NM Patriot Frequently Asked Questions

Here are answers to frequently asked questions about how you can honor your New Mexico Colonial Patriot ancestor.

Frequently Asked Questions

SAR NM Patriot List

DAR NM Patriot List
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Updated:
December 2, 2006

 

How did New Mexico's colonial soldiers and alcalde mayores aid the cause of the American Revolution?

What are the SAR and the DAR?

Why would I want to become a member of the SAR or the DAR?

Which soldiers or alcalde mayores can be recognized?

What if I have more than one patriot in my family, how can I recognize them all?

What about the Pueblo Indians and Spanish colonists, didn't they contribute?

What are the guidelines? Who is eligible to apply for membership?

What if I only want to honor my patriot and not be an active member at this time. Can I join but not belong to a chapter?

How can I get an application?

What type of source documentation will I need to submit with my application?

What steps are involved?

What additional information is available?

I have more questions, who can I contact?


How did New Mexico's colonial soldiers and alcalde mayores aid the cause of the American Revolution?

When the American colonies waged a war for independence against England, King Carlos III of Spain sought opportunity to regain land Spain lost to England at the end of the Seven Years War in 1773. Spain agreed to join France as an ally and beginning in 1776, covertly shipped arms, munitions, cattle, uniforms, medicine, blankets, and money to the American colonies using France as the go between. Spain declared war on England in June 1779

In March of 1780, Carlos III decreed that to sustain the war against England, "his vassals in America" were to contribute a one-time donativo (donation) of one peso (approximately $30 by year 2002 standard) per Indian and other castes and two pesos per Spaniard and noble. Collectors (such as alcalde mayores or military commanders) went to towns and pueblos in the New World and collected one peso per Indian over 18 years old and other castes, and two pesos from each Spaniard. Donativos were collected from soldiers and citizens throughout Cuba and Spain's hard-pressed North American colonies, including the provinces of California, New Mexico, and Texas. (Robert H. Thonhoff, The Vital Contributions of Spain in the Winning of the American Revolution: An Essay on a Forgotten Chapter in the History of the American Revolution, 2000, (2), self published, 617 N. Esplanade St., Karnes City, TX, 78118-2522, (830) 780-3582 (profk@karnesec.net).

See also, Wills of a Father and Son and A Contribution to the American Revolution by Virginia Sanchez.

What are the SAR and the DAR?

The Sons of the American Revolution and the Daughters of the American Revolution are two national lineage societies that honor and recognize patriot contributions to the American Revolution.

As part of that, they are interested in Spain's involvement in the American Revolution and are reaching out to descendants of all Spanish soldiers to research their lineage and apply for society membership. Some activities recognized by the SAR and the DAR include service in the Spanish military, service in the militia, service as Indian auxiliaries, making voluntary contributions to defray expenses of the War, Spanish cowboys (in Texas) who drove cattle to feed the American colonial troops, and mission priests who lead public prayers on behalf of Spain's support of the American Revolution (SAR only).

Why would I want to become a member of the SAR or the DAR?

There is no better way to honor our New Mexico Colonial Patriot ancestors than by working to ensure that future generations will be aware of the contributions of Spanish Colonial Patriots to the American cause. Our American history books tell of the aid that France gave to the colonists in the American Revolution, however very little is mentioned about the aid given by Spain.

Consider the number of descendants of Spanish Colonial Patriots who served under the Spanish flag (including Mexico, Cuba, Puerto Rico) who, as a result of Spain's aid, can say their ancestors aided in the American Revolution and can now be officially recognized through societies such as the SAR and the DAR. Members of these families can now be included in stating that their ancestors aided the American cause.

If you take the number of New Mexico Colonial Patriots, add to that number all their descendants, we would have an impressive number of newly found daughters and sons who will have genealogical information on our patriot ancestors officially recognized, microfilmed, and catalogued in historical documents housed in the U. S. Library of Congress. This is one step we can make to impact and change what traditionally was taught about American colonial history.

And, if you feel you can't be an active member, consider joining as a Member at Large.

Which New Mexico colonial soldiers or alcalde mayores can be recognized by the SAR and the DAR?

SAR

The complete list of New Mexico Patriots who qualify for SAR patriot status is located at the South Coast Chapter of the Sons of the American Revolution and on Jose Antonio Esquibel's website, New Mexico Colonial Patriots.

The SAR only needs proof that your patriot ancestor served during the time Spain was at war with England; namely 1779-1783. Alcalde mayores who served in a military capacity during this time may also qualify for patriot status.

DAR

The lists of New Mexico Patriots and Alcalde Mayores who qualify for DAR patriot status was compiled by Virginia Sanchez (with the help of Henrietta Christmas, Jose Antonio Esquibel, Harriet McCallum, Charles Martinez y Vigil, Granville Hough, and of course the enlistment information compiled by Virginia L. Olmsted and Evelyn Lujan Baca).

