium
[L.]  a sum of money, or other compensation, given to a person to make up for loss or inconvenience
solecism
1) a nonstandard usage or grammatical construction
2) a violation of etiquette
3) an impropriety, mistake, or incongruity
solfatara
[It., sulfur mine]  /sole fuh TAR uh/  a volcanic area or vent that yields only hot vapors and sulfurous gases
solidus
[Med. L. solidus, shilling]  (pl. solidi)
diagonal, or forward slash : /  (a.k.a. virgule) (appears in this sense in the Century Dictionary of 1891)
solifidian
one who holds that faith alone without achievement or personal merit is sufficient to insure salvation; hence solifidianism, the doctrine thereof -- compare nullifidian, also, cf. antinomian
soli-ipsiism
[f. L. soli ipsi, selves alone]  nonce-word  self-conceit  (cf. solipsism)
solipsism
the belief that the self is all that exists
solisequious
following the course of the sun, as the sunflower
solitarian
[fr. L. solitarius, solitary]  a recluse, a hermit
solmization
the use of syllables to denote the tones of a musical scale  (do... re... mi... )
somnifugous
[fr. L. somnus, sleep + fugare, to put to flight]  /som NIF u gous/
obs. driving away sleep
sonance
a sound
sonsy
(also sonsie)  having pleasing curves; buxom, comely
soodling
[fr. soodle, to walk slowly]  moving slowly
sophism
an argument apparently correct in form but actually invalid; esp: such an argument used to deceive
sophister
[fr. OF sophistre, ad. L. sophista]
one who makes use of fallacious arguments; a specious reasoner: sophist
(also, Hist: an upperclassman at Cambridge (or Oxford, or Harvard or Dartmouth, or Trinity College, Dublin))
sophistry
deceptively subtle reasoning or argumentation; an argument used to deceive
sophrosyne
[Gk fr. sophron of sound mind, prudent]  /sau FRAS en ee/
moderation; prudence, self-control
soporiferous
causing or tending to cause sleep: soporific
sordine
a cone-shaped mute for a trumpet
sorn
Scot.  to impose in order to obtain hospitality: sponge
sororal
of or pertaining to or characteristic of a sister or sisters; sisterly  (cf. fraternal)
sortilege
[fr. L. sortilegus, foretelling]
1) the act or art of divination by lots  2) sorcery, witchcraft, enchantment
the sortilege of suddenly acquired wealth
sot
obs.  a foolish or stupid person
soteriology
the Christian doctrine of salvation
sottage
[fr. sot]  obs. rare  foolishness, folly, stupidity
sottise
[F.]  /so TEEZ/ a silly remark or saying; a foolish action; also transf.
sottish
drunken (or stupid)
sottisier
[F.] /so TEEZ je/ a collection of sottises, esp. a list of written stupidities; also transf. and fig.
soubrette
[F. coy, reserved]  /soo BRET/
1) Theatr.  a) a lady's maid in comedies who acts the part of an intrigante : a coquettish maidservant or frivolous young woman -- compare ingenue
b) an actress who plays such a part; in extended use, a woman playing a role or roles in light entertainment
2) a lady's maid; a maidservant
sowl
[fr. G. zausen to tug, drag]  Brit. dial.  to pull by the ears; to drag about  
sozzled
[fr. sozzle : to splash, intoxicate, alteration of sossle, probably frequentative of Brit. dial. soss, to mess]
drunk, intoxicated
spadassin
[F., swordsman] a duelist; a fighter, a bully
spaghettification
[by extension fr. spaghettify]  the stretching of objects into long thin shapes in a very strong gravitational field, as by extreme tidal forces
spaghettified
[by extension]
1) heavily Italianized; fig.  incomprehensible
2) Physics  stretched into a long thin shape, or torn apart by the tidal forces of a strong gravity field such as a black hole
spalling
[origin uncertain]  splitting or chipping off
spalpeen
[fr. Gaelic spailpin, common laborer, migratory workman, worthless person]  chiefly Irish
1) a common laborer  2) a scamp, a rascal  3) a young boy
spancel
to tie or hobble: fetter
spaneria(?)