NOTE:  These lists are a work in progress and does not automatically assume membership. (They may take a while to load.)

Remember, for the DAR you must be able to prove your ancestor contributed or was in the Spanish military between the April 3 and November 18, 1782 timeframe. This list is not all inclusive, but it is a start.

What about the Pueblo Indians and Spanish colonists, didn't they contribute?

Documents listing Pueblo Indians and Spanish citizens in the Province of New Mexico who donated to the cause of the American Revolution exist but have not yet been located. Let's keep looking! (Governor Anza obtained permission to exempt the Indians of the Zuni and Hopi pueblos from making donations.)

What are the guidelines? Who is eligible to apply for membership?

For a Patriot to be recognized by the SAR and the DAR, descendants of Patriots must research and document their lineage and apply for membership. As with any organization, there are membership dues and/or application fees. Visit the SAR or the DAR websites for further information.

SAR

The SAR accepts male applicants, 18 years or older, who can prove lineage back to a Patriot ancestor who contributed to the American cause between the 1779-1783 timeframe, the time Spain officially was at war with England.

The complete list of New Mexico Patriots who qualify for SAR patriot status is located at the South Coast Chapter of the Sons of the American Revolution and on Jose Antonio Esquibel's website, New Mexico Colonial Patriots.

DAR

The DAR's criterion for descendants of New Mexico Patriots is slightly different than that of the SAR. Female applicants, who are descendants of New Mexico Colonial Patriots, must be able to prove that the Patriot soldier was at the Presidio of Santa Fe between April 3, 1782 and November 18, 1782, and that he was discharged after November 1782. April 3, 1782 is the date Governor Anza authorized collection of the donativos within the Province of New Mexico; November 18, 1782 represents the date of Anza's letter informing Teodoro de Croix that all but three donativos were collected.

The list of New Mexico Patriots and Alcalde Mayores who qualify for DAR patriot status was compiled by Virginia Sanchez (with the help of Henrietta Christmas, Jose Antonio Esquibel, Harriet McCallum, Charles Martinez y Vigil, Granville Hough, and of course the enlistment information compiled by Virginia L. Olmsted and Evelyn Lujan Baca).

NOTE:  This list is a work in progress and does not automatically assume membership. Remember, for the DAR you must be able to prove your ancestor contributed or was in the Spanish military between the April 3 and November 18, 1782 timeframe. This list is not all inclusive, but it is a start.

What if I only want to honor my patriot and not be an active member at this time. Can I join but not belong to a chapter?

Like other organizations, the SAR and the DAR would love to have active members in their chapters. If you feel you cannot attend chapter meetings and be an active member, you may apply for Membership at Large. Your patriot will still be officially recognized and your genealogy will be microfilmed and catalogued in historical documents housed in the U.S. Library of Congress.

What if I have more than one patriot in my family, how can I recognize them all?

To recognize more than one patriot, you must first have one recognized by the SAR or the DAR, then submit a supplemental application for your other patriots.

How can I get an application worksheet?

You will need to complete a SAR application worksheet or a DAR application worksheet before you complete the final application. Some SAR or DAR members have access to application software to assist you. (DAR prospective members - After accessing the DAR application workseet webpage, scroll to the "DAR Membership and Genealogy" section to view step-by-step instructions and helpful hints.)

After you complete the worksheet and have all your source documents, contact a SAR or a DAR member for further assistance.

What type of source documentation will I need to submit with my application?

To submit your application, you will need copies of documents that show the connection between each generation back to the Patriot ancestor. You must be able to prove each date and place. Transcribe or translate documents written in Spanish. If you are using a secondary source, (the source information is published in a book), make a copy of the book's cover page and a copy of the page you source.

Examples of documents may include:

  • Baptismal and/or birth records
  • Marriage records
  • Death and/or burial records
  • Census records
  • Military records (musters, enlistment, etc.)
  • Obituaries

If you've researched your genealogy back to 1776 and you've documented your sources, you already have:

  • Your Patriot ancestor's name and his records of baptism, marriage, military enlistment and muster, and death or last will.
  • Records that trace your lineage to the Patriot ancestor: source documentation for your parents, grandparents, great-grandparents, great, great-grandparents, etc.

What steps are involved?

  1. Do your genealogical homework to trace your family line back to a patriot ancestor.
  2. Track all your sources and keep a copy of each source you find.
  3. Fill out an application worksheet.
  4. Contact a DAR or a SAR member to discuss and review your application to ensure it is complete.

SAR

The first paragraph of your SAR application should read:

I hereby apply for membership in this Society by the right of bloodline descent from ___<patriot's name> ___ Gen # __<generation #>__ who assisted in establishing American Independence while acting in the capacity of New Mexico's Patriots during Spain's War with England.