a scarcity of men  cf. spanogyny
spang
[fr. Scot., to leap, cast, bang]
1) to a complete degree: totally  2) in an exact or direct manner: squarely
spanghew
dial.  to throw or jerk violently; spec. to cause (a toad or frog) to fly into the air
spanogyny
[fr. Gk spanis, scarcity + gyne, woman]
/span OJ un ee/  a scarcity of women  (contrast spaneria)
sparble
[fr. OF esparpeillier]  (also sparple)  obs.  to scatter; to disperse
sparge
1) sprinkle, bespatter; esp. spray
2) to agitate (a liquid) by means of compressed air or gas via a pipe
3) to wash out all soluble products from beer mash prior to boiling
sparrow-blasting
[fr. sparrow, with jocular or contemptuous force]
obs.  being blighted by some mysterious power of whose existence one is skeptical
spermologer
[f. Gk spermologos, gathering seeds; also fig. picking up news, gossiping]
obs.  a gatherer of seeds; fig., gossiper (a collector of trivia, according to Trivial Pursuit™)
sphallolalia
[fr. Gk sphallo, make to fall + -lalia, chatter]
/SFAL oh LAY lee yuh/  nonsense word?  flirtatious talk that leads nowhere
spheropygian
having full and rounded buttocks
spheterize
to make something one's own: appropriate
sphingine
sphinx-like in character
spifflicated
[a fanciful conflation]  /SPIFF likatid/  slang  intoxicated, drunk (also spiflicated)
spiflicate
to overcome or dispose of by violence; beat
spiv
Brit. one who lives by his wits without regular employment; slacker
spizzerinctum
/spiz er INK tum/  ambition; the will to succeed
splanchnic
visceral
splendent
glossy; brilliant
splenetic
[fr. L. spleneticus]  marked by bad temper, malevolence or spite
splenitive
[fr. L. spleneticus]  (also splenative/splenetive)
obs.  splenetic; of a hot or hasty temper
spliff
[Jamaican Eng.]  slang  a marijuana cigarette
spoliate
[fr. L. spoliare]  /SPO lee ate/  to spoil or despoil; to rob or deprive of something
spondulics
[origin uncertain]  see next
spondulix
U.S. slang  cash, money
spork
a proprietary name for a piece of cutlery combining the features of a spoon and a fork
Sprachgefuhl
[G., fr. sprache, speech + gefuhl, feeling]  /SHPRAKH guh fyl/
an intuitive grasp of the spirit of a language, esp. consciousness of what is acceptable usage; linguistic instinct
sprezzatura
[It.] ease of manner, studied carelessness; the appearance of acting or being done without effort; spec. of literary style or performance
sprunt
obs. anything that is short and will not easily bend  {Johnson, 1755}
spruntly
[origin unknown]  obs.  1) vigorously; youthfully  2) smartly; gaily; neatly
spud
[fr. ME spudde, a short knife]
1) to dig up or out (as with a spud)  2) to begin to dig (an oil well)
spumescent
frothy, foamy
spunkie
Scot.  ignis fatuus
spurge
1) [v] Middle Eng.  to cleanse, clear or purify: purge
2) [v] obs.  to emit foam, to froth
3) [n] a plant of genus Euphorbia, usually having a milky juice which yields powerful emetic and cathartic (purgative) products
sputation
[fr. L. sputare, to spit]  the act of spitting; expectoration
sputative
[see previous]  /SPYOO ta tive/  obs. rare  given to (excessive) spitting
an ugly and sputative lizard - D. Grambs
squabash
to crush esp. with criticism: lambaste
squabbish
somewhat fat or squat
squadoosh
Italian-American slang  used to describe something that is missing, absent, or forgotten; zero, nil, nothing
squamous
[fr. L. squama, scale]  scaly
squeamy
squeamish: queasy
squidger
the huge wink in tiddly-winks (the shooter)
squidgy
unpleasantly damp: clammy
squiffed
intoxicated, drunk
squiffy
Brit.  intoxicated; drunk  Austral.  askew, skew-whiff
squillo
[It. < squillare  to ring, to blare]
the resonant, trumpet-like sound in the voice of opera singers -- the purpose of the squillo is to enable an essentially lyric tone to be heard over thick orchestrations
stamagast
[fr. dial stam, to astonish + ag(h)ast (?)]
Brit dial.  a great and sudden disappointment, an unpleasant surprise
steampunk
[steam + punk]  neologism  a sub-genre of speculative science fiction set in an anachronistic 19th century society
steatopygia
an excessive development of fat on the buttocks, esp. of females
steganography
1) archaic  cryptography
2) the art of concealing a message, image, or file within another message, image, or file
stellify
to turn into a star: place among the stars
stelliscript
nonce-word  writing in the stars
stentorian
[fr. Stentor, a Gk warrior with a powerful voice]  /sten TOR ee un/
of the voice: loud, like that of Stentor; also stentorious
stercoranist
a disparaging nickname given to one who holds that the consecrated elements of the Eucharist undergo digestion in and evacuation from the body of the recipient
stercoration
the act of spreading manure; generally, the excrement of animals
sternutate
[back-formation fr. next?]  quite rare  to sneeze
sternutation
[fr. L. sternuere, to sneeze]  the act, fact or noise of sneezing; a sneeze
stertor
[fr. L. stertere, to snore] a heavy snoring sound
stertorous
[see previous]  1) characterized by a harsh snoring or gasping sound: exhibiting or marked by stertor
2) marked by snoring
hence stertorously and stertorousness
stichomythia
[ab. Gk., speaking in alternating lines]  /STIK uh MITH ee uh/  (also stichomythy)
an ancient Greek mode of dialogue in drama, poetry, and disputation in which two actors deliver alternating lines; also applied to modern imitations of this
stickit
Scot.  unfinished; having failed esp in an intended profession
stillicide
a succession of drops of water, esp. falling from the eaves of a house
stilly
[prob. fr. still + –ly]
[adj.]  characterized by stillness: calm, quiet  [adv.]  calmly, quietly
stime
Scot.  glimmer, glimpse
stingo
strong ale or beer; zest or zip
stiver
1) a Dutch coin worth a penny or two 2) something of little value
stocious
Irish slang  drunk, intoxicated
stodgy
Brit. slang  of a thick, semi-solid consistency; of food: thick, glutinous; of a meal: heavy, hard to get through
stonk
a heavy concentration of military fire
loosed a ~ on them and wiped them off the face of the earth
stonker
[Austral] 1) to hit hard: knock unconcious
2) to baffle completely: outwit, foil
stonking
[Brit] 1) impressively large 2) an intensifier
a ~ good time
stoush
[Austral. or NZ slang] [v] to thrash or beat (a person); to fight
[n] fighting; a brawl or fight, a scrap
strabismus
[Gk strabismos, act or condition of squinting]
inability of one eye to attain binocular vision with the other because of imbalance of the extrinsic eye muscles -- called also manifest strabismus, or squint
strack
Vietnam War era slang  straight and by the book
stramash
disturbance, racket; crash, smashup
stramineous
[fr. L. stramen, straw]  /struh MIN ius/  
1) consisting of or relating to straw; fig., worthless
2) Bot.  straw-colored; dull pale yellow
strappado
[ad. F. strapade, estrapade, ad. It. strappata, fr. strappare to drag]
obs. exc. hist.  a form of punishment or of torture to extort confession in which the victim's hands were tied behind his back and secured to a pulley; he was then hoisted from the ground and dropped partway back with a jerk; also an application of this punishment or torture; also the device so used
stravage
[prob. by shortening and alteration fr. extravagate]  /struh VAIG/
chiefly Scot.  saunter, stroll, wander
streel
chiefly Irish
an untidy slovenly person; esp. a woman: slattern  also fig.