DAR

The "Ancestor's Services" portion of your DAR application should read:

The said ___<patriot's name> ____ who resided during the American Revolution at ___Santa Fe, Spanish America___ assisted in establishing American Independence, while acting in the capacity of __Presidial Soldier of the Santa Fe Presidio, Spanish America___.

My ancestor's services during the Revolutionary War were as follows:

Rendered material aid (money donated by the Presidio soldier's between April 1782 and November 1782) for the cause of American Independence in the war against the British.

Reference by volume and page to the documentation or other authorities for MILITARY RECORD:

Ltr, Teodoro de Croix - Juan Bautista de Anza, 13 Jan 1783, Span. Arch. of NM II, Roll II, Frames 511-4, NM Archives, Santa Fe, NM; Span. Enlist. Papers of NM 1732-1820, NGS Vol __, No __, pg ___.

Ltr, Juan Bautista de Anza, Troop Report and Instructions, Santa Fe Presidio, SA, NM II, Roll II, Frames 124-127.

When your application is approved, genealogical information on your patriot ancestor will be officially recognized, microfilmed, and catalogued in historical documents housed in the U. S. Library of Congress.

What additional information is available?

"Spanish Enlistment Papers of New Mexico 1732-1820," compiled by Virginia L. Olmsted, National Genealogical Society Quarterly, September 1979-March 1980, Spanish Archives of New Mexico II Roll 21 (SANM II, Roll 21).

"Spanish Enlistment Papers 1770-1816," compiled by Evelyn Lujan Baca, New Mexico Genealogical Society.

"Military Records, Colonial New Mexico," by Henrietta Christmas. This book is a transcription of the military muster rolls found in Spanish Archives of New Mexico II (SANMII). It is available from the Hispanic Genealogical Resource Center of New Mexico.

The Calendar of the Microfilm Edition of the Spanish Archives of New Mexico, 1621-1821, available through the New Mexico Records Center and Archives, provides several documents that mention voluntary donations:

  1. October 7, 1779 - document #769 refers to "war with Great Britain."
  2. February 11, 1780 - document # 785 refers to "war with Great Britain."
  3. August 12, 1781 - two documents (#827 and 828) refer to "citizens contribution to the war" and "war fund contributions."
  4. January 14, 1784 - document #875 refers to "war fund collections."
  5. March 13, 1784 - document #885 refers to the "termination of war fund" and the letter from Gov. Anza thanking contributors for their "offerings" and the Alcalde Mayores for collecting the donativos.
  6. March 17, 1784 - document #886 refers to "peace between Spain and England."

For additional information about Spain's involvement in the American Revolution, refer to the following books and articles:

  • "Spain and the Independence of the United States," by Thomas E. Chavez, Ph.D., DAR Magazine, February 1992, pages 108-117, 166, 168, 172, 190. Dr. Chavez provides a list of suggested reading at the end of the article.
  • "Spain's Support Vital to U. S. Independence," Thomas E. Chavez, Ph.D., New Mexico Magazine, January 1992, pages 32-37.
  • "What History Owes Spain and Bernardo Galvez," Lionel Garza, Nuestras Raices, quarterly publication of the Genealogical Society of Hispanic America, Vol. 2, No. 3, July 1990, pages 88 and 89.
  • "Spanish Aid to the American Revolution," Ellen Risser Farrell, Los Alamos Family History Society Newsletter, January 2000, Volume XV, Number 3, pages 4-6.
  • "A Brief History of New Mexico's Colonial Patriots and Their Involvement in the American Revolution," Granville Hough, Ph.D., Raices y Ramas, quarterly publication of the Colorado Society of Hispanic Genealogy, Vol. 3, No. 1, Spring 2001, pages 6-7.
  • Spain and the Independence of the United States: An Intrinsic Gift, by Thomas E. Chavez, Ph.D., University of New Mexico Press: Albuquerque, 2002.
  • Patriots Series by Granville W. and N.C. Hough, SHHAR, P. O. Box 490, Midway City, CA 92655-0490
  • Spanish Patriots in the American Revolution, by Granville W. Hough.

I have more questions, who can I contact?

The following SAR and DAR members are available to answer your questions:

Virginia Sanchez, DAR Member, Colorado

Donna Santistevan, former DAR Spanish Task Force Member, Colorado

Harriet McCallum, DAR Regent, New Mexico

Charles Martinez y Vigil, SAR Member, New Mexico

George W. Randle, SAR Member, New Mexico

SAR Prospective Member Contacts

Thanks to the following for their assistance, input, and support:

  • Henrietta Christmas
  • Jose Antonio Esquibel
  • Granville Hough, Ph.D.
  • Charles Martinez y Vigil, New Mexico SAR
  • Harriet McCallum, New Mexico Regent DAR


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