strepitant
[fr. L. strepere, to make noise]  also strepitous
clamorous, noisy, boisterous (strepitous found chiefly in musical criticism)
stridulate
to make a shrill creaking noise by rubbing together special bodily structures -- used esp. of male insects (as crickets or grasshoppers)
strigil
an instrument used by ancient Romans/Greeks for scraping the skin esp. after the bath
stroppiness
UK  obstreperousness, unruliness, rebelliousness
stroppy
Brit.  touchy, belligerent
struldbrug
the appellation given to the immortals in Gulliver's Travels who were incapable of dying but continued to exist in a state of miserable decrepitude, regarded as legally dead, and receiving a small pittance from the state -- hence in allusive uses
struthious
of or relating to ostriches or related birds
stultiloquence
foolish or senseless talk; babble; twaddle
stumer
[origin unknown]  /STJU me(r)/  Brit. slang
1) a bad check; counterfeit money; a sham
2) generally: something which is worthless; a failure, a flop, a dud
3) (also stuma) a state of agitation; a sweat or 'stew'
stupend
[fr. L. stupend-us]  stupendous (see also tremend, horrend)
(much favored by Burton, now obs. in serious use)
stupex
[fr. stupid]  jocular, obs.  a fool
stupiditarian
nonce-word  one whose ruling principle is stupidity (from stupidity, after humanitarian etc.)
stygian
of or relating to the river Styx; extremely dark; infernal, gloomy; inviolable
stylite
[fr. Gk stylos, pillar]  a Christian ascetic living atop a pillar
stylometry
[fr. style + -metry]  the study of the chronology and development of an author's work based especially on the recurrence of particular turns of expression or trends of thought; hence, stylometrics and stylometrist (or stylometrician)
suasible
capable of being persuaded; easily persuaded
subboreal
extremely cold
subderisorious
rare  ridiculing with moderation
subdolous
[fr. L. subdolus]  /SUB-du-lus/  now rare  crafty, cunning, sly
subfusc
Brit.  drab, dusky
subhumerate
[fr. sub- + L. humerus, shoulder]  to place the shoulders under; to bear upon the shoulders
sublunary
[fr. Late Latin sublunaris]  of, relating to, or characteristic of the terrestrial world
dull sublunary lovers — John Donne
subreption
[fr .L. subripere, surripere to take away secretly]  /sub REP shun/
a deliberate misrepresentation, or an inference drawn from it
subreptitious
fraudulently obtained; surreptitious; so, subreptiously
subrogate
to substitute for another with regard to a legal right or claim
succedaneous
subrogated, substituted
succedaneum
/suksi DAY nee um/  a thing which (rarely, a person who) replaces or serves in place of another; a substitute
succubus
a demon assuming female form to have intercourse with men in their sleep
succussatory
characterized by up-and-down vibrations of short amplitude -- used of an earthquake
succussion
[fr. L. succutere, to toss up from below]
1) Medical  a violent shaking of the body to ascertain if fluid is present in a cavity
2) transf.  the condition of being shaken violently
suctorial
[mod. L. suctorius < sugere, to suck]  Zool.  adapted for sucking
sudatorium
a sweat room in a bath
sudorific
causing or inducing sweat: diaphoretic
suffisance
[ad. late L. sufficientia]  1) obs.  sufficiency; plenty; abundance; contentment
2) after F. suffisance  excess of self-confidence, conceit
suffonsified
[perhaps a blend of sufficiency and fancified]  (also sophonsified, suffancified, suronsified, etc.)
regional(?)  used in phrases to politely refuse more food at a meal: full; e.g., I am sufficiently sophonsified!
suine
[fr. L. sus, pig; cf. suinus, swine]  /SUI ain/  nonce-word  pig-like, porcine
Forget not Madam Grissel Steevens nor the suine scions of the house of Lambert. - James Joyce, Ulysses
sumph
Scot.  a dunce, a blockhead
sumptuary
designed to regulate extravagant expenditures or habits especially on moral or religious grounds   sumptuary laws
superannuate
to become retired; to become antiquated
superannuated
[fr. L. superannuatus]  of persons: disqualified or incapacitated by age; old and infirm; of things: impaired by age, worn out; antiquated, obsolete, out of date
superbity
haughtiness, arrogance
superchery
[F. supercherie, trickery < It. superchio, excess]
/su PERCH ery/?  obs.  deceit; fraud; foul play
supercilious
haughtily contemptuous
supererogation
the act of performing more than is required by duty, obligation or need
supererogatory
1) observed or performed to an extent not enjoined or required
2) exceeding what is needed: superfluous
superfetation
[fr. L. superfetare, to conceive while already pregnant]
fig.  a progressive accumulation or accretion reaching an excessive degree  (also superfoetation)
superhumerate
a spurious word, error in Richardson's Dict. for subhumerate [?]  to carry on the shoulders
superjacent
lying above or upon: overlying
supernacular
very good; first rate
supernal
1) being or coming from on high; heavenly, ethereal
2) located in or belonging to the sky
supinity
[fr. L. supinus, lying on the back]  obs.  supineness: inertness; sluggishness
suppedaneum
a support for the feet of a crucified person, projecting from the vertical shaft of the cross
supputation
obs.  an act of calculating or computing; a method of reckoning; calculation, computation, reckoning
supralapsarian
[fr. L. supra- before + lapsus, fall] pertaining to the doctrine of supralapsarianism (opposed to infralapsarian)
supralapsarianism
[fr. L. supra-, before in time + lapsus, fall]
a belief that the predestination of some to eternal life and of others to eternal death was antecedent to the creation and the fall of man (opposed to infralapsarianism)
suprapreantepenultimate
[fr. ultimate + a plethora of L. prefixes; e.g., supra  above, beyond]
the fifth from the last (or propreantepenultimate)
surbate
to make footsore; to harass or fatigue
surd
[fr. L. surdus, speechless]
1) Math.  irrational; fig. : lacking sense: irrational
2) Linguistic  voiceless, used of speech sounds
surdaster
[fr. L. surdus, deaf + -aster, not genuine]  inkhorn term  deaf person; a little deaf
suresby
obs.  one to be sure of, or to be relied on
surquedry
obs.  arrogance; haughty pride; presumption
surseance
[F.] obs.  cessation or suspension (of hostilities), peace; quiet
suspercollate
[fr. the abbreviation of L. suspendatur per collum (sus. per coll.), 'let him be hanged by the neck' in the entry of a capital sentence in a jailer's books]  to hang by the neck
"None of us Duvals have been suspercollated to my knowledge." -Thackeray
suspire
to sigh
sussultatory
[fr. It. sussultare to leap up, heave]  /suh SAL tuh toe ree/
characterized by up-and-down vibrations of large amplitude -- used of an earthquake
sustention
[fr. sustain, after such pairs as retain : retention, detain : detention]  /suh STEN chen/
an act or instance of sustaining; the state or quality of being sustained
suttee
the act of a Hindu widow willingly being cremated on the funeral pyre of her husband
suzerain
an overlord
suzerainty
[F. suzeraineté]  /SU zeh ren tee/  the dominion of a suzerain: overlordship
swacked
[fr. Sc. swack, to gulp, swill]  drunk, intoxicated
swarf
[of Scand. origin, akin to ON svarf]  any fine waste produced by a machining operation
swasivious
/swa SIV ee uhs/  obs.  agreeably persuasive
swedge
/swedj/  to leave without paying
sweven
archaic  a dream, vision
swidden
[fr. Eng. dial. swithen, to singe]
land that has been cleared for cultivation by slashing and burning the vegetation cover; the method of slash-and-burn
swingeing
[fr. swinge, to flog]  /SWI njin/ or /SWIN jeen/  Brit.  whopping, capital
swink
archaic  [n] labor, toil  [v] to labor, toil, work hard; to exert oneself, take trouble
swinkful
obs.  full of toil or trouble; disastrous; troublesome, irksome; painful, distressing
swith
[fr. OE swithe, strongly]
1) obs.  strongly, forcibly; extremely, excessively  2) chiefly dial.  instantly, quickly
swivet
a state of extreme agitation: tizzy
syllogomania
[fr. Gk sylloge, collecting + -mania]   /SIL eh jo mania/?  compulsive hoarding
sylph
[NL sylpha]  /silf/  a slender graceful woman or girl
symphoric
[fr. Gk sumphora, mishap, calamity]  /sim FOR ik/
accident prone, clumsy  elderly and increasingly symphoric - D. Grambs
syncategorem
[ad. L. syncategorema, a. Gk]  /sin KAT uh gor rem/
Logic  a word which cannot be used by itself as a term, but only in conjunction with another word or words: e.g. a sign of quantity (as all, some, no), or an adverb, preposition, or conjunction
syncategorematic
of the nature of a syncategorem, also in extended uses in linguistic analysis
synchronoptic
two or more things seen at the same time by one person
syncretic
brought about by fusion of forms of belief/practice
syncretism
1) reconciliation or union of conflicting beliefs or an effort intending such
2) flagrant compromise in religion or philosophy
3) the union or fusion of two or more originally different inflectional forms
syne
[OE siththan, since]   Scot.  [prep] since  [adv] since then: ago
synecdoche
[L. a. Gk synekdoche]  /suh NEK duh kee/  (rhymes with Schenectady :)
a figure by which a more comprehensive term is used for a less comprehensive or vice versa; as whole for part or part for whole, genus for species or species for genus, etc.  (compare metonymy)
syneidesis
[L.]  /sin uh DEE sis/  (see also synteresis)
Theol.  that part of conscience which is concerned with passing judgement on acts already performed  
synoptic
[ad. Gk. synoptikos]  /si NAHP tik/
1) affording a general view of some subject; spec. depicting weather conditions over a broad area   a synoptic study of polar air masses
2) chacterized by a comprehensive mental view of something   the synoptic genius of Einstein
3) giving an account of events from a common viewpoint   the synoptic Gospels
synteresis
[L.]  /sin tuh REE sis/  (also synderesis)
Theol.  that part of conscience which serves as a guide for conduct; conscience as directive of one's actions
syzygy
alignment of 3 celestial bodies


T

tabescent
[fr. L. tabes, a wasting away]  progressively wasting away
tachydidaxy
rare  a short or rapid method of teaching
tacturiency
[fr. L. tangere, to touch]  obs. nonce-word  the desire of touching
talaria
small wings or winged shoes represented as fastened to the ankles, chiefly used as an attribute of Mercury or Hermes
talion
punishment in kind; an eye for an eye... (lex talionis in legalese)
talionic
pertaining to revenge in kind
tammany
generally, any corrupt political organization (from Tammany Hall, in New York City)
tanstaafl
[acronym, there ain't no such thing as a free lunch]  /tans toffle/
intj. asserting that there is a cost, hidden or otherwise, to everything
tantalism
[fr. Tantal-us + -ism]  obs. rare  a teasing or torment like that of Tantalus; tantalization
tantivy
[adv] in a headlong dash
[n] 1) a rapid gallop 2) the blare of a trumpet or horn, as at a fox hunt
tapetless
Scot.  senseless
taphephobia
the morbid fear of being buried alive
taphonomy
[fr. Gk taphe, burial + -nomy]  /tuh FON uh me/
the study of the processes that affect animal and plant remains as they become fossilized; also, the processes themselves; hence, taphonomic
taphophile
one who loves cemeteries and funerals (see Harold, in Harold and Maude)
taradiddle
a fib
tarantism
a disorder characterized by an uncontrollable urge to dance attributed popularly to the bite of a tarantula
tarassis
[fr. Gk tarasso(?), to trouble the mind, confound, agitate, disturb, disquiet]  /tuh RASS iss/
male hysteria  {Mrs. Byrne}?
tardigrade
[fr. L. tardigradus, slow-moving]   /TAR duh grade/  slow-moving; sluggish
Tardis
[TARDIS (acronym: Time And Relative Dimensions In Space), the name in the science-fiction BBC television series Doctor Who (first broadcast in 1963) of a time machine outwardly resembling a police telephone box, yet inwardly much larger.] allusively  something resembling or likened to Doctor Who's TARDIS; spec. (a) a thing seemingly from another time (past or future); (b) a thing which has a larger capacity than its outward appearance suggests; a building, etc., that is larger on the inside than it appears from the outside
tartarean
[from Gk Tartaros]  of or relating to Tartarus: infernal, hellish
the Tartarean gloom in which he found himself - Edith Sitwell
tartuffery
hypocrisy
tathagatagarbha
the eternal and absolute essence of all reality, according to Buddhism
tatterdemalion
1) ragged or disreputable in appearance, being in a decayed state: dilapidated  2) beggarly, disreputable
tatum
[named to evoke the rapid-fire piano playing of jazz keyboardist, Art Tatum]
Music  the smallest perceptual time interval between successive notes in a rhythmic phrase
tautology
needless repetition of an idea, statement or word; a redundant (tautologous) statement
tautoousian
[fr. Gk words meaning the same + essence]  /tau to OU sian/ (also tautousious)
rare  having absolutely the same essence; being identically of the same nature (used in Theology)
tawpie
Scot.  a foolish or awkward young person
taxon
a group of plants or animals classified according to their presumed natural relationships
taxonomist
a specialist in taxonomy (systematics; classification)
tchotchke
a knickknack, trinket  (see also bibelot)
teetotaciously
[fanciful elaboration of teetotally {OED2}, t(otal) + total + -ly]
U.S. dial.  totally, completely, absolutely
tegestology
[fr. L. tegetis, covering, mat]  the collecting of beer mats or coasters; thus, tegestologist
tehuantepecer
[fr. Gulf of Tehuantepec + -er]  /tuh WANTuh PEKur/
usu. capitalized  a violent north wind that brings an inflow of cold air to Central America and esp. to regions around the Gulf of Tehuantepec
telamon
a draped male figure used like a caryatid as a supporting column or pilaster: atlas
teleology
the doctrine that final causes exist in nature
telic
tending toward an end
tellurian
an earthling
telos
an ultimate end
temerarious
/tem eh RARE ee us/  marked by temerity
temerity
rash or presumptuous daring
temulent
intoxicated, drunken [inkhorn term]
tendentious
biased
tenebrific
1) gloomy  2) causing gloom or darkness
it brightens the tenebrific scene - Robert Burns
tenebrous
shut off from the light: gloomy, obscure
tenesmus
medical  a distressing but ineffectual urge to evacuate the rectum or bladder
tensity
[fr. L. tendere, to stretch]  the state of being tense: tenseness
tentiginous
1) stiff or strained   2) sensuous, lascivious, lustful
tenty
Scot.  attentive, watchful
teratism
[Gk terat, marvel, monster + -ism]   /TER eh tizm/
1) an anomaly of organic form and structure: monstrosity  (also teratosis, Medical)
2) love of the marvelous; worship of monsters
teratology
the study of malformations, monstrosities or serious deviations from the normal type in organisms
tergiversate
[L. tergiversari, fr. versare, to turn]
1) to use evasions or ambiguities: equivocate  2) to change sides: apostatize
tergiversation
desertion; equivocation
teritoepiest
[origin unknown]  /?/  bombastic nonsense word(?)
termagancy
a scolding disposition, habitual bad temper: shrewishness
termagant
a shrew; a hard, overbearing woman
term of art
a word or phrase used in a precise sense in a particular subject or field; a technical term
terp
[Frisian]  an artificial mound or hillock, the site of a prehistoric village
terp
theater slang  'stage dancer' or chorus girl
terrenity
the quality or condition of being earthy; (conc.) earthy matter
terriculament
[L. terriculament-um, bugbear]  /ter RIK yoo la ment/
obs.  a source or object of needless dread; a bugbear   childhood terriculaments
terrine
[F.]  (cf. tureen)  an earthenware serving dish; a ragout served in such a dish
terroir
[F.] the situation in which wine is made
tessellate
[fr. L. tessera, tile]
1) to construct with a mosaic of small tiles  2) to fit together exactly
tessellated
having a checkered appearance (from tessera, used in mosaics)
testamur
[L., we testify] UK, in university use  a certificate from the examiners that a candidate has satisfied them; also, a certificate generally
testudinal
[fr. L. testudo, tortoise] of, relating to, or resembling a tortoise
testudinarious
of a tortoise shell
testudineous
[fr. L. testudine-us]  /tes tju DIN eus/
1) like the shell of a tortoise {Blount}  2) slow, like a tortoise
testudo
[L.]  /tes TOO doe/  a cover of overlapping shields or a shed wheeled up to a wall used by the ancient Romans to protect an attacking force
tetchous
U.S. dial.  easily irritated or made angry; short-tempered; peevish, irritable; testy: tetchy
tetrabard
[fr. L tetra-, four + bard (Shakespeare)]
neologism  a unit of vocabulary : 60,000 words; hence, a tetrabardian vocabulary is one of that size
tetragram
a four-letter word (see next)
tetragrammaton
[Gk, four-letter word] spec. the Hebrew word written YHWH or JHVH, vocalized as YaHWeH or JeHoVaH; often substituted for the ineffable name of God
tetrapyloctomy
nonce-word  "The art of splitting a hair four ways" according to Umberto Eco in Foucault's Pendulum
thagomizer
[coined by Gary Larson]  the cluster of spikes at the end of a stegosaurus' tail
thalassotherapy
[fr. Gk thalassa, sea]  the use of seawater (baths, voyages, etc.) in health and cosmetic treatment
Thalian
[pertaining to Thalia, the muse of comedy]  of the nature of comedy; comic
thalweg
[G. thal, valley + weg, way] /TAHL veg/
1) a line, as drawn on a map, connecting the lowest points of a valley
2) the middle of the main navigable channel of a waterway that serves as a boundary line between states
thanatologist
[see next]  one who practices thanatology
thanatology
[fr. Gk thanatos, death + –logy]  the study of death and dying and of psychological mechanisms for coping with it
thanatophilia
an undue fascination with death
thanatopsis
a meditation upon death
thanksgive
[by back-formation] to give thanks (for)
thaumaturge
a performer of miracles, esp a magician
theanthropy
a belief in the union of divine and human
theiform
[L. fr. thea, tea + -form]  /THEa form/
having the form of tea; resembling the tea plant
thenar
the fleshy part (ball) of the thumb
theodicy
defense of God's goodness and omnipotence in view of the existence of evil
theolepsy
[fr. Gk theolepsis]  rare  seizure or possession by a god; inspiration
theologaster
[NL, fr. theologus + -aster; cf. poetaster]  /the AL uh gas te(r)/
a shallow theologian, esp. one who pretends to possess great theological knowledge; a theological quack
theomachy
1) fighting against or amongst the gods
2) opposition to the divine will
theomancy
[fr. Gk theos, god + -mancy, divination]
divination by the responses of oracles supposed to be divinely inspired
theopneustic
[fr. Gk theos + pneustos, inspired]  /THE op neus tic/  given by divine inspiration
theopneusty
[see prvious]  /THE op neus ty/  divine inspiration
therblig
in time-and-motion study, a unit of work or absence of work into which an industrial operation may be divided
[anagrammatic formation by partial reversal of the name of its inventor, F. B. Gilbreth (1868-1924), American engineer and pioneer of time-and-motion studies.]
therianthropic
[fr. Gk therianthropos, beast-man]
1) combining human and animal form : therianthropic deity
2) relating to religions in which the deities worshiped are partly human and partly animal in form
therianthropy
a transformation into animal form, such as lycanthropy
theriomaniac
[fr. Gk combining form; dim. of ther, wild beast]  nonce-word  one who has a mania for hunting wild beasts
theriomorphic
[fr. Gk theriomorphos < therion, wild animal + morphe, form]
having the form of a beast  theriomorphic gods
theriomorphism
[see previous]  the belief that gods exist in animal form
thersitical
loud and abusive, scurrilous
theurgy
the art/technique of compelling or persuading a god to do or refrain from doing something
thig
Scot.  to beg; hence, thigging
thiotimoline
a fictitious chemical compound conceived by science fiction author Isaac Asimov (first published in the March 1948 issue of Astounding Science Fiction)
thirlable
[fr. OE thirl: hole, perforation]  obs. rare  that may be thirled or pierced; penetrable
thixotropy
/thik SOT ro py/  the property of certain gels of becoming fluid when agitated and of reverting back to a gel when left to stand
thole
[OE tholian]  Scots  to endure something without complaint; tolerate
(not to be confused with thole, the peg on the gunwale of a boat that holds an oar in place)
tholing
archaic  suffering, enduring
thrapple
[origin obscure]  /THRAPul/
Scot.  [n] the throat, windpipe  [v] to throttle, strangle
thrasonical
bragging, boastful
threap
[fr. OE threapian, to rebuke, reprhend]  chiefly Scot.
[vt] to rebuke, reprove, chide, scold, blame
[vi] to contend in words; to inveigh against; to argue, dispute; to quarrel, bicker, disagree; to wrangle about terms, haggle; hence, threaping
threnody
a song of lamentation for the dead, elegy
throstling
[prob. in origin a misprint or other error for throttling]
spurious word [?] A disease of bovine cattle, consisting of a swelling under the throat, which, unless checked, causes strangulation. - Webster's Revised Unabridged, 1913 (orig. in 1828 Webster; but not known to Vet. Surgery)
thuggee
[fr. Indian thag, thief]  murder and robbery by thugs
thurification
[fr. L. thurificare, to thurify]
the burning or offering of, or perfuming with incense
thurify
to burn incense (as with a censer)
thylacine
[fr. NL Thylacinus, genus of marsupials, < Gk thylakos sack, pouch]
the Tasmanian Wolf: a somewhat doglike carnivorous marsupial that formerly inhabited Tasmania but is now considered extinct -- called also Tasmanian Tiger
thyrsus
a staff tipped with a pine cone and twined with ivy, carried by Bacchus, Dionysian revelers and satyrs
tiddledies
[origin unknown]  soft flexible ice, or chunks of floating ice
timber-head
[timber + head]  also, timbernonce(?)
Melville's slang usage  a blockhead
"Don't you see, you timber-head, that no harm can come to the holder of the rod, unless the mast is first struck?" - Herman Melville, Moby Dick
tinnitus
a sensation of noise (as a ringing or roaring) that is purely subjective
tintinnabulation
the ringing or sounding of bells; a jingling or tinkling sound
titivate
[perhaps from tidy + (reno)vate]  to spruce up or adorn
titivation
[titivate + -ion]  /TID uh VAY shun/  the action of sprucing up or making small additions or improvements in appearance
titivil
[L. Tutivillus, of unknown origin]  /tit uh vil/  obs.
1) a name for a demon or devil in the mystery plays, said to collect fragments of words dropped, skipped, or mumbled in the recitation of divine service, and to carry them to hell, to be registered against the offender
2) a term of reprobation: a bad or vile character, scoundrel, knave, villain  b) esp. a tattletale
titubation
a nervous condition marked by staggering
tmesis
separation of the parts of a word by insertion of another word (linguists refer to tmesis as a type of infixation)
tocsin
an alarm
toey
[toe + -y]  /TOE ee/  Austral. informal  nervous, anxious; frisky(?)
tohubohu
[fr. Heb. tohu, confusion + bohu, emptiness]  /TOW hu BOW hu/  chaos, utter confusion
tokoloshe
an evil spirit; a supernatural being that does the work of witches
ton
[F.]  the fashion, vogue or mode
tongue-shot
[tongue + shot, range or distance]  speaking or talking distance, voice-range
tonitruone
[see next] a device or instrument for imitating thunder
tonitruous
[fr. L tonitruare, to thunder]   /tu NI tru ous/  (also tonitruant)
thundering, fulminating
tonsure
the shaven crown worn by monks; a bald spot resembling same
tontine
a financial arrangement whereby the last living member of the group gets the whole
toper
a drunkard
topiary
the art of tree or shrub shaping
toponym
[fr. Gk topos, place + onama, name]  the name of a geographic locality: place-name
(not to be confused with eponym, a name or noun formed after a person)
topos
[Gk, short for (koinos) topos, (common)place]  /TOE pos/
a stock rhetorical theme or topic; a literary convention
torpor
dullness, apathy; lethargy
torschlusspanik
[G., lit. 'shut gate panic'] a sense of alarm or anxiety (said to be experienced particularly in middle age) caused by the feeling that life's opportunities are passing (or have passed) one by; spec. that manifested in an aging woman who longs to discover the excitement of youth, and who fears being left 'on the shelf'
tortiloquy
[fr. late or med.L. tortiloquium < tortus, crooked + loqui, to speak]
obs. rare  crooked talk {Blount, 1656}
tosspot
toper, drunkard
totipotent
[fr. L. toti-, fr. totus : whole + potent; cf. omnipotent]  /toe TIP oh tent/
Biol.  capable of developing into a complete organism or differentiating into any of its cells or tissues; also gen.
totipotent blastomeres
toxophilite
one fond of or expert at archery
tracasserie
[F.] chiefly in pl.  a state of disturbance or annoyance; a turmoil, bother, fuss; an embroilment, a petty quarrel, a tempest in a teapot
traduce
to malign
tragematopolist
[fr. L. tragematopola]  obs. rare  a seller of sweets; a confectioner
tragolimia
in a man, an overwhelming and indiscriminate urge to have sex with any woman, regardless of her looks or age
trainspotter
figurative sense  person who collects trivial information of any sort
tralatitious
[fr. L. tralatio, a transporting or transferring]  /tra luh TISH us/
1) characterized by transference; metaphorical, figurative
2) handed down: traditional
tramontane
1) the north wind (of the Mediterranean)  [also tramontana]
2) someone from beyond the mountain; a stranger, a foreigner
transdiurnal
nonce-word  that which is beyond the confines of day
transpicuous
clearly seen through or understood
transpontine
situated on the other or far side of the bridge (in London, south of the Thames)
transvection
[fr. L. trans, across + vehere, to carry]  /trans VEK shun/
1) obs.  the act of carrying from one place to another
2) Math.  a method for deriving invariants and covariants
3) witchcraft  flying on something via magical powers
traulism
[fr. Gk traulismos]   /TRA lizem/  stammering, stuttering
trebuchet
[fr. OF trebucher, to overthrow]
also trebucket  /treb yeh SHET/  or  /treb eh KET/
a medieval catapult, a heavy siege engine for hurling large stones and other missiles
treeware
[tree + -ware, after hardware, software, etc.]
computing slang, freq. humorous  documentation or other printed material
tregetour
/TREJ i tur/  a street magician or juggler
trencherman
a hearty eater
trendoid
[blend of trend + android]  /TREN doid/
usu. disparaging  [adj] trendy  [n] a trendy person
trepanation
/treh puh NAY shun/  surgical removal of sections of bone from the skull
trepid
fearful; agitated; trembling
trepidacious (or trepidatious)
(overwrought word for) trepid
trepidity
apprehension
treppenwitz
[G.] wit of the stairs: l'esprit d'escalier [F.]  cf. afterwit (also, stairwit)
trews
1) full-length trousers worn by Scot regiments
2) close-cut tartan drawers sometimes worn under the kilt in Highland dress
trianon
a small, elegant villa; usu. on the grounds of a large estate
tribadism
lesbianism
tribology
the study of friction and lubrication
triboluminescence
luminescence due to friction
trichoptilosis
?/tri kop ti LO sis/?  a longitudinal splitting of hair fiber better known as split ends
trichotillomania
the abnormal urge to pull out one's hair
trigamist
1) a person who has three wives or three husbands  2) one who has been married three times  (cf. quadrigamist)
trimalchion
of or relating to a banquet for gourmands  (after The Banquet of Trimalchio from The Satyricon)
triolet
an eight-line poem of the form AB aA ab AB
tripos
a final honors examination at Cambridge university, orig. in Mathematics
tripudiate
[fr. L. tripudiare, to dance exultingly]  rare  
1) to dance, skip, or leap for joy; to exult  2) to trample, stamp, or jump upon in contempt or triumph
tripudiation
obs., rare  the act of dancing {Carlyle}
trireme
an ancient galley having three banks of oars
triskaidekaphobia
fear of the number thirteen
trismegistic
[after Hermes Trismegistus]  mysterious, occult; metaphysical  (cf. hermetic)
triste
[F.]  /treest/  sad; wistful
tristesse
melancholy
tristful
sad, mournful
tritagonist
Greek drama  the actor who plays the role third in importance in a play
tritical
[trite + -ical, after critical]  archaic  trite or commonplace in nature
triturate
to crush or grind
trivium
[L., crossroads (three roads)]  /TRIV eum/
the lower division of the seven liberal arts in medieval schools, comprising grammar, logic, and rhetoric; cf. quadrivium
trope
a figure of speech
trot
archaic  an old woman; a hag
trothplight
betrothal
trout-tickling
guddling
trouvaille
[F., from trouver, to find]  /troo-VYE/  something discovered by chance; a windfall
trucidation
[fr. L. trucidare, to slaughter]  /tru ci DAY shun/  obs.  a cruel killing or murdering
truckling
acting in a subservient manner; bending obsequiously: submitting
trull
[of uncertain origin]  a female prostitute
trumpery
worthless nonsense; trivial or useless articles: junk
truthiness
[fr. truth via truthy]  1) obs. rare  truthfulness, faithfulness
2) nonce usage  the quality of preferring concepts or facts one wishes to be true, rather than concepts or facts known to be true
tsunami
[Jap.] a great sea wave produced by submarine earth movement or volcanic eruption
tsuris
[fr. Yiddish tsores, plural of tsure, trouble]  troubles, distress
tucket
a fanfare on a trumpet
  ...Then let the trumpets sound
       The tucket sonance and the note to mount - Shakespeare
tubster
one who preaches from a tub; a dissenting preacher or minister  cf. tub-thumper
tub-thumper
a speaker or preacher who for emphasis thumps the pulpit; a violent or declamatory preacher or orator; a ranter
tufthunter
Brit.  someone that seeks association with persons of title or high social status: snob; a toady
tulgey
[nonsense word coined by 'Lewis Carroll' (C. L. Dodgson)]
applied to a wood(s); (usu. interpreted as) thick, dense, and dark; also fig.
tumblebug
dung beetle
tumbrel
a farm tipcart; a vehicle carrying condemned persons to a place of execution
tummler
[fr. Yiddish tumler]  /TOOM ler/  
1) one, such as a social director or entertainer, who encourages guest or audience participation
2) one who incites others to action
tump
regional  to tip or turn over esp. accidentally; to cause to tip over: overturn, upset -- usually used with over
tumular
[cf. tumulous]  consisting of a mound or tumulus; having the shape of a tumulous
tumulous
/TU myu lus/  an artifical hillock; esp. an ancient burial mound
tunket
U.S. dial.  euphemism for hell; as in what in tunket?
turbid
1) thick or opaque with/as if with roiled sediment; heavy with smoke or mist
2) deficient in clarity or purity: foul, muddy
turdine
characteristic of thrushes
turgor
[LL. fr. turgere, to swell]
1) Physiol.  the normal swollen condition of the capillaries and smaller blood vessels
2) fig.  turgidity; swelling
tushery
writing of poor quality distinguished esp. by the affected choice of archaic words
twee
Brit.  affectedly or excessively dainty, delicate, cute or quaint
tweeker
[fr. UK tweak, crack cocaine?]   (also tweaker)  U.S. street slang  a methamphetamine user
twitterpated
nonce-word  love-struck, smitten
Nearly everybody gets twitterpated in the springtime. - Friend Owl, Bambi
typoglycemia
[fr. Gk typos : image, type; after hypoglycemia]
the fanciful name given to the mind's ability to read misspelled words
tyro
a novice or beginner
tzigane
[F.]  a gypsy
tziganologist
[fr. F. tzigane < Magyar cigány]  /tsi guh NOL ud jist/  one who studies gypsies

